Thule T2 Design Flaw??- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Thule T2 Design Flaw??

    Hi everyone -

    I just have a quick question about the Thule T2 and its security. I have the locking "racheting arms" and the hitch bolt. But after I got everything mounted I realized that even with everything locked all someone has to do is loosen/remove the mounting brackets and then they would be able to completely remove the bike tray.

    So I am looking for some ideas on how to truely secure these bike trays. I have already thought about putting a lock through the extension holes but that would just prevent the tray from being slid off.

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
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    I own the Yakima version of the T2. It doesn't have a lockable racheting system. Yes, it has the same problem where you can just take an allen wrench and an adjustable wrench and remove the tray completely. If I lock the bike to the car, I just run a cable type of lock through my bike frame to the car or hitch. The way I look at it, if they wanted the bike they could just undo the quick release and take the bike without the wheel. In the case of the Yakima design, if they had a racheting system lock, all you have to do is release the air pressure in the front tire and you get the front tire out. I think Yakima figured that out so they didn't offer any lockable solution. I try not to leave my bike on the rack for any length of time and if I do I use a cable lock(which is just in hope to slow a thief down a tad bit).
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  3. #3
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    I have the T2 also. Why waste time with the 4 mounting bolts for the tray. I bet if you removed the rear wheel clip, then undid the front quick release, I know you can get the frame w/ rear wheel. Now, just wiggle the front tire a bit, and that's out too. I think anytime you've got a front wheel mount, that's what you get. I use a seperate cable. Not as elegant as an integrated locking system, but I feel safer.

  4. #4
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    Not to mention, has anyone tried just letting the air out of the front tire and trying to slip the bike completely out of the arm? I thought about this a little while ago.

    I'm a little dissapointed with my thule T2, for $400 (retail) you'd think they'd include the stupid lock cores and not make you buy them seperately, and I'd also expect a quicker way to disconnect the rack from the vehicle.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    Not to mention, has anyone tried just letting the air out of the front tire and trying to slip the bike completely out of the arm? I thought about this a little while ago.

    I'm a little dissapointed with my thule T2, for $400 (retail) you'd think they'd include the stupid lock cores and not make you buy them seperately, and I'd also expect a quicker way to disconnect the rack from the vehicle.
    The locking cylinders are completely worthless for securing the bikes. Literally, a typical size flat-head screwdriver will open the lock _EASIER_ than the actual key.

    I accidently left the lock key at home after locking bikes on my rack. We were at the trailhead ~75 miles from home when I realized my mistake. I figured I was hosed, but thought I'd try using my little multi-tool and try to force it anyways. It took no force and popped right open.

    How could they make the rack quicker to detach from the vehicle? Using a threaded hitch pin prevents it from swaying, and those take an effort to install. You could always switch to a smooth locking hitch pin that wouldn't require a tool to install. Personally I use a ratchet driver to install/remove the hitch pin (due to clearance issues on my hitch), and it takes less than a minute to get it installed or removed.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by anotherbrian
    The locking cylinders are completely worthless for securing the bikes.
    Make no mistake, I don't think they'd keep anyone from getting the bikes, but they are deterrent. Anyone who is serious can get the bikes and the rack, but the locks will stop the casual thief, only because they exist, not because they actually do anything.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    Make no mistake, I don't think they'd keep anyone from getting the bikes, but they are deterrent. Anyone who is serious can get the bikes and the rack, but the locks will stop the casual thief, only because they exist, not because they actually do anything.
    Sure, but don't let them lead you, or others, into a false sense of security. It would take all of 15 seconds for someone to remove a "locked" bike from a T2 and be riding away with it. No trying to get it off the roof or put a wheel back on it, just riding away.

    That said, I still rely on the appearance of the lock when I need to run into the house to grab something ... if I have to stop and mostly can keep my eye on it, I'll run a cable through the frame and the parallelogram region of the rack ... if I can't keep my eye on it, I'll run the cable around the hitch.

  8. #8
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    Get a really solid cable lock. I have one I used to lock my motorcycle with- back in the day. Now I use it for my bikes. Several years ago, it cost me over $100 but a thief would rather cut through my bike rack than that lock. I've tried cutting it with huge bolt cutters- nothing doing. At the least, it is a huge deterrent. Get a solid lock that will last you a lifetime. I think the website was www.lockitt.com. It is a German brand- ABUS.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueMountain
    Get a really solid cable lock. I have one I used to lock my motorcycle with- back in the day. Now I use it for my bikes. Several years ago, it cost me over $100 but a thief would rather cut through my bike rack than that lock. I've tried cutting it with huge bolt cutters- nothing doing. At the least, it is a huge deterrent. Get a solid lock that will last you a lifetime. I think the website was www.lockitt.com. It is a German brand- ABUS.
    Are the ABUS locks durable enough to withstand foul weather? I want to get one of these and lock my bike to my vehicle frame but since the tow hook is near the bottom, magnesium choloride, extreme temperatures (-40 F), road dirt, and water will be splashing all over it. I've gone through plenty of locks and finally want one that'll be the last one. What do you think?

    Thanks!

  10. #10
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    It's the area near the keyhole that all locks will be vulnerable since it is partially exposed. The ABUS is the most sealed one I have ever seen so call the guy who owns that online store. I remember him being extremely helpful and knowledgeable. Also, when I use mine, I keep the bike or bikes unlocked and lock them when stopping somewhere. It's a hassle but I don't do that very often- mostly on trips.

  11. #11
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    if there was some way to prevent the release lever from being squeezed this would eliminate the problem...

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