20 Miles One way?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    20 Miles One way?

    Anyone commute 20 miles (or more) one way? Mtb or roadie? How long does it usually take you? Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    namagomi
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    That is pretty far, nobody is going to be doing it on a MTB i'd bet.

  3. #3
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    Sometimes....

    During non-winter months, I try to commute a few days a month. My ride is 27 one way. I normally ride a road bike, but have used my mountain bike with 80 psi 1.25" slicks. If you can lock-out the suspension, that helps. I pre-stage all my clothes, etc. the day before. I have a locker/gym/shower at work. Traveling as light as possible is the key. Nothing worse than having to wear a full-size book bag / back-pack with my laptop on the ride. Takes me about 1:30 in the AM, and 1:45+ on the way home due to hills, PM winds, long day. I'm tired when I get home, but there is really nothing better than watching the sunrise on your bike in the AM when the roads are clear and quiet. Great way to start the day....
    James

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  4. #4
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    I commute on a road bike during the nicer weather. Usually 1-2 per week. I work 11 miles from home, and it takes me around 35-40 mins depending on how many red lights I catch.

  5. #5
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    I used to live 35 mi from work & would sometimes go 1 way by road bike. I had a car pool too, so it was easy to get a ride the other way. This made it do-able without being a riidiculously long day.

  6. #6
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    Not quite 20 for me but its 17 each way to work, and 18 to school. I use an 06 Kona Dawg Deluxe for my commuting/weekend trips. I need to look into some road tires as the knobby tires make it a little more difficult.

  7. #7
    Wierdo
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    I commute year-round 37 miles RT, about 1800 feet of ascent. Usually four days/week. Cyclocross bike outfitted with lights, rack/panniers, fenders. Typically takes me around an hour and ten to an hour and fifteen minutes, each way. I'd make that commute on a Mountain Bike only if I were a masochist.

  8. #8
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    My commute doesn't even compare, length wise, but I've done plenty of recreational 30 milers and a 50+ miler on my mountain bike. I really don't see what all the fuss is about.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 – May 16, 2010

  9. #9
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    My full time job now is ~ 35 miles each way with either a 12 or 24 hour shift. I haven't attempted the commute on the bike yet. Maybe in the summer, but it could make for a very long day. I was able to commute to my part-time job, but it was only 4 miles from home.

    I've ridden that far, and further on many occasions, but not when I had to be anywhere, or be fully alert for work.

  10. #10
    One Colorful Rider
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    A couple times in the summer I'll ride to my bank to deposit my check then go to work.
    Thats 25 miles.

    On the First weekend in May I have to work cause of our Tent Sale. And I usually have a Sunday morning ride that I run. Last year I rode 50 miles before work.

    Back in 2001, I ran Road ride before work. I would Ride to work 10 miles then lead a 30-35 mile Sunday morning road ride after ride a group breakfast and then to work. After all the rides then work the Ride Home.

    So Far this February I racked up 136 this week about 27 miles a Week. 45min to work-12 miles 70 min home 15 miles.
    On a Singlespeed Bianchi San Jose 44-17 Fixed.

  11. #11
    jalopy jockey
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    16 mile commute to work. I do it once or twice a week in the warmer months. Takes about an hour. Some days it takes longer than that to drive. True I don't see the fuss on the distance, but i have showers at work. It would be rough on knobbies but I have comfort tires on my old rigid mountain bike. Yes I could put on the high PSI slicks and shave some time but the route favors a cushier ride.

    That said for me my commute is a short ride. I regularly roll out 40 to 50 miles on any given weekend day, sometimes over 60, and that's towing 2 kids.

    Sure I could do it faster on a road bike but my old mountain bike is fine for rolling out big miles.

  12. #12
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    I regularly once or twice a week, more if anything calls for it, ride 26km (16 miles) one way on my all purpose MTB. For an 08 Giant Rincon w/ knobbies still. Front suspension.

  13. #13
    One Colorful Rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by Normbilt
    A couple times in the summer I'll ride to my bank to deposit my check then go to work.
    Thats 25 miles.

    On the First weekend in May I have to work cause of our Tent Sale. And I usually have a Sunday morning ride that I run. Last year I rode 50 miles before work.

    Back in 2001, I ran Road ride before work. I would Ride to work 10 miles then lead a 30-35 mile Sunday morning road ride after ride a group breakfast and then to work. After all the rides then work the Ride Home.

    So Far this February I racked up 136 this week about 27 miles a Week. 45min to work-12 miles 70 min home 15 miles.
    On a Singlespeed Bianchi San Jose 44-17 Fixed.
    I guess I Missed the MTB Question. Life is tough enough, If I Can Make my commute easier not Shorter but easier I choose 700c Wheels.

    Now on the weekend Not Going to work I take my Single Speed Rigid Mountain bike to Kettle Moraine for a 20-26 mile off road adventure, 29"/700 Wheels of coarse

  14. #14
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    I have a 15mi one way ride that is pretty flat. I ride a commutered out Redline Conquest with rack/panniers, fenders, discs, etc. The ride on that bike takes me about 50-54 minutes. When the weather is clear/dry and I can travel light, I take my lightweight road bike (Orbea Onix). When I do that the commute time drops to around 43-45 minutes. Seriously, the Orbea is just so freaking fun to ride I push myself harder.

    A guy I know has been riding his old steel Trek road bike 27 miles each way every day for years. He went to high school with my brother so he's in his upper 40s. I think he told me it takes him about 1.5 hours and he has quite a few hills.

  15. #15
    Wierdo
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary the No-Trash Cougar
    My commute doesn't even compare, length wise, but I've done plenty of recreational 30 milers and a 50+ miler on my mountain bike. I really don't see what all the fuss is about.
    Me too and it's no problem to do an ocassional long day on a MTB. But for 20+ miles each way on a daily basis, bigger wheels, skinnier tires and a less upright sitting position are going to make the ride much more enjoyable. JMHO.

  16. #16
    Ride-Drink Beer-Repeat
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    I travel 15 each way and after time change routinely go on long 20+ rides home. When on my commute I hook up with a guy on a MTB and he rides close to the same mileage. He's really changed his bike to more of a roady as it makes the trip much better. I prefer a SS cross bike myself. SS are cheaper to buy or build and easy'er to maintain.
    We have a "bosque" close to my house 2 miles and I can get in 20 easy on flat trails. I use a SS MTB for that. I think dirt is about twice as hard on you physically as road. Even the flat stuff.
    I love the dirt but just don't have time to go. Besides I really like to leave from home on my bike and not have to drive to the ride.
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  17. #17
    Born to push....
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    Once the weather warms up my commute will be 18 miles each way.

    last year i did that route on my MTB an it took me iout an hour.

    I plan on using the same MTB til i can get a road bike build. The knobbies jus seem a lil over kill since my route is all highway.

  18. #18
    ol'guy who says hi &waves
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    35 miles each way, once or twice a week. Choice of four bikes depending on mood, 26"SS, 29HT, roadie, and a unique cruiser (Pedersen) with a 5spd hub. The mtbs usually have semi-slicks or fast rolling knobbies. Usually takes 1-1/2 to 2 hours depending on bike, traffic, route and pace.
    .

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  19. #19

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    Commute

    I've done 27 miles each way in the past. First it was out of necessity (broken car) but I continued it even after the car was fixed out of sheer enjoyment. Right up until I couldn't feel my toes due to the cold. To work was mostly a descent through scenic back roads with a river ferry crossing that allowed me to relax and collect my thoughts. It took approx 1.5 to 1.75 hours to get to work. The trip back was mostly uphill and took 2 to 2.25 hours through the same scenery. It made for long days and I wasn't up for going out after I got home but I was in incredible shape, saved a lot of money, and had this peaceful/quieting piece of mind that I have yet to recapture. I am gearing up for another commuting stint, although it's only 10 miles, I hope it's at least 1/2 as rewarding.
    My prior commute was on a road bike. It just goes/went well with the distance, roads, and terrain.
    This time I'm going with a Salsa Fargo as it's more of an urban jungle commute/curb hopping pot hole avoidance exercise.
    Last edited by d3.dogg; 02-11-2010 at 09:28 PM.

  20. #20
    weirdo
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    I know my commute isn`t all that impressive, but some of you folks really make me feel like a whimp. At least I don`t let myself weasel out of it often.
    Recalculating....

  21. #21
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    My commute is 25 miles each way and when we don't have 2' of snow on the ground I try to do it twice a week. I do not own a road bike but I have made a few mods to my bike to make it more commuter friendly - I replaced the suspension for with a rigid and the flat bars were replaced with a set of Titec H-Bars to give me more hand positions (these may get replaced with a set of Mary's). My bike is a 29er so I do have a decent selection of 700c tires available and have tried a few different 32-35 mm road tires, I have recently settled on the 2.1 Small Block 8's as my tire of choice. Because of traffic, lights, and hills it is about 1 hour 40 minutes. I have a gym w/ a shower in my office building so I just bring my work clothes with me in a backpack.

    If I were strictly looking at this as commuting it would be just too much time. However, I view this as training. The improvements that I see in speed and endurance after getting 8 straight weeks of this commute in are significant and make the weekend rides that much more enjoyable. Now, if we could just do something about all of this snow.

  22. #22
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    When I was commuting in traffic and along a very convoluted route in SF, I preferred a MTB with 1.35 to 1.5 slicks- it made more sense; head up to survey the scene ahead, stronger brakes, and the option for those quirky connects; through parks and other variances to make it fun (and less time around cars). The extra time was well worth it.

    My commute now: I still have some streets and death machine weaving, but long stretches of flat, and I still don't mind riding out 25 miles one way on the slicked up steel Bridgestone with a midge bar, or my old OCLV trek hardtail with an air fork and reborn bar ends. With 1.4 michelin slicks, I can adjust the tire pressure for a comfortable but efficient ride. (At some point I'll post pics of these buggers)

    I do not have the heart NOT to keep utilizing my bikes that keep on truckin'. I still am able to incorporate some singletrack, backroads with crappy surfaces, interesting twists that I look forward to. The distinction between ride and commute is lost. The economy of getting from Point A to B has become my "visit"; my in-the-moment, my meditation. The trip is never the same and I feel my time is being revered and held precious.

    All said, I sometimes run my 29r as a commuter, also a cross bike w discs ( a K2 frame I picked up at last year's swap for $5). And yes, after many, many years of riding everywhere, I am building up my first strict road bike.

    Back to OP: I have two routes, the other more like 35 miles (great to have options, even if longer), but let's say I average more or less 2 hours spent on the saddle getting to or from work.
    Last edited by grandsalmon; 02-13-2010 at 05:41 AM.

  23. #23
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    20 miles one way is pretty much what my daily commute is. I usually ride all year round, missing maybe 10 days in the year. It usually takes me an hour fifteen minutes, more or less depending on the wind. My commute is over rolling hills, nothing is flat but no long climbs either.
    I usually ride a 2007 Trek 7.5 FX (or something like that) where I took the rizer bars off and replaced them with flats+bar ends. I added some fenders for obvious reasons. Fortunatly, snow is rare and I manage to ride year round with 700/35 tires.
    Basically, I end up leaving home at 6.15 and arrive back home around 17.45.

  24. #24
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    once it warms back up here in the NE...
    24 miles each way on a singlespeed commuter. Pretty flat (+/- 150') with lights and traffic. 2 hours roughly each in the past and this year I may split days between the car and bike to see the kids quicker.
    (Drive to W, ride home; ride to W, drive home, ect.)
    I'd hit it, but I bruise like a peach.

  25. #25
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    Used to commute the 19.8 miles to Hartford, CT and back during the summer of '08. Nice days saw the roadie which took about an hour in the morning and an hour and 15 on the way home.

    It took too much out of my day! I was too tired after a day of commuting and work to do anything in the evening! Picked up a Honda Rebel 250cc cruiser so I could enjoy more of my summer riding to places other than work.

  26. #26
    Mantis, Paramount, Campy
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    22~23 miles each way.

    Road bike mostly or the 'cross bike when there's a lot of snow.
    Takes an hour +/- 5 minutes in normal weather.
    *** --- *** --- ***

  27. #27
    Hairy man
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    I've got about a 20 commute if I go the long way to work and a six mile commute if I take the bus over the bridge. So I do about 26 miles a day usually. It's nicer to take the long way in the morning when I've got more energy and there's sunlight. Takes me about an hour and a quarter. I'm riding a Redline Conquest with slick tires. I wouldn't want to do it on a mountain bike, and I really wouldn't want to grind down a set of knobbies on the pavement.
    We all get it in the end.

  28. #28
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    [QUOTE=bpnic]once it warms back up here in the NE...

    I here ya there! My commute would be 20miles one way. Anyway I'm gearing up and getting ready

  29. #29
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    I do that on my cobia in China. 29" actually 33km in about 1 hour 13-15 min depending on wind and traffic... love it.

  30. #30
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    My commute ranges 15-18 miles depending ont he route I take... On days when I want a really good workout, I take the MTB and hit some trials on the way, extending the ride, and sometimes sneak in a lunch ride...

    When I'm trying to get the commute done with less effort, and less time, I take the cyclocross bike...

  31. #31
    One Colorful Rider
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    I have to go to the Bank today before work. That will be a 25 ride,
    It's good to get a good ride before work sometimes

  32. #32
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    My commute would be 18 miles each way. I can't wait for summer so I can give it a try. Right now I have to be at work at 5:30a.m. I don't see myself getting on the bike at 4:00a.m. Although I wouldn't have to worry about too much traffic at that time.

  33. #33
    Bedwards Of The West
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    Usually once every other week I ride to my in-laws house after work. It's 18 miles, takes about an hour. I feel it the next day depending on the headwind I was dealing with on the long ride... it's a long ride but very do-able for the commute. The one thing would be the longer time frame...that would stress me out a little, because I probably wouldn't get up early enough to give myself enough cushion to deal with a mechanical issue like a flat tire. I love doing it after work though.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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  34. #34
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    38 mi RT today on the MTB. I am realizing the longer commute on the MTB is really just a matter of time, temperature, and terrain. No problem if you have the free time to spare, the temps are comfy, and the terrain isn't super-hilly. If I had added the last 3.5 mi hill to my house, it would have been too long a day for me (& still too tough on the healing ankle).

  35. #35
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    Currently I commute 18 miles per day, (9 miles each way). Start in April my commute will go to 17 miles each way. I'm a bit nervous, I'll most likely switch from commuting on my fixed gear to my road bike. I hope it doesn't provide too much of a drain on my life, there is no option of "driving" because I work in Melbourne, parking a car is $14/day, so it's out of the question. I despise public transport so this commute has to work. the nice thing is that Melbourne is relatively flat and the weather accommodates riding year round. What do you lot think? 34 miles per day OK for commuting?
    Draft College Republicans

  36. #36
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    I was doing about 20-21 miles (one way)

    Tried it with an old roadie and then all the other times with a mtn bike. Wasn't too bad, took about an hour and a half. My commute is full of hills and some traffic. Haven't done it in awhile since I work nights now and I need some better lights.

    You will probably be tired though. Make sure you eat enough too, you will need at least another 2000 calories a day.

  37. #37
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    Last spring, I did 20km of rolling hills each way on a Salsa Las Cruces cross bike. There was usually so much automobile traffic during my commute times that it would only take about 10 minutes longer to commute by bike than it would to drive. I've since moved to a new city. My current commute is only 3.2km. It's nice to be able to commute in under 10 minutes, but I often miss the longer ride. I don't think I'd ever be able to justify 20 miles each way.

  38. #38
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    was doing 18 last year, took 1:15. Bike lanes on big 4 lane streets the whole way. Kinda boring, and i was flying. Really got me in shape though. Rigid mtb with slicks is pretty fast.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
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  39. #39
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    My commute used to be 35 miles one way. When I would ride it, I would drive the bike to work, ride home, ride in the next day, drive home, repeat. Usually took from 2 - 2 1/2 hours. Phoenix is pretty flat, and I was able to take the canals most of the way, which have (some) under passes so you don't have to make so many street crossings.

  40. #40
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JunkShip
    My commute used to be 35 miles one way. When I would ride it, I would drive the bike to work, ride home, ride in the next day, drive home, repeat. Usually took from 2 - 2 1/2 hours. Phoenix is pretty flat, and I was able to take the canals most of the way, which have (some) under passes so you don't have to make so many street crossings.
    That sounds like my dream commute actually; long and mostly off the street!
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 – May 16, 2010

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by electrik
    That is pretty far, nobody is going to be doing it on a MTB i'd bet.
    Commuted roughly 20 on my SS rigid 29er MTB this morning (and will be commuting home the same way in a couple of hours) Plan on doing tomorrow on the fully.

    Peaople DO commute by MTB.

  42. #42
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    Thanks for all of the input. I recently put some Michelin city tires on the bike. They ride pretty well. Well.. except for the slime tubes I put inside, they make them a little heavy. I'm thinking of getting a rigid fork and converting to a single chain ring in front. I'm thinking of a 50-52t ring. I don't ever use the other two, and I usually stay in the big ring and 5,6,7 in the back. Will a 50 or 52 make a big difference from a 48? Thanks

  43. #43
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Going from 48-52 might feel like being about a gear higher, depending on your cassette spacing. You may not notice the difference between a 48 and a 50.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  44. #44
    Bedwards Of The West
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    I have a 50 tooth big ring on my cyclocross bike, and I find myself using the 50/16 combo a lot of the time on relatively flat stuff. So much that I almost went singlespeed, but I finally decided against it. You will run a gear or two higher in the back, but probably won't feel a difference.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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  45. #45
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    Mine is 23 miles.

    I rode it once on a mountain bike. I bought a road bike the following day

    Last year my fastest commute was 1 hour 8 minutes door to door. I was HAULIN ass that day. About 90% of my commute is on a MUT with no stop lights or vehicle traffic and it's VERY well maintained so I'm able to do it on a carbon road bike (Specialized Tarmac). I also have the luxury of a secure area to lock the bike, and full locker room facility at the office .
    :wq

  46. #46
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    38 miles 1 way. Road bike. I generally only go one way and we have showers at work. I would never do it on my mt bike, but then again my mt, bike is a 6" travel AM bike with 2.35" tires.

  47. #47
    One Colorful Rider
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    Yesterday was my Ride to Bank before work Day. I ride 10 miles to the bank, deposit my pay check in the Night Deposit then 17 miles to work. Then a 17 mile ride home at night. All on a Single Speed Seattle Langster.

  48. #48
    M8 M12 M15 deez nuts
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    From April 2008 to April 2009 my commute was somewhere between 17.5 and 18.5 miles each way. I was mainly riding on my road bike, and the average time was 44 minutes (included stop signs and stop lights, all of which I stopped for as per the rules outlined within the California Vehicle Code). The best time was 37 minutes, and that was I think maybe with only getting caught at two short stop lights. The longest was more than an hour thanks to bad traffic signal timing coupled with major headwinds. However, once per week I’d mix things up a bit and use my mountain bike, and amazingly only be off my road bike pace by maybe 5 minutes—something to be said about high-speed endurance training with a road bike.
    Don’t frail and blow if you’re going to Braille and Flow.

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