• 11-09-2009
    mountainking_71
    UPRIGHT, FORK (roof) or HITCH
    Hello people¡

    I´m having hard time deciding what rack to get and i was wondering if you help me out on this one (you always do).

    The options that I have are these:

    The thule side arm (roof)

    The thule Prologue (roof)

    and

    The thule roadway (hitch)

    I was wondering if you´ve had any experience with them and if it´s been good or bad kinda like pros´ and conts´

    I would really apresiate your help.

    Thanks.
  • 11-09-2009
    cracksandracks.com
    thule sidearm is an awesome rack for the roof. super easy loading, and security without having to take off your front wheel. some guys with disc brakes get all bent out of shape when they have to take their front wheel off, but i never had a problem in the last 9 years with my magura martas (best brakes ever!!). for the past 2 years, though i've been using the sidearm on my honda element, and think it's awesome.

    the thule prologue is a pretty weak fork mount bike carrier. in my opinion, at that price range, the rocky mounts pitchfork is way better, and easier to use. the skewer on the prologue at best is difficult to adjust. this rack may or may not work with your fork if you have disc calipers mounted...depends on the fork, and depends on the calipers. the pitchfork has cutouts to alleviate this potential problem. if you are dead set on the thule line, upgrade to the peleton.

    the roadway bike racks are a great value in hitch mounted racks, but more often than not with mountain bikers, they require the use of a frame adapter to create a crossbar from the seat to the stem. this is why the tray style, hitch mounted bike racks, like the thule t2 hitch rack, have become so popular lately.
  • 11-09-2009
    jeff spicoli
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mountainking_71
    Hello people¡

    I´m having hard time deciding what rack to get and i was wondering if you help me out on this one (you always do).

    The options that I have are these:

    The thule side arm (roof)

    The thule Prologue (roof)

    and

    The thule roadway (hitch)

    I was wondering if you´ve had any experience with them and if it´s been good or bad kinda like pros´ and conts´

    I would really apresiate your help.

    Thanks.

    How much did you spend on your bike? Will it last forever? No. Will it last as long as your rack? Probably not. Spend the extra $ and get a T2. You're welcome;)
  • 11-10-2009
    tednugent
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mountainking_71
    Hello people¡

    I´m having hard time deciding what rack to get and i was wondering if you help me out on this one (you always do).

    The options that I have are these:

    The thule side arm (roof)

    The thule Prologue (roof)

    and

    The thule roadway (hitch)

    I was wondering if you´ve had any experience with them and if it´s been good or bad kinda like pros´ and conts´

    I would really apresiate your help.

    Thanks.

    For roof mounted holders. why limit to Thule only. Consider the Yakima High Roller also. It is compatible with Thule Square bars
  • 11-12-2009
    mountainking_71
    Thanks craksandcraks.

    One more thing would you say there are any advantages in carrying your bike on the roof rather than in a hitch rack or viceversa, I mean is there a chance of a bike falling off a roof rack? o having your kikes hit while on a hithc rack?

    has that ever happened to any of You?
    What´s more likely to happen?
  • 11-12-2009
    JohnJ80
    There are hazards with any of them. On a roof rack, you have to watch going into garages. For a hitch rack, you have to worry about backing up and being rear-ended. In either case, get good insurance.

    The best roof rack is the Yakima High Roller IMHO. The best hitch rack, bar none, is the 1UpUSA rack (http://www.1upusa.com). Second best hitch rack is the Raxter rack. The T2 and the Yakima hitch racks are beastly heavy.

    J.
  • 11-13-2009
    Jayem
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JohnJ80
    There are hazards with any of them. On a roof rack, you have to watch going into garages. For a hitch rack, you have to worry about backing up and being rear-ended. In either case, get good insurance.

    The best roof rack is the Yakima High Roller IMHO. The best hitch rack, bar none, is the 1UpUSA rack (http://www.1upusa.com). Second best hitch rack is the Raxter rack. The T2 and the Yakima hitch racks are beastly heavy.

    J.

    The T2 looks WAY more solid than that 1up rack, I'm looking at where it connects to the support/reciever area.
  • 11-13-2009
    JohnJ80
    The 1UpUSA rack can hold 250 lbs of bikes. Done it and driven thousands of miles with it. It doesn't matter what it looks like, it matters what it can do. It's welded aluminum and it is rigid (1/2" and 5/8" stock eyeballing it).

    On top of that, the 1upUSA rack doesn't bounce up and down as bad as the T2 does. Nor does it twist.

    A 4 bike T2 weighs in at something like 80 lbs and storing it when you are not using it is a royal PITA. Then, getting an 80lb rack on and off is horrible. Getting the 1upUSA rack on and off is - literally - 30 seconds. Adding or removing a bike add on is another 30 seconds. Storing the 1upUSA racks are simple. Each piece (one for each bike) fold up and store in the box they came in. The main section weighs something like 16 lbs and each add on about 10lbs or so. A small person can do this without help and can have a 4 bike rack installed in a couple of minutes.

    On top of that, the 1UpUSA rack is much more secure for the bikes because it has dual arms. A flat tire is not going to allow a bike to fall off - which is possible on a T2. The reason Thule or Yak don't have two arms is because 1UpUSA has a patent on that. Raxter has a license to do that.

    You can also get trays for the 1upUSA rack that can be used on the back (they don't fold up like the standard ones) or can be mounted on a roof rack.

    Finally, with a 1upUSA rack, you can configure it to carry from 1 to 4 bikes without extra rack left over. You can't do that with any other rack.

    The T2 is a good rack but the 1upUSA rack is considerably better.

    J.
  • 11-13-2009
    Jayem
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JohnJ80
    A 4 bike T2 weighs in at something like 80 lbs

    It better, the amount of leverage on a bike rack like that is immense with 4 bikes and the distance from the reciever. I was not aware that my T2 "twisted", but whatever.
  • 11-13-2009
    bgfthntr
    1 Attachment(s)
    If you have a truck you can load it this way. See below.

    http://www.utahmountainbiking.com/bikerack/makerack.htm
  • 11-13-2009
    JohnJ80
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jayem
    It better, the amount of leverage on a bike rack like that is immense with 4 bikes and the distance from the reciever. I was not aware that my T2 "twisted", but whatever.

    The weight of the bike rack is not a positive attribute. It just contributes more to the leverage issue you describe. Weight of the rack is a bad deal.

    Look at the the 1upUSA's wide connection to the rack trays. Now look at the connection to the T2's which is just the width of the metal tube coming out. The wider one will (and does) twist less. Watch in your rear view mirror. With a full load on it, there will be twisting on the T2. There is virtually none on the 1upUSA. The T2 will also have a lot more bounce to it (up and down).

    I'm not saying it is a bad rack, quite the contrary. It is a good rack. It's just that there are better ones out there (and they cost more). The cons to the T2 are it's high weight, it's sensitivity to tire pressure to retain the bike, and it's difficulty in storage.

    J.
  • 11-13-2009
    cracksandracks.com
    i am not familiar with the 1up rack.
    i believe the t2 and the yakima holdup are both excellent racks. what i find most interesting though is this renaissance of upright bike racks for the roof and the increasing popularity of tray style bike racks for the hitch. most mtn bikers are riding full suspension bikes these days, and frame geometry doesn't lend itself to "standard" hitch bike racks with dual bike arms sticking out.
    on the roof, the increasing popularity of thru-axles and lefty's make fork mounting difficult and time consuming. riders new to disc brakes often get bent out of shape worrying that their lever will get squeezed with the rotor off so they're afraid to fork mount their bikes too.

    so if you ask me, i think it's completely personal preference whether you carry on the roof or on the hitch. if you're a short guy with a tall suv, roof mounting might be too hard....if you've got a garage and don't want to drive in, or park underground somewhere, then a hitch mount is the way to go....there are lots of other scenarios. none is right or wrong.

    will a bike fall of the roof? not if the rack is installed properly and the bike is loaded properly. if it's the first time loading a bike on the roof, you'll probably be a little nervous, but i've seen some pretty marginal installs over the years and only a few have actually failed. most often, it's the owner forgetting to strap down the rear wheel, or tighten enough on the fork. usually the result of too much focus on the beer and not enough focus on the bike.

    will a bike fall of the hitch? not likely either if you're using the rack properly. all of the stuff on the market has undergone extensive testing and r&d. no manufacturer wants to be buying people $5000 bikes in exchange for a $400 rack, so be confident that you'll be fine.

    i use a thule sidearm on the roof with a cargo box...when i need to carry more bikes, i use a 2 bike hitch rack to carry our road bikes, since they fit well.
  • 11-13-2009
    JohnJ80
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cracksandracks.com
    i am not familiar with the 1up rack.
    i believe the t2 and the yakima holdup are both excellent racks. what i find most interesting though is this renaissance of upright bike racks for the roof and the increasing popularity of tray style bike racks for the hitch. most mtn bikers are riding full suspension bikes these days, and frame geometry doesn't lend itself to "standard" hitch bike racks with dual bike arms sticking out.
    on the roof, the increasing popularity of thru-axles and lefty's make fork mounting difficult and time consuming. riders new to disc brakes often get bent out of shape worrying that their lever will get squeezed with the rotor off so they're afraid to fork mount their bikes too.

    so if you ask me, i think it's completely personal preference whether you carry on the roof or on the hitch. if you're a short guy with a tall suv, roof mounting might be too hard....if you've got a garage and don't want to drive in, or park underground somewhere, then a hitch mount is the way to go....there are lots of other scenarios. none is right or wrong.

    will a bike fall of the roof? not if the rack is installed properly and the bike is loaded properly. if it's the first time loading a bike on the roof, you'll probably be a little nervous, but i've seen some pretty marginal installs over the years and only a few have actually failed. most often, it's the owner forgetting to strap down the rear wheel, or tighten enough on the fork. usually the result of too much focus on the beer and not enough focus on the bike.

    will a bike fall of the hitch? not likely either if you're using the rack properly. all of the stuff on the market has undergone extensive testing and r&d. no manufacturer wants to be buying people $5000 bikes in exchange for a $400 rack, so be confident that you'll be fine.

    i use a thule sidearm on the roof with a cargo box...when i need to carry more bikes, i use a 2 bike hitch rack to carry our road bikes, since they fit well.

    The dual arms on the 1up rack are to engage the tires. So, since pretty much every bike (with the exception of unicycles) has two tires, it works for most bikes irrespective of frame geometry.

    Bikes that grab onto only one tire and depend on tire pressure can be jogged loose if the tire goes flat. In the 1upUSA rack, a flat tire (or even two) will not permit the bike to escape.

    J.

  • 11-13-2009
    willevans
    I use the Raxter Rack, which is a simpler looking setup to the 1upUSA rack. Mine carries 2 bikes very well and I've never had an issue in any of the conditions I've used it. I had a roof rack, but new it was only a matter of time before I too drove into my parking deck with a bike on the roof, so I got a hitch rack. I tried the "thru the frame" style and hated the slow loading and incompatibility with my frame's geometry. It wasn't until I saw a Raxter that I found an affordable multi-bike by-the-wheel option.
  • 11-13-2009
    JohnJ80
    Raxter and 1upUSA are probably the two best racks out there and are very similar. You pick the Raxter if you don't need the modularity and if storage is less of an issue. You pick 1upUSA if you need modularity and storage is an issue. Raxter is cheaper. Additionally, the 1upUSA rack can support both 1.25 and 2" receivers without modification with any rack configuration. Raxter needs to be set up for one or the other at time of purchase and you add bikes in increments of 2 bike add ons.

    In terms of carrying bikes, both have a very tight pitch so that the distance out the back is minimized and both racks are much lighter than the equivalent Thule or Yak racks and are better choices IMO.

    J.