Thule T2 and Lefty - be careful- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Thule T2 and Lefty - be careful

    Did a quick search and didn't see anything dated back to 2014, so thought I'd share:

    I had my lefty equipped hard tail come out of my Thule T2 bike rack not once, but twice within 200 feet on a muddy dirt road leading to locust point at the border of Kaibab NF and GCNP. I had the lefty equipped bike in a tray such that the adjustable front wheel holder on the rack wasn't able to contact the lefty...it was contacting the wheel only. Meaning the lefty was on the left and the adjustable arm was on the right.

    I believe for total security with a lefty - you need to have the adjustable arm contact the lefty in addition to the wheel. Any conventional fork and that adjustable arm will have some contact with a fork stanchion/lower.

    I've previously covered thousands of paved miles with my lefty in a Thule T2 with no issues. But, most of the time I had the bike in the tray configured such that the adjustable rack arm contacts the lefty as well as the wheel. And most of those trouble free miles were with 2 bikes total. This time I had 3 bikes on and since the lefty bike is the lightest, it was the last one on the rack.

    On the drive back out from Locust point the next day (we camped), I had the lefty bike in the middle of 3 trays I had mounted and not an issue.

  2. #2
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    I've never had the adjustable arm contact the fork (traditional fork)? In fact I do my best to keep the arm and fork from rubbing.. I've transported multiple bikes with Lefties on my rack and never had an issue.

    I've had my bike pop off the T2 as well but I was probably going too fast up a fire road, if memory serves me correctly the rack is "not for off-road use"..... that could be the issue..

  3. #3
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    Personal Opinion comingled with fact

    Quote Originally Posted by NothinSpecial View Post
    I've never had the adjustable arm contact the fork (traditional fork)? In fact I do my best to keep the arm and fork from rubbing.. I've transported multiple bikes with Lefties on my rack and never had an issue.

    I've had my bike pop off the T2 as well but I was probably going too fast up a fire road, if memory serves me correctly the rack is "not for off-road use"..... that could be the issue..
    Yes. Manual says not for off road use. Fact. Are you aware of any rack out there that is? Does everyone that goes to to Gooseberry Mesa put the bike in the car or bed of the truck?

    Opinion: Near useless restriction if one can't leave pavement with the bike in a rack on the car/truck/SUV. **** I've traveled plenty of interstate (years ago I-40 near Memphis and Little Rock was one of them, and 5 years ago I-5 in December in Oregon come to mid) where those sections of crap pavement were worse than most dirt roads I've traveled.

    Final fact - have you looked at page 6 of 14 on the current T2 "classic" as posted on Thule's website? Sure seems to be a picture of a front wheel in which the rotating arm comes in contact with the fork lowers. Maybe I wasn't clear in my original post?

    That is how my traditional bikes have always been loaded - never had one of those pop out. My lefty, well, I've only had it pop out when I have that arm on the right or drive side of the bike. In that arrangement, the arm won't contact the body of the lefty. If I load it such that the arm is on the non drive side of the bike (left), it will contact the body of the lefty in a similar fashion as a traditional fork - not contacting it on a stanchion that slides in and out of the fork body. In this loading arrangement, I've never had my lefty equipped bike pop out of the rack.

    Also - my lefty equipped ride tends to lean more in the rack if I load it such that the arm is on the drive side. If I load it such that the arm is on the non drive side - it doesn't lean over as much. Running 29x2.35 Hand Dempf up front and 29x2.25 racing Ralph in back.

  4. #4
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    Very fun fact, you need to calm down fella.

    I was just saying they're 'not for off road use'. I wasn't scalding you for using it off road, I've taken mine down absolutely terrible fire roads and hit railroad crossings going way too fast. I said that because you came up with this huge rant about how your bike came off the rack, while driving off road, which Thule doesn't recommend.



    Isn't the whole intention and benefit of the T2 so that there's no paint touched, rubbed, scratched etc? Whether you're supposed to contact the fork or not, I never have, my old bike's fork was too narrow to contact the arm. The new bikes fork is very close but I do my best to keep them from touching.

  5. #5
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    I have the thule sidearm on my work truck (same arm design as the T2), and use it with my lefty-fat bike.
    Couple times I've had the front tire start to get a bit sideways in the tray, but I think it's more because of the 4" tires vs lefty.

    When on longer interstate trips or really bumpy forest roads, I'll put an extra bungee around the front tire and the tray, helps things stay put.

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