Thule T2 home made "snug-tite 2." So ugly yet so affective.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Thule T2 home made "snug-tite 2." So ugly yet so affective.

    So I just dropped a crap ton of money on a new T2, and low and behold there is no hitch lock (snug-tite) included. I knew there wasn't lock cores, but I didn't expect this.

    Ran back to the store to pick it up (how much can one be right?) and found it was $45 on sale. $45! ARE YOU KIDDING ME!

    I became enraged and stormed out. I debated on taking the whole thing back, but slowly calmed down and realized it is an awesome rack. So I started thinking....how can I make a lock for under $10.

    Low and behold, the most ugly monstrosity ever made. The chain and masterlock in a old bike tube approach.






    PS - The reason I was expecting the lock and everything included is due to my great experience with the SoftRide Access Versa rack. Everything included in the box to secure everything (including a cable to go around the bikes). If my car wasn't so low to the ground and requiring the large step-up the T2 offers, I would be all over this again (I had the 2inch version on my previous vehicle).
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  2. #2
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    i don't think it looks too bad. crazy how expensive the thule lock is- absurd since you're already spending so much for a rack.
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  3. #3
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    Yeah, I just bought a T2 a week ago, and was also a little disappointed that for as much as I spent, I didn't get a lock with it. It is a great rack though.
    Trying to win hearts and minds, but willing to stomp them if necessary.

  4. #4
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    Good for permanent or mostly-permanent installations. Can't really do that myself since we don't leave the rack on all the time.

  5. #5
    JWA
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    Am I missing something, or are you not aware that you can buy locking hitch pins at any Wal-Mart or hardware store for ~$10?

  6. #6
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    The normal locking pins (non-threaded, non-antisway), in order to fit through the welded-in nut that's inside the Thule T2 would have to be smaller diameter and non-threaded. That would make the bike carrier wobble.

    You can buy a 10 dollar locking pin, and buy the Swagman Anti-Rattle device for 17 bucks. Still cheaper than the Thule STL2, and depending on the locking pin, probably a lot more secure.

  7. #7
    i call it a kaiser blade
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    it has elements of ghetto and mental instability all over it.

    thieves would be too scared to steal from someone who conjures something like this up

  8. #8
    JWA
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    Quote Originally Posted by solara
    The normal locking pins (non-threaded, non-antisway)...
    Oh yeah - I forgot that they use the threaded pin.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by solara
    Good for permanent or mostly-permanent installations. Can't really do that myself since we don't leave the rack on all the time.
    It is no slower to un-do than the Thule lock. There is 1 lock to undo and the chain stays in place and comes with the rack. Very simple to remove and re-install.


    it has elements of ghetto and mental instability all over it.

    thieves would be too scared to steal from someone who conjures something like this up
    I will take this as a compliment! This will for sure scare the thieves away...not to mention it should be difficult to actually break into.
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  10. #10
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    Obviously if you're using the Thule threaded bolt, it's definitely slower to undo both the threaded bolt and the lock/chain. But yeah, it wouldn't be much longer to undo since the chain stays with the T2 itself - hadn't realized that at first.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by solara
    Obviously if you're using the Thule threaded bolt, it's definitely slower to undo both the threaded bolt and the lock/chain. But yeah, it wouldn't be much longer to undo since the chain stays with the T2 itself - hadn't realized that at first.
    So you don't have to unlock the Snug-Tite? I don't see how putting my key in a master lock and then un-doing the threaded bolt takes longer than putting your key in the snug tite and undoing the threaded bolt.
    GG Smash

  12. #12
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    No, I was comparing it with the regular threaded bolt, not with the STL2.

    Btw, that chain can still be cut with relative ease if someone really wanted it (replace with a Kryptonite New York one and then you'd be in business!), but it's still a lot more secure than the STL2 I think due to the STL2's flimsy locking core and thin bolt. I like the more secure Softride QuietRide threaded locking bolt, but you'd have to remove the T2's internal welded bolt: SoftRide

    It's a much more robust, thicker bolt and would be very hard to cut through - it takes up the entire 5/8" hole of the 2" hitch/carrier - and the locking core is not flimsy like the STL2.

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