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  1. #1
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    Become A COMBA Trail Construction Guru

    Everyone loves new trails… Don’t You? Want to have some input on the design and construction of new trails? Well here’s your chance. COMBA has a busy trail construction and maintenance season ahead and we’re looking for eight enthusiastic volunteers who are interested in becoming Trail Crew leaders.

    Based in Denver, the Outdoor Stewardship Institute is offering Crew Leadership training programs in April (4/15 & 16) and May (5/1 ,3 & 5). Learn the fundamentals of successful volunteer crew management for the construction and maintenance of sustainable trails. Then help COMBA design and build some awesome new trails this summer. Upon successful completion, COMBA will reimburse you for the cost of the course.

    So jump in, get involved and have some fun along the way. Come help us build some sweet singletrack! For more information, click on the link below or contact Keith Clarke at keith.clarke@comba.org.

    Volunteers Outdoor Colorado - Outdoor Stewardship Institute

  2. #2
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    you used the ridiculously tired vernacular, "sweet"

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    Kudos to COMBA

    COMBA has done a superb job working with land managers to design and build new trails in the Buffalo Creek area. If you have the time and interest, please give serious consideration to taking advantage of these training seminars. You will be glad you did, and many a mountain biker will be in your debt for the additional trails that will get built!

  4. #4
    zrm
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    Crew leader training's like these enable groups like COMBA to do projects with less agency babysitting. this means that the agencies don't have to devote a lot of their scarce staff time to projects and are more likely to allow a group like COMBA to do more trail work.

    Many in the MTB community complain about lack of new trails or trails being in poor shape. The only way that new trails will get built is if the MTB community steps up to the plate with more trained volunteers that the FS, BLM, etc feels they can trust.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by zrm View Post
    Crew leader training's like these enable groups like COMBA to do projects with less agency babysitting. this means that the agencies don't have to devote a lot of their scarce staff time to projects and are more likely to allow a group like COMBA to do more trail work.

    Many in the MTB community complain about lack of new trails or trails being in poor shape. The only way that new trails will get built is if the MTB community steps up to the plate with more trained volunteers that the FS, BLM, etc feels they can trust.
    That's right. So, go build some new trails for me to ride.

    Back in the olden day's, me and my buddy would go out into the woods with a rake and shovel and build some bad-ass trails. We also liked when the moto guys would churn up some dirt randomly through the trees. Those guys made trails faster than anyone I have ever seen.

    I'm too old to be breaking my back doing that anymore, so you young whipper-snappers get out there and build me some trail.

  6. #6
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    "you used the ridiculously tired vernacular, "sweet""

    Would you prefer Awesome!?! Sweet. Thanks for the bump!

    BTW, there are only three spots left, so if you want in, sign up soon!


    "Crew leader training's like these enable groups like COMBA to do projects with less agency babysitting. this means that the agencies don't have to devote a lot of their scarce staff time to projects and are more likely to allow a group like COMBA to do more trail work.

    Many in the MTB community complain about lack of new trails or trails being in poor shape. The only way that new trails will get built is if the MTB community steps up to the plate with more trained volunteers that the FS, BLM, etc feels they can trust."

    Thanks ZRM. Good luck with things up in Summit County this season.

  7. #7
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    Voc

    I took the VOC training last year. Was a very good 2 day course. Trail Building fundamentals and learning to work with people of various skill levels and backgrounds

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by KarateChicken View Post
    you used the ridiculously tired vernacular, "sweet"
    You forgot to ironically include "lulz".

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moustache rider View Post
    You forgot to ironically include "lulz".
    I guess that means you must have signed up, Huh, squeaky wheel?


  10. #10
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    I'm too old to be breaking my back doing that anymore, so you young whipper-snappers get out there and build me some trail.[/QUOTE]

    Must suck to be you, close to death and all.

  11. #11
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    As much as I'd love to learn more about what goes into the construction of quality trails, especially since (apparently) using a couple of XR500's to ride-in trail is no longer PC... as soon as I see "role-playing" in the course description, I groan and my eyes roll back in my head... might as well mix in a couple "human pyramids" and an "egg relay" while you're at it.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by topmounter View Post
    As much as I'd love to learn more about what goes into the construction of quality trails, especially since (apparently) using a couple of XR500's to ride-in trail is no longer PC... as soon as I see "role-playing" in the course description, I groan and my eyes roll back in my head... might as well mix in a couple "human pyramids" and an "egg relay" while you're at it.
    Aw come on Toppy. After-all, you are a "top"mounter.

    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/u2pu0m9iTo4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by topmounter View Post
    As much as I'd love to learn more about what goes into the construction of quality trails, especially since (apparently) using a couple of XR500's to ride-in trail is no longer PC... as soon as I see "role-playing" in the course description, I groan and my eyes roll back in my head... might as well mix in a couple "human pyramids" and an "egg relay" while you're at it.

    If you are experienced with instructing, managing and motivating people, then I could see how role playing may be a turn off. But for those that don't have these skills or need to hone them, role playing is an invaluable tool. Last time I checked, a little role playing never hurt anyone.

  14. #14
    zrm
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    Quote Originally Posted by topmounter View Post
    As much as I'd love to learn more about what goes into the construction of quality trails, especially since (apparently) using a couple of XR500's to ride-in trail is no longer PC... as soon as I see "role-playing" in the course description, I groan and my eyes roll back in my head... might as well mix in a couple "human pyramids" and an "egg relay" while you're at it.
    I'd say give it a shot and form your opinions afterward. I've done several trail crew leader training's, and they've all been very worthwhile. Agencies will generally give a lot of latitude and take input more to heart with an "official" crew leader when it comes time to move dirt.

    As I said in an earlier post, people whine about trails - there aren't enough trails, the trails aren't good enough for me, the trails are in bad shape. Then, when an opportunity to do something about that within the system arises, an awful lot of those same complainers are too busy, or too cool.

    The MTB community does have the opportunity to step up to the plate and have a place at the table but progress is going to be slow if it's the same few dedicated people who are doing 90% of the work.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by casey View Post
    If you are experienced with instructing, managing and motivating people, then I could see how role playing may be a turn off. But for those that don't have these skills or need to hone them, role playing is an invaluable tool. Last time I checked, a little role playing never hurt anyone.
    I probably wouldn't have written into the description of the training "role playing" even if I intended to make it part of the program.

    But casey is right, even if you don't learn anything from the exercise, it puts into your head that the people part of this stuff can be, uh, interesting.

    Trail design and trail construction, to a lesser extent maintenance, is a very opinion charged activity. With no effort I can think of half a dozen stories from projects I've been involved with where there were issues. People disagreeing, crew leaders saying inappropriate things, people stomping away from the work site hopping mad...

    Crew leading isn't just showing people how to bench cut, avoid rolling rocks onto other workers and how not to shove picks into each others faces. Sometimes it is a totally kindergarten teacher thing. In my years as a nightclub bartender I'm not sure I saw more bizarre behavior between adults than my years out on trailwork projects.
    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

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  16. #16
    zrm
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomP View Post
    I probably wouldn't have written into the description of the training "role playing" even if I intended to make it part of the program.

    But casey is right, even if you don't learn anything from the exercise, it puts into your head that the people part of this stuff can be, uh, interesting.

    Trail design and trail construction, to a lesser extent maintenance, is a very opinion charged activity. With no effort I can think of half a dozen stories from projects I've been involved with where there were issues. People disagreeing, crew leaders saying inappropriate things, people stomping away from the work site hopping mad...

    Crew leading isn't just showing people how to bench cut, avoid rolling rocks onto other workers and how not to shove picks into each others faces. Sometimes it is a totally kindergarten teacher thing. In my years as a nightclub bartender I'm not sure I saw more bizarre behavior between adults than my years out on trailwork projects.
    Yeah, often times leading a crew is like herding cats. I'd rather have a bunch of novices than a bunch of opinionated guys who have a little - but not much - experience or who have done some bandit trail construction. Usually though, when you get down on your hands and knees and show why you're doing something the way you're doing it, and are skillful in getting people who are compatible together (or separating incompatible people) things usually proceed harmoniously. I even got to watch a teenage romance get started in one of my crews once, it was so sweet

    Trail work ain't glamorous and it's hard labor, but few things are more satisfying than riding a trail that you built that you know is going to be there for a long time.

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    Wow, you guys make this sound like so much fun. Who wouldn't want to waste their bike time doing this?

    Anybody who wants to take the course and build me some trail, I'll gladly throw you a beer and watch you behave like little children.


  18. #18
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    Is it just me or does drunkenbikesnob seem like a complete a-hole?

  19. #19
    zrm
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    Quote Originally Posted by Comrade K View Post
    Is it just me or does drunkenbikesnob seem like a complete a-hole?
    Don't feed the idiots.

  20. #20
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    There are still some openings available for this weekends Crew Leader training class. Check out the OSI page on the Volunteers for Outdoor Colorado web site for more info and to register. Thanks.

  21. #21
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    Are there still openings for the one in May?

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by ibmkidIII View Post
    Are there still openings for the one in May?
    Last time I checked, the early May class is still available. You can either call VOC (303-715-1010) and check, ask for Matt Martinez or go on-line and register for that class. Here's the link

    Volunteers Outdoor Colorado - VOC Projects

    Thanks.

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