1.5 or 1.35 tires for commuting?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    1.5 or 1.35 tires for commuting?

    I have a fairly good mtb bike. Im using it to commute to job everyday.

    I currently have Marathon Plus 2.0 tires. The problem is that these tires are too heavy (1100 grams)

    I wanna switch to MPlus 1.5 (860 grams) or 1.35 (775 grams)

    Which one shall i go? Is 1.35 going to be too uncomfortable? I always ride on the pavement but the pavement is very irregular sometimes. Also 1.35 tires are too thin for a mtb bike?

  2. #2
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    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...tact+Tire.aspx

    I use the 1.3 inch tire....

    If you go thin you want to really go thin cause that way the absolutely will not plane on water.

    You will lose some top end cause the OD ends up abouty 7% smaller than a 2.2 inch tire.

  3. #3
    Bedwards Of The West
    Reputation: CommuterBoy's Avatar
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    I say go small...more room for fenders, and the difference between a 1.5 and a 1.35 in terms of ride quality is miniscule.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  4. #4
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    It somewhat depends on your priorities. Obviously weight and size are highly correlated but when it comes to rolling resistance, skinnier does not always mean faster. Personally I believe that rolling resistance is far more important that weight - but then again my commute doesn't have much stop and go where which is the main place where you benefit from lighter tires. A 1.5 will give a little extra cushion if that is important to you.

    After spending a year commuting on 32mm tires I decided that I didn't like not being able to go take a detour and go off road and went back to commuting on fat tires.

  5. #5
    weirdo
    Reputation: rodar y rodar's Avatar
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    I`ve never tried 1.35, but the difference between 1.25 Paselas and several 1.5s I`ve used was quite a jump. Comming from fatter tires, I`d say try a round of 1.5s (which are already two steps skinnier than 2.0s) and see how you like them, then maybe think about skinnier for the next set. Or maybe go back a step fatter.

  6. #6
    I got nothin'
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    Check out the Performance Brand Metro-K tires. They come in 1 1/4" wide (really closer to 1 3/8") - 26" diameter. They have a Kevlar layer and wear like iron. They are about 340gms each, and cheap too.

    http://www.performancebike.com/bikes...8#ReviewHeader
    I ride at ludicrous speed

  7. #7
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    I have some Performance Metro tires that are 1.5" but w/o the kevlar. They are light and so far I really like them! I can'r believe I waited so long to go to a skinny tire - totally worth it! I go up and jump off curbs on a regular basis and ride over some very rough asphalt and I have to say they aren't much more harsh than my 2.125" hybrid type tire but SO much lighter. I can't imagine you'd notice much difference b/w the 1.35 or 1.5

  8. #8
    The Brutally Handsome
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    1.35? 2.35 baby!

  9. #9
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    Yo. First- bicycles cannot hydroplane. They can slip. Smaller tires will make that more likely.

    Width isn't necessarily going to make a difference on your overall speed. I had 26x 1.5marathon races until I wore them out, and they haulllllled balls and were pretty comfy. I've also used continental's contact sport and they were pretty fast 1.6s, but were kinda harsh. Right now I'm using 1.75 michelin country rock and I think they are perfect- still fairly quick, but have enough bite to get off pavement on the way home (if dry).

    I'd really love to get something 2.3+ and supermoto through my winters.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by umarth
    Yo. First- bicycles cannot hydroplane.Yes Dear They can slip. Smaller tires will make that more likely.

    Width isn't necessarily going to make a difference on your overall speed. I had 26x 1.5marathon races until I wore them out, and they haulllllled balls and were pretty comfy. I've also used continental's contact sport and they were pretty fast 1.6s, but were kinda harsh. Right now I'm using 1.75 michelin country rock and I think they are perfect- still fairly quick, but have enough bite to get off pavement on the way home (if dry).

    I'd really love to get something 2.3+ and supermoto through my winters.

    Read what Sheldon says some guy came up with some general guidelines...

    Try hitting a puddle at say 50 km/hr just after a downhill with a 2 inch slick with your weight back a bit.. yup it lifts, as far as car tires not hydroplaning will been there done that...

    Oh yeah and then add a little bit of slush yup go with the narrow ones....besides you will be faster.

  11. #11
    No-Brakes Cougar
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    I don't think there will be a whole lot of difference between 1.35 and 1.5, but I would go as wide as possible. This increases shock absorbtion, traction and lesses the chances of your tire getting stuck in a crack, railroad track, etc.... I'd go up to at least 1.75, but that's just a personal preference.
    R.I.P. Ronnie James Dio ~ July 10, 1942 May 16, 2010

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