26" to 700C Conversion (PICS)- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    26" to 700C Conversion (PICS)

    Drizzle's bike in the "SS Commuters Unite" thread really changed my mind about keeping my old Marin Team a 26" wheel bike. If for no other reason than Deep V's look sweet enough to put on anything.



    My only concern is that because my bike is vintage it's go super long rear stays which looks a bit goofy no matter what wheelset is in it. I thought about converting to track drops, but then I risk rubbing.

    So lets see some pictures of your conversion.

  2. #2
    Rides like wrecking ball
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    not a convert here (bought a 700c frame to start with) but that bike above is hot!
    Quote Originally Posted by Hesh to Steel
    With people liking mongoose and trek bikes now, what's next in this crazy world? People disliking the bottlerocket?!

  3. #3
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    I keep hoping for more photos, but I think it is unlikely. Nice ride though. Out of curiosity I threw my 700c on my 26inch bike and reveled in how stupid it looks. My bike looked stupid to begin with.

  4. #4
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    it looks great, can we see more pictures? Thank you.

  5. #5
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    700Cx38 Hybrid wheels


    700C x 28 road wheels + fancy photoshop


  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaintPeelinPbody
    Drizzle's bike in the "SS Commuters Unite" thread really changed my mind about keeping my old Marin Team a 26" wheel bike. If for no other reason than Deep V's look sweet enough to put on anything.



    My only concern is that because my bike is vintage it's go super long rear stays which looks a bit goofy no matter what wheelset is in it. I thought about converting to track drops, but then I risk rubbing.

    So lets see some pictures of your conversion.
    Sweet. Looks like you might even have clearance for fenders.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  7. #7
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    recently wrote about this build on the VRC forum. It's already in pieces again but it was fun to try building a 26" with 700c wheels. Had to make the front brakes from parts and use a bmx brake for the rear.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 26" to 700C Conversion (PICS)-trek-1.jpg  

    26" to 700C Conversion (PICS)-trek-2.jpg  

    26" to 700C Conversion (PICS)-trek-3.jpg  


  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sizzler
    Had to make the front brakes from parts and use a bmx brake for the rear.
    Wow- how`d you go about that?
    Recalculating....

  9. #9
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    wasn't anything too impressive: I found these new arms in a parts bucket and saw their potential for high pad placement, but they were missing everything like springs, bushings, spring retainers . . . so they were only 3$. I was able to harvest the other parts from an old odyssey a-brake like the one pictured, but I had to machine some of the parts to make them fit. worked very well but with the pads being so high and the canti bosses being so low, the flex was too great and I feel that they would not have lasted very long before something failed from stress.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 26" to 700C Conversion (PICS)-26-700-brakes.jpg  

    Attached Images Attached Images  

  10. #10
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    There isn`t much meat in those top calipers- they must be for some serious weight weenies! Any idea what make they were? And the rear brakes are BMX? I see Odessy on a lot of stuff that I think if for BMX, but I thought they all used U-brakes or no brakes. I guess not.
    Recalculating....

  11. #11
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    as far as i can tell, the arms are one-of-a-kind. i showed them to several experienced mechanics and none had even a clue of their origin. the fact that they weren't even finished or functional makes me think that they were a project someone abandoned.

    bmx bikes have used many of the same brake systems as mountain and road bikes, such as side pull, cantilever, u-brake, v-brake and even some disk brakes. but when i was into bmx, most of us used shoe-brakes, meaning you just crammed your shoe between between the tire and seat stay to stop the bike!

  12. #12
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    how did it ride?

  13. #13
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    i've built many a bike and this was by far the biggest bomb i ever produced. it was almost comical how bad the geometry was and how poorly it handled. my expectations were low going in so luckily i wasn't at all disappointed, i mostly did it for the challenge.

  14. #14
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    Could you explain this in detail a little more?

    The stem length and height could have really affected the handling, as well as the fork offset and length.

    I've spoken with other conversion riders who say that the handling isn't as bad as some people would lead us to believe, but then they seem to have better conversion as well.

  15. #15
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    Sorry, let me clarify: I built this mostly out of spare parts and mostly for something to do, so the geometry and handleing were poor because of choices I made and from the strange mix of components I used. For example, the frame was a small even though I ride large, so I had to jack the seat post to it's max. I also used a very vertically short but very horizontally long stem, which made it feel like a pursuit bike. And the rake is adjustable on that fork, which was another thing I could have done to make it more ridable. So, I guess my point is that if I had the inclination, I could have made it a very comfortable bike.

  16. #16
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    I did the opposite for a while... I was running 26" wheels/tires on my cyclocross bike when I first built it. I was saving for the 29er wheels, and had some slicks and disc compatible mtb wheels laying around. It wasn't too bad to ride, other than an incredibly low BB height. I smacked my pedals on pretty much everything higher than road level, and could not pedal around corners AT ALL.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  17. #17
    Off the back...
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    This conversion worked really well:

    The handling was basically like a mellow road bike, but still performed well in all conditions, including snow. I've since put a flat bar on it and loaned it to a friend.

    That Kona is sweet...

  18. #18
    JohnniO
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    Try these for V brakes- I've seen them elsewhere for about $20 per,
    Let's me run 700 open pro's on a Klein Adroit

    WebCyclery :: Brakes :: Misc. Brake Parts :: Mavic Canti Brake Adapter

    Mavic Canti Brake Adapter #17608
    Mavic Canti Brake Adapter

    Click the photo to enlarge
    If you have a 26" bike that you want to run with 700c road wheels - you might need this. Sure you could run discs, but if you want to run cantis or v-brakes, this will help.

    Max suggested tire size is 700x25 - maybe a 28.

    Sold individually.

    Details

    Price: $ 30.00

    Options

    Quantity

    Add to cart

  19. #19
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    Its not the best picture, but its snowing out and I am not taking another. Its actually a faded lime green or neon yellow. This bike was set up as a 26 coaster brake. Now is a 700 rear and a 27 front. Built from spare parts this is my current commuter. I didnt work out the brake problem yet, but it is set up fixed and doesnt go to fast, so I am not worried about it.


  21. #21
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    Excellent frame! Is that a Flightliner or something?
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  22. #22
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    I don't believe its anything too vintage. Nothing too great on it to identify it. My best deduction yet was, late 80s early 90s department store cruiser.

  23. #23
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thatdirtykid
    I don't believe its anything too vintage. Nothing too great on it to identify it. My best deduction yet was, late 80s early 90s department store cruiser.
    Nice anyhow! Looks way raked out though, how does it handle?
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  24. #24
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    Many parts are off my broken MkIII right now, waiting to go back on when it is welded. My old hardtail frame into a road bike, 70 dollars invested beyond what I already had. Now I have a "race ready" road bike. We'll see how it does in the spring. Since pictures the stem has gotten a fair amount shorter, it was a little stretched out-feeling for even my long torso.




    edit... solved the brake problem by just drilling a hole in the frame, mounting a normal road brake right there. works perfectly. And keeps my center of gravity lower so I can corner just that much harder. hardcore.
    Last edited by skottt160; 01-07-2010 at 10:34 AM.
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  25. #25
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    Not as bad as you would think. Not super nimble like a track bike or mtn bike, but better than some other cruisers I have owned. I have considered a straight fork to bring the front back in some, but there are many other parts and bikes in my stable that are more in need.

  26. #26
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thatdirtykid
    Not as bad as you would think. Not super nimble like a track bike or mtn bike, but better than some other cruisers I have owned. I have considered a straight fork to bring the front back in some, but there are many other parts and bikes in my stable that are more in need.
    Reminds me of those photos of early safety bicycles with way slack headtube angles.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

  27. #27
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    The GT is my first MTB that I built into a city ripper when I first went to college. Just about a year ago I figured out how to make the 700c wheels work. The Raleigh is my brothers that I built up more recently.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 26" to 700C Conversion (PICS)-img_2426-2.jpg  

    26" to 700C Conversion (PICS)-img_2427.jpg  

    Last edited by newskoolbiker; 01-20-2010 at 07:03 AM.

  28. #28
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    I took a simple single and converted it to a 3 speed coaster brake 700c. It was a sick bike, it had massive aluminum fenders with fins like the old cadilacs. I gave it an awesome John Deere green paint job and built her up with a honey brown cruiser saddle and honey brown ergo leather grips. That thing hauled ass! I ran a 28c but could have gotten away with a 32c (i tested one at the shop). I really wish i had a camera when i owned that bike!!!
    Req. Disclaimer: I sell Giant, Trek, and Electra bikes.
    Quote Originally Posted by ErrantGorgon
    The no-brainer store called, they want their question back.

  29. #29
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    2006 GT Avalanche 1.0 - Bontrager Race Lite Hardcase 700x32C on Ritchey Pro/OCR rims

    http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/p...v=0&size=large

  30. #30
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    I put 700 X 38 wheels on an old RockHopper before and they fit perfect. One thing, however, is I have a generic Kinesis frame with 26" X 2.35" Big apples, and that wheel/tire setup is actually taller than my 700 X 28 wheel/tire set-up on my Surly Pacer.

    26" to 700C Conversion (PICS)-cimg0377_copy.jpg

    26" to 700C Conversion (PICS)-cimg0380-copy.jpg

  31. #31
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    Oh, I was able to fit 700 X 25 wheels on a Schwinn beach cruiser without any problems. These were coaster brake deep V's. You know you like those 3-piece cranks on the American BB...

    26" to 700C Conversion (PICS)-cimg0351.jpg

  32. #32
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    ^^ Man, that thing is Kool! Any more pics?
    Last edited by FastFix; 02-08-2011 at 09:07 AM.

  33. #33
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    Lets see more of these! I have a stupid question: Is 700c the standard road bike wheel size? And what does the c mean?

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Cycle Shawn
    And what does the c mean?
    club

  35. #35
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    From http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html

    French sizes:
    In the French system, the first number is the nominal diameter in mm, followed by a letter code for the width: "A" is narrow, "D" is wide. The letter codes no longer correspond to the tire width, since narrow tires are often made for rim sizes that originally took wide tires; for example, 700 C was originally a wide size, but now is available in very narrow widths, with actual diameters as small as 660 mm.

    "size" 700 C actual measurement: 622 mm use: Road bikes, hybrids, "29 inch" MTBs.

  36. #36
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    Thanks

  37. #37
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    I know it's an old thread, and this post is slightly off topic, but...

    Dion, several years ago I built this bike up from parts we had in the basement of the shop I worked at. At the time I was thinking about lacing a 700c coaster brake rear wheel for it, but decided against it and eventually sold it to a friend before I moved.

    26" to 700C Conversion (PICS)-klunker.jpg

    Now I'm considering building up another cruiser in similar fashion (bmx fork, stem, bars, cranks, pedals, etc) and putting one of those 700c hipster-fixie coaster brake wheelsets you see all over eBay.

    Anybody else have any 26->700 cruiser conversions? For "inspiration"...

    -Connor

  38. #38
    I'd rather be on my bike
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    Not a 26" conversion, but I have the "700c hipster-fixie coaster brake"

    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  39. #39
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    I should know better than to click on random threads. There is zero reason for me to convert my 80's 26er fixie to 700c, but this makes it seem so tempting.

  40. #40
    I'd rather be on my bike
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    Do it!!!! And post pictures!
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.

  41. #41
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    I was given this Scott Scale with the Rohloff like this...



    I changed a few things to set it up like this...


  42. #42
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    That thing looks fast just sitting there!

    This frame sometimes looks like this


    And other times like this

  43. #43
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    More reviving of this old thread. If I wanted to do a 26 to 700c conversion to this bike, which based on testing with my road bike wheel should fit in the frame, how would you approach the brakes? I like this old Fisher frame and hate to do any cutting or welding on it, though I am not opposed to drilling a hole or two if need be.



    I will use this fork. road wheel fits there too.




  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by vaultbrad View Post
    That thing looks fast just sitting there!

    This frame sometimes looks like this


    And other times like this
    I would like to do something like that with my bike posted just above this post. I want to be able to put the 26 inch wheels back on for backroad/dirt road touring, but run 700c for my 12 mile commute. Oh, and though I am not really a cyclo-cross rider, I could then use that bike for the citizen division of my local Ocktoberfest Cyclocross. How did you do that with the brakes? I think if I can get the brakes figured out, I can pull it off. I hope to do it without any welding.

  45. #45
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    I know you don't want to go fixed, so you might need to look at an adapter like this:



    Or mount road calipers to the fork and seat stay bridge.

  46. #46
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    Thanks!
    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    I know you don't want to go fixed, so you might need to look at an adapter like this:



    Or mount road calipers to the fork and seat stay bridge.

  47. #47
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    just go road brakes

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by digitalayon View Post
    just go road brakes
    Thanks for the reply. I replied in my other thread.

  49. #49
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    Ok, now I am really interested in doing this to my old Fisher pictured in post #43 above. I have a really old '88 Trek 1200 that is getting put out to pasture. It has a trek made front wheel, and an old Campy Elite (Ambrosia 19) wheel that replaced the old one when it's hub broke. I am guessing that probably that hub would work with my '89 XT gearing. I wonder if those rims would accept a cyclocross/commuter size tire. I want to have that larger tire size on this bike. What wheels have you used in your projects? I would love to scavenge old parts that would work, rather than buy new stuff, if possible. I will look at the adapters, but I may also just pull the old shimano 105 brakes off the old Trek and use those too. Can I use my current V-brake levers to work them? I do not want to have to put road levers on there.

    Also, what about toe and front wheel overlap? Has that ever been a problem for you on these builds?

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunvalleylaw View Post
    Can I use my current V-brake levers to work them? I do not want to have to put road levers on.
    I think the general consensus is that V levers won't work well. You'd need road levers, old cantilever flatbar levers (the co-op might have some), or adjustable levers like the avid speeddial.

  51. #51
    jrm
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    I know you don't want to go fixed, so you might need to look at an adapter like this:



    Or mount road calipers to the fork and seat stay bridge.
    Arent those canti adapters? meaning you could just use v brakes?

    Like this

    <img src=https://test.dirtragmag.com/sites/default/files/blogarific/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/rear-frame.jpg>

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrm View Post
    Arent those canti adapters? meaning you could just use v brakes?

    Like this

    <img src=https://test.dirtragmag.com/sites/default/files/blogarific/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/rear-frame.jpg>
    Yeah, upon reflection I will go that route if I can, but maybe with these adapters rather than the horseshoe kind. More likely i can fit fenders if I want then.

    Bombshell Vps Brake Adapter - Bicycles Parts Manufacturer and Wholesale Supplier from Bombshell Inc, Usa

    EDIT Well, that might not work. Apparently they are discontinued. Hmm. I will keep looking. I like the idea.

  53. #53
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    Ok, I will get this brake thing figured out. Planning to stick with the V-brakes and some sort of adapter.

    But meanwhile, here is the bike with my front beater road wheel installed, and rear beater road wheel shoved in there to check it out. Looks like it will work just fine once i get it all figured out. No toe overlap, and it feels great. I will gain a little toe room when I put the original steel fork on due to the rake in the fork.



    But how does a guy make the hub and gearing work with the different frame sizing in the rear triangle. The rear triangle of my Fisher is a good bit wider than my old road frame. Here are the two wheels together.



    Sorry for the dumb question, but how is this aspect handled? I hope to use the old XT gearing for now, so as not to dump too much money in this. I think the gearing will work fine with the larger wheels, and the larger wheels will roll very nicely based on my test spin with the front 700c on the bike. I ultimately intend on running a cross/commuter hybrid type tire.


    EDIT: after research looks like the thing to do would be to rebuild some wheels with the right size hubs from parts. Or so it seems. Any other ways around this?
    Last edited by sunvalleylaw; 04-20-2014 at 10:21 PM.

  54. #54
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    My single speed has that issue....I just flexed it a bit by letting the rear skewer bring it in. You can also pick up a rear MTB hub cheap on flea bay. Even 7 or 6 speed like you currently have.

  55. #55
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    It's worth taking a read through this: Bicycle Frame/Hub Spacing

    Your 6spd road wheel probably has 126mm spacing. Your mtb frame probably has 130mm spacing, although it might be 135 (I can't tell from the pictures)

    Like digitalayon says, for 4mm difference you can probably just crank on the quickrelease.

    You could also repack the hub, and add a few spacers to the axle. According to Sheldon: "for respacing hubs to wider spacing, if you're not adding more than, say, 5-6 mm of spacers, you don't need a new axle. As long as you have 2 or 3 mm sticking out on each side, that's plenty."

    If you add spacers the wheel won't be centered anymore, so you'll have to redish it a few mm.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by digitalayon View Post
    My single speed has that issue....I just flexed it a bit by letting the rear skewer bring it in. You can also pick up a rear MTB hub cheap on flea bay. Even 7 or 6 speed like you currently have.

    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    It's worth taking a read through this: Bicycle Frame/Hub Spacing

    Your 6spd road wheel probably has 126mm spacing. Your mtb frame probably has 130mm spacing, although it might be 135 (I can't tell from the pictures)

    Like digitalayon says, for 4mm difference you can probably just crank on the quickrelease.

    You could also repack the hub, and add a few spacers to the axle. According to Sheldon: "for respacing hubs to wider spacing, if you're not adding more than, say, 5-6 mm of spacers, you don't need a new axle. As long as you have 2 or 3 mm sticking out on each side, that's plenty."

    If you add spacers the wheel won't be centered anymore, so you'll have to redish it a few mm.
    Thanks for the replies and the links. Ok, so I measured tonight finally, and determined that it is 135mm spacing on the deore XT-II hub. So, I am thinking I want to keep my MTB wheel set as is, and find a CX type wheel that is 135 and freewheel and that can accept a 7 speed cassette that will work with the Deore XT-II derailleur. I can try to find some parts to build up, or could try to find an inexpensive wheel set. Ideas? I will want to run commuter and CX type tires depending on what I am doing. If I get this done within the next couple weeks, I will be doing a dirt road back country hot pool tour (supported by vehicles hauling camp from place to place. Also, this will make the 12 mile commute roll along more smoothly and quickly.

    I will fix the brake issues with adapters, or if I can find used Paul Motolites, I may go that way so I can swap wheel sets easily.

  57. #57
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    Had an old 06 Jamis Durrango 26" frame laying around and was thinking about trying to fit 650b's to it and use it as a commuter.. turns out 29" mtb wheels with 42c tires cleared with about 3/16" to the seat-stay cross member. (couldn't find a pic, maybe on old phone)

    First rendition:

    26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-jamis00.jpg26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-jamis01.jpg26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-jamisshft.jpg

    Tried all sorts of bar/stem and shifter combinations.. ended up liking the Gary bar w/ a 9spd barcon quite a bit..

    In full winter commute mode:
    (rear fender was modified to clear)

    26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-jamis1.jpg26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-jamis2.jpg26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-jamis3.jpg

    I later ended up acquiring a Giant Roam 2 frame for the extra clearance and slightly more appropriate geometry.. currently running 29x1.8 Renegade's and Woodchipper II's with some Sora brifters.. LOVE the 'chippers!
    Cant stop thinking about getting my hands on a karate monkey or AWOL frame though.. ..never ends!

    26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-roam1.jpg
    (i know..not 26".. but for comparison purposes..)

    As for forks.. I ordered and tried out both the CroMoto 26" fork and the Karate Monkey fork.. ended up settling with the KM fork.. fit the geo of the Roam frame better and it felt a little 'beefier'.. still feels like its going snap-off under heavy braking and/or rocky bumpy terrain. (it should be said I'm used to riding a Fox 36 and the new Pike, so any steel fork is probably going to feel like a noodle to me)
    Heres the KM and cromoto forks side by side. (KM steerer cut already)

    26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-forks-surly-vs-salsa.jpg

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    It's worth taking a read through this: Bicycle Frame/Hub Spacing

    Your 6spd road wheel probably has 126mm spacing. Your mtb frame probably has 130mm spacing, although it might be 135 (I can't tell from the pictures)

    Like digitalayon says, for 4mm difference you can probably just crank on the quickrelease.

    You could also repack the hub, and add a few spacers to the axle. According to Sheldon: "for respacing hubs to wider spacing, if you're not adding more than, say, 5-6 mm of spacers, you don't need a new axle. As long as you have 2 or 3 mm sticking out on each side, that's plenty."

    If you add spacers the wheel won't be centered anymore, so you'll have to redish it a few mm.
    What about throwing a 7 speed freewheel on that wheel and then spacer on the other side? Would it be centered then?

  59. #59
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    Well, I have one of two brake adapters (found one for free that a buddy wasn't using any more) and have some wheels coming hopefully soon. Will likely just order a second brake adapter (xtracycle) and just try this thing!

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by vokeswaagin View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Tried all sorts of bar/stem and shifter combinations.. ended up liking the Gary bar w/ a 9spd barcon quite a bit..
    What shifter mount is this? Do you have some more pics?

    Thanks!
    Today I will do what others won't, so tomorrow I can do what others can't

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrm View Post
    Arent those canti adapters? meaning you could just use v brakes?

    Like this

    There is now a better option for modding your brakes without using the horse shoes. Check out the v-brake extensions on this page (under the headsets). Keep your old brakes and save a bit of weight.

    New items from Elevn Racing | BMX Racing Group

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhitepawRolls View Post
    There is now a better option for modding your brakes without using the horse shoes. Check out the v-brake extensions on this page (under the headsets). Keep your old brakes and save a bit of weight.

    New items from Elevn Racing | BMX Racing Group
    Huh. Wish I knew about that before I ordered the Xtracycle horseshoe. Oh well.

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by TitanofChaos View Post
    What shifter mount is this? Do you have some more pics?

    Thanks!
    It's just the stamped steel clamp that came with the cheapo sun shifter.. It worked.. Was kind of in the way in certain gears though.. Ended up going with a barcon after a couple weeks

  64. #64
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    Here is an update on my conversion, cross posted from my commuter conversion thread.

    Been commuting on this bike a LOT! Still playing around with the bars. I have a wider, more sweep bar I may try. But in the meantime, I have the 700C conversion nearly all done!




    From the looks of this last pic I may need to check the adjustment of the pads yet. The Xtracycle adapter seems to work great! I may use another rear wheel that I got from AlexCuse, but I found this old freewheel one with correct spacing that slipped right in to try out. Both of these tires will be replaced, but they serve to try it out. No toe rub or anything like that, and feels good and fast! I have a Mavic adapter for the front, but still need some bolts for it, then I will get the front brake working too.

  65. #65
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    ^ glad to see that it's worked out for you.

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    ^ glad to see that it's worked out for you.
    Thanks for the input along the way!

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    When you have a chance, can you take a shot of the clearance at the fork?

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    When you have a chance, can you take a shot of the clearance at the fork?
    Sure. Right now it clears with this 35C Conti Cyclocross tire but not by too much. I will be interested to see how the Mavic adapter fits. And I will have to go to a 32 or 28 I think if I want to fit a fender in there, though I might try a modified one like you or someone else on here did rather than a full cover fender. I will shoot a pic after dinner.

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    When you have a chance, can you take a shot of the clearance at the fork?
    Here ya go!




  70. #70
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    old norco rampage 853 reynolds frame, traitor cycles claymore columbus slx fork. magic geared, ti bars, old stx-rc cantis, rear one's on an xtracycle adapter a bud gave to me.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-rampagecrosser.jpg  

    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  71. #71
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    I'm working on building up an old Diamondback Sorrento frame for my wife to use as a townie/grocery bike. I know a 700c fits the rear. I needed to buy a fork for it so I nabbed a brand new Surly cross check fork for an insane deal, but my LBS won't install it because the frame was designed for 26" wheels and "it will handle like a chopper". How much would it really mess with the geometry of the bike? Should I try to get them to install it anyway?

  72. #72
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    ^ installing a fork is actually super-easy. If you've got the crownrace for the headset, then you just need a roughly 2' piece of 1 1/4" pvc pipe. Or have a shop install the crownrace and starnut, and just don't tell them what it's for.

  73. #73
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    Yea. I took it to the shop to have them install the headset on the frame, because my co-op doesn't yet have a headset press. I figured if I was going in, might as well have them install the crown race and starnut as well. I'll just do the crown race and starnut on my own.

    Any thoughts on the changes to the geometry? I suppose since I already have the 700c fork, I might as well give it a try and source a 26" fork if the need arises.

  74. #74
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    I'm not very good at this stuff, but the axle-crown of the crosscheck fork is 400mm. Compared to Surly's 26" forks they range from 413mm (80mm suspension corrected 1x1) to 425mm (bigdummy) to 453mm (100mm suspension correct Troll).

    So depending what the diamondback was originally designed for, the crosscheck fork might drop the front end by an inch or two, and make the bike less slack? Hopefully the steerer on the fork is nice and long to bring the bars back up?

  75. #75
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    Thanks for your help! I'm obviously new to all of this. This is the first bike that I am building up on my own so I have a lot to learn. All I thought about when I picked up the fork was whether the steerer tube would work with my headtube. It sounds like it should work out for me.

    The DB originally had a 60mm no-name suspension fork. I can't find actual specs for the axle-crown measurement of the original fork, and I don't have it to be able to measure it, but I suspect from the specs you listed above I should be ok.

    The steerer on the xcheck fork is uncut, so it has plenty of room to bring the bars up.

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  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by vokeswaagin View Post
    Had an old 06 Jamis Durrango 26" frame laying around and was thinking about trying to fit 650b's to it and use it as a commuter.. turns out 29" mtb wheels with 42c tires cleared with about 3/16" to the seat-stay cross member. (couldn't find a pic, maybe on old phone)

    First rendition:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Tried all sorts of bar/stem and shifter combinations.. ended up liking the Gary bar w/ a 9spd barcon quite a bit..

    In full winter commute mode:
    (rear fender was modified to clear)

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I later ended up acquiring a Giant Roam 2 frame for the extra clearance and slightly more appropriate geometry.. currently running 29x1.8 Renegade's and Woodchipper II's with some Sora brifters.. LOVE the 'chippers!
    Cant stop thinking about getting my hands on a karate monkey or AWOL frame though.. ..never ends!

    Click image for larger version. 

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    (i know..not 26".. but for comparison purposes..)

    As for forks.. I ordered and tried out both the CroMoto 26" fork and the Karate Monkey fork.. ended up settling with the KM fork.. fit the geo of the Roam frame better and it felt a little 'beefier'.. still feels like its going snap-off under heavy braking and/or rocky bumpy terrain. (it should be said I'm used to riding a Fox 36 and the new Pike, so any steel fork is probably going to feel like a noodle to me)
    Heres the KM and cromoto forks side by side. (KM steerer cut already)

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Incredible looking bike!!

    Thinking of doing a similar thing with a single speed disc 26" MTB.

  78. #78
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    one way to off the u brake

    here's my contribution...1991 GT Zaskar, xt/xtr 9 speed, kona p2 forks, old mavic open pros w/dura ace hubs. a tektro 559 replaced the rear u brake (big weight savings: u brake w/hardware=382g, tektro 559 w/hardware=180g) and I made alum extensions for the front v brake. just under 22 pounds.

    ive used this as my "road bike" for a while using 1.0 ritchey tom slicks w/ 26 inch mavic 517 xtr wheels. nice lite set up but the slicks made the wheels way too small (24.5 inches overall for the ritcheys while a 26 by 2.1 is 26.5 inches overall) resulting in too low a bottom bracket (an inch lower) and I lost 2 mph off my top gear speed...the 700c wheels w/30c tires, at 27 inches overall, are much closer to the original overall wheel diameter.

    26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-1zaskar-700.jpg 26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-front-brake-1.jpg 26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-front-brake-3.jpg 26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-rear-brake-7.jpg 26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-rear-brake-8.jpg
    its just around the next corner...

  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by baljoint View Post
    ...and I made alum extensions for the front v brake.Click image for larger version. 

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    Nice idea.
    Recalculating....

  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodar y rodar View Post
    Nice idea.
    It works well for me, at 130 lbs, but we did front and back on my friends Cannondale M 700, he weighs 205, and the brakes are barely adequate. His clearances are tight though and we can easily put on a set of road brakes...
    its just around the next corner...

  81. #81
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    ^ Old pads can perform very poorly. If he has old pads, he can swap in new pads to check that, and he may avoid new brakes.

  82. #82
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    Always loved this thread, and now I can finally contribute:




    I did it the easy way with a disk frame, but this wheelset is rim/disk, so it will definitely get swapped over to my old bridgestone at some point (just need to get either v-brake adapters, or long-reach roadbrakes).

    Why did silver rims/spokes ever go out of style. So many rimbrake rims are black down the middle, but all silver looks so much better.
    Last edited by newfangled; 11-02-2015 at 01:41 PM.

  83. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhitepawRolls View Post
    There is now a better option for modding your brakes without using the horse shoes. Check out the v-brake extensions on this page (under the headsets). Keep your old brakes and save a bit of weight.

    New items from Elevn Racing | BMX Racing Group

    So a couple of different companies make these things now - Elevn, Promax, Eiosix - but I'm trying to figure out how you'd use them if your brake studs aren't removeable. And I think that the answer is "you can't".

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    That seems like bad planning to me, although maybe it's a common thing with bmx's? I need to recheck my bridgestone, but I'm pretty sure I'd determined that those studs are not moving. (and since I am just goofing around, I would want this to be a reversable mod - I'm not sawing them off)

    In other news, Promax has introduced the P-1 which has 35mm of vertical adjustment, at a much more reasonable price than the Paul's:



    26>700c should be 31.5mm, so these might work? (with all the typical caveats of decreased leverage) I'm doing some winter tire swaps this week, so I'm going to see how the 700c fit on my bridgestone , and if 35mm would be enough or not.

  84. #84
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    Some playing around while doing my studded tire switchover:






    I'm a little surprised that a 700x35mm is still taller than the 26" big apple by about 1/2".

    Anyone used roadbrakes with mountain levers? I know the idea is that longpull levers mean less force at the pads, so you have to squeeze harder - I'm just not sure how bad that feels.

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    FYI guys....there are now several cheaper options for older bikes using linear pull brakes. I got some on ebay that are extra long. 44 bucks free shipping. Will put them on my single speed. Also they are making v brake extender kits as well. I ordered these as well....Will give them a shot. Thee were not available a few years ago.

  86. #86
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    <HIPSTER VOICE>

    Yeah, those are hydraulic STI levers with disks on 700C wheels in 2008. But now that everyone's doing it, I've taken this bike apart..I'm now running cantilever brakes on my commuter.... man.

    </HIPSTER VOICE>
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  87. #87
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    ^ my #1 rule was that I was not allowed to leave my Inbred with it's flat bar. Woodchipper, or inverted mary, or bullhorns, or something, but I was not going to build myself a <shudder> hybrid.

    And since we haven't gotten snow yet, I've actually gotten quite a few more weeks with it than I expected before I have to flip it back to 26er mode.

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    ^ how's the stopping power with the long arms and high pads?

    For my bridgestone for next year I'm debating between those, or getting some Tektro r559 longreach dualpivot roadcalipers. I think either would fit, and they're about the same price, and both would have slightly weakened braking power (for the v's it's the leverage, for the calipers it's because I'd be using longpull levers). But I think that swapping to longer vbrakes would probably be a little quicker if I'm switching back and forth frequently (and I wouldn't be left with the studs sticking out).

  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    ^ how's the stopping power with the long arms and high pads?

    For my bridgestone for next year I'm debating between those, or getting some Tektro r559 longreach dualpivot roadcalipers. I think either would fit, and they're about the same price, and both would have slightly weakened braking power (for the v's it's the leverage, for the calipers it's because I'd be using longpull levers). But I think that swapping to longer vbrakes would probably be a little quicker if I'm switching back and forth frequently (and I wouldn't be left with the studs sticking out).
    Tried them out today.....stopping power is good and strong. And I used road flat bar levers. I am not sure if they are compatible as they are all I had. But if they can stop my fat ass I am good. They are powerful!

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    Newf, Yuba spec'd that length on the cheap Mundo. They stop pretty damn well.

  92. #92
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    ^ the math is still a little freaky though - something like 4x leverage with a 26rim reduced to 2x when you move the pads all the way up. But since my bridgestone is fixed it's not like a need super duper brakes, so the v's are probably the way to go.

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    I have now done the conversions to two bikes. One a single speed and the other out of spare parts. I am using old school bonded trek frames. These work so well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    ^ my #1 rule was that I was not allowed to leave my Inbred with it's flat bar. Woodchipper, or inverted mary, or bullhorns, or something, but I was not going to build myself a <shudder> hybrid.
    The thought did occur to me at the time that I was basically building a $2500 hybrid. But since the 26" wheels were instantly-swappable, the only real financial commitment at the time was $450 for the wheelset build, which seemed pretty cheap compared to buying a second 22-lb bike. Plus I had just busted my road bike and not yet got my CX bike, so I was desperate for something I could run fast on the road without emitting a tractor-tire noise.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

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    great find on long V-brakes!

    Quote Originally Posted by digitalayon View Post
    Bought these in black before I saw they had colors. Thank goodness Paul Components aren't the only ones that make a usable product (for the 700c conversion). Just couldn't do their 110 USD per brake.

    I would've bought the red arms, for my '96 Schwinn Moab 3 conversion. Basically I'm just swapping out the sloppy stock RST 171b fork, for a nashbar rigid MTB fork, and the stock brakes, for the long V-brakes. Should be more efficient for 'mostly-pavement' commuting.

    The new setup (rigid fork + long V-brakes) will allow the bike to run 26", 650b, and 40x700c tires/wheels.

  96. #96
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    Finally did my bridgestone:






    With the freaky v-brakes I've got the pads almost as high as they'll go. Braking power is definitely reduced a lot, but between the fact that it's a fixie and the drop levers giving lots of places to pull from, it should work.

    The intent with this is to be modular. I want to be able to swap this bike back to 26 easily and use these wheels on another bike. Since all I have to do is swap the wheels, swap the bolt-on cog, and swap the brake arms (easier than readjusting the pads) I hope it'll be a 20~30min job.

    Really nice ride today in it's new setup.

  97. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by baljoint View Post
    here's my contribution...
    Click image for larger version. 

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    I just did that for my junker spare parts commuter on the front wheel. Works great. It's running a flat bar with the higher leverage short pull brake levers and the higher pad positioning results in really good braking power, surprisingly.

    On the rear I am running an FMF BMX V-brake that has a really long pad mounting slot that allows me to mount the pads higher to reach the 700c rims.

  98. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by PCC View Post
    It's running a flat bar with the higher leverage short pull brake levers and the higher pad positioning results in really good braking power, surprisingly.
    Yeah, I think the reduced leverage of these various v-brake extensions basically turns the brakes into short-pull. I'd have to measure to see exactly how the math works out, but it's probably surprisingly close to a 2:1 ratio.

  99. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    So a couple of different companies make these things now - Elevn, Promax, Eiosix - but I'm trying to figure out how you'd use them if your brake studs aren't removeable. And I think that the answer is "you can't".
    So I'm looking at these things to convert a Jake24 kids CX bike from the almost-impossible-to-find 520-ISO rims to 26" rim brake mountain bike wheels, which my basement happens to be full of. I think the Jake has removable brake posts.

    If we drop down to a 559-28C road tire like the Conti 26" GP there should be still a ton of tire clearance.

    I'll have a look to see if road calipers happen to fit, since I have a set of 6500 brakes lying in the basement as well. Those brakes didn't exactly have massive tire clearance tough, IIRC.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

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    Stopping power, per long-arm (125mm, 44m pad-adjust) V-brakes

    Quote Originally Posted by newfangled View Post
    ^ how's the stopping power with the long arms and high pads?
    With the long V-brakes, I haven't noticed any change
    (or lesser/reduced grip) in stopping power.

    With the long-arm V-brakes, I use Avid FR-5 levers, with Jagwire cable.

    Keep in mind the brake bosses (on the rear stays and fork)
    remain the same distance apart,
    regardless of the length of the brake arms.

    Also keep in mind V-brakes are linear-pull brakes. If anything,
    the longer arms make the pull (of the pads toward each other) more 'linear,'
    with less drag, i.e. less 'rising' or 'curvelike.'

    The length of the brake arms has less to do with the grip-strength
    of the V-brakes, than the distance between the bosses, the strength of the cable, and the leverage/ratio provided by the brake levers.

    That said, add brake levers with good strong leverage-ratio and strong cables, and you're all set.

  101. #101
    mtbr member
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    Sep 2015
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    106

    1996 Schwinn Moab 3 MTB/hybrid 26", converted to run wheelsets up to 650b, 700c/29"

    A few factoids on the bike

    This Schwinn Moab 3.0 (base model of the Moab line, with steel frame)
    was released in 1995 as an "Anniversary edition," but
    is actually from the 1996 model production run.

    The bike originally had 26" Araya wheels (19mm between clinchers),
    and an RST 171b suspension fork (@ 400mm a-c, not more than 410mm).

    I've opted to do a few mod-swaps on the bike,
    for not only better rolling over varied terrain, but also more efficient
    energy transfer when pedaling.

    The RST 171b fork was low-end as I understand it, for SFs,
    but it worked okay for awhile. However, the fact that it springs at all
    is less than optimal for mostly pavement commuting (which I do).

    I haven't been able to find info on refurbishing the RST 171b fork/stanchions.
    I think it says 'polymer inserts' on the side, but it probably has springs too.
    I'd think there's springs or inserts out there that could be used,
    or slightly modded for use. Another option I though about was to 'rigidify'
    the SF fork, by removing the internal suspension assembly from the stanchions,
    and/or adding bushings and some sort of "fab'd" rigid shims.

    In fact, I would've used the original RST SF fork for the conversion
    if I had been able to do that, as I noticed the stock SF (@400mm a-c)
    will accomodate the current 700x40 wheelset, once the canti-brace is modded,
    or removed for a different brace (mounts above the brake bosses).


    The Conversion, from 26-only to "69er"

    It was after I realized that a 700x40 "tire" would fit in the rear "frame" stays, that I decided to do the conversion to "26++," i.e. "69er, "
    or whatever nickname is used.

    The conversion to run larger diameter wheelsets beyond 26," i.e.
    650b x 50mm+, or 700c x 42 (622-40) involved mod-swaps
    in two main areas: brakes and front (steering/suspension)


    1. Brakes

    The stock cantiliver brakes (including cables and levers)
    were swapped for a certain extra long V-brake system.
    The V-brakes themselves have arm lengths of 125mm,
    with an also-crucial spec of 44mm pad travel/adjust.
    This allows the pads to reach the 29" or 700c rims, even with
    the brakes mounted on the 'stock' or 26" rim-brake bosses.

    The long-arm brakes (125mm arms, 44mm pad adjust)
    as previously discussed elseware here in other posts,
    are available from at least two Taiwan sellers on 'eBA.'
    Price ranges from one seller at
    45 USD per set (for both wheels), 4 color options (free S&H), to
    36.50 USD per set (black or red only).


    Aside from the 44mm pad travel, it was crucial also to use
    brake levers affording strong leverage-ratio, with strong cables.

    I chose Avid FR-5 brake levers, affordable and effective.

    A nicer version of this lever is Avid's Speed-Dial lever, which adds
    efficient on-the-fly tension adjustment to the lever.

    I installed the Avid FR-5 levers with Jagwire brake cables.


    2. Front (steering/suspension)

    The stock SF fork, the RST 171b, was swapped for a rigid fork,
    of similar A-C (axle-to-crown) distance.
    the 171b has an A-C of @ 405mm I think.

    The new rigid fork I opted for is the Kona Project Two 26" fork.
    The model I chose has rim-brake bosses only (no disc mount),
    and an A-C of 410mm.
    I believe they also make a P2 with 425mm and 450mm A-C.

    A fork meant for 26" wheels, with an A-C "at-or-near" 400mm,
    will fit a 700x40 (622-42) "tire": specifically a wide MTB-style rim
    (like a Sun Rhyno Lite 622-27 or SRL XL 622-29),
    with a 40-42mm wide tire. A narrower rim will raise the same tire's
    'height' slightly. This should still fit on most 26" fork options with
    @ 400mm A-C, but will be a tighter fit for the rear stays if it fits at all.
    If 'wider tires' are preferred over 'largest wheel diameter,'
    a 650b wheelset is a good choice.

    Keep in mind that a fork with near-400mm A-C will tend to give
    a lower, i.e. more 'level' profile to the frame/geo.

    Alternately, a fork with A-C @ 450mm (or more) will jack up the front end,
    with an inclined (possibly ball-crushing) 'cruiser-type' geometry.
    I found this out when I tried a Nashbar 26" rigid fork,
    which turned out to have 453mm A-C.
    The big FSA DH-Pro 15 headset (which I still like and use)
    probably compounded this issue a bit.

    ------------

    That said and taking a break here,
    but here's a few 26" rigid fork options,
    which should work for a "69er" project:

    Kona Project Two fork
    A-C: 410, 425, 450 options I think. Rim-brake only, and/or disc (?)
    (my current choice for rigid fork)

    Sunlite Hi-Ten 26" rigid fork
    A-C: @ 400mm. Has rim brake bosses.
    Fork blades are a traditional curved/sweeping type,
    as opposed to the newer 'straight-with-rake' designs.

    Surly Big Dummy 26" fork (4130 Cromoly)
    A-C: 425mm. Has 26" rim brake bosses and disc mount.
    (I like this fork; have not used it though).

    Salsa CroMoto 26" fork
    A-C: 425mm and 450mm options. A longer fork.
    Has both rim-brake bosses and disc mount on the one side/blade.

    Nashbar 26" rigid fork
    A-C of 453mm. This fork is *long* --- jacks the front right up. I still like it though.
    Might be less 'crazy' on a 26" with other adjustments.
    Or maybe the Heavy-duty DH headset I'm using just makes it seem worse lol.
    Has both 26" rim bosses and disc mounts.

    Surly Instigator 26" fork
    A-C of 447mm, another 'long' fork. Has 26" rim brake bosses and disc mounts.

    ---------------


    Okay back to the conversion process: front (steering/suspension).

    Again, I opted for the Kona P2 rigid fork.
    It is threadless (original fork/steering was threaded),
    so it required other mod-swaps as well:
    stem, handlebar, and headset (I think I might've been able to get away with using the stock/threaded headset, depending on how it was secured, to stem or other parts of the stock headset. I never bothered to try it with the new threadless rig).

    I went with a 25 stem by Profile Designs based on spec.
    (don't recall the length at the moment),
    similar to the angle of the original/threaded stem

    The bar is alloy, a bit shorter than the stock bar, 31.x (?) mount

    The original headset was threaded.
    I swapped it for an FSA DH Pro No. 15 headset.
    Good strong headset with sealed heavy-duty bearings,
    for @ 30-40 USD, includes crown race.

    At the moment, not going into all the drama and dumb mistakes
    I made along the way, but I should've kept a diary, lol.
    It wasn't a difficult process per se. It was a bit complex for me,
    regarding the whole pathology of getting proper and affordable
    parts and tools and/or researching techniques/methods.
    Hopefully I've taken care of some of the 'sloggy' guesswork aspects of it
    for you. Let me know if you have any questions on tools or parts.

    Here's a few pics of the Schwinn Moab 3,
    modded to a "26++" aka "69er." That 'thingy' above the seat stays
    is the mount/remains of a broken cheap plastic aftermarket
    rear fender (have to get a new one lol).

    Also the red-reflective areas are 3M Diamond Grade reflective tape,
    available in various colors (silver/light-gray/white is supposed to be
    the most reflective, but I can tell you the red blue and green
    light up super-good too when light hits them. I recommend the tape,
    for enhanced safety --- hi-vis commuting. The tape has a 'grain':
    It can curve/roll as around a cyclinder or bar, but
    is not optimal for complex curves (like a sphere),
    as it will crack and/or flake if curved against/across its 'grain.'

    The way I apply it is to wrap it around the 'bars' of the frame/fork areas,
    with the 'grain' parallel to the 'bar;' you will find it conforms readily this way.
    I then secure it with a few plastic zip-ties along the length of the wrap.
    This method produces perhaps not the sleekest look, but
    function-over-fashion here.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-img_20160304_064321.jpg  

    26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-img_20160304_064418.jpg  

    26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-img_20160304_023834.jpg  

    26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-img_20160304_022820.jpg  

    26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-img_20160304_024105.jpg  

    26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-img_20160304_024037.jpg  

    26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-img_20160304_024511.jpg  

    26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-img_20160304_024541.jpg  

    26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-img_20160304_024552.jpg  

    26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-img_20160304_023414.jpg  

    26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-img_20160304_024333.jpg  

    26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-img_20160304_024541.jpg  

    Last edited by 2wTrekr; 03-08-2016 at 08:57 PM.

  102. #102
    mtbr member
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    106

    26" to 700c: Promax P-1's need boss hardware

    I tried to use Promax P-1's for a 26-to-700c conversion, but the pads wouldn't reach the 700c rims at max height adjust, mounted on the bare 26" bosses. Those Eleven brand boss attachments would make it possible though.

  103. #103
    mtbr member
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    Jun 2005
    Posts
    4
    This is my conversion of GT Corrado.
    Brakes BR-R450 + levers BL-R440, rims Mavic A119, tires Schwalbe Smart Sam 37x622.26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-fotografie0133.jpg26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-fotografie0135.jpg26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-fotografie0136.jpg26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-fotografie0137.jpg

  104. #104
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sunvalleylaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    535
    Quote Originally Posted by libor View Post
    This is my conversion of GT Corrado.
    Brakes BR-R450 + levers BL-R440, rims Mavic A119, tires Schwalbe Smart Sam 37x622.Click image for larger version. 

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    Nice! I like that one!

  105. #105
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sunvalleylaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    535
    Quote Originally Posted by 2wTrekr View Post
    A few factoids on the bike

    This Schwinn Moab 3.0 (base model of the Moab line, with steel frame)
    was released in 1995 as an "Anniversary edition," but
    is actually from the 1996 model production run.

    The bike originally had 26" Araya wheels (19mm between clinchers),
    and an RST 171b suspension fork (@ 400mm a-c, not more than 410mm).

    I've opted to do a few mod-swaps on the bike,
    for not only better rolling over varied terrain, but also more efficient
    energy transfer when pedaling.

    The RST 171b fork was low-end as I understand it, for SFs,
    but it worked okay for awhile. However, the fact that it springs at all
    is less than optimal for mostly pavement commuting (which I do).

    I haven't been able to find info on refurbishing the RST 171b fork/stanchions.
    I think it says 'polymer inserts' on the side, but it probably has springs too.
    I'd think there's springs or inserts out there that could be used,
    or slightly modded for use. Another option I though about was to 'rigidify'
    the SF fork, by removing the internal suspension assembly from the stanchions,
    and/or adding bushings and some sort of "fab'd" rigid shims.

    In fact, I would've used the original RST SF fork for the conversion
    if I had been able to do that, as I noticed the stock SF (@400mm a-c)
    will accomodate the current 700x40 wheelset, once the canti-brace is modded,
    or removed for a different brace (mounts above the brake bosses).


    The Conversion, from 26-only to "69er"

    It was after I realized that a 700x40 "tire" would fit in the rear "frame" stays, that I decided to do the conversion to "26++," i.e. "69er, "
    or whatever nickname is used.

    The conversion to run larger diameter wheelsets beyond 26," i.e.
    650b x 50mm+, or 700c x 42 (622-40) involved mod-swaps
    in two main areas: brakes and front (steering/suspension)


    1. Brakes

    The stock cantiliver brakes (including cables and levers)
    were swapped for a certain extra long V-brake system.
    The V-brakes themselves have arm lengths of 125mm,
    with an also-crucial spec of 44mm pad travel/adjust.
    This allows the pads to reach the 29" or 700c rims, even with
    the brakes mounted on the 'stock' or 26" rim-brake bosses.

    The long-arm brakes (125mm arms, 44mm pad adjust)
    as previously discussed elseware here in other posts,
    are available from at least two Taiwan sellers on 'eBA.'
    Price ranges from one seller at
    45 USD per set (for both wheels), 4 color options (free S&H), to
    36.50 USD per set (black or red only).


    Aside from the 44mm pad travel, it was crucial also to use
    brake levers affording strong leverage-ratio, with strong cables.

    I chose Avid FR-5 brake levers, affordable and effective.

    A nicer version of this lever is Avid's Speed-Dial lever, which adds
    efficient on-the-fly tension adjustment to the lever.

    I installed the Avid FR-5 levers with Jagwire brake cables.


    2. Front (steering/suspension)

    The stock SF fork, the RST 171b, was swapped for a rigid fork,
    of similar A-C (axle-to-crown) distance.
    the 171b has an A-C of @ 405mm I think.

    The new rigid fork I opted for is the Kona Project Two 26" fork.
    The model I chose has rim-brake bosses only (no disc mount),
    and an A-C of 410mm.
    I believe they also make a P2 with 425mm and 450mm A-C.

    A fork meant for 26" wheels, with an A-C "at-or-near" 400mm,
    will fit a 700x40 (622-42) "tire": specifically a wide MTB-style rim
    (like a Sun Rhyno Lite 622-27 or SRL XL 622-29),
    with a 40-42mm wide tire. A narrower rim will raise the same tire's
    'height' slightly. This should still fit on most 26" fork options with
    @ 400mm A-C, but will be a tighter fit for the rear stays if it fits at all.
    If 'wider tires' are preferred over 'largest wheel diameter,'
    a 650b wheelset is a good choice.

    Keep in mind that a fork with near-400mm A-C will tend to give
    a lower, i.e. more 'level' profile to the frame/geo.

    Alternately, a fork with A-C @ 450mm (or more) will jack up the front end,
    with an inclined (possibly ball-crushing) 'cruiser-type' geometry.
    I found this out when I tried a Nashbar 26" rigid fork,
    which turned out to have 453mm A-C.
    The big FSA DH-Pro 15 headset (which I still like and use)
    probably compounded this issue a bit.

    ------------

    That said and taking a break here,
    but here's a few 26" rigid fork options,
    which should work for a "69er" project:

    Kona Project Two fork
    A-C: 410, 425, 450 options I think. Rim-brake only, and/or disc (?)
    (my current choice for rigid fork)

    Sunlite Hi-Ten 26" rigid fork
    A-C: @ 400mm. Has rim brake bosses.
    Fork blades are a traditional curved/sweeping type,
    as opposed to the newer 'straight-with-rake' designs.

    Surly Big Dummy 26" fork (4130 Cromoly)
    A-C: 425mm. Has 26" rim brake bosses and disc mount.
    (I like this fork; have not used it though).

    Salsa CroMoto 26" fork
    A-C: 425mm and 450mm options. A longer fork.
    Has both rim-brake bosses and disc mount on the one side/blade.

    Nashbar 26" rigid fork
    A-C of 453mm. This fork is *long* --- jacks the front right up. I still like it though.
    Might be less 'crazy' on a 26" with other adjustments.
    Or maybe the Heavy-duty DH headset I'm using just makes it seem worse lol.
    Has both 26" rim bosses and disc mounts.

    Surly Instigator 26" fork
    A-C of 447mm, another 'long' fork. Has 26" rim brake bosses and disc mounts.

    ---------------


    Okay back to the conversion process: front (steering/suspension).

    Again, I opted for the Kona P2 rigid fork.
    It is threadless (original fork/steering was threaded),
    so it required other mod-swaps as well:
    stem, handlebar, and headset (I think I might've been able to get away with using the stock/threaded headset, depending on how it was secured, to stem or other parts of the stock headset. I never bothered to try it with the new threadless rig).

    I went with a 25 stem by Profile Designs based on spec.
    (don't recall the length at the moment),
    similar to the angle of the original/threaded stem

    The bar is alloy, a bit shorter than the stock bar, 31.x (?) mount

    The original headset was threaded.
    I swapped it for an FSA DH Pro No. 15 headset.
    Good strong headset with sealed heavy-duty bearings,
    for @ 30-40 USD, includes crown race.

    At the moment, not going into all the drama and dumb mistakes
    I made along the way, but I should've kept a diary, lol.
    It wasn't a difficult process per se. It was a bit complex for me,
    regarding the whole pathology of getting proper and affordable
    parts and tools and/or researching techniques/methods.
    Hopefully I've taken care of some of the 'sloggy' guesswork aspects of it
    for you. Let me know if you have any questions on tools or parts.

    Here's a few pics of the Schwinn Moab 3,
    modded to a "26++" aka "69er." That 'thingy' above the seat stays
    is the mount/remains of a broken cheap plastic aftermarket
    rear fender (have to get a new one lol).

    Also the red-reflective areas are 3M Diamond Grade reflective tape,
    available in various colors (silver/light-gray/white is supposed to be
    the most reflective, but I can tell you the red blue and green
    light up super-good too when light hits them. I recommend the tape,
    for enhanced safety --- hi-vis commuting. The tape has a 'grain':
    It can curve/roll as around a cyclinder or bar, but
    is not optimal for complex curves (like a sphere),
    as it will crack and/or flake if curved against/across its 'grain.'

    The way I apply it is to wrap it around the 'bars' of the frame/fork areas,
    with the 'grain' parallel to the 'bar;' you will find it conforms readily this way.
    I then secure it with a few plastic zip-ties along the length of the wrap.
    This method produces perhaps not the sleekest look, but
    function-over-fashion here.
    Nice. Thanks for the explanation of your process and parts selection. Helpful info me thinks.

  106. #106
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by libor View Post
    This is my conversion of GT Corrado.
    Brakes BR-R450 + levers BL-R440, rims Mavic A119, tires Schwalbe Smart Sam 37x622.Click image for larger version. 

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    That is nice libor

    I recently swapped the 130 mm axle for a 135. Added a couple spacers between the race and the locknut and now the wheel fits right in beautifully and is perfectly centered.
    I want to find a pair of woodchippers or something...
    its just around the next corner...

  107. #107
    mtbr member
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    4

    1995 GT Tequesta

    Here's my 1995 GT Tequesta after stage 1 & 2 of conversion.

    Stage 1 = 700c wheels from an even older hybrid. 700x38 tires just barely fit in this frame, with 1cm gap at most at the fork and rear cross member behind the bottom bracket.

    Stage 2 = Cantilever brakes replaced with some very nice used Dia-Compe center pulls, from the 80's I think.

    Before and after...
    26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-img_0332.jpg
    26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-img_0331.jpg

  108. #108
    mtbr member
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    FYI this works great on older trek and Gary fisher frames. Love my old 8000 with 700c

  109. #109
    mtbr member
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    Here are my two converts....one is a Trek 7000(repainted with GT decals) and the other is an ancient 92 Trek 8000. I have a thing for the old school bonded frames. The single speed is using large breaks found on ebay to extend the adjustment and the other is using little adjusters that bolt onto the brake to extent it up also are found on ebay.

    26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-img_0143.jpg26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-klunker5.jpg

  110. #110
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    just found out about the mavic 700c adapters. kinda by accident, anybody got some? I want some (2)

  111. #111
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    those have not been made in years

  112. #112
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    I know. 10 years too late and a dollar short.
    But I bet there's a box full of them somewhere.

  113. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by gigglez View Post
    I know. 10 years too late and a dollar short.
    But I bet there's a box full of them somewhere.
    They are not needed....you can find extended vbrakes on ebay.

  114. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by janthenat View Post
    Here's my 1995 GT Tequesta after stage 1 & 2 of conversion.

    Stage 1 = 700c wheels from an even older hybrid. 700x38 tires just barely fit in this frame, with 1cm gap at most at the fork and rear cross member behind the bottom bracket.

    Stage 2 = Cantilever brakes replaced with some very nice used Dia-Compe center pulls, from the 80's I think.

    Before and after...
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	1121139
    Final product...
    26&quot; to 700C Conversion (PICS)-2019_gt_tequesta_700c.jpg

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