Traditional "arm" Racks, Adapters and Dropper Posts- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Arebee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    701

    Traditional "arm" Racks, Adapters and Dropper Posts

    I've had a Thule Vertex Swing Away (4 bike) hitch rack for about 4 years. I've been riding a hard tail with a relatively straight head tube, there was never an issue with how the bike sits on the rack's arms.

    I just bought a FS bike with a rear shock located directly under the head tube, right where the bike would rest on the rack's arm, so that isn't going to work.

    I have a Yakima adapter that can be attached between the seatpost and stem, but I'm worried about beating up the dropper post.

    A new rack is NOT an option right now, so what can I do to keep the bike from getting beat up?
    AreBee

  2. #2
    Bikesexual
    Reputation: jcd46's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    6,978
    Remove front wheel and stash the bike in the back of your car?
    Surly Krampus
    All City MMD
    Kona Unit
    Surly Cross-Check

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: One Pivot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    8,566
    ^ Pretty much!

    Those racks are unpopular because they either ruin your bike, or they just dont fit. Or a little of both.

    A brand new swagman can be had for $115-$125! You could sell yours and buy one, probably break even.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tk1971's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    561
    Go on craigslist and find yourself a used Sportwing rack. Bike still hangs on the rack but by the wheels, not the frame.

    Use ball bungees when the cheap rubber straps break as needed.

    These are cheap new and even cheaper used, and I mean cheap in materials, craftsmanship and price. But the idea is sound despite poor execution.

    Here is a $55 2-bike version shipped from Amazon:

    Reese Explore 1390000 Hitch Mount SportWing 2-Bike Carrier https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00D8NNVZ2..._LeB7Bb5H0C8SC

    Currently the previous generation of this rack is my rack of choice because it is light (2-bike version) and I store it in my trunk when not in use. Of course itís been upgraded with ball bungees to replace the straps and silicone hoses to replace all the foam.

    Looks like the new version is even cheaper than mine. The arms fold instead of detach and the hitch shank/stinger is no longer detachable/upgrade-able, as I have a riser shank on mine.

    Traditional "arm" Racks, Adapters and Dropper Posts-kmhf6658.jpg



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. #5
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    26,370
    platform rack or none at all, imo.

    Have a platform rack for the wife's Subie. Won't fit on my car (long story), so I put a fork mount on a piece of wood and transport it there.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    210
    So i have the same setup as you and have been using it for months with no ill effects on my dropper

    what I do is just full extend the dropper and the add the clamp, IMHO its not more impactful that working on your bike in a bike stand with it clamped to your seattube. Most of the forces are on the "arm"

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: supersedona's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    689
    Just do not get a platform rack made to hold the top tube. I just got done doing a full frame repaint/body work where I hit a speed bump and there was enough flex/give bounce that the holder hook put a dent in the top tube. Even if it doesn't, it will rub the paint rough.
    Tire-holding platform racks are the ticket. Hold anything that you would ride, holding with a surface/device of the bike that is meant to rub and be beat on asphalt.
    '93 Giant Sedona ATX custom
    '93 Giant Sedona AtX aero-edition
    '73 Schwinn Suburban
    '95 Fuji Suncrest

  8. #8
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    26,370
    Quote Originally Posted by ehfour View Post
    So i have the same setup as you and have been using it for months with no ill effects on my dropper

    what I do is just full extend the dropper and the add the clamp, IMHO its not more impactful that working on your bike in a bike stand with it clamped to your seattube. Most of the forces are on the "arm"
    Effects will occur slowly and with repeated use.

    I do not clamp on the dropper stanchion if I can avoid it. The risk is that the stanchion will get scratched. That's fairly low on the workstand, if you use a clean rag between the post and the clamp. On a bike rack? Fuhgeddaboutit. Anywhere there's contact, stuff will rub and scratch.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    210
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Effects will occur slowly and with repeated use.

    I do not clamp on the dropper stanchion if I can avoid it. The risk is that the stanchion will get scratched. That's fairly low on the workstand, if you use a clean rag between the post and the clamp. On a bike rack? Fuhgeddaboutit. Anywhere there's contact, stuff will rub and scratch.
    I agree with you and you points. One thing, on the setup I have you dont have to clamp anything to the seat post stanchion...the arm takes the brunt of the load.

    My reference to the bike in a bike stand was more to do with Bike Store Mechanics popping bikes in stands, clamping the stanchions then wrenching on them(BB, Crank and Pedal installs)

    Is the setup ideal or as cool as a platform? no
    It does the job for me for now, like the OP upgrading is not a priority/option

  10. #10
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    26,370
    Quote Originally Posted by ehfour View Post
    I agree with you and you points. One thing, on the setup I have you dont have to clamp anything to the seat post stanchion...the arm takes the brunt of the load.

    My reference to the bike in a bike stand was more to do with Bike Store Mechanics popping bikes in stands, clamping the stanchions then wrenching on them(BB, Crank and Pedal installs)

    Is the setup ideal or as cool as a platform? no
    It does the job for me for now, like the OP upgrading is not a priority/option
    Those top tube adapters suck. They work for the purpose, but they move...a lot. The weight of the bike is what holds them. They don't really clamp onto anything.

    The weight of the bike gets supported by the two points where the adapter holds the bike. One of them is around the seat post saddle clamp. When the bike bounces as you drive, much more force is transmitted through the seatpost than it is when the bike is static in a workstand.

    It is a bad idea to use this kind of setup when you have a fancy dropper post. Hell, I don't like this sort of setup if all you have is a fixed seatpost, because bikes never hang well from them. Too low, too far to one side or another, tire too close to the tailpipe, hang at funny angles, sometimes the adapter doesn't even fit.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  11. #11
    Bikesexual
    Reputation: jcd46's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    6,978
    It's very scary, and stressful to have your nice bike dangling in the back of your car. (For me it was)

    I don't think a solid rack is a luxury at all. It's a smart investment, if you ride often. Just my personal opinion.
    Surly Krampus
    All City MMD
    Kona Unit
    Surly Cross-Check

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Arebee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    701
    Wow, a lot of information to process. I was surprised how affordable some of these tray-type racks are.

    I looked up the Swagman and realized that one of my riding buddies has one. He says it scratched up his frame, but solved the problem by putting a pool noodle over the top tube clamp.

    Looking at the Reese rack, I was a little concerned about damage to the rims. Has anyone experienced issues?
    AreBee

  13. #13
    Snow Dog
    Reputation: str8edgMTBMXer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    2,737
    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    It's very scary, and stressful to have your nice bike dangling in the back of your car. (For me it was)

    I don't think a solid rack is a luxury at all. It's a smart investment, if you ride often. Just my personal opinion.
    I am with you here....I got the 1UP, and I know that it will last me for life. And will withstand carrying the bikes in some of the places that I go with them on the back.
    Go practice. Figure it out. - Fleas

    15 Surly Krampus - King Amongst Bikes
    LET IT SNOW!

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Arebee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    701
    I really like the Swagman Semi 4.0. No frame contact as it holds at the wheels.

    Amazon sells it for under $300. I could possibly sell my Vertex and my Thule bike trays and seriously offset the cost.
    AreBee

Similar Threads

  1. When are dropper posts "needed"?
    By UFMatt in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 133
    Last Post: 12-30-2015, 11:49 AM
  2. Dropper posts for us "larger" characters
    By COMMandrew in forum Clydesdales/Tall Riders
    Replies: 46
    Last Post: 11-11-2014, 06:42 PM
  3. Thoughts on "dropper" seat posts
    By michaelsnead in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 03-26-2011, 07:12 PM
  4. Roots, and other "traditional" advanced features
    By jmurray in forum Trail Building and Advocacy
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 05-03-2007, 08:55 PM
  5. 15" X5's and Gravity Dropper Posts
    By myitch in forum Ventana
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 05-04-2006, 11:57 PM

Members who have read this thread: 7

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.