Aluminum commuter with disc tabs- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Aluminum commuter with disc tabs

    I am looking for an aluminum bike that I can use for inclement weather in San Fran that allows disc brakes. I have a nice fair weather bike but the rainy season here extends longer than the time off my bike and I want something that will stop well in the rain without tearing up rims. I am set on aluminum and disc brakes.

    I looked at the Nashbar X but it has a top tube that is too long. 56 for a medium and 53.5 for small when I need something around 54.5. Redline looks good but looks to not have tabs for fenders. Any other thoughts?

  2. #2
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Trek Portland? Kona Dew Drop?

    Do you need to do your own build? What's your budget?
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  3. #3
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    I want to do my own build. Budget is fairly open. I had planned to spend about $2200 on a Motebecane build until I ran into scary customer service from bikes direct. I want something on the stiffer side as I am a bigger rider.

    I really should have mentioned frame/carbon fork. I have a bunch of 9 sp Dura Ace stuff lying around for the rest of the build with Avid BB7s.

    My backup option is a Traitor Ruben. That is a slick looking bike but steel fork and steel frame.

  4. #4
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    Your Trek dealer might be able to get you a Portland frameset. The Kona Honky Inc. is another complete road bike with discs; your Kona dealer might be able to get you that frame. Novara Buzz (REI brand - might be tough to get frame-only, but you can strip it. Only comes with an aluminum fork, unfortunately.)

    There's another thread on this forum about almost the same topic. That guy wanted a cyclocross bike specifically.

    If you don't mind doing a mixed sidepull/disc setup, your options open up a lot too - carbon disc forks are relatively common, and a disc front/sidepull rear will give you all the control and subtlety of disc brakes, although if you tend to drag your rear brake, you might chew up rear wheels pretty fast. Voodoo has a beautiful bike with a scandium frame and carbon seatstays that ships with a disc-compatible fork.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  5. #5
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    swobo crosby?

    http://www.swobo.com/catalog/product...cPath=201_1503

    might fit? geo might be too close to the nashbar, can't you fiddle w/stem lengths?

  6. #6
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    I really like the Swobo. Geometry is a little small for 53 but could work with a longeish stem. The rear dropouts are funky. I need to look into those deeper.

  7. #7
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    Check out the Civia Hyland. Available as a frame - that's what I bought and built it up from there. Solid, nice balanced geometry, rides awesome loaded or unloaded. Lots of little features that make sense in the real world. Really great bike for internal gear hubs, I use an Alfine on mine. The Civia is the best bike choice I've ever made outside of my SS mountain bike - I simply use it for just about everything.

    Check it here: www.civiacycles.com/bikes/hyland/
    Alison Dunlap Coaching
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  8. #8
    Bedwards Of The West
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    Reconsider the Nashbar X... it makes you cooler.
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  9. #9
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    Dood, I would get gorilla arms if I had to stretch my body out that much...

  10. #10
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    I think he meant you should consider the small and a 1cm longer stem. What stem size do you use now? You might not even notice the difference...
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maximus_XXIV
    Dood, I would get gorilla arms if I had to stretch my body out that much...

    But you're only talking about 1.5 centimeters... That's this much: |-------------|

    If the difference between you and gorilla arms is that small, you are already an ape my friend
    Seats are adjustable, you know. Certainly you can move your seat that much or find a stem/handlebar combo that will compensate for this gigantic gorilla inducing expanse. I'd get the small and choose a stem and seatpost combo that gives you a little wiggle room. For $99, can you go wrong?
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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  12. #12
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    yeah, as much of as higher end bike snob i've become, i'd have to say for $99 you could try it out and flip it on the local craigslist if it don't work.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeyDurango
    Check out the Civia Hyland. Available as a frame - that's what I bought and built it up from there. Solid, nice balanced geometry, rides awesome loaded or unloaded. Lots of little features that make sense in the real world. Really great bike for internal gear hubs, I use an Alfine on mine. The Civia is the best bike choice I've ever made outside of my SS mountain bike - I simply use it for just about everything.

    Check it here: www.civiacycles.com/bikes/hyland/
    The down tube on the Hyland looks a little familiar. Any one riding a Nasbar X notice that shape?
    I ride at ludicrous speed

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by nativeson
    yeah, as much of as higher end bike snob i've become, i'd have to say for $99 you could try it out and flip it on the local craigslist if it don't work.
    X frame is $250 after the fork. I am thinking Redline after learning the Swobo is 130mm.

  15. #15
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    ^^ The new X frames are 130mm also. Mine is 135... yours complete for $1000.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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    (no excuse for that either)

  16. #16
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    Take 1.5 cm off the effective top tube and you have a deal!

  17. #17
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    I have a hacksaw...you pay shipping?
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

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