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  1. #1
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    Cold weather simulated survival ride

    Don (DWF), Elroy (Funkmaster) and myself did an experiment this weekend to see how we would fare if we were to end up stuck overnight in the woods. Our report was originally posted on another site, but I wanted to post it here as I am sure at least a couple of people would be interested in our results:

    http://f88me.com/showthread.php?t=6854
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  2. #2
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    Nice work man. I've always thought about doing this myself. Hopefully I can take some lessons from your trip. I must admit, I would probably attempt this in the summer first. Good read. Thanks.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ColoradoOutsider
    Nice work man. I've always thought about doing this myself. Hopefully I can take some lessons from your trip. I must admit, I would probably attempt this in the summer first. Good read. Thanks.
    Yeah - I had actually wanted to do something like this for a few years, but couldn't find the motivation to take off and do it by myself. Fortunately Don presented the idea last week and we decided to give it a go.

    We have a second trip planned, I imagine this one will be much less "sucky".

    I would have preferred summer but "when opportunity knocks"...
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  4. #4
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    Excellent post !

    As a BP'r , rock climber, MTB'r ... outdoor person for 40+ yrs, I know that when the $hit hits the fan, it stinks big time.

    How many regular "Weekend riders" even carry a fire source when they ride; assuming that most don't smoke or they wouldn't be riding ?

    "The 10 Essentials" list has been long discussed from many sources and most deem it too small a list.

    Curious question, since many people assume a cell phone should be #1 on the list in the updated version. Did you have any signal ?

  5. #5
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    Good job!

    good read.

    as somebody who doesn't take enough, but perhaps more than most, i would've been cold and hungry.

    note to self: stay next to 'zilla or DWF on future group rides.


    x2 on the cell phone question– i never carry one and suspect no signal in most cases where "riding" is the destination.
    -
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    and may just go where no one's been.

  6. #6
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    I just learned a ton and feel humbled. Thank you for opening my eyes.

  7. #7
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    Great info on the "emergency" blankets...
    the drugs made me realize it's not about the drugs

  8. #8
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    should've snuggled.

    j/k
    thanks for taking one for the team. Very informative.

  9. #9
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    If there was snuggling, it probably wouldn't have made the official record.
    Godzeera - what's up w/ the Chameleon? Your dj bike the only one rolling that day?
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  10. #10
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    This is interesting as hell. I've had a space blanket in my bag for years, but never matches.

    Apparently, I'm a fool.
    Take the long cut, we'll get there eventually.

  11. #11
    Oh, So Interesting!
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    Cool... I usually carry this lightweight (< 8 oz) down vest:

    http://www.featheredfriends.com/Pica...eliosVest.html

    Its highly water resistant, and with the softshell rain jacket I carry will stay dry overnight in rain. Its far warmer than any other type of insulation for the weight, and packs very small.

    A lightweight sil-nylon tarp or bivy sack is seeming like a good idea too, but I don't carry one.

  12. #12
    Rolling
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    Jesus christ. Next time practice in your backyard.

    This seems almost too "real"

    Thanks so much for the reality check. This kind of stuff makes you realize the details--this is a valuable post. Maybe this should be on Passion too. It's that kind of passion.

  13. #13
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    Good stuff guys! Like a lot of people have mentioned, your post really makes me evaluate the things that I keep in my bag. I've always been known to carry around a few extra tools, but I'm not sure I'd be prepared to crash outside in cold weather--maybe I should add another couple pounds of stuff to my camelbak .

    In addition to a lighter or two, I carry a big black plastic trash bag and a thin plastic ponch on every ride. My theory is that they are light, windproof, waterproof (although not the slightest bit breathable), and combined they would cover most of my body. I wonder if they would be up to the task of staying out, or if they would end up in a sorry state like your blankets.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by kristian

    In addition to a lighter or two, I carry a big black plastic trash bag and a thin plastic ponch on every ride.
    Funny you mention that. I took an aircraft survival course and learned the utility of a garbage bag. That is one useful item and you can even put trash in it.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by onbelaydave
    As a BP'r , rock climber, MTB'r ... outdoor person for 40+ yrs, I know that when the $hit hits the fan, it stinks big time.

    How many regular "Weekend riders" even carry a fire source when they ride; assuming that most don't smoke or they wouldn't be riding ?

    "The 10 Essentials" list has been long discussed from many sources and most deem it too small a list.

    Curious question, since many people assume a cell phone should be #1 on the list in the updated version. Did you have any signal ?
    None - surprising really, given that we were roughly 6 miles as the turkey vulture flies, from my house in South Littleton.
    Now with more vitriol!

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by lidarman
    Funny you mention that. I took an aircraft survival course and learned the utility of a garbage bag. That is one useful item and you can even put trash in it.

    Did they show you how to make a floatation device with your pants?
    Since when did Need have anything to do with this?

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbabuser
    If there was snuggling, it probably wouldn't have made the official record.
    Godzeera - what's up w/ the Chameleon? Your dj bike the only one rolling that day?
    Nah - that's my trail bike / DJ bike / light DH bike / XC bike. It's serving all roles pretty well actually.

    To everyone else - thanks for the feedback, I'm glad you all seem to think it was as informative as I did. We've got a second trip planned, but it may be a few, given other commitments.
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  18. #18
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    Awesome Post! Being prepared especially in the mountains could mean the difference between life or death.

    My pack usually contains:

    two tubes
    two bike tools including a chain tool
    extra links of chain and a couple of sram quick links
    1st Aid kit....along with being 1st aid certified for those around me
    duct tape
    Bike Lights front and rear
    Water Filter or iodine
    Lighter/ waterproof matches
    Map and Compass
    Knife
    Whistle
    Rain Jacket
    long cycling tights or pants
    min 100 wt. fleece or capaline long sleeve top
    Emergency Blanket
    $10, in cash and a credit card, for emergencies if I could get out of the woods

    Biggest asset is a map and a compass and an ability to read them. I've done my share of bushwacking to just see what was at the top of that peak or to cut a route short feeling a bonk come on.

    I've been lucky enough to get injured riders out of the woods the three times I've had injuries riding in the backcountry.
    Last edited by mountaingoatepics; 11-24-2008 at 10:27 PM.

  19. #19
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    Interesting and very thought provoking. Although I tend to pack more crap around than most even on smaller rides. Clearly there is more to consider even when you are only on a seemingly short ride, injury, bike failure, and loss of light. I typically will have some matches and small home made first aid kit. Bike tools, chain links for mine and others, headlamp. And all of the ten essentials, even carrying an emergency space blanket. Usually that is in another pack that is used for day hikes particularly when the we take our kids. Not doing this before it is easy to think of ways to better the situation, but until you are in it you won't know for sure. I guess my only immediate thought would have been to try and huddle together and maybe use your fishing equipment to sew the blankets together and create more of a barrier for all the combined body heat.

    Thanks for sharing
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by icegeek
    Did they show you how to make a floatation device with your pants?
    No, I didn't have my MC hammer pants....

    But I did learn that my camera can be used as a boat anchor.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Godzilla
    Nah - that's my trail bike / DJ bike / light DH bike / XC bike. It's serving all roles pretty well actually.

    To everyone else - thanks for the feedback, I'm glad you all seem to think it was as informative as I did. We've got a second trip planned, but it may be a few, given other commitments.
    I just remembered, my 24 hr race rig looked pretty similar to your Chameleon, other than it was a medium, and too small for me.
    I'd thought about something similar (but would have to add a few things to my current pack to be even as comfortable as you were) at W Ranch. If things got too bad I could always walk home...
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by kristian
    Good stuff guys! Like a lot of people have mentioned, your post really makes me evaluate the things that I keep in my bag. I've always been known to carry around a few extra tools, but I'm not sure I'd be prepared to crash outside in cold weather--maybe I should add another couple pounds of stuff to my camelbak .

    In addition to a lighter or two, I carry a big black plastic trash bag and a thin plastic ponch on every ride. My theory is that they are light, windproof, waterproof (although not the slightest bit breathable), and combined they would cover most of my body. I wonder if they would be up to the task of staying out, or if they would end up in a sorry state like your blankets.
    I think most items would get pretty torn up by the rocks, sticks, pinecones, sharp edges prevalent on the ground, etc, so the trick would be to protect them through awreness.

    you could also get away with a small plastic grocery type bags.
    as you say, not breathable..........................however,
    if you put them over your feet, you would be shocked at how well they help keep you warm (I was at least).
    the flip side of that (no pun intended) would be a quality hat, preferably windblocker.
    I usually have a 'cap' style on when I ride these days (as I am a balding elderly type), but those do nothing for you ears.
    that and a windblocker glove could really do a lot (with little weight/space penalty) to keep extremeties warm.
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  23. #23
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    Good stuff!

    Hmmm. Makes me feel better about carrying all the crap in my pack that I do. Nice to not have to use it, but nicer still knowing it's there in case I do. Perhaps a replacement for the emergancy blanket is in order? Matches and lighter are already in my first aid kit at least.

    IMO, the ability to start a fire is the biggest thing. If you can't or don't have the ability to do that, you're screwed - at least below some temps. Failing that, building or preparing whatever sort of shelter you are able.

    Granted, out here in the east, it's a bit tougher on most of my daily rides to get "out there" than out west, but there are some spots with a powerful maze of trails on some pretty decent sized chunks of land. Since much of my ride time is solo, during the weekdays without seeing any other trail users - I still carry everything.
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  24. #24
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    Great read and thread. I just happened to think of this while I was out at Buffalo Creek for the first time on Sunday starting my ride at 12:30pm. I typically carry a lighter load and definitely need to re-consider what essentials I have since I typically ride alone. One of the things I'll add soon is a chain tool and extra links. I'm not sure if I have a chain that allows adding extra links so I'll need to look into that. I'm just now starting to do slightly colder riding so this is some good stuff to consider.

  25. #25
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    How about stashing a light in your pack? Wouldn't that increase your chance of making it out? And the movement would keep your blood warmer. At the very least, it would allow you to find a better shelter. (I once took my future wife on a ride at Buff Creek and got stuck in the dark 8 miles from the car. Luckily I brought a camera and shot, as in picture taking, myself out of the predicament).

    On top of that, wouldn't being close to a body of water make things a lot colder?

    _MK

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  26. #26
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    I'm an avid adventure racer and have raced in some pretty extreme situations (both super hot - Moab in the summer....West Virginia during a raging snow/rain storm). In the WVA situation, our entire team carried the Western Mountaineering HotSac (http://www.westernmountaineering.com...&ContentId=44). 4.5 oz and will stand up to anything....just take your shoes off before you get in. I highly recommend this product in place of those shitty emergency blankets.

    Nice write up!

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by MK_
    How about stashing a light in your pack? Wouldn't that increase your chance of making it out? And the movement would keep your blood warmer. At the very least, it would allow you to find a better shelter. (I once took my future wife on a ride at Buff Creek and got stuck in the dark 8 miles from the car. Luckily I brought a camera and shot, as in picture taking, myself out of the predicament).

    On top of that, wouldn't being close to a body of water make things a lot colder?

    _MK
    Yeah, we all had lights, they were just LED and while they would have worked in a true life or death situation, the idea was to stick it out and honestly it would not have made sense (under the circumstances) for us to relocate.

    The experience was pretty miserable, but none of us were in any real danger - just really uncomfortable. The body of water did make things colder, but it seemed a reasonable handicap given that we would not have started preparing shelter, etc... - in a real situation - until well after dark. Well, that and trout sounded awfully good.

    Not sure if I mentioned it in the other thread, but all three of us decided that we would be walking out (rather than camping) if at all possible.
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by denveryeti
    <snip> our entire team carried the Western Mountaineering HotSac (http://www.westernmountaineering.com...&ContentId=44). 4.5 oz and will stand up to anything....just take your shoes off before you get in. I highly recommend this product in place of those shitty emergency blankets.
    Dude - $90?

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkaredShtles
    Dude - $90?
    All depends on how serious you are about staying alive if in the backcountry. Course a cheaper option is a little juju in a flask to at least make you happy while your huddled in your emergency blanket.

  30. #30
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    there are less expensive ones that you can find at REI - around $30-$35 - but I can't speak for their usefullness. I just know that in four distinct situations, the el-cheapo space blankets would not have lasted more than 10 minutes. Yes, the "cheap" space blankets are $4...but they simply don't work and I would not rely on them if my life depended on it.

  31. #31
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    effing nutz...

    yo josh, don and elroy,

    i heard you guys where doing this when duc and I went riding GG this weekend. first.. you effing crazy..! second.. i want to hear elroy/funkmaster's write up. it would seem like don was the only one somewhat comfortable and got some sleep. while you where suffering quite a bit.

    third.. don't EVER invite me on one of these trips.. EVER..! you know i have a prepensity to ***** and complain like NO other.

    ps.. awesome write up. i laughed my a$$ off, although I'm not sure the recap was meant to be comical. maybe cause i know you guys and all the suffering was .. well funny..!

    glad you guys made it out alive...

    P"

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountaingoatepics
    All depends on how serious you are about staying alive if in the backcountry.
    Come on...

    You know that a $250 bivvy sack and $300 ultralight sleeping bag would be even BETTER, don't you?

  33. #33
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    Blizzard Bags

    http://www.blizzardsurvival.com/prod...d_survival_bag

    $35, As used by British special forces, as warm as a 3 season bag, water proof
    and windproof. it really is the size of a VHS tape, I have one in my camel and one in my
    car.

    The only downside I can see is watching your friends freeze. maybe as it's the giving season
    they would make good presents for your riding buddies?

    You can get them here: http://www.redflarekits.com

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by LikeClockwork
    http://www.blizzardsurvival.com/prod...d_survival_bag

    $35, As used by British special forces, as warm as a 3 season bag, water proof
    and windproof. it really is the size of a VHS tape, I have one in my camel and one in my
    car.

    The only downside I can see is watching your friends freeze. maybe as it's the giving season
    they would make good presents for your riding buddies?

    You can get them here: http://www.redflarekits.com
    Reusable, cheap, warm? We have a winner - those look awesome. Even better still is that you could cut it (so that you could walk / ride in it if necessary) without worrying about ruining your $100 bivy - this was my reservation about many of the other options I've seen.

    Thanks for the info.
    Now with more vitriol!

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by LikeClockwork
    it really is the size of a VHS tape, I have one in my camel and one in my
    car.
    better if it was the size of a betamax tape

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Godzilla
    Reusable, cheap, warm? We have a winner - those look awesome. Even better still is that you could cut it (so that you could walk / ride in it if necessary) without worrying about ruining your $100 bivy - this was my reservation about many of the other options I've seen.

    Thanks for the info.
    Those are the ones I was talking to you about yesterday. Free shipping from the UK if we spend $100.
    A man must have enemies and places he is not welcome. In the end we are not only defined by our friends but those against us.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Winn
    yo josh, don and elroy,

    i heard you guys where doing this when duc and I went riding GG this weekend. first.. you effing crazy..! second.. i want to hear elroy/funkmaster's write up. it would seem like don was the only one somewhat comfortable and got some sleep. while you where suffering quite a bit.

    third.. don't EVER invite me on one of these trips.. EVER..! you know i have a prepensity to ***** and complain like NO other.

    ps.. awesome write up. i laughed my a$$ off, although I'm not sure the recap was meant to be comical. maybe cause i know you guys and all the suffering was .. well funny..!

    glad you guys made it out alive...

    P"
    I was asking myself in the dead of night - "what would Phu do in this situation?" I tried like hell, but I just couldn't fit my entire body into my camelback and so resumed wrestling with the good ol' emergency napkin.

    You should come with us next time, not that you need any more character - but all that suffering has to be good for a person - right? Glad you got a kick out of the writeup, it was pretty funny, in hindsight.


    On a not-at-all related note - my friend Rich (the guy with the cameras) has finished his video and is getting ready to distribute it under the title "Pinned" - it's got Sizemon, Shewmake, Wentz, Hallenbeck, myself (for like 30 seconds) - and a bunch of other medium / big names. He lucked out and shot with Kovarik in CA - I sheet you not, it is THE best footage of Kovarik I've ever seen, including that on Illusionary Lines, the guy is so fast it's surreal. You should recognize some of the (unnamed) scenery. Sizemon's part is very cool - he actually looks fast and stuff. I'll post here once it's officially out, I've only got the rough cut right now.
    Now with more vitriol!

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by DWF
    Those are the ones I was talking to you about yesterday. Free shipping from the UK if we spend $100.
    I'm in for one, maybe if anyone else is (I'm assuming Elroy wants one too) we could do a group order?
    Now with more vitriol!

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    Even with free shipping from the UK, the current exchange rate would make them $47 each.

    I actually got mine (and a bunch for friends) here:
    http://www.cigarsandfiretrucks.com/i...roducts_id=268

    It was a year or 2 ago, took me some time to remember the company.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by LikeClockwork
    Even with free shipping from the UK, the current exchange rate would make them $47 each.

    I actually got mine (and a bunch for friends) here:
    http://www.cigarsandfiretrucks.com/i...roducts_id=268

    It was a year or 2 ago, took me some time to remember the company.
    Actually, the US price from Redflare is $34-odd USD each, for the international orange version with free shipping (if we order 3) which makes it almost exactly the same price as Cigar's price with shipping for the OD green color (they don't seem to carry the IO color). I don't know how useful the IO color would be in reality, but in a SAR or low vis situation, it would be better to be easily seen.

    Great link though!
    A man must have enemies and places he is not welcome. In the end we are not only defined by our friends but those against us.

  41. #41
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    Good stuff

    Mk brought up a good point about moving.... A little light can be way handy. Ptec eos is my backup and sometimes primery light. Esbit soild fuel stove tabs kick ass for fire starting...

    Water treatment tabs can be super handy to carry. I like mirco pure mp-1's

    Still looking for the best blanket biv sack.....
    Read my BLOG!

    just a guy who loves bikes and exploring

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by DWF
    Those are the ones I was talking to you about yesterday. Free shipping from the UK if we spend $100.
    Apologies DWF, I took your comment to mean you were thinking of importing them direct from the UK.

    I went with the bright orange ones, If I ever have to use mine then I figure things are going badly for me or someone with me and the chances of being seen should be as high as possible.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Godzilla
    I'm in for one, maybe if anyone else is (I'm assuming Elroy wants one too) we could do a group order?
    I'd be down for one. Let me know if you guys do.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkaredShtles
    Come on...

    You know that a $250 bivvy sack and $300 ultralight sleeping bag would be even BETTER, don't you?
    Sure....if I'm riding the Colorado Trail or The Conti Divide Trail but for every day regular riding use that I plan on being back home that evening for...The other would work just fine.....along with my flask of JuJu

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountaingoatepics
    Sure....if I'm riding the Colorado Trail or The Conti Divide Trail but for every day regular riding use that I plan on being back home that evening for...The other would work just fine.....along with my flask of JuJu
    Well for every day regular riding NOTHING works just as well. And it has the added advantage of being completely free.


  46. #46
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    Best quote of the whole writeup.

    <i>Elroy has noted, correctly, that our "test run" has no contingency plan and is pretty much the real deal</i>

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by LikeClockwork
    http://www.blizzardsurvival.com/prod...d_survival_bag

    $35, As used by British special forces, as warm as a 3 season bag, water proof
    and windproof. it really is the size of a VHS tape, I have one in my camel and one in my
    car.

    The only downside I can see is watching your friends freeze. maybe as it's the giving season
    they would make good presents for your riding buddies?

    You can get them here: http://www.redflarekits.com

    They weigh 3x what the Western Mountaineering bags weigh, 4.5 oz vs. 13.6 oz.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by davec113
    They weigh 3x what the Western Mountaineering bags weigh, 4.5 oz vs. 13.6 oz.
    But the WM bag is nothing more than a vapor barrier. The Blizzard is, essentially, a three season water proof sleeping bag. After my experience with a 4-oz emergency blanket (which is what the WM bag is in tube form) I don't trust anything that weighs so little to be able to last the night in harsh conditions.
    A man must have enemies and places he is not welcome. In the end we are not only defined by our friends but those against us.

  49. #49
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    great write-up guys, you've added some good food for thought with the equipment discussions.
    I applaud your environmental stewardship in keeping the fire under control. With all of the talk of equipment to help maintain warmth, I'm reminded of advice my dad shared after getting stuck out one night in B.C. hunting sheep. They got damn near a whole dead tree going, and didn't have to resort to some of your creative rock tricks. I appreciate the limitations you imposed upon yourself, but in a real episode, the bigger the fire the better.
    Keep up the good work!
    Scott

  50. #50
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    Nice work guys! I have allways keept the most basic survival stuff in my pack: emergency blanket, emergency rain jacket, MATCHES, a little survival tool with compass mirror and flint, trail tool with knife in it. Go to an army surplus and stock up guys it'll run you about 45 bucks for all the stuff including an LED head lamp. I know as I just set up my girls pack. She just started biking 4 months ago and moved out here 10 months ago she was looking at me all funny when I had here get all that stuff. I said well ya never know when you will need it babe! Josh and Don I wana hit the next overnight experiment! Coop PS I have not looked at your link yet but did you guys heat rocks in the fire and burry themand sleep ontop of them for warmth it works great!

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrcolo96
    Nice work guys! I have allways keept the most basic survival stuff in my pack: emergency blanket, emergency rain jacket, MATCHES, a little survival tool with compass mirror and flint, trail tool with knife in it. Go to an army surplus and stock up guys it'll run you about 45 bucks for all the stuff including an LED head lamp. I know as I just set up my girls pack. She just started biking 4 months ago and moved out here 10 months ago she was looking at me all funny when I had here get all that stuff. I said well ya never know when you will need it babe! Josh and Don I wana hit the next overnight experiment! Coop PS I have not looked at your link yet but did you guys heat rocks in the fire and burry themand sleep ontop of them for warmth it works great!

    Hey Coop! We didn't try burying the rocks, although a couple of us had read about the technique (I started reading anything I could find between the time Don proposed the idea on Wednesday and when we left on Saturday). I think that once it got cold enough to matter, I was just trying to make my choices work instead of exploring other options - whether this is a good thing or not - I don't know. It sounds like you're better prepared than most. Truth be told, I carry so much junk in my pack normally that I think it would take quite a bit of extra stuff for me to even notice a difference - so there's really no excuse for me to not have the appropriate stuff. We'll give you a heads up next time around.
    Now with more vitriol!

  52. #52
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    When a friend and I did a couple sections of the Colorado trail in the fall a couple months ago we spent 2 nights camping on the trail. I learned a lot about bringing the right gear for staying warm. I suppose we were a little better off because we planned on being out, but it still wasn't as much fun as it soundsed. First night was at around 10,500 ft and that was cold and very wind too. We didn't make a fire cause we were too tired from riding, and it was about 1 am by the time we stopped to make camp. We did make a lot of use of our propane burners though. 2nd night wasn't as bad but still not too fun. Anyway, good times.

    -Simon

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by DWF
    But the WM bag is nothing more than a vapor barrier. The Blizzard is, essentially, a three season water proof sleeping bag. After my experience with a 4-oz emergency blanket (which is what the WM bag is in tube form) I don't trust anything that weighs so little to be able to last the night in harsh conditions.
    For that much weight you can carry a down sleeping bag. The epic fabric will last a night out in the rain if you seal the seams. Also, I doubt the WM vaporliner is cheap mylar like an emergency blanket.

    http://www.featheredfriends.com/Pica...Specialty.html

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by davec113
    For that much weight you can carry a down sleeping bag. The epic fabric will last a night out in the rain if you seal the seams. Also, I doubt the WM vaporliner is cheap mylar like an emergency blanket.

    http://www.featheredfriends.com/Pica...Specialty.html
    Not for $35.

  55. #55
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    For perspective on the weight, 2 standard mtn bike inner tubes are 12oz.

    And even if you could afford it, a down bag and a VM bivy sack would weigh more, and not pack down as small. Although granted you might be more comfortable.

  56. #56
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    another good one.....

    Here is an other good ‘shelter’ option to stuff in the bottom of your camelback with some waterproof matches and LED light (and a bandage wrap for a first aid kit) This will get you through the night!

    I have used this one for a lightweight camping bivy. Pretty rugged for 7 oz, repacks very well, big and roomy, about $35 when I got mine

    Thermo-Lite® 2.0 Bivvy

    http://www.adventuremedicalkits.com/...%202.0%20Bivvy

    oh, and go here for lots of light weight 'bike camping' ideas that could also be used in an emergancy http://www.bikepacking.net/
    ---------------
    me have blog

    forever lost in the desert, except when in the mountains

  57. #57
    ColoradoCoolBreeze
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    Great Writeup Guys

    Quote Originally Posted by Godzilla
    Don (DWF), Elroy (Funkmaster) and myself did an experiment this weekend to see how we would fare if we were to end up stuck overnight in the woods. Our report was originally posted on another site, but I wanted to post it here as I am sure at least a couple of people would be interested in our results:

    http://f88me.com/showthread.php?t=6854
    As you stated it could have been much worse had it rained, snowed or someone was seriously injured.
    After reading your exellent adventure, what I came away with was;
    Try and walk/ride out if possible. Bring your bike lights. Have the tools and small parts to perform repairs.
    Fire is your best friend. Carry fire starter supplies don't rely on a 2 year old BIC laying in the bottom of your pack.
    Location, location, location when sellecting a bivy camp.

    As one who rides alone most of the time and really enjoys exploring new trails in the back country I use a medium size handlebar bag to carry my extra emergency bivy supplies. That keeps the pack a little lighter.

    Thanks again for the report. It got me off the couch to check my stuff and add a few things.

    STL

    04 Azonic Saber
    08 Yeti AS-x
    12 Rocky Mtn 29er Alt 970



  58. #58
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    A good idea...

    Leave a message with a friend or spouse, VM, text...where you're going, when you'll be back. If you're stuck outside, and can fend for yourself, all this gear is good, but if you have a head wound, and no DIY brainsurgery kit...

    And for those that can afford it...

    Self sufficiency is good, reality is better.

    That's a pretty impressive reality check, though.
    MY dog can lick YOUR dog!

  59. #59
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    Just...

    Quote Originally Posted by icegeek
    Did they show you how to make a floatation device with your pants?
    Inflate the 'six' emergency condoms that you carry in your back pocket...
    MY dog can lick YOUR dog!

  60. #60
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    Nice

    wow i have to admit thats pretty awesome. no mountain lion encounters huh. Im not gonna lie though that i am tempted to go on such an adventure myself sometime
    If you are bombing a run and have enough time to think about where you are going.....then you are not going fast enough

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by lostwind
    no mountain lion encounters huh
    No - but I've got to admit that Don had me convinced that we were having one, for about 4 seconds. I think the fire probably helped keep anything that might have been in the area away.
    Now with more vitriol!

  62. #62
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    Hey Godzilla, I read this last week, but never replied. Truly one of the best threads this forum has ever seen. I could read published survival guides 'till my eyes are crossed, but I don't think any of them would hit as hard as this one. You guys have totally made me rethink my pack and its contents. Thank you for risking your nuts on purpose so we don't have to on accident.
    A trail that’s too difficult wouldn’t exist because it’d never be used. But, trails can exist that’re too difficult for you.

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