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  1. #1
    nice marmot.
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    Gas Prices = Less Riding?!

    seems like a strange, backwards idea no? here is the scoop... i live in summit county and often like to drive down to the "frange" to ride stuff like the cone and whatnot. this is especially true in the spring when most of the higher trails around here are still kissing snow i gotta tell ya that my "frange" trips this spring have been non-existent due to one fact... friggin gas prices when it costs $60-70 to fill up a tank and you burn almost a half a one with a roundtrip, it gets hard to justify no matter how much i LOVE and NEED to ride. i geuss i'll just have to be patient the snow is melting fast, although snowflakes did fly in breckenridge the first four days of june anybody else found themselves in this picke
    Q. how many kids with A.D.D. does it take to change a light bulb?
    A. i don't know, ya wanna go ride bikes?

  2. #2
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    Bummer. But once the melt occurs, you are set! I will have to pay big dollars to ride your stuff.

    For me it's been more riding, less driving. Riding to work. And yes, riding more pavement to the trails.

    Ironic since I live in Boulder and everyone thinks there are no trails here.

    Having a bus pass to Nederland is golden...oh wait, my pass will let me get to Golden too!

  3. #3
    post-ride specialist
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    really, a boulder ticket can get me from here to ned?
    Since when did Need have anything to do with this?

  4. #4
    "Oldfart from Wayback"
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    My truck rarely leaves the lot

    I only get 2-3 days off a month, but even then, I prefer to ride from home. HTMP, Lory, Bluesky to Coyote/Rimrock/DBB, are all just a 45 min warmup ride away. Heck, I can ride the same things after work right from my doorstep.

  5. #5
    bacon! bacon! bacon!
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    Nope... it's my gimpy ankle that's preventing me from riding, not the price of gas.

  6. #6
    Rolling
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    Quote Originally Posted by icegeek
    really, a boulder ticket can get me from here to ned?
    With transfer!

  7. #7
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    I feel for you as I spent 7 mud seasons in Summit County. Part of the reason I moved back to the front range was that I wasn't snowboarding / skiing much anymore, but I needed my biking. The riding season is awesome up there, but way too short.

    We moved closer to the trails in October so we could ride from our door. Like OBD above, HTMP, Lory, etc are ridden from home.

    For us, higher gas prices = more riding. My wife parked her the car and she and the kids are riding everywhere; Wife had 150 miles last week and 28 today. 9 year old son had 60 last week and 28 today. 12 year old daughter had 78 last week and 20 today.

  8. #8
    Arrrgggghhh!!
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    Best thing about commuting is that I barely notice an increase in gas prices. Trips on the weekend can get spendy, but when compared to the 40 miles a day I used to drive to work it's a drop in the bucket.

    My only problem is that I never seem to get out on the trails on the weekdays anymore since my wife always takes the car and I have to walk the dog. Plus regardless of what Rich says, there is no singletrack in boulder except the .5 miles I hit everyday on my commute
    Give 'da people 'da air.

  9. #9
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    It did affect me for a little while but then I sold my POS SUV and got a small sedan. Whats funny is that I picked up a 1996 Chevy Corsica that when I hang my bikes on the trunk rack (still gathering $$ for a roof rack) the trunk is worth a lot more. The corsica gets 30+ mpg and the old SUV got 13-15. I feel much better. Though I wish I had a new derailleur hanger so I could ride. Come on UPS dude!!!!!
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  10. #10
    what nice teeth you have
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    Its affecting my ability to get to keystone. But that doesn't keep me off the bike. There's plenty of local riding here.

  11. #11
    EJP
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    Quote Originally Posted by icegeek
    really, a boulder ticket can get me from here to ned?
    You would want to make a day of it. Also, the GS runs only on weekdays. You could connect the 7:20, 8:20, or 9:20 GS with the N bus in downtown Boulder, all for $3.75 each way. The earliest GS back is not until 2:30. Or, the ride to Ned could be the start of a fine epic--figure out how to ride jeep roads and other stuff like Golden Gate SP and White Ranch all the way back to Golden....

    I think it's a shame that the Lyons-Boulder RTD route has such a limited schedule. I sometimes take the SKIP in Boulder to the end of the line (either north or south) to cut some pavement from my ride. The RTD also serves Evergreen--some of you Denverish folks might find that useful.

    Even with my wee civic, buying gas is no fun. I feel fortunate that I don't have to drive a whole lot right now.....

  12. #12
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    I'm glad I have a buddy who rides with me 75% of the time so we split the driving. It still sucks. What will really suck is when I HAVE to come up to Breck this summer and have you show me a trail or two- well, the gas cost part will suck. Maybe instead of drinking a post-ride beer, we can go steal some gas from all the SUVs the weekenders bring in.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by EJP
    Or, the ride to Ned could be the start of a fine epic--figure out how to ride jeep roads and other stuff like Golden Gate SP and White Ranch all the way back to Golden....
    Has anyone explored or want to explore this option? Sounds far better than riding a bus all day.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by upmtnsinbreck
    seems like a strange, backwards idea no? here is the scoop... i live in summit county and often like to drive down to the "frange" to ride stuff like the cone and whatnot. this is especially true in the spring when most of the higher trails around here are still kissing snow i gotta tell ya that my "frange" trips this spring have been non-existent due to one fact... friggin gas prices when it costs $60-70 to fill up a tank and you burn almost a half a one with a roundtrip, it gets hard to justify no matter how much i LOVE and NEED to ride. i geuss i'll just have to be patient the snow is melting fast, although snowflakes did fly in breckenridge the first four days of june anybody else found themselves in this picke

    Bring a couple of buddies and have them help kick in. And you mean to tell me that you are so broke that you can't spend $20+/- week to ride. If you lived in Denver and bought a Colorado Pass for $400 and you only skied 20 days(generous estimate). It would cost you $20 each time just for the lift. Not to mention the GAS it cost to get up to the mountains. Oh and the cost of parking. I know that gas is expensive and I feel it too but come on. Cut back on something else. A gallon of gas cost barely more than a gallon of milk.

  15. #15
    zrm
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    90% of my riding, both road and mountian is done from my front door. When snow is still on the trails that's OK because spring is my favorite ski season and dozens of trailheads accessing spring corn are within a 30 min drive.
    I also ride my road bike more in spring and once the trails start to melt out I start putting miles on the mountain bike. I used to do major spring mountian bike road trips and the price of gas is an issue, but I also have tried to drive less due to the many other implications of consuming gasoline. I'll never get away from having to drive, but I try to minimize as much as possible.

  16. #16
    PDB
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    Higher Gas Prices have led me to the following -
    Selling the SUV, buying a 40MPG USED car
    Got an EcoPass
    Riding my Road Bike More
    CarPool to MTB spots with Friends

    All this adds up to MORE riding time, seeing my friends more, meeting more riders, more beer consumption, and more epics rides.
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  17. #17
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    its nice as others mentioned above there are numerous trails within a 30 minute ride from my house, foot hills, lory, htmp, blue sky, devils, coyote ridge, michaud, pine ridge its awesome

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by upmtnsinbreck
    seems like a strange, backwards idea no? here is the scoop... i live in summit county and often like to drive down to the "frange" to ride stuff like the cone and whatnot. this is especially true in the spring when most of the higher trails around here are still kissing snow i gotta tell ya that my "frange" trips this spring have been non-existent due to one fact... friggin gas prices when it costs $60-70 to fill up a tank and you burn almost a half a one with a roundtrip, it gets hard to justify no matter how much i LOVE and NEED to ride. i geuss i'll just have to be patient the snow is melting fast, although snowflakes did fly in breckenridge the first four days of june anybody else found themselves in this picke
    I understand your position. I too used to live in the mountains.... I left because the mud/offseasons and now ride more than ever. Frange trails are within 2 minutes of the house.

  19. #19
    nice marmot.
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    great news! all the snow up high is disappearing at a fast rate. i'm gonna let the gas hawg sit in the driveway and collect dust!

    have a good ride today!
    Q. how many kids with A.D.D. does it take to change a light bulb?
    A. i don't know, ya wanna go ride bikes?

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by upmtnsinbreck
    i live in summit county and often like to drive down to the "frange" to ride stuff like the cone...
    ...when it costs $60-70 to fill up a tank and you burn almost a half a one with a roundtrip...
    Centennial Cone? Yes, that IS too much money to burn to ride there!
    Gone are the days we stopped to decide,
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  21. #21
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    A solution

    Three words:

    High speed train.

    Until we get it, and gas prices stay high, ski and bike tourism in Summit County will suffer. Eldora ski area had their most successful year ever. Some of this has to do with snow - some has to do with the price of gas.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pluto Pilot
    Three words:

    High speed train.

    Until we get it, and gas prices stay high, ski and bike tourism in Summit County will suffer. Eldora ski area had their most successful year ever. Some of this has to do with snow - some has to do with the price of gas.
    Now you're talkin! I could do super-dooper loops...

    Chimney to Apex, TRAIN, Peaks to Wheeler to vail to Two Elks, TRAIN, Apex to Chimney and then retire at Golden City Brewery.

  23. #23
    Rolling
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pluto Pilot
    Three words:

    High speed train.

    Until we get it, and gas prices stay high, ski and bike tourism in Summit County will suffer. Eldora ski area had their most successful year ever. Some of this has to do with snow - some has to do with the price of gas.
    I think it was mainly due to snow. They had the best snow in years. And gas prices in winter were back down to around $2.15/gallon on the front range.

  24. #24
    Perpetually single track
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    Quote Originally Posted by lidarman
    I think it was mainly due to snow. They had the best snow in years. And gas prices in winter were back down to around $2.15/gallon on the front range.
    U think? I'd put some blame(credit?) on I-70 traffic too.
    The more out of shape you are, the steeper the hill looks.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by lidarman
    I think it was mainly due to snow. They had the best snow in years. And gas prices in winter were back down to around $2.15/gallon on the front range.
    Nope. Season pass sales were up almost 30% over the year before. Those passes were bought before the snow came. There were probably more day passes sold becuase of the snow though.

  26. #26
    bacon! bacon! bacon!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pluto Pilot
    Three words:

    High speed train.
    So you think people will pay $75 round trip to get to Summit County on a train? Not any of the locals I know...

  27. #27
    Rolling
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    Quote Originally Posted by GunMetalGirl
    Nope. Season pass sales were up almost 30% over the year before. Those passes were bought before the snow came. There were probably more day passes sold becuase of the snow though.
    Fair enough...I presume last summers gas prices and I-70 traffic motivated Eldora passes. But I do know lots of peeps who skied Eldora this past season due to the snow.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkaredShtles
    So you think people will pay $75 round trip to get to Summit County on a train? Not any of the locals I know...
    This is a bit outside the realm of Front Range mountain biking, but I'll bite.

    Seeing as how it costs about $60 to fill up my vehicle right now, I don't think it's unreasonable to assume that by the time the train is completed...10 years at the very minimum, that $75 will see like a bargain in comparison. Gas prices in the U.S., while higher than they have ever been, are still well below the rest of the world, and we have some catching up to do. The poop is just starting to hit the fan. When combined with factors like no waiting in traffic, a shorter trip and the ability to just relax and enjoy yourself, a train would hopefully be the preferred transportation method.

    The question is, why does it need to be $75? Colorado is dedicated to clean air - the voters passed a bill on that - and one significant way to do that is to get folks out of their cars. In my opinion, the best way to do this is to create a statewide train system that is the preferred method of travel. A key component to this - it needs to be affordable. One way to subsidize this is through taxes, similar to how we pay an RTD tax. I'm not suggesting we go full on socialist here, but throughout Europe train travel is the preferred method of travel, and is subsidized by the government. It's very affordable to use.

    Look, and RTD round trip from Boulder to Nederland costs $7.50. That's 40 miles round trip. A train fare should be comparible...a trip from Denver to Summit County 160 miles round trip...that should cost about $30 accordingly.

    I'm not talking a ski train novelty type thing. I want a utilitarian, efficient travel method that is affordable and practical. It would transform the state and the way our country looks at transportation if done properly.

  29. #29
    the cool nerd
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    Quote Originally Posted by athalliah
    Has anyone explored or want to explore this option? Sounds far better than riding a bus all day.
    easy to link, but there is mucho pavement involved too.. for a racer chick like you, you should link White Ranch/Golden Gate/Walker Ranch.. good stuff.. can be done from Boulder or from Golden (from Boulder has more difficult climbing)
    "The search for a perfect pint should take lifetime." M.Jackson

    Ride bikes, not goats. Just good advice

  30. #30
    bacon! bacon! bacon!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pluto Pilot
    This is a bit outside the realm of Front Range mountain biking, but I'll bite.

    Seeing as how it costs about $60 to fill up my vehicle right now, I don't think it's unreasonable to assume that by the time the train is completed...10 years at the very minimum, that $75 will see like a bargain in comparison. Gas prices in the U.S., while higher than they have ever been, are still well below the rest of the world, and we have some catching up to do. The poop is just starting to hit the fan. When combined with factors like no waiting in traffic, a shorter trip and the ability to just relax and enjoy yourself, a train would hopefully be the preferred transportation method.

    The question is, why does it need to be $75? Colorado is dedicated to clean air - the voters passed a bill on that - and one significant way to do that is to get folks out of their cars. In my opinion, the best way to do this is to create a statewide train system that is the preferred method of travel. A key component to this - it needs to be affordable. One way to subsidize this is through taxes, similar to how we pay an RTD tax. I'm not suggesting we go full on socialist here, but throughout Europe train travel is the preferred method of travel, and is subsidized by the government. It's very affordable to use.

    Look, and RTD round trip from Boulder to Nederland costs $7.50. That's 40 miles round trip. A train fare should be comparible...a trip from Denver to Summit County 160 miles round trip...that should cost about $30 accordingly.

    I'm not talking a ski train novelty type thing. I want a utilitarian, efficient travel method that is affordable and practical. It would transform the state and the way our country looks at transportation if done properly.
    I admire your optimism. Train fares will NOT be comparable to bus fares... it will be orders of magnitude more expensive to build a train up the I-70 corridor than even building light rail around the city.

    And why should the people who like going to the mountains expect to have their convenience subsidized by the people who could give a rat's ass about going up to the mountains?

    Also - people here would $hit the bed if they had to pay the kinds of taxes for automotive ownership, autoroute tolls & gas taxes like they do in Europe. European train travel is only affordable when compared to owning a car there. For example, Lyon to Chamonix is around $60 one way - not inexpensive by any means.

    The "solution" is going to be gas getting so expensive that more and more people drive to those places less. Which means fewer people in the mountains. Which IMHO is a good thing.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkaredShtles
    The "solution" is going to be gas getting so expensive that more and more people drive to those places less. Which means fewer people in the mountains. Which IMHO is a good thing.
    I agree wholeheartedly that less people in the mountain is a good thing. But the Colorado tourism industry, is based on getting people into the mountains. You can be sure they will do everything in there power to make sure this happens. Perhaps it will be piggy backed on another Winter Olympics bid, perhaps some other way, but the I-70 corridor issue will be addressed.

    Quote Originally Posted by SkaredShtles
    I admire your optimism. Train fares will NOT be comparable to bus fares... it will be orders of magnitude more expensive to build a train up the I-70 corridor than even building light rail around the city.
    Of course it will be more expensive than building light rail...it's a longer route. But more recent estimates have shown that the cost to build the rail system up to the mountains is comparable to the cost of expanding I-70 by two to four lanes. There is much less excavation that needs to happen for the train system. From an aesthetics and environmental standpoint, the impacts of a train being constructed are less. And from a cost perspective, it's similar. Your argument is similar to the classic argument that environmentalism and successful industry can't co-exist. The expense argument is the first thing brought up by anti-rail people. Show me numbers, with sources, and I'll do the same.

    Quote Originally Posted by SkaredShtles
    And why should the people who like going to the mountains expect to have their convenience subsidized by the people who could give a rat's ass about going up to the mountains?
    Why should people fund Invesco Field at Mile High with tax payers dollars? According to CDOT 11,092,693 vehicles passed through Eisenhower Tunnel in 2006. More than 30,000 vehicles pass through PER DAY. Meanwhile, Invesco Field, which is subsidized by tax payers dollars, attracts 750,000 fans per year, including exhibition games. Add a few concerts and were still talking a small fraction of the people that would use an I-70 train system.

    Quote Originally Posted by SkaredShtles
    Also - people here would $hit the bed if they had to pay the kinds of taxes for automotive ownership, autoroute tolls & gas taxes like they do in Europe. European train travel is only affordable when compared to owning a car there. For example, Lyon to Chamonix is around $60 one way - not inexpensive by any means.
    Of course they would. People are $hitting the bed already, and gas is barely over $3.00 a gallon. And it's going to get worse. By the way, the Lyon to Chamonix train trip requires a bus transfer at Annecy, and is a far longer trip than Denver to Summit Country. I agree train travel will be more, but let's not scare people away with false facts.

    A train system is going to take an expanding of peoples current car-based U.S. mindset to make happen. But this happening as we sit here. When you combine the factors - rising gas prices, increased CO2 in the atmosphere, global warming (and a major industry in this state that has a very vested interest in preventing global warming - skiing), and a population that, by and large, favors environmental protection, I believe the train can and will happen. There will be a lot of naysayers who shun it off as unreasonable and too expensive without looking at the facts. The old generation, the doubters.

    It's time to move on.

  32. #32
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    I encourage everyone to educate themselves on the i-70 train situation. It's a long article, but this gives a good synopsis.

    http://www.westword.com/2007-03-15/news/rail-roaded/

  33. #33
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    I'll add to this. Look at the money we spend on roads, everything about it is a government subsidy. What's so different about subsidizing a train if it help solve the I-70 transportation problem?
    Give 'da people 'da air.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pluto Pilot
    I encourage everyone to educate themselves on the i-70 train situation. It's a long article, but this gives a good synopsis.

    I'm for a train. It might not make enough impact to reduce the traffic on I-70, but it would certainly give me a way to avoid I-70.

    A stress free ride to Summit Valley is worth a lot. at $3.15 a gallon, It costs me $30 round trip in gas plus wear and tear on my truck and huge stress.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkaredShtles
    The "solution" is going to be gas getting so expensive that more and more people drive to those places less. Which means fewer people in the mountains. Which IMHO is a good thing.
    I agree--bring on $6.00/gallon!!! Seriously though, that will be the only way to change people's habits in this country. It's just a shame that it will cause a short term economic crash in the process because we're so dependent on the dino-juice based infrastructure. But that's a whole different debate...

    Back to the subject of high gas prices:

    I've started hypermiling even when driving my Outback. Instead of the ~21mpg that my computer used to read, I'm currently showing 27mpg. I have a 1/4 tank left, but I'm already at 300 miles which is where I usually fill up. That's like finding a $10.00 bill on the ground! If you dislike the price of gas, change your driving habits instead of just complaining about the prices!

    K (got a record 63mpg on the way to work today in the hybrid)

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by kristian
    If you dislike the price of gas, change your driving habits instead of just complaining about the prices!
    AHA! This man knows what he's talking about! Kristian, you couldn't have said it better. Thank you.
    A trail that’s too difficult wouldn’t exist because it’d never be used. But, trails can exist that’re too difficult for you.

  37. #37
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    The I-70 "problem" into the moutains is what? Saturday and Sunday mornings and afternoon for a few hours. Friday evenings can be a bit rough?

    Compare that to the "problem" faced along the Front Range 5 days a week by commuters and I think you will quickly see that money would probably be better spent addressing the "big" problems.

    Let's get light rail on all the major commuting corridors before we start blowing wads of cash to "solve" a weekend problem.

    And to the Mile High issue - it pi$$es me off since I could give a rat's ass about organized sports played there... but no point now crying over spilled milk, eh?

    Too few dollars chasing too many problems. Train into the mountains is *decades* off, IMO.

    Maybe we should get the ski areas to pay for the train.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by kristian
    (got a record 63mpg on the way to work today in the hybrid)
    says the man with the downhill tailwind commute. Must have time them lights right! (or is it wrong with the regenerative braking?)

    I want my next car to get 100MP to the virtual G.
    The more out of shape you are, the steeper the hill looks.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by lidarman
    A stress free ride to Summit Valley is worth a lot. at $3.15 a gallon, It costs me $30 round trip in gas plus wear and tear on my truck and huge stress.
    !DING! !DING!

    pro-train....but they are gonna have to have good local mass transit for every train stop for it to really work..I hear Summit's local stuff isn't too shabby but I haven't used it. Wonder how Vail's is?
    The more out of shape you are, the steeper the hill looks.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkaredShtles
    Train into the mountains is *decades* off, IMO.
    Course it is. Fasttracks is a decade out itself....I figure the I-70 train is in line behind it....
    The more out of shape you are, the steeper the hill looks.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by kristian
    Back to the subject of high gas prices:

    I've started hypermiling even when driving my Outback. Instead of the ~21mpg that my computer used to read, I'm currently showing 27mpg. I have a 1/4 tank left, but I'm already at 300 miles which is where I usually fill up. That's like finding a $10.00 bill on the ground! If you dislike the price of gas, change your driving habits instead of just complaining about the prices!

    K (got a record 63mpg on the way to work today in the hybrid)
    You can take a chance and draft a semi at 10 feet to save 39%

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MythBus...ting_For_Money

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by lidarman
    You can take a chance and draft a semi at 10 feet to save 39%

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MythBus...ting_For_Money
    Been there, done that. It really depends on the drive. Flat roads and downhills are good, uphill drives are not worth the effort. If I follow a semi from CS to Denver, I can get about 67mpg @ 65mph vs. 56mpg @ 65mph without drafting. However, drafting on the way home only gets 52mpg vs. 51mpg without because I am having to drive inefficently to keep myself in the truck's airstream.

    The really good thing about drafting (and when I say drafting, I'm talking ~3 car lengths back, not the 1 length people tend to picture), is that people expect semis to go slow so they preemptively get in the left lane to pass. When you're driving by yourself at 60mpg, they will come up on your bumper, tailgate, and the floor it to make a statement while passing...

  43. #43
    nice marmot.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ibmkidIII
    !DING! !DING!

    pro-train....but they are gonna have to have good local mass transit for every train stop for it to really work..I hear Summit's local stuff isn't too shabby but I haven't used it. Wonder how Vail's is?
    vail, and all the way to eagle, has excellent transportation.
    Q. how many kids with A.D.D. does it take to change a light bulb?
    A. i don't know, ya wanna go ride bikes?

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by ibmkidIII
    !DING! !DING!

    ..I hear Summit's local stuff isn't too shabby but I haven't used it...

    Pretty good transit system and based just off I-70 in Frisco near where the train is supposed to stop. Easy to get around by bike, too. My wife and I lived there 7 years. Only had one car for most of the time, and did very little driving.

    (Had to go platforms in the winter and it was hard to find SPD Sorels)

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by ibmkidIII
    !DING! !DING!

    pro-train....but they are gonna have to have good local mass transit for every train stop for it to really work..I hear Summit's local stuff isn't too shabby but I haven't used it. Wonder how Vail's is?
    Vail's stop would be more or less within walking distance of the lifts. Not a short walk but one that many do all the time.

  46. #46
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    I'm pro train travel. Trains are cool and its relaxing. When I lived in Michigan it was fun to take the train to Toronto and Chicago. Yeah i guess maybe that makes me a dork. But if I could commute by train I'd feel less guilty when I take my Mustang to the drag strip.

  47. #47
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    Laughing inside because I can relate...

    (Had to go platforms in the winter and it was hard to find SPD Sorels)[/quote]
    Tact is for people not witty enough to be sarcastic...

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by ibmkidIII
    Course it is. Fasttracks is a decade out itself....I figure the I-70 train is in line behind it....
    I personally think that they'll end up putting high speed in from Ft. Fun to the Springs before the mountain corridor.

    And the problem the US will have with higher gas prices is that the increase will come due to supply price increases, not gas tax increases. So the gummint will get less and less revenue from gas sales and the train will end up being even *further* off...

  49. #49
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    Good thought, but what about the fact that this is a tourism based state? If people are not going into the mountains, gobs of dollars are lost. A lot of folks have an economic incentive to make the train system work. I don't believe it's as far off as some might think.

    Quote Originally Posted by SkaredShtles
    I personally think that they'll end up putting high speed in from Ft. Fun to the Springs before the mountain corridor.

    And the problem the US will have with higher gas prices is that the increase will come due to supply price increases, not gas tax increases. So the gummint will get less and less revenue from gas sales and the train will end up being even *further* off...

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pluto Pilot
    Good thought, but what about the fact that this is a tourism based state? If people are not going into the mountains, gobs of dollars are lost. A lot of folks have an economic incentive to make the train system work. I don't believe it's as far off as some might think.
    I again tip my hat to your optimism.

    The dollars lost will definitely be brought up as a reason to consider the transportation issue into the mountains, but you can bet the lobbyists for the resort/tourist towns not on the proposed train route will rightfully raise holy hell that they're getting the shaft.

    Actually I should lobby for this damn train to be put in, because if it's put in then the friggin' tourons will be *years* away from overrunning my favorite stashes.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pluto Pilot
    This is a bit outside the realm of Front Range mountain biking, but I'll bite.

    The question is, why does it need to be $75? Colorado is dedicated to clean air - the

    Look, and RTD round trip from Boulder to Nederland costs $7.50. That's 40 miles round trip. A train fare should be comparible...a trip from Denver to Summit County 160 miles round trip...that should cost about $30 accordingly.
    Welcome to the economies of scale. If the gas prices are up, so are energy prices. That train, when (if) ever built, assuming its constructed in 10 years (doubt it), will probably cost more than you think. 30 bucks? Perhaps one way. To sustain that cost for construction, land acquirement, energy running it, it will be at least 75.

    Its not like it will be built for poor ski bums; this will be for upper class people looking to get up past the traffic.

    The Ski train alone takes 2 more hours to muck with than me just driving there.

    And then you have to get to the resort / destination.

    Cars will be just as cheap to operate, but will have traffic.

  52. #52
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    High Speed Train by 2015?

    High-speed mountain train by 2015?

    Voters could be asked to approve funding for high-tech statewide system in 2008

    By Alison Miller
    Glenwood Springs, CO Colorado
    April 2, 2007

    EAGLE COUNTY — Hopping a train and taking in the scenery on the way to Denver or Grand Junction could soon be an option for motorists who are weary from traveling along the long and winding roads of Interstate 70.

    The Rocky Mountain Rail Authority, based out of Westminster, wants to establish high-speed commuter rail from Denver International Airport along the I-70 corridor to Grand Junction.

    “Our goal is to have a train that can travel at 125 miles per hour and will make stops at all the ski resorts along Interstate 70,” said Bob Briggs, executive director of Rocky Mountain Rail Authority. “It is exciting to think about, and it’s something we think is really needed.”

    The rail authority also is working on building rail from Casper, Wyo., to Albuquerque, N.M.

    For some, it’s a pie-in-the-sky goal but would be a welcome amenity if it can be done.

    If voters statewide approve a 2008 ballot initiative led by a blue-ribbon commission developed by Gov. Bill Ritter to study commuter rail throughout Colorado, the system could be built by 2015, Briggs said.

    The first step in making the dream a reality was raising enough money to conduct a feasibility study to determine where best to build a track and what type of track to use, Briggs said.

    The rail authority has raised $311,000 from communities that would be affected by the trains as a 20 percent match to $1.25 million the Colorado Department of Transportation granted the authority for the feasibility study, Briggs said.

    Summit and Garfield counties have given money to help fund the initial study, as did the Roaring Fork Regional Transportation Authority, Briggs said.

    “Now that we have the funding we need, we are going to take the next step and determine how this can be done,” Briggs said. “There’s still a lot that needs to be figured out, like if we should try to go up and over mountains along the way or just poke holes through for tunnels.”

    The goal of the rail authority is to use trains and tracks of advanced technology similar to the commuter train system in Japan, Briggs said. The “advanced line” will run from the Denver airport to Dotsero before switching to a track that is compatible with the existing ones, he said., but will have traffic.

  53. #53
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    I've never really thought about it before, but the resorts directly along the corridor (Loveland, Copper and Vail) would have a lot more to gain by a train than Breck, Keystone, Steamboat, etc. If I were taking a train up to Summit, I probably wouldn't want to mess around with a bus transfer after already being on the train.

    It would be sweet if they could really do 125mph, but that is not very realistic in the mountains. I've ridden a few different bullet trains in Europe and they need wide open spaces and extremely high quality track to hit those speeds (well, faster I guess--I think the TGV does 280km/h). I don't think that would be attainable in our crumbly mountains--ever notice all the rocks on I-70?

    It is an interesting experience to enter a tunnel at 150mph--your ears pop!

  54. #54
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    At 125 mph you could get to Fruita in 2 hours!

    Quote Originally Posted by Pluto Pilot
    High-speed mountain train by 2015?

    Voters could be asked to approve funding for high-tech statewide system in 2008

    By Alison Miller
    Glenwood Springs, CO Colorado
    April 2, 2007

    EAGLE COUNTY — Hopping a train and taking in the scenery on the way to Denver or Grand Junction could soon be an option for motorists who are weary from traveling along the long and winding roads of Interstate 70.

    The Rocky Mountain Rail Authority, based out of Westminster, wants to establish high-speed commuter rail from Denver International Airport along the I-70 corridor to Grand Junction.

    “Our goal is to have a train that can travel at 125 miles per hour and will make stops at all the ski resorts along Interstate 70,” said Bob Briggs, executive director of Rocky Mountain Rail Authority. “It is exciting to think about, and it’s something we think is really needed.”

    The rail authority also is working on building rail from Casper, Wyo., to Albuquerque, N.M.

    For some, it’s a pie-in-the-sky goal but would be a welcome amenity if it can be done.

    If voters statewide approve a 2008 ballot initiative led by a blue-ribbon commission developed by Gov. Bill Ritter to study commuter rail throughout Colorado, the system could be built by 2015, Briggs said.

    The first step in making the dream a reality was raising enough money to conduct a feasibility study to determine where best to build a track and what type of track to use, Briggs said.

    The rail authority has raised $311,000 from communities that would be affected by the trains as a 20 percent match to $1.25 million the Colorado Department of Transportation granted the authority for the feasibility study, Briggs said.

    Summit and Garfield counties have given money to help fund the initial study, as did the Roaring Fork Regional Transportation Authority, Briggs said.

    “Now that we have the funding we need, we are going to take the next step and determine how this can be done,” Briggs said. “There’s still a lot that needs to be figured out, like if we should try to go up and over mountains along the way or just poke holes through for tunnels.”

    The goal of the rail authority is to use trains and tracks of advanced technology similar to the commuter train system in Japan, Briggs said. The “advanced line” will run from the Denver airport to Dotsero before switching to a track that is compatible with the existing ones, he said., but will have traffic.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pluto Pilot
    At 125 mph you could get to Fruita in 2 hours!
    Well - you'd be in Grand Junction...

    It would probably take you another hour to get to Fruita. And you'd have to ride your bike. NTTAWWT.

  56. #56
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    Can't do it with a tunnel. If you do, Loveland gets the shaft. As it is, Winter Park and Cooper will get the shaft. So will Steamboat, but it's more of a specific destination resort as opposed to a FR resort, so the shafting would be somewhat less.

    You know... this train is sounding better all the time. Less traffic on I70, fewer people at Winter Park and Steamboat....

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