Smooth... real smooth- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 51 of 51
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    615

    Smooth Rides for a Bad Back

    So my back issues have basically rendered technical terrain not an option. I was a "roadie" before I discovered mountain biking, so Im back to the spandex mostly, but still can't quit the trails entirely. I get the shakes if I don't hit the dirt once a week. So here's the list I got so far listed by proximity and desired smoothness factor.

    Updated List:
    -Specific loop at NTM 12 miles
    -Green Mountain Loop (Mtbproject.com) 8 miles
    -Centennial Cone: Mayhem Gulch -> Elk Range (no Travois Trail, do out-and-back) 12 miles
    -STM options
    -Buff Creek - Shinglemill, Little Scraggy
    -Bear Creek Lake Park (desired smoothness) 7-10 miles
    -Elk Meadows 6 miles
    -Marshall Mesa (Dirty Bismark) 15 miles
    -North Fork Trail 19 miles
    -Staunton State Park 10-15 miles
    -Erie Trails (never done) 7 miles
    -Hildebrand Ranch and Wetland Connector trails at chatfield 10-12 miles
    -South Valley Loops 5-6 miles
    -Meyer Ranch
    -Flying J (short, never ridden) 4 miles

    South of Denver:
    -Ridgeline
    -Philip S Miller Park
    -Dawson Butte Open Space
    -Spruce Mountain
    -Spruce Meadows
    -Greenland Open Space.

    Co Springs:
    -Talon Trail and South Talon Loop/Sundance (Cheyenne Mountain)

    North of Denver:
    -Lory State Park
    -Bobcat Ridge(parts)
    -Soapstone Prairie

    Passable but rockier:
    -Betasso
    -Marshall Mesa
    -3 sisters
    -Myer Ranch? (not sure about this one)

    Destination rides:
    -Soda Creek loop -Keystone

    Gravel:
    -Old Fall River Road and down Trail Ridge

    Fat Biking:
    -Flying J
    -NTM community ditch roads/trails.
    -Snow Mountain Ranch
    -Breckenridge XC trails

    So any ideas on the unknowns? Any others I missed? It's really the descending that causes problems.
    Last edited by pOrk; 10-12-2016 at 09:29 AM.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: eurochien's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    258
    Staunton State Park is minimally technical, even less so than Buff Creek.

  3. #3
    slow
    Reputation: sgltrak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    6,533
    If you get north, you could try the East Valley, West Valley, and South Valley in Lory State Park, and connect them to Shoreline and Nomad in Horsetooth Mountain Park. Also, the valley loop and the Eden Valley spur at Bobcat Ridge is another northern option.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    1,033
    Bummer, hope your back heals up!

    I'd suggest Centennial Cone starting at Mayhem Gulch, then out and back on the traversing trail until it gets rocky.

    Careful on the Marshall Mesa area trails, some are pretty rocky particularly out in the Doudy end of things (the small-bumpy-rocky type, not technical, but definitely not smooth).

    Betasso does have some rocks (I thought it was totally smooth until I brought a friend who doesn't like any rocks and found out it actually is a tad rocky!).

    If you're in the area, Walker Ranch is really smooth if you avoid 100% of the normal loop - instead, starting from the normal parking lot, head the other direction up a mile of smooth singletrack to the Meyers Ranch trailhead, then up smooth doubletrack to the end (gets steep near the end). Nice viewpoint at the top. Coming down you'd have to watch your speed unless your back can take jumps off the water bars (also not advised for weekends with foot traffic, but if you're descending slowly anyway it could be fine). Also you can combine with Flagstaff if you want to get a ton of climbing in (and don't mind mountain biking up the road).

  5. #5
    Kaj
    Kaj is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Kaj's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,169
    Not to avoid the question, but I assume you have tried riding a mid to long travel bike with plus size (2.5" to 3.0") tires at 14ish psi? That tends to render most trails smoothish anyway.

    good luck with your back, I empathize.
    Kona Wo for Fat Biking, Ibis HD3 for Trail Shredding, Merckx Road bike for collecting dust

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    615
    Great suggestions on Staunton and Lory. I didn't include Cent Cone because its one of my favorite rides and if I go there I'll just get angry that I can't ride it the way I used to, but yeah Mayhem up to basically evening sun loop as an out-and-back is a doable long ride. Also interesting suggestion on Walker.

    As for the bike its your standard 120mm 29'er Fiox Float 32 type rig. A little less pressure than usual and I run about 28psi in my 2.3-2.5s. I have thought about going to a 140mm bike. Well honestly, I've even thought about going to a Bucksaw or mid-fat FS like a 6fattie FSR or something. Question on 120 to 140: Is there just a greater flat spot in the "spring-rate" curve on something a little bigger, if you know what I mean? Obviously Im not running out of travel with my "new" riding style.

  7. #7
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    7,168
    Quote Originally Posted by pOrk View Post
    As for the bike its your standard 120mm 29'er Fiox Float 32 type rig. A little less pressure than usual and I run about 28psi in my 2.3-2.5s. I have thought about going to a 140mm bike. Well honestly, I've even thought about going to a Bucksaw or mid-fat FS like a 6fattie FSR or something. Question on 120 to 140: Is there just a greater flat spot in the "spring-rate" curve on something a little bigger, if you know what I mean? Obviously Im not running out of travel with my "new" riding style.
    What about bike designs? SC bikes sit you more upright than most brands. Not sure if that will help or hinder.
    Another thought...yoga, to build your core? I have lower back prob from skiing moguls and yoga and stretching has pretty much eliminated that issue.

  8. #8
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    35,080
    Bummer about your back. That's no fun and very painful.

    Are you overweight? because that can effect your back. I was just asking because of your user name.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    615
    Quote Originally Posted by Pau11y View Post
    What about bike designs? SC bikes sit you more upright than most brands. Not sure if that will help or hinder.
    Another thought...yoga, to build your core? I have lower back prob from skiing moguls and yoga and stretching has pretty much eliminated that issue.
    To get technical on my issue, Spine doc says L5-S1 and prescribed Mackenzie PT. Will be going for a second opinion though, cause all the mackenzie pt did was aggrevate the hell out of it. My issues are really related to standing for a long time; my legs get tired. So sitting is preferred. And leaning forward helps.

    This is where the descents get me. Not only do I have to stand for a good amount of time, but then Im also transmitting a lot of the jarring of the rocky terrain up to my back and a few times, on both chimney and apex descents, my leg would get weak enough to not support me on 2 foot drops or kicker like features when I would land. It would be a quick jolt and my heal would drop on impact. There were a few other times in rock gardens where I could feel the fatigue real bad as well. Those few times were enough for me to know that I shouldn't be riding like this right now.

    I can climb the tech stuff without any problem, but I have to find a smooth way down, So, Ill climb chimney and take Lookout down... kinda ****ty.

    As for PT like alternatives, I continue to do core type work and Ive gained about 10-15 lbs over this past year, so dropping that is my current priority, Im 6' and about 192ish, in good shape Im usually around 180, hopefully that helps a little.

    They say leg weakness is a bad sign, but not many folks are bombing chimney and launching their bike to find the leg weakness.

  10. #10
    Candlestick Maker
    Reputation: baker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,098
    Soda Creek is pretty darn smooth. I rode it several times while recovering from back injury (and accompanying drop foot) then surgery.

    Some other smooth stuff south of Denver that is in Douglas County: Ridgeline, Philip S Miller Park, Dawson Butte Open Space, Spruce Mountain, Spruce Meadows, Greenland Open Space.
    baker

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    615
    Quote Originally Posted by baker View Post
    Soda Creek is pretty darn smooth. I rode it several times while recovering from back injury (and accompanying drop foot) then surgery.

    Some other smooth stuff south of Denver that is in Douglas County: Ridgeline, Philip S Miller Park, Dawson Butte Open Space, Spruce Mountain, Spruce Meadows, Greenland Open Space.
    Yeah some of my ideas are/were speculative, so thanks for the soda creek input. Just because a website says "green" doesnt mean its not a rocky consistency. I am committed to no more tech until at least next season.

    I've updated the list as well. How bout this buff creek loop? Climb Nice kitty and then take shinglemill back down. Thats a good 10-12 mile loop that gets me out there, without much concern for tech. Never done it though. Anyone have thoughts on that loop?

  12. #12
    ..ouch
    Reputation: thump's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    2,028
    Quote Originally Posted by pOrk View Post
    To get technical on my issue, Spine doc says L5-S1 and prescribed Mackenzie PT. Will be going for a second opinion though, cause all the mackenzie pt did was aggrevate the hell out of it. My issues are really related to standing for a long time; my legs get tired. So sitting is preferred. And leaning forward helps.

    This is where the descents get me. Not only do I have to stand for a good amount of time, but then Im also transmitting a lot of the jarring of the rocky terrain up to my back and a few times, on both chimney and apex descents, my leg would get weak enough to not support me on 2 foot drops or kicker like features when I would land. It would be a quick jolt and my heal would drop on impact. There were a few other times in rock gardens where I could feel the fatigue real bad as well. Those few times were enough for me to know that I shouldn't be riding like this right now.

    I can climb the tech stuff without any problem, but I have to find a smooth way down, So, Ill climb chimney and take Lookout down... kinda ****ty.

    As for PT like alternatives, I continue to do core type work and Ive gained about 10-15 lbs over this past year, so dropping that is my current priority, Im 6' and about 192ish, in good shape Im usually around 180, hopefully that helps a little.

    They say leg weakness is a bad sign, but not many folks are bombing chimney and launching their bike to find the leg weakness.
    Sorry to hear. Not a qualified medical professional in any way, but between years in DH and Moto, I've helped a lot of friends from "Doc says no more riding" back to "braaap" status by introducing them to simple, good form deadlift lifting routines. Core muscle is an amazing thing.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: eurochien's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    258
    Quote Originally Posted by pOrk View Post
    To get technical on my issue, Spine doc says L5-S1 and prescribed Mackenzie PT. Will be going for a second opinion though, cause all the mackenzie pt did was aggrevate the hell out of it. My issues are really related to standing for a long time; my legs get tired. So sitting is preferred. And leaning forward helps.
    Everyone is different, but fwiw, I was diagnosed with 2 herniated discs (L4-L5 and L5-S1) several years ago after more than 20 years of lumbagos, sciatica and various back spasm episodes that were really an issue. The chiropractor that I was seeing at the time put me on a "spine decompression" treatment and that just changed my life. I maybe have a couple of flare-ups a year nowadays, but I can ride, run, lift and ski. Chiropractic spinal decompression, check it out.
    New to Colorado since 1993.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    615
    Quote Originally Posted by eurochien View Post
    Everyone is different, but fwiw, I was diagnosed with 2 herniated discs (L4-L5 and L5-S1) several years ago after more than 20 years of lumbagos, sciatica and various back spasm episodes that were really an issue. The chiropractor that I was seeing at the time put me on a "spine decompression" treatment and that just changed my life. I maybe have a couple of flare-ups a year nowadays, but I can ride, run, lift and ski. Chiropractic spinal decompression, check it out.
    Yeah nerve problems are real annoying, because they present in so many different ways and it seems to be different from week to week, but only slightly. It's been frustrating for sure.

    Oddly enough, when its bad like when I've been bending down and picking up kids all day, hanging from a monkey bar for 20 seconds gives me temporary relief, so its funny you bring up the decompression.

    Probably the most painful thing right now is knowing that I shouldnt compete in the Golden Giddyup even though Im registered for the full.

    Looks like I have a pretty good list going here though. Any smooth high country rides to add to this list? Things like Monarch Crest have been on my to-do list for a while, but it looks like I may need an alternative.

  15. #15
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    7,168
    Quote Originally Posted by pOrk View Post
    Oddly enough, when its bad like when I've been bending down and picking up kids all day, hanging from a monkey bar for 20 seconds gives me temporary relief, so its funny you bring up the decompression.
    I really want an inversion table...

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    133
    Quote Originally Posted by pOrk View Post

    Looks like I have a pretty good list going here though. Any smooth high country rides to add to this list? Things like Monarch Crest have been on my to-do list for a while, but it looks like I may need an alternative.
    Most of the Crested Butte rides are pretty smooth and not real technical. Deer Creek, Snodgrass and 401 have almost no tech, although 401 would be a pretty long downhill.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    133
    Quote Originally Posted by baker View Post
    Some other smooth stuff south of Denver that is in Douglas County: Ridgeline, Philip S Miller Park, Dawson Butte Open Space, Spruce Mountain, Spruce Meadows, Greenland Open Space.
    Yeah, I live in Douglas County and they live by wide and smooth. I hope the new cooperation with COMBA will help with better trails being built at Hess Reservoir.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    615
    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny_T View Post
    Most of the Crested Butte rides are pretty smooth and not real technical. Deer Creek, Snodgrass and 401 have almost no tech, although 401 would be a pretty long downhill.
    Luckily, I got a good early morning run at the 401 loop last summer before all this started. It wasnt techy, but in the trees, definitely was getting rutted out, which can make for bumpy descents.

    I did a Lupine -> Lower Loop loop also and I think thats probably still a safe bet. snodgrass was also im my list last time I went there, so maybe Ill check that out next time. Amazing how great this list is getting and spoiled we are in Colorado.

  19. #19
    High Plains Drifter
    Reputation: Johnny Ryall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    209
    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny_T View Post
    Most of the Crested Butte rides are pretty smooth and not real technical. Deer Creek, Snodgrass and 401 have almost no tech, although 401 would be a pretty long downhill.
    The Crest isn't any worse than 401 or Deer Creek for non-smooth. Silver Creek has some bumpy bits, but Rainbow is smooth (mostly). If you choose the Starvation option off the Crest, there is less bump, just a couple short sections of talus that you can walk in 2 minutes.

    Been decades since I rode Snod, so I can't remember clearly.
    always phoneless

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: eurochien's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    258
    Quote Originally Posted by Pau11y View Post
    I really want an inversion table...
    The beauty of the decompression therapy is that it isolates the trouble spot (say, L4-L5) and stretches the spine at that level, which relieves pressure on the disc and brings in new blood flow and O2. It's really worked for me so I'm an advocate and I've only had to have 2 or 3 sessions in about 7 years (so not that expensive and non-invasive). When my first-ever session ended it felt like I had wings.
    New to Colorado since 1993.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    8,899
    Smooth up, smooth down: the bike path from Frisco to Vail>lunch>back to Frisco. I'm serious. Time trail the up returning from Vail for a decent workout.

    One time I was indeed time trialing back from Vail when I spotted some lady rider way ahead of me and decided to catch her. I rode like a sumbiatch (either she was fast or I was slow, both of us were on our mountain bikes) and slowly slowly ever so slowly I reeled her in (of course, if she'd known I was "reeling her in" she might have just kicked it up a notch and left me) but eventually I caught up to her and said "race you to the top?"

    She smiled and said, well, I gotta get back to work so...see ya! And turned and around and went the other way. I kept hammering to the top anyway.
    The only reply to a fool is silence

  22. #22
    bacon! bacon! bacon!
    Reputation: SkaredShtles's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    12,409
    Quote Originally Posted by xcguy View Post
    Smooth up, smooth down: the bike path from Frisco to Vail>lunch>back to Frisco. I'm serious. Time trail the up returning from Vail for a decent workout.
    That's mean. Guy comes here looking for appropriate DIRT and you point him to a bike path.

  23. #23
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    7,168
    Quote Originally Posted by SkaredShtles View Post
    That's mean. Guy comes here looking for appropriate DIRT and you point him to a bike path.
    It's what happens when you get old and stop riding...crotchety doesn't even cover it! XCGuy, when you start talking to empty chairs, sell all your guns and go see the doc and get some meds.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ridetheridge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    500
    Check out Soapstone Natural Area. http://www.fcgov.com/naturalareas/pd...brochure15.pdf It's north of Fort Collins. Many miles of smooth trails with great views.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    615
    Quote Originally Posted by ridetheridge View Post
    Check out Soapstone Natural Area. http://www.fcgov.com/naturalareas/pd...brochure15.pdf It's north of Fort Collins. Many miles of smooth trails with great views.
    Great suggestion. Found a video of the trails and looks really nice.

  26. #26
    WTF is downcountry?
    Reputation: Tickle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    624
    Gravel/CX style bike and grind out some miles on fireroads or bike paths? I love my Salsa La Cruz

    Road riding kills be safe out there!

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    8,899
    Quote Originally Posted by SkaredShtles View Post
    That's mean. Guy comes here looking for appropriate DIRT and you point him to a bike path.
    Desperate times call for desperate measures. Obviously you've never done a time trial up Vail Pass. Try it.
    The only reply to a fool is silence

  28. #28
    bacon! bacon! bacon!
    Reputation: SkaredShtles's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    12,409
    Quote Originally Posted by xcguy View Post
    Desperate times call for desperate measures. Obviously you've never done a time trial up Vail Pass. Try it.
    With so much dirt all around? NO. I WILL NOT.


  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    8,899
    Quote Originally Posted by SkaredShtles View Post
    With so much dirt all around? NO. I WILL NOT.

    Hah! It's not our backs that are hurting it's his. Maybe my suggestion is something he hadn't considered, ya know, to keep in climbing shape while recovering. Heart pumping, legs getting stronger, sweat pouring into his helmet, getting climbing fit, sounds like a recovery plan to me.
    The only reply to a fool is silence

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    615
    Quote Originally Posted by Tickle View Post
    Gravel/CX style bike and grind out some miles on fireroads or bike paths? I love my Salsa La Cruz

    Road riding kills be safe out there!
    I know man... It's getting tougher and tougher to convince myself to ride the shoulders... I actually dont mind gravel grinding. I do kind of have a mental roadblock with driving somewhere to gravel grind, as if gravel roads are a destination to be driven to for riding. But eh... ill take what I can get these days.

    Looks like there are some good routes near Cent Cone.

    Quote Originally Posted by xcguy View Post
    Hah! It's not our backs that are hurting it's his. Maybe my suggestion is something he hadn't considered, ya know, to keep in climbing shape while recovering. Heart pumping, legs getting stronger, sweat pouring into his helmet, getting climbing fit, sounds like a recovery plan to me.
    I'd actually done a similar version of that ride. Parked at second Frisco exit and took the path to the top of the pass and then back down (20-25 miles ish). Beautiful ride, but I climb lookout mtn a few times a month and onto Genesee Park sometimes to keep the climbing fitness in check.

    I need a suggestion for Salida now. Im going on a trip there next month, and I need a smooth alternative, even a gravel road, to get some high mountain views. Any info on Little Rainbow?

  31. #31
    bacon! bacon! bacon!
    Reputation: SkaredShtles's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    12,409
    Quote Originally Posted by xcguy View Post
    Hah! It's not our backs that are hurting it's his. Maybe my suggestion is something he hadn't considered, ya know, to keep in climbing shape while recovering. Heart pumping, legs getting stronger, sweat pouring into his helmet, getting climbing fit, sounds like a recovery plan to me.
    My back hurts. I'm still not riding that f***ing bike path.


  32. #32
    High Plains Drifter
    Reputation: Johnny Ryall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    209
    Quote Originally Posted by pOrk View Post
    I need a suggestion for Salida now. Im going on a trip there next month, and I need a smooth alternative, even a gravel road, to get some high mountain views. Any info on Little Rainbow?
    It smoov. Actually been identified as a decent adaptive trail (handicap, handcycle, wider than two wheels). Kinda boring but not too bad. Take racetrack down, it's the smoovest option, or just out and back from the west end TH. From town you can ride gravel up to west TH, across, down racetrack, back to town. ~12 miles, over 1000 feet of climbing.

    The Ark Hills Trail system (aka S-Mountain) has some smooth options too. Skip Frontside (not too smoov) and ride up on the dirt road (CR177 I believe) then take Lil' Rattler to Backbone, go east to Cottonwood Gulch then take the unamed option (go like you're heading to Sweet Dreams, but go straight at the saddle up the hill). That descent isn't completely smoov, but best option for getting down other than back to the road.

    EDIT: forgot about Berm Pile. The old (and crappy) Burn Pile trail down from the Lil' Rattler was reworked by Tony Boone Trails now it's a very banky twisty flow trail. Peoples be callin' it Berm Pile now. Totally smoov. Good way down.
    always phoneless

  33. #33
    slow
    Reputation: sgltrak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    6,533
    Quote Originally Posted by pOrk View Post
    I know man... It's getting tougher and tougher to convince myself to ride the shoulders... I actually dont mind gravel grinding. I do kind of have a mental roadblock with driving somewhere to gravel grind, as if gravel roads are a destination to be driven to for riding. But eh... ill take what I can get these days.
    We did the ride up Old Fall River Road and down Trail Ridge again last night under the full moon. Gravel road up was hero dirt and the relatively new pavement coming down was like butter. Cross wheels on the MTB was just the ticket. 30 miles and 4100' of climbing.

    Smooth... real smooth-14063921_10210380562819370_6784271790766458212_n.jpg
    Last edited by sgltrak; 08-18-2016 at 10:18 AM. Reason: Grammar

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    968
    What about Little Scraggy at Buff Creek?

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    615
    Quote Originally Posted by trhoppe View Post
    What about Little Scraggy at Buff Creek?
    So I really really want to do that loop, and all the pictures of it make it seem like the flow trail of the century... but never did the first leg before they completed the loop, so I really have zero clue on the trail makeup. What say you?

    My current plans for buff creek include some way to end up descending shinglemill. Also buck gulch up and strawberry jack down, but last time I rode strawberry jack, I remember there being some pretty good drainage ruts, so I will have to keep my eyes peeled.

    Great work guys! All the trails around boulder reservoir look interesting to string some loops together.

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    968
    I thought it was pretty damn smooth. From what I remember there were a few times riding UP some giant rock, but you could just do it slowly. There wasn't anything like rock gardens on it. Really awesome and fun trail on the way down. Would definitely recommend.

  37. #37
    not actually bad :)
    Reputation: bad_andy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,768
    Quote Originally Posted by pOrk View Post
    Any others I missed?
    North Fork Trail from Reynolds Park to South Platte and back ~19 miles.

    The bummer going that direction is it's uphill pretty much all the way back.

    The bummer about the other way is a longer drive.
    Old Codger

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    615
    Quote Originally Posted by trhoppe View Post
    I thought it was pretty damn smooth. From what I remember there were a few times riding UP some giant rock, but you could just do it slowly. There wasn't anything like rock gardens on it. Really awesome and fun trail on the way down. Would definitely recommend.
    Yeah I guess I saw the blue rating and thought maybe technical features, enough to warrant the blue rating. But if its Blue because length and climbing... no worries here.

  39. #39
    tiny rider
    Reputation: cartographer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    623
    You might try going up Mule Deer trail at Golden Gate Canyon SP. You could come back down Mountain Base Road to finish about where you started, or maybe add an out and back on Gap road to put in a bit more dirt.

    It looks like you might be able to take Gap Rd to the gravel down Rifleman Phillips and work your way down to Nott Creek parking lot, but I think you'd end up on a section of Burro or another trail which might not be quite smooth. That gravel road has also eaten my tire a couple times when I rolled into a rut.

    I was just exploring around there this weekend and rode a nice connection from Robinson Hill Rd over to Smith Hill (right turn). It's very much CX bikeable, but pretty quiet and a good workout. You can drop down and back up Douglas Mtn Drive if you want (broken pavement like Drew Hill), but it's not particularly interesting to bottom out at 119/Hwy 6 and have to turn back around to climb up.

    Lots of other stuff in that area which I haven't checked out yet.

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    615
    Update: MRI showed mild disc bulges at L4-L5 and L5-S1 and mild bilateral foraminal narrowing (which I think is the real problem here and also a result of the bulges as well).

    So its no wonder the rocky stuff has been problematic for me. Basically need a 200mm stem and Ill be good...

    Taken a break from the MTB and just been road biking and walking, and lots of core work. Currently not needing medication but by the end of a day of being on my feet or standing, its bad enough to take some aleve.

    In the world of back problems/sciatica, Im doing pretty good, but not good enough. Need to MTB'ing by spring. Extension exercises really bring it on, which is what seems to be a standard prescription for disc issues. ANyone got any other advice.

    drop bars on the fat bike are definitely under consideration as well.

  41. #41
    zrm
    zrm is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    5,577
    Quote Originally Posted by trhoppe View Post
    What about Little Scraggy at Buff Creek?
    Little Scraggly certainly has buff/smooth sections, but it also has a lot of boney, rocky sections. I'd say it's more technical than most of the BC trails by a fair amount.

  42. #42
    Candlestick Maker
    Reputation: baker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,098
    Quote Originally Posted by pOrk View Post
    Update: MRI showed mild disc bulges at L4-L5 and L5-S1 and mild bilateral foraminal narrowing (which I think is the real problem here and also a result of the bulges as well).
    Ugh...best of luck, man. I had issues in the same area from a climbing (falling) accident and years of abuse after that. Ended up with a ruptured disc and spinal stenosis which caused MASSIVE leg pain and drop foot. Eventually led to surgery and the worst year of my life. Don't be like me...be smart and take care of your back, including core strength, stretching, and avoiding further abuse.
    baker

  43. #43
    zrm
    zrm is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    5,577
    Quote Originally Posted by trhoppe View Post
    I thought it was pretty damn smooth. From what I remember there were a few times riding UP some giant rock, but you could just do it slowly. There wasn't anything like rock gardens on it. Really awesome and fun trail on the way down. Would definitely recommend.
    Now that the whole trail is finished, it changes character and gets a lot rockier as you approach the saddle and the drop down to the CT. They made the bottom half of the west leg as something of a flow type trail with berms and all that, but the upper part while not boney compared to some super boney trails, is definitely not smooth.

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Funrover's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    3,836
    I know your pain. I have to be off all bikes for six weeks due to back issues. (On week 2 and chomping at the bit) However Meyers Ranch is good as long as you don't do Old Ski Hill. Stay to the lower loops.

    Also you can do South Valley Park. not much to the area, but easy and smooth. Hope you heal well my friend

  45. #45
    Total Goober
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,041
    Since there are a few peeps on this thread suffering back issues, I'll throw out a recommendation for a good doc: Brad Duhon at Parker Adventist. I tried non-surgical methods for years, and finally gave in and got a lumbar fusion. Got my life back. Non-surgical is the way to go if you can (they exhaust all options at that practice before recommending surgery), but if you get to that point, it's good to know a good surgeon. They use a robot to align the hardware, which reduces most issues with fusions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Fuglio View Post
    You guys suck im all bummed now

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    89
    Cheyenne Mountain State Park has a trail called Talon which is the smoothest trail I know. No rock gardens or drops. Just a decent climb and then you can choose to do South or North Talon loop at the end. I would do South Talon as it is also very smooth while North Talon is more rocky. Sundance is also pretty smooth although maybe just a little more rocky. You do have to pay for parking which is not a problem if you have a Colorado State Park pass or you could even park across 115 before entering Fort Carson and biking up the road.

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    615
    Thanks for continuing recs. I'll update the top because Im sure others could benefit. I've been full rehabbing for about 2 month. Meaning losing weight, core work, and avoiding mountain biking and running, and it feels like I've plateau'd in my sciatica,

    I don't take any medicine, I average about 6-8 miles walking a week and about 50 miles a week road biking. A pretty good life, but still tightness and numbness when walking and standing longer than 10-15 minutes (not really a big deal, just discomfort and a subtle reminder that my back hates me). I know if I got back on the trails, at least rougher, ones I would decline to weakness and pain and popping NSAIDs every day.

    So what to do. I will keep at it for the winter, and see where I get, but if it doesnt change, do I accept that I may not ride white ranch again for example? Or do I try to get surgery to get MY life back, not this new non-mtb life? I feel like avoiding surgery will be easy for me, but at what cost. Just thinking aloud on the interwebs. There is more to life than mountain biking and snowboarding, but life is short and giving up what you love, when there may be another way to get it, is a hard pill to swallow. On the plus side, I can tell myself that smooth trails would be smoother on a carbon FS plus bike.

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Funrover's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    3,836
    I have seen amazing things happen to folks with back injuries. You may take time off, but I bet you will be able to get back to it in time! Sending good vibes your way bud!

  49. #49
    bacon! bacon! bacon!
    Reputation: SkaredShtles's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    12,409
    Quote Originally Posted by pOrk View Post
    Thanks for continuing recs. I'll update the top because Im sure others could benefit. I've been full rehabbing for about 2 month. Meaning losing weight, core work, and avoiding mountain biking and running, and it feels like I've plateau'd in my sciatica,

    I don't take any medicine, I average about 6-8 miles walking a week and about 50 miles a week road biking. A pretty good life, but still tightness and numbness when walking and standing longer than 10-15 minutes (not really a big deal, just discomfort and a subtle reminder that my back hates me). I know if I got back on the trails, at least rougher, ones I would decline to weakness and pain and popping NSAIDs every day.

    So what to do. I will keep at it for the winter, and see where I get, but if it doesnt change, do I accept that I may not ride white ranch again for example? Or do I try to get surgery to get MY life back, not this new non-mtb life? I feel like avoiding surgery will be easy for me, but at what cost. Just thinking aloud on the interwebs. There is more to life than mountain biking and snowboarding, but life is short and giving up what you love, when there may be another way to get it, is a hard pill to swallow. On the plus side, I can tell myself that smooth trails would be smoother on a carbon FS plus bike.
    Get multiple opinions if possible. I blew up my back in 2012 (ruptured disc with fragmentation) and had awful symptoms. Primary Care tried a number of things over the course of about a month, then referred me to a spine guy who looked at the MRI and had me scheduled for surgery in less than a week. After surgery most of my symptoms were gone (I still have some surface numbness in my lower leg due to nerve damage) and after about 6 months of PT I was able to get back to skiing/mt biking.

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    615
    Quote Originally Posted by Funrover View Post
    I have seen amazing things happen to folks with back injuries. You may take time off, but I bet you will be able to get back to it in time! Sending good vibes your way bud!
    Thanks. Hope you can get back to your adventures as well. Always good to open up one of your threads or posts.

    Quote Originally Posted by SkaredShtles View Post
    Get multiple opinions if possible. I blew up my back in 2012 (ruptured disc with fragmentation) and had awful symptoms. Primary Care tried a number of things over the course of about a month, then referred me to a spine guy who looked at the MRI and had me scheduled for surgery in less than a week. After surgery most of my symptoms were gone (I still have some surface numbness in my lower leg due to nerve damage) and after about 6 months of PT I was able to get back to skiing/mt biking.
    Yeah, Im pretty sure I'll be holding off on the surgery for quite a while, but when I do, I will definitely be getting a few opinions. I think if I ever get to the point where Im dependent on any daily medication to manage the symptoms, I will look to surgical options.

    I just need to be patient and buy other interesting bikes. Been planning some gravel grinding bike pack trips and things like that to keep my mix at bay.

  51. #51
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    8,899
    Bringing this thread back up with another suggestion (I saw this in the OPs first reply but here it is again): Hildebrand Ranch. Two Brands loop. I believe that is exactly what he's looking for. Smooth fast loop (except for the hikers). It's a mud pie when wet but when dry it's pretty sweet.

    https://www.mtbproject.com/trail/599...ldebrand-ranch
    The only reply to a fool is silence

Similar Threads

  1. Can't get gears to run smooth :(
    By Rustyy117 in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 01-20-2014, 06:06 AM
  2. A smooth enough ride?
    By Gatorback in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 06-28-2011, 05:21 PM
  3. WILL ITs B2 smooth?!!
    By aosty in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 41
    Last Post: 06-28-2011, 11:40 AM
  4. smooth?
    By phillabong in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 45
    Last Post: 01-09-2011, 06:47 PM
  5. Help! Where is the Fast and Smooth in NH?
    By B Rad in forum Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 05-25-2010, 04:12 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.