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  1. #1
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    Big'uns

    Hey guys.
    Got a heavy friend who is committing to Mountain Biking and has charged me with doing some initial investigations.Going EP for obvious reasons. So is there weight limitations on bikes overall or on specific parts ie Wheel sets,Frames or both? I was thinking about 36h rear wheel once he reaches off road trail status but are there specific heavy rider frames or set ups i could look out for?
    I am so pumped for him to ride as we spent a good portion of our youth in the winter mountains so will be awesome to now do a simular thing in butnow in our adulthood and get himself in better shape as that is one of the goals.

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Whats the weight of your "heavy friend" ?

    What does "EP" mean ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt4x4 View Post
    Whats the weight of your "heavy friend" ?

    What does "EP" mean ?
    Electric Power maybe?

    Anyway, "heavy" is pretty vague. I'm 270# naked, and ride pretty much standard stuff. Don't know the weight of your friend.

  4. #4
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    He is 145kg/320 pounds.

    EP is ref for electric power

    thanks

  5. #5
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    Gotcha.

    So some parts will really have a weight limit. I wouldn't worry about wheels, drivetrain and frame, but dropper seatpost and suspension may be a problem: for instance, my rear shock has instructions for not pressuring above 300 psi. But for my weight (again, 270 lb/122 kg), pressure should be set to 280-290 psi... Very close to the limit. The fork pressure has some more headroom, but the rear shock would drive your friend to a hard tail. But then the load on the dropper may be too high due to the bumps on the trail. In this case I'd suggest a hardtail without dropper seatpost for start.

    For pedals, I'd recommend the Shimano Saints, that I use, pound them and they're still hanging strong.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by fmendes View Post
    ...but the rear shock would drive your friend to a hard tail..
    big guy like that should be on a coil anyway..


  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by .WestCoastHucker. View Post
    big guy like that should be on a coil anyway..
    yea think bout a coil with a fairly heavy spring and built 35h rear wheel. Didnt think about the seat post tho..........gotta have a dropper tho aye :-P

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    320 isn't special. ;-) I was 333 when I bought my Spec Camber with an air shock and sit between 280 and 290 right now on my Hightower. You will be hard pressed (pun) to find a coil over set up that has a high enough rate (most coils are made for "average" sized folks). Not all full-squish frames are going to work due to their leverage ratio. He will need to go to some shop that will work with him to find which models or bikes can have the rear shock set high enough to reach the proper sag setting. This alone eliminated a lot of bikes for me originally.

    I have used a RS SID rear shock, RS Monarch, and now a Fox DPS through many years of full squishing. None of the shocks have ever had a problem with my fat ass. I had to go up one size on volume spacer on my current DPS to keep it from a harsh bottom on jumps/drops.

    Onward.

    He needs to go get on some bikes. An e-bike is not necessary at all, but if it gets him riding regularly, then it is not a bad idea.

    I ran my Camber in completely OEM trim until I sheered off a few nipples on the wheel on the back. I had a 36h Velocity Blunt rim built with a Hope Pro 4 hub, brass nipples, and Sapim Strong spokes. That rear wheel was built back in 2014 or so, is currently on its second bike (my Hightower), and has NEVER needed to be trued. I replaced the brakes (OEM were Elixer 3s) with a Shimano Saint front and SLX rear. I still have the Saint front, but replaced the SLX with a Zee after building my Hightower.

    I also replaced my RS Reba fork when the bushings wore out. I replaced it with a RS Yari several years ago and have only had to do normal service on it.
    2018 Santa Cruz Hightower CC
    2014 Trek Domane 4.0
    2015 Surly Karate Monkey Ops (commuter, gravel, fun))

  9. #9
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    I would have guessed coil only is the way to go for obese cats like us. Specialized Camber looks like a decent bike. I see in the specifications
    FORK RockShox Recon RL 29, Solo Air, rebound adjust, lockout, 51mm offset, 15mm Maxle® Lite thru-axle, 120 mm of travel
    REAR SHOCK Custom X-Fusion 02 Pro RL, rebound adjust, lockout, 205x53mm



    Quote Originally Posted by Knight511 View Post
    320 isn't special. ;-) I was 333 when I bought my Spec Camber with an air shock and sit between 280 and 290 right now on my Hightower. You will be hard pressed (pun) to find a coil over set up that has a high enough rate (most coils are made for "average" sized folks). Not all full-squish frames are going to work due to their leverage ratio. He will need to go to some shop that will work with him to find which models or bikes can have the rear shock set high enough to reach the proper sag setting. This alone eliminated a lot of bikes for me originally.

    I have used a RS SID rear shock, RS Monarch, and now a Fox DPS through many years of full squishing. None of the shocks have ever had a problem with my fat ass. I had to go up one size on volume spacer on my current DPS to keep it from a harsh bottom on jumps/drops.

    Onward.

    He needs to go get on some bikes. An e-bike is not necessary at all, but if it gets him riding regularly, then it is not a bad idea.

    I ran my Camber in completely OEM trim until I sheered off a few nipples on the wheel on the back. I had a 36h Velocity Blunt rim built with a Hope Pro 4 hub, brass nipples, and Sapim Strong spokes. That rear wheel was built back in 2014 or so, is currently on its second bike (my Hightower), and has NEVER needed to be trued. I replaced the brakes (OEM were Elixer 3s) with a Shimano Saint front and SLX rear. I still have the Saint front, but replaced the SLX with a Zee after building my Hightower.

    I also replaced my RS Reba fork when the bushings wore out. I replaced it with a RS Yari several years ago and have only had to do normal service on it.

  10. #10
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    I weigh 295 ready to ride. I picked up a Niner Rip 9 rdo 3 weeks ago and it handles my weight no problem with the stock fox factory dps Evol shock and factory 36 fork. The shock can go up to 350 psi so plenty of room to make adjustments as a bigger guy without maxing out the shock.

    That being said, I started riding at 320 with a Surly Krampus stock rigid build. I rode/ride (it's going to be my winter/gravel/change of pace/loaner bike now) it on everything in the St Louis area as well as Bentonville and Brown County. Great bike for any weight. After 2 years I did have a wheelset built up and added a RS yari as I was starting to ride more aggressively through the rocky stuff.

    Lot of good options out there these days. The most important thing is get something that fits and ride it. None of this matters if he isn't putting time in the saddle.
    Last edited by big_stoke; 4 Weeks Ago at 05:31 AM. Reason: Spelling and add info

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by matt4x4 View Post
    I would have guessed coil only is the way to go for obese cats like us. Specialized Camber looks like a decent bike. I see in the specifications
    FORK RockShox Recon RL 29, Solo Air, rebound adjust, lockout, 51mm offset, 15mm Maxle® Lite thru-axle, 120 mm of travel
    REAR SHOCK Custom X-Fusion 02 Pro RL, rebound adjust, lockout, 205x53mm
    Coils are not progressive enough for big folks. You actually need the shock rate ramp up on most frames. Coils are a linear spring (or weakly progressive on bikes due to a low number of coils available). The leverage ratio of the bike will have MUCH more to say about how well it can handle a larger rider. When I bought my Camber, it was the only bike that a local dealer had that would happily set sag at the right amount (25%). My Hightower takes a higher PSI than the Camber did, but the bike is so much better than the Camber was too. I don't worry about the sag psi because I am not gaining weight... only losing it, so the pressure will come down over time.
    2018 Santa Cruz Hightower CC
    2014 Trek Domane 4.0
    2015 Surly Karate Monkey Ops (commuter, gravel, fun))

  12. #12
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    Knight511 nailed it, when I got back into this I was at 248lbs and would have came fairly close to the max pressure of the shock on some bikes. Suspension curve is key, found several recommendations on this forum. I also ended up with a Spec Camber for a couple years, now at 180lbs with gear I am on an Intense Primer running 210psi for 30% sag (If I remember correctly thats slightly more PSI than I ran on the camber at 248lbs).

    Not sure if its the model or just Specialized FSR suspension in general, but if the new StumpJumper has a similar curve looks like it would make a great bike for big dudes (tall stack, beefy frame, travel options and prices from $2k-$9000)

    Bikes are such an easy/fun way to get in shape, I never could have lost the weight without it

  13. #13
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    Well air does make sense, but I've read a few posts that said they were blowing air seals. What makes sense is to not go above the rated psi for the shock. I will make note of what you guys said. I dont really want to buy yet another bicycle, as I already have 3 non rear suspensions. If anything I was going to build up a FS bso from a department store that I broke the shock mount on, weld in a new mount for a good shock. But you talk about leverage ratio so I have to look into that more.

    As for losing weight, yeah I am good during the day. I stick to eating at noon and trying to stay within a 8 or 9 hr window, laying off the carbs (bread). My downfall is at night, I gorge out of snacks. It probably has a lot to do with the stocking of the fridge/cupboards. I need ready to eat fruits and veg like carrots and dipping sauce. Rarely drink cola anymore. I mix it 3/4 soda water and 1/4 cola. Rarely drink milk anymore, I used to drink a gallon a day.

    Quote Originally Posted by Knight511 View Post
    Coils are not progressive enough for big folks. You actually need the shock rate ramp up on most frames. Coils are a linear spring (or weakly progressive on bikes due to a low number of coils available). The leverage ratio of the bike will have MUCH more to say about how well it can handle a larger rider. When I bought my Camber, it was the only bike that a local dealer had that would happily set sag at the right amount (25%). My Hightower takes a higher PSI than the Camber did, but the bike is so much better than the Camber was too. I don't worry about the sag psi because I am not gaining weight... only losing it, so the pressure will come down over time.


    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Lee View Post
    Knight511 nailed it, when I got back into this I was at 248lbs and would have came fairly close to the max pressure of the shock on some bikes. Suspension curve is key, found several recommendations on this forum. I also ended up with a Spec Camber for a couple years, now at 180lbs with gear I am on an Intense Primer running 210psi for 30% sag (If I remember correctly thats slightly more PSI than I ran on the camber at 248lbs).

    Not sure if its the model or just Specialized FSR suspension in general, but if the new StumpJumper has a similar curve looks like it would make a great bike for big dudes (tall stack, beefy frame, travel options and prices from $2k-$9000)

    Bikes are such an easy/fun way to get in shape, I never could have lost the weight without it

  14. #14
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    Righto some direction has been attained in this quest to get my heavy mate on a bike and work towards becoming lighter :-P , The budget has been curtailed a bit due to an implusive trip to Japan to follow a certain national sports team not make the final of the world cup but that is another story.....
    ......so now i am thinking how bout finding a slightly older model bike and so some drive train upgrades and a E conversion. Are e-converted mountain bikes up to the job? . bearing in mind the occupant is slightly large.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 27FIVE Dirt Surfer View Post
    Righto some direction has been attained in this quest to get my heavy mate on a bike and work towards becoming lighter :-P , The budget has been curtailed a bit due to an implusive trip to Japan to follow a certain national sports team not make the final of the world cup but that is another story.....
    ......so now i am thinking how bout finding a slightly older model bike and so some drive train upgrades and a E conversion. Are e-converted mountain bikes up to the job? . bearing in mind the occupant is slightly large.
    If he wants a EMTB then buy a EMTB a conversion is going to be a hub drive which is quite crap for mtb application / and in general..

    since we are talking about a larger rider pay careful attention to frame / fork etc condition as having a fatigued old frame + 320lb rider could end especially badly for all concerned. however used might not be too bad a route to go as your friend could be heavy enough to void the warranty on a new bike..

    I think** for example the max rider weight specified for my Giant Trance Adv 2 is 300lbs ... sooo should something fail I wonder if they could deny the warranty claim if the rider was over 300?

    blah blah .. I'd have any used bike looked over for suitability / condition before sending your friend off on the trails on it.

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