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  1. #1
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    Tubeless tire conversion and goatheads?

    I'm looking at getting Stan's tubeless tire conversion kit for my spiffy new bike, but I was wondering how well the product holds up to the goatheads?

    I enjoyed a nice walk home after both my tires were flattened by goatheads near Delaney Park on my maiden voyage this afternoon.

    If I don't go tubeless, then I'll probably look into purchasing those no mor flat tubes that I've run on every other bike I've ever had.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrimsonFox
    I'm looking at getting Stan's tubeless tire conversion kit for my spiffy new bike, but I was wondering how well the product holds up to the goatheads?

    I enjoyed a nice walk home after both my tires were flattened by goatheads near Delaney Park on my maiden voyage this afternoon.

    If I don't go tubeless, then I'll probably look into purchasing those no mor flat tubes that I've run on every other bike I've ever had.
    I did the same at Green Mountain a couple of weeks ago, but luckily I had 5 patches left in my kit...5 friggin' goatheads in barely 100 yards. If you change tires on an anywhere near regular basis, then I wouldn't go tubeless with Stan's. It's a bit messy changing out tires, I would rather put the Stan's in my tubes to eliminate the goathead problem. On the other hand, if you're one of those folks who runs tires 'til they're bald, then go for it.

  3. #3
    This is how it started...
    Reputation: sdsantacruzer's Avatar
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    Life is about the ride.

  4. #4
    Got single track/speed?
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    I'm sure they work just fine.

    Unless you're taking advantage of the performance of tubeless tires, self sealing tubes like Slime, etc. are easier and cheaper to use. You pay a little weight penalty, but they install just like regular tubes.

    I've seen two of my friends rip a tread in a tubeless tire and have to put a tube in. But I've also gotten a bad snakebite flat with a Slime tube. Either way it's messy! At least I was able to patch the tube and re-use it.

    I use Slime in my park bikes and regular tubes in my mountain bikes. I go through at least a set of tires every season and wouldn't want to deal with the sealant and setting the bead on a tubeless.

    -Chuck

  5. #5
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    The bike guy at my work added slime to my tubes, so they didn't hold up to the task today. I purchased more self sealing tubes, with the crap already added hoping those are a bit tougher. Now, I'm sad to find my freaking bike pump doesn't work any longer, I shouldn't be surprised since I haven't used it in years.

  6. #6
    "Oldfart from Wayback"
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    I can't specifiably comment on Stans/ "Ghetto tubeless" vs goatheads

    But they are almost a non-issue w/a UST tire and sealant.

    I'd no sooner ride any lower elevation trail around the Front Range w/o a sealant in my UST's than ride w/o a helmet.



    I've picked up 10-20 in a few 100 yds in some places, and after digging them all out, once and a while I'll need to put a few PSI back in the tire, but I've never had a "Flat" during a ride from a goathead since going tubeless/sealant.

  7. #7
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    Do it.

    Stans is awesome against goatheads. Just flat out solves the problem. I have been running Stans for just over five seasons in that time I've had just one flat and that was because of a sidewall defect in the tire. That is 306 hours, 22 minutes and 57 seconds of riding time (yup, I track this kind of stuff) with zero flats from goatheads, cacti, and assorted other sharp objects that litter Colorado and Eastern Utah.

    Conversly, my new SS 29er is still running tubes and in a month, I've had four flats- all from goatheads (Satan's weed). It's the amazing goathead location device. In fact, I'm taking my own advice and ordering a 29er Stan's conversion kit before I close this browser session.

  8. #8
    friend of Apex
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrimsonFox
    my freaking bike pump doesn't work any longer.
    Do yourself a favor, get one of these...

    the drugs made me realize it's not about the drugs

  9. #9
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    Stan's the man!

    I've been running Stan's No-Tubes for about seven years. Yes, it's messy (especially when you install a new tire on a gunky rim) and you have to periodically put in additional fluid (in my case every three months), but it works. I've only had two flats in those seven years -- once in March when I rode around Bear Creek Lake Park (goatheads galore!) and had not replenished the sealant since the previous August, and once when the valve stem failed. Besides the protection against flats, other reasons to go tubeless (with standard rims and ordinary tires, by the way) are a smoother ride, less rolling resistance and much better uphill traction -- all due to running lower pressure (about 30 PSI). Tires seem to last longer, too, with the lower air pressure. Yep, I'm a Stan's man.

  10. #10
    "Oldfart from Wayback"
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    Trying to keep out of Stans/ vs Slime debate

    But I've never had a problem w/ Slime "Tubeless" in my "true" UST tires on "true" UST rims.

    Zero flats in 4 yrs of tubeless riding

    It might blurble/beltch all kinds of green snot out the puncture holes. But I've never flattened a tire from a cactus spine/goathead, etc. in the entire length of riding them.



  11. #11
    Rolling
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    Quote Originally Posted by sdsantacruzer
    Damn. Looks impressive...just like those info-commercials.

    Is that the same tire with all the holes? And was it that good the next day?

    Goatheads, no problem, but lots of nails...hmmmm?

    Then there is this

    http://www.paradigmhosting.net/yes_tubes/

  12. #12
    ..ouch
    Reputation: thump's Avatar
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    I've had great luck with ghetto tubeless this season. No need for a conversion kit. Best method is right here: http://www.go-ride.com/Articles/ghetto_tubeless.html

    More often than not I can get them to mount up with just a floor pump but a gas station compressor will work if needed. A couple layers of electrical tape works great as a rim strip.

  13. #13
    Heads up Flyboy!!
    Reputation: mountaingoatepics's Avatar
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    I'm a tubeless guy myself. Make it yourself ghetto, Stans, Slime, whatever you use...its the way for me. I usually just use stock tires but if ya want a little tougher tire run the UST's. I still carry two tubes when I ride and even I don't use them...got a friend who might. Want to make your tubeless sealant seal even better...add some sawdust or glitter.

  14. #14
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    Sweet thanks for the link! I might have to try it for the sake of trying it.

    Also, will it really eat away my tires if my bike sits around for the winter? If that is the case, then I might be waiting until spring to try the tubeless since I'm not sure how much riding I'll get in once the snow starts to fly.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrimsonFox
    Sweet thanks for the link! I might have to try it for the sake of trying it.

    Also, will it really eat away my tires if my bike sits around for the winter? If that is the case, then I might be waiting until spring to try the tubeless since I'm not sure how much riding I'll get in once the snow starts to fly.
    No. You're going to wear through the tread waaaaay before what little ammonia is in the sealant will do anything to your tires. Even with the winter storage.

    However... the sealant does dry out and there might not be any sense coverting now and letting it turn into "Stan's boogers" over the winter. You might want to wait until early Spring just to save a little sealant.

  16. #16
    percocet pioneer.
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    Quote Originally Posted by sdsantacruzer
    was waiting for him to stab himself multiple times with the 1/8 nail. I guess I should go contemplate how I look at things.

  17. #17
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    ^ what he said.. and I'd recommend a full 2 cups of Stans for any decent volume tire. Also, don't trim the excess to close until you've put a couple rides in. I leave about 1/4 inch.

  18. #18
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    Used to average a couple of front range flats a week till switching to ghetto tubless with Stan's sealant. Now the only thing I have to remember is to check sealant every couple of months by shaking the tires. Since I do absolutely no tire maint. now it's hard to remember !
    Seriously I had read only go ust tubeless. Well............no. If you have a tight bead on your used current setup, it will almost always work.
    Wow, was I an idiot for waiting so long.
    Also, I know guys that have gone YEARS without flats on the front range with ghettos and I've seen some pretty damn beat up rims. Also, watch that sealing video stan has on website as he runs over bunches of nails (I think someone mentioned above.)
    It's been so long since I flatted I only carry a tiny ultralight spare tube anymore. Also, it's like riding road tubulars if you know what that is.

  19. #19
    hehe ...you said "member"
    Reputation: jake7's Avatar
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    I changed over to UST tubeless this year and it was made my life so much easier. Not only with goatheads, which are everywhere along the front range, but with pinch-flats. As a bigger guy, I was pinching regularly on bigger hits or being forced to run such high pressures that I sacrificed considerable traction. Going tubelss has completely eliminated both or those problems.
    “Me fail english? Thats unpossible.” - Matt Groening

  20. #20
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    Stan's is the single best upgrade you can buy. I've been running it on my 575 in DT tubeless converted Specialized Eskar Control tires on E540 rims and haven't flatted once since installation earlier this spring. Goatheads aplenty, but now when I see them I just pick them out and keep riding.

    Yesterday, I was riding my P3 at lunch and got a few goatheads in the rear tire . . . not tubeless, but instead of changing the tube I just pulled out the valve core and shot some Stan's into the tube. Pumped it back up and rode it for a bit. As of right now the tire is still at 60PSi.

    Seriously, you can't go wrong with it. Slime works ok but Stan's makes Slime look like a joke.

  21. #21
    skillz to pay billz
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    Quote Originally Posted by thump
    ^ what he said.. and I'd recommend a full 2 cups of Stans for any decent volume tire. Also, don't trim the excess to close until you've put a couple rides in. I leave about 1/4 inch.
    Is that inner tube mandatory on the ghetto tubeless, or will the electrical tape hold?

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by nOOby
    Is that inner tube mandatory on the ghetto tubeless, or will the electrical tape hold?
    Inner tube will still be necessary for the seal and to provide a valve stem. If you used a UST tire then I guess it would be possible to use a tubeless stem adapter and liberal electrical tape, but I don't think I'd try it.

  23. #23
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    I was going to go with the tubeless stem, on a SS xc set up so not too much chance of a catastrophic failure.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by nOOby
    I was going to go with the tubeless stem, on a SS xc set up so not too much chance of a catastrophic failure.
    I'd still recommend the inner tube. There's not much weight saving to skipping on 1/2 of a 20" tube, and this will keep any Stans from creeping back into the rim. It also makes for a very nice seal between the inner tube and the tire bead which is helpful if you like running low pressure.

    If you do skip the inner tube I'd be interested in hearing how it works out.

  25. #25
    Shread Ready
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    Man, after reading this thread and dealing with countless downtime at the resorts due to "snake bites" I'm going to do the tubeless conversion!! Any idea about how much weight going tubeless adds? Thanks

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thrasher
    Man, after reading this thread and dealing with countless downtime at the resorts due to "snake bites" I'm going to do the tubeless conversion!! Any idea about how much weight going tubeless adds? Thanks
    If you've typically been running a medium duty tube then I'd guess it's a wash. A 20" tube strip and a couple shot glass sized cups of Stans don't weigh much.. certainly lighter than running full DH tubes. Another plus of ghetto tubeless is you're not forced into the extra weight of UST tires. I have a 2.5 Pin'it S-works mounted ghetto style as my front tire on my DH wheelset and it's survived an entire season of weekly abuse at Keystone and SV while running sub-30 air pressure.. and I'm neither light, nor gentle.

  27. #27
    Gaa-zee-raaaa!
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    Quote Originally Posted by jlang002
    I would rather put the Stan's in my tubes to eliminate the goathead problem.
    This doesn't work, at least it didn't for me.
    Now with more vitriol!

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by thump
    A 20" tube strip and a couple shot glass sized cups of Stans don't weigh much..
    I'd be curious to hear how Stan's (or "Josh's" - since I've found wiperfluid / mold builder to be much cheaper) actually compares to a tubed setup. While the actual weight may be comparable - I'll bet the rotating weight is not, given that Stan's is fluid enough that a large portion of the weight is actually sitting directly over one's contact patch while the wheel spins. This is just my theory, of course. I mix my homebrew sealant so that it is roughly the consistency of milk. Do any of you engineering geek types know?
    Now with more vitriol!

  29. #29
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    I think the stans will hold, I don't run super low pressures on this set up.

    I've been running ust wheels and tires on the other bike for about two years and just started to use the sealant. Mostly because the tire are getting worn.

  30. #30
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    I tried both Stan's rim strips and ghetto tubeless. The rim strips have to fit a wide variety of rim widths/depths to tightly fit the bead to the strip edge. It worked fine for me but the ghetto was an exact seal every time with the overlap + without as much pressure on the bead as I thought it would be. Still go with thinner presta tubes with removable cores. (you don't really need the extra weight of the shrader valve.) http://www.everybicycletire.com/Shop...sta-valve.aspx
    Also, ghetto was less leakage areas and subsequent sealant.....edge sealing....when inflating and much harder to burp on sideways twist test at 10 lbs psi.

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