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  1. #1
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    Taco TRD Pro as a daily driver?

    Anyone consider one as a daily driver? I have a line on one right now, but I need to move quickly if I do. I have owned 3 Rams in a row and have loved every single one. I wouldn't mind being able to park my vehicle in my garage though, which is part of what makes the Taco appealing.

    I owned a Jeep Rubicon and discovered that what made it such a beast off road, also made it a relatively shitty daily driver (relative to a Sahara, for example). I don't want to go down that road again (no pun intended).

    Any comments by anyone who has looked at a TRD Pro (vs a Limited) would be appreciated.

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    I daily drive a 2019 Tundra TRD Pro and love it. I have also had two Tacomas and loved them both. If I didn't need the extra size of the Tundra I would be driving a Tacoma. For me they are a joy to drive and are way easier to manage in parking lots and around town. The Pro trucks are expensive for what they are, but the new Fox suspension has been great so far, and I like the look of the package.

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    You're going to find it to be very under-powered compared to the Rams. I DD'd one for a few months. Cool truck, but couldn't get out of it's own way. Traded it in on a 4Runner, only because the supercharger was available for the 4.0L, but not the 3.5L. On top of that, the transmission on the current gen Taco is garbage. Constant hunting for gear in the mountains.

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    I picked up a 2018 Tacoma TRD Offroard last year. I don't know the differences between the Offroad and Pro models, but after owning mine for a year, I definitely wouldn't pay the premium for the TRD Pro model. As TMWTP mentioned, the transmission is terrible. The constant hunting for a gear is annoying. Other than a few minor annoyances, overall the truck hasn't been all that bad as a daily driver, but the transmission issue is awful.

    Also, The Tacoma isn't much of a "truck". They look good, but don't plan to haul much.
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    This thread is not going in the direction I expected. Thanks guys for the candid responses.
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    I agree on the automatic trans. I sold mine in under a year for the same reason. I plan to buy another when I return to the US IF I can find a six speed manual for a decent price...

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    I came out of 3 RAMS in a row just like you before I bought my 2016 Tacoma. I wanted to down size and really liked the look of the 3rd Gen. I don't regret getting it at all, ya just can't compare it to a full size truck because thats ridiculous. Gas mileage is not overwhelming better than a RAM but you need to assess whats best.

    IMO the Pro's are over priced, don't get me wrong they're nice for sure but you can get better suspension and wheels/tires for less money if you like to tinker and do stuff yourself.
    If you don't have the tools, time or knowledge and have the coin, then get the Pro, I don't think you will be disappointed.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    This thread is not going in the direction I expected. Thanks guys for the candid responses.
    I've been casually shopping for a midsize truck and the bulk of the reviews I'm reading are saying that the Taco is falling behind competitors who are stepping up in that vehicle class.

    I keep reading that Honda is killing it with daily driver duties with the Ridgeline (comfort, fuel economy, AWD is a bit better for snowy roads), though it sacrifices towing and hauling capability, as well as legit off-road chops. For more "trucky" duties, the Ranger and the Canyon/Colorado are reviewed consistently better than the Taco, it seems.

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    I was looking at Tacoma's and ended up getting a F150. The main driver for me was interior room. I'm a big goon (6'3") and appreciate the headroom of the F150 YMMV. I also can't get over how roomy the back seats are...

  10. #10
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    Real-world mpg of my 2018 trd pro Taco was WORSE than my 2014 F250 diesel.

    Unless you're getting a smoking deal, pass. Dealers around here get 5-10k over MSRP for them. For that kind of money, you can get a trd off road premium 4runner with a lift, wheels, tires, and maybe the Magnuson supercharger (identical to the trd supercharger).

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  11. #11
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    rather have a ranger...operating costs..gas..insurance...parts...repair...is probably less...

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    Quote Originally Posted by jrm View Post
    rather have a ranger...operating costs..gas..insurance...parts...repair...is probably less...
    I'm reading that the Ranger fuel economy is best out of the gasser midsize trucks right now (with premium gas even. I've read hypothesizing that it should be even better on regular gas, which the truck can also use). Also with a 7500lb towing. And that the engine/tranny combo works very well together.

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    Nissan frontier

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    Thread went sideways a bit but since it did here we go...The GMC twins are OK but don't have the resale value of a Tacoma, check the last decade. The Ranger is meh, not Fords best effort. They only brought it back to get a slice of the mid-size pie. They let it go away once and wouldn't be surprised if it happened again. The F-150 is their flagship and I don't believe they'll cut their own throat long term. (Now the Ranger Raptor has potential...) Fronter needs a make over its stale, same for over ten yrs. The Honda Ridgeline is NOT a truck it is a chopped mini van (Odyssey)

    Sorry mtnbkrmike, I'm out of the thread for good, lol.

    Plz take things with a grain of salt, just my opinion sprinkled with sarcasm. I love my Taco but its not for everyone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gdb85 View Post
    Thread went sideways a bit but since it did here we go...The GMC twins are OK but don't have the resale value of a Tacoma, check the last decade. The Ranger is meh, not Fords best effort. They only brought it back to get a slice of the mid-size pie. They let it go away once and wouldn't be surprised if it happened again. The F-150 is their flagship and I don't believe they'll cut their own throat long term. (Now the Ranger Raptor has potential...) Fronter needs a make over its stale, same for over ten yrs. The Honda Ridgeline is NOT a truck it is a chopped mini van (Odyssey)

    Sorry mtnbkrmike, I'm out of the thread for good, lol.
    Meh, resale of the Tacoma is stupid. Honestly, I think it's a bubble and when it pops, I think there are going to be a lot of people crying over it.

    I would honestly prefer a smaller truck, more akin to the 98 Ranger I used to own. I regret selling that truck. Vast majority of people don't need a full size truck of any kind. I certainly don't. The current smaller trucks on the market are more like the full size trucks of 20+yrs ago.

    I've read that we're going to be seeing more vehicles like the Ridgeline as time goes on. Whether you want to call it a truck or not, it seems like Hyundai has something in the pipeline. It's the sort of thing that would suit a lot more people's needs than are willing to admit it. The false macho "it's not a truck" line is the same reason the current gen Taco is so fugly.

    It also sounds like the Frontier refresh will be coming in a year or so. Dunno what that'll look like.

  16. #16
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    You can find older Tacos on Bring-A-Trailer.com every now and then. Apparently the older ones are more "truckish" then the new ones.

    A couple of my friends who drive Tundras say that they don't understand why people would buy a new Taco. According to them, the size and mileage difference between the too isn't all that different now that the Tacos have become so bloated. I don't know, I think the new Tacos look pretty bad-a$$ but I don't have a need for a pickup truck and never liked them in the snow all that much.

  17. #17
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    Taco TRD Pro as a daily driver?

    The TRD Pro is still available for MSRP, if I want it.

    Reading all this, I think I may just stick with my Ram, at least until spring, and reevaluate things then. I was only considering things now because the TRD Pro became available to me. I thought it would be nice to be able to finally park my vehicle in my garage. I also thought that the Taco was the unofficial vehicle of all things mountain biking in this galaxy.

    In light of all that, I thought I should seriously consider this opportunity.

    I will just hang onto my Ram for now. The thing is beautiful - every option box checked. Itís a Sport so reasonably bad ass looking too. I love it. I just thought I should consider all options.

    Taco TRD Pro as a daily driver?-img_0073.jpg

    Taco TRD Pro as a daily driver?-img_0021.jpg

    Itís a 2015. Those photos are from 4 months ago. Like I said - I love it. But it's probably not a bad time to dump it in the next 6 months and move on to either to a fourth Ram or something else.

    I thought the TRD Pro (without the Desert Air Intake) looked completely bad ass. I really like the looks of it and yeah - resale wise, it can't be beat. Anyway, it's good to have options, and the time to be able to consider them all.
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  18. #18
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    I, too, have always like Tacos and the resale value has been ridiculous for YEARS (if that's a bubble, it's the world's longest bubble).

    That said -- and having owned various full- and midsize trucks -- I personally think it's absolutely nuts to move from a full-size to midsize. I can't see any reason to do so. Barely cheaper, almost the same gas mileage, don't have the towing or load capacity. I'd never buy a small truck again.
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    That said -- and having owned various full- and midsize trucks -- I personally think it's absolutely nuts to move from a full-size to midsize. I can't see any reason to do so. Barely cheaper, almost the same gas mileage, don't have the towing or load capacity. I'd never buy a small truck again.
    Sigh, I keep coming back to an EcoBoost F150. It seems the truck to beat.
    I like 'em long, low, slack and playful

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    The Ram was my personal favorite of all the modern trucks, but I never owned an F150 with the Ecoboost.

    I'm looking hard at that Mercedes Metris van for my next rig. Too bad no AWD, but we don't really need that here in Phoenix.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrm View Post
    rather have a ranger...operating costs..gas..insurance...parts...repair...is probably less...
    ahh, negative. tacoma most reliable. if you want to keep it, long term you pay FAR less maintaining any toyota
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  22. #22
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    I might be the wrong person to ask. I've gone from full-sized pickups, Kenworths, Macks & Japanese brand 4x4s to cars and love not having to be in something that's not so great at handling. I'm a ski area director and drive on the service roads and ski trails often. A Subaru Outback will often have traction where my Toyota 4x4 with lockers and AT tires did not.

    My Toyota was the most reliable and easier to repair of many but it's just nicer to have the generally better handling, better in winter, lower cost to operate top safety car. At times I get teased by some associates about this but I don't need to play super trucker. I had my time with real trucks and I rent a pickup or trailer when I need one.

    An associate who's our MTB trail manager has gone from Subarus to his second AWD Sienna because he wants more interior space and a better road trip vehicle. My wife has the lowered sport Sienna SE but I get this guy's decisions because my wife's Sienna has the same 292 HP engine. For a lot of the year I even drive it on our "4x4 only" service roads.

    One of our snow crew and shooting rage people have the pickup discussed here. He might not push snow with the bumper when I do but I've watched him slip sideways when the Subarus don't or need running starts and that's probably tires. I have snow rated tires that make a difference. I'd still choose a Toyota if that fit my needs, I liked mine, but I just don't want to lose the more pleasant to drive and often more competent handling vehicle. I would not want to give up the "EyeSight" feature.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I've been casually shopping for a midsize truck and the bulk of the reviews I'm reading are saying that the Taco is falling behind competitors who are stepping up in that vehicle class.

    I keep reading that Honda is killing it with daily driver duties with the Ridgeline (comfort, fuel economy, AWD is a bit better for snowy roads), though it sacrifices towing and hauling capability, as well as legit off-road chops. For more "trucky" duties, the Ranger and the Canyon/Colorado are reviewed consistently better than the Taco, it seems.
    An associate is very happy with his Ridgeline. He had a Jeep Gadiator??? and GM Colorado briefly. He got GM pickups for his business and loves his Ridgeline for a good combo of utility, civility and quality.
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  24. #24
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    Having owned 3 4runners, currently a 06' w 115k miles Ive found that yes they are reliable and pretty cheap to maintain but i only buy um used. If i was financing, insuring and paying for periodic required maintenance of a new top of the line tacoma i'd think twice..

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    Quote Originally Posted by bitflogger View Post
    I might be the wrong person to ask. I've gone from full-sized pickups, Kenworths, Macks & Japanese brand 4x4s to cars and love not having to be in something that's not so great at handling. I'm a ski area director...
    Sorry for the slight thread drift but I agree with all of this. Not a ski area director but a frequent visitor (20-year season pass holder at Bridger Bowl with a smattering of days at Big Sky each year). Back when I had my 94 Nissan Pathfinder I would ALWAYS take my wife's FWD VW Jetta to the ski hill when the roads were bad. The more nimble car with dedicated snow tires crushed the SUV with BFG TA tires on snow packed or icy roads.

    Now we both have AWD cars (VW Alltrack and Suby Crosstrek) and I would never go back to "truck handling". I even rallied the Crosstrek a few miles up a snowmobile trail last year. That was a total mistake but it got us back once I found a wide enough spot to turn it around. My wife and friends were all like, "wow this car is awesome, you're so good at driving!". All I could think was, "this is going to be a loooong walk out of here and I'm not getting my car back until spring thaw".

  26. #26
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    Not in the same boat. I have been deep in the mountains a minimum of once a week through the winter for decades (Lake Louise, Sunshine, Kicking Horse, Revy, not to mention Fernie and others). My Rams with BF Goodrich A/Ts have never once let me down, nor have I ever even had a sense of fear or concern with them. They are absolute beasts in shitty winter conditions. A near perfect ski (and bike) vehicle.

    Donít get me wrong. I love Subarus. But if I bought one, it wouldnít be because I lacked confidence hitting the deep and steep in the winter with my Ram.

    I canít go the Ridgeline route. I just canít.

    EDIT: re-reading this post, it has the wrong tone. It wasnít meant to be confrontational. Sorry if it read that way.
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post

    EDIT: re-reading this post, it has the wrong tone. It wasnít meant to be confrontational. Sorry if it read that way.
    I didn't take it that way. I also realize my SUV/truck experience is biased by my SUV being obsolete technology when I owned it and my work truck is similarly a 13-year old POS.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    The Ram was my personal favorite of all the modern trucks, but I never owned an F150 with the Ecoboost.
    My dad's on his second of these. I drove his last one a couple of times and it was a decent truck. He always buys the stripped down 4x2 work truck versions, though, because he's a cheap bastid, so there are zero creature comforts. I haven't seen his new one yet, but I hear he splurged for a spray-on bedliner this time. lol

    Quote Originally Posted by bitflogger View Post
    An associate is very happy with his Ridgeline. He had a Jeep Gadiator??? and GM Colorado briefly. He got GM pickups for his business and loves his Ridgeline for a good combo of utility, civility and quality.
    I can't stand the new Jeeps, either. Esp the Gladiator. Ugh. I like the older (and smaller) 2 door Jeeps. Zero utility for me, though. Not gonna deal with their crappy on-road ride quality when I don't do ANY actual off-roading.

    I'm not a huge fan of the Ridgeline's styling, but I could tolerate it. I'm a little concerned by reports I've read about how the engine struggles a bit with a load, so I'll definitely have to do a test drive. Bonus points if the dealer lets me bring my camper along so I can test drive one towing the camper. At least my camper is pretty small and light and WELL below the truck's tow rating.

    Quote Originally Posted by bitflogger View Post
    A Subaru Outback will often have traction where my Toyota 4x4 with lockers and AT tires did not.
    My wife has a Crosstrek and that car is an absolute champ. With regular AS tires, she was the person breaking tracks for about a mile through a 14" dump of fresh snow last winter.

    I'm looking for a bit more utility for my next vehicle that'll be replacing a Honda Fit. Otherwise, I'd probably be considering a Subaru, as well.

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    These threads talking about cars is interesting. Mainly because there are a lot of posters that praise Subaru's. Driving around North Texas, I kinda look around for them to see what they look like on the road (as opposed to web pics). But I never seem to see any. Maybe a regional car? I think if (a big if) I were ever to be in the market for a smaller vehicle, I may look a Subaru over. At least give it some thought. But then, I notice more BMW, Audi, Mercedes, Porsche, Land Rover, and Jaguar mid size SUV's than anything else on the roads I frequent. They are outnumbered only by the full size stuff from GM, Ford and Dodge. And it's comical here. All sort of guys plowing around in their 3/5 ton 500 ft lb super charged diesels with lift kits and blasting exhaust that never see dirt or haul more than a couple of kids and their soccer balls to practice. Not knocking anyone... just think it's funny.

    Me... I prefer full size SUV with "true" 4 wheel drive. Just fit my needs best. Z71 Tahoe'e are my favorite. And as long as I continue to get more than 300,000 nearly repair free miles out of GM/Chevy (like my last 4 full sized vehicles), that's what I'll continue to buy.
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  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    This thread is not going in the direction I expected. Thanks guys for the candid responses.
    Iíve never owned one but a buddy has the new version and weíve taken it on a few bike trips and itís horrible on long drives. Fuel mileage is a joke and they havenít changed the seating position since the 70s or 80s. Which for me is a big deal. To me they sit like a c3 or c4 vette which we all know was awful. Honestly all the smaller trucks suck in that regard and the fuel mileage


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  31. #31
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    Had a '16 Subaru Outback, that car was surprisingly capable off-road in snow and mud. It has a max tow capacity of 2500# though, so when my wife and I decided to get a travel trailer (our current one is 4500 # dry) we started shopping for trucks.

    Ended up with a '16 Supercrew F-150 Eco. 365 hp 420 fpt, that 3.5 V6 twin turbo is a beast, so much fun to drive. The turbo is handy here at altitude, 5800 ft.

    You can have Eco or Boost, but not both. Driving it like grandma, can get about 18mpg city, driving it for fun, about 15/16mpg. It's also highly capable off-road, and unlike the Subaru, has 4wd low.

    Max tow package (11500 #) 36 gallon gas tank.

    Was thinking Tundra, but after looking at the offset crash test data for 2016/2017 trucks, they all basically failed miserably (also at rollover), the supercrew f-150 the only one that didn't.
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    Word to the wise. You may think you have a win fitting in the garage. But when you actually drive it, you will hate it compared to your Ram. I went from full-size to the Tacoma TRD when they came out. Drove it for 2 years and just could not get along with it. Iíve had Tacomaís in the past and thought this new version would be like my 1st gen plus all the creature comforts. I donít know if itís my age but hated the seating position, floor too high, ceiling too low. So uncomfortable. Bed is ok, but too shallow that when I used a tailgate mat, the bikes would fall over. Traded it for an eco boost F150. So much better in every way. Except tight trails but I have an ATV for that.

    Keep your truck.

    If you absolutely needed to get a midsize, Iíd look at the Colorado or Ranger. I think Colorado is better of the two, personally. ZR2 is pretty cool.

  33. #33
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    I went small truck shopping 6 moths ago. Compared the Canyon/Colorado to the TRD Offroad. Have been wanting a newer Taco for years and love the exterior styling and reliability so fully expected to LOVE my test drive. I was wrong. The tranny is awlful. My test ride was hunting gears up and down all over the place..on flat Phoenix paved streets. What a shame. Ended up not buying anything as these small truck prices are just ridiculous.

    We do have a '15 Outback, love that car. Nice daily driver (my wife's) and with Geolander A/T tires it's plenty capable for camping and getting out in the woods or desert trails.

  34. #34
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    I have a 2015 GMC Canyon, I've had it since new. I was prepared to be disappointed-this is my first new GM product ever. But I really liked the size and styling. I can say now that it's been a great truck for me-the Colorado/Canyon are worth a look. I plan to drive it for a good while yet.

  35. #35
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    I have a '15 Taco TRD Offroad and it's been super reliable. Coming up on 200k miles. I can park it in my garage.

    I have a small travel trailer that I tow with it. From all the negative reports of the third generation Taco transmissions, I'm going to try to keep my truck running until Toyota comes out with a better transmission. I've heard that they're terrible for towing.

    I drove a RAM 1500 a while back and it was way more comfortable than my Taco.
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  36. #36
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    about the tranny in the new tacomas

    be specific to the model and year and if there is a TSB for it, as there has been a TSB to reprogram the 'hunting' trannies

    so yes , toyota admitted the rush for economy made a bizzare shifting logic that some customers hated in the 3rd gen tacos.

    whichever 3rd gen toyota taco truck you ride and feel the tranny blows goats, (a) is it under any TSB and if so, (b) has the TSB been done
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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    about the tranny in the new tacomas

    be specific to the model and year and if there is a TSB for it, as there has been a TSB to reprogram the 'hunting' trannies

    so yes , toyota admitted the rush for economy made a bizzare shifting logic that some customers hated in the 3rd gen tacos.

    whichever 3rd gen toyota taco truck you ride and feel the tranny blows goats, (a) is it under any TSB and if so, (b) has the TSB been done
    Thanks for the information!

    I had no idea that there was a cure for it and now I can consider a third gen truck when my second gen finally wears out.
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  38. #38
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    Well regarding the transmissions on the newer tacos... My test ride was just six months ago or so on a brand new vehicle. If there was a TSB for it you'd think they'd take care of that before they sold the vehicle but who knows.

    Anyway it's not a complete deal-breaker as evidence by the millions of people seemingly driving them. It just sucks and it should have been a lot better. I would get frustrated driving that truck as a daily driver with all the hunting...but if I bought one not knowing the situation and only realizing it later I guess I'll get used to it, that's for sure.

    on the plus side and there are many to that truck, they are finally ditching the rear drum brakes and adding a 10-way power front seat. Welcome to 1995 Toyota! lol.

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    Quote Originally Posted by eatdrinkride View Post
    Well regarding the transmissions on the newer tacos... My test ride was just six months ago or so on a brand new vehicle. If there was a TSB for it you'd think they'd take care of that before they sold the vehicle but who knows.

    Anyway it's not a complete deal-breaker as evidence by the millions of people seemingly driving them. It just sucks and it should have been a lot better. I would get frustrated driving that truck as a daily driver with all the hunting...but if I bought one not knowing the situation and only realizing it later I guess I'll get used to it, that's for sure.

    on the plus side and there are many to that truck, they are finally ditching the rear drum brakes and adding a 10-way power front seat. Welcome to 1995 Toyota! lol.

    TSB are not done until a customer complains with symptoms specific to a TSB and not beforehand....until [fix] becomes put in production OR it becomes a recall
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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    about the tranny in the new tacomas

    be specific to the model and year and if there is a TSB for it, as there has been a TSB to reprogram the 'hunting' trannies

    so yes , toyota admitted the rush for economy made a bizzare shifting logic that some customers hated in the 3rd gen tacos.

    whichever 3rd gen toyota taco truck you ride and feel the tranny blows goats, (a) is it under any TSB and if so, (b) has the TSB been done
    The TSB ďfixĒ does not work consistently. Some have had luck with it but others still have issues. Seems like there are still a lot of dealers who donít even know about the TSBís. Toyota still has yet to come out with a solution.

    There are aftermarket fixes, like OVTune, but even they seem to have some mixed reviews. Iíd advise finding a 2013-2015 with the 4.0 and 5-speed. Or look elsewhere.

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    And here I thought that this thread would be filled with endless posts about how truly epic the TRD Pro is. I actually thought that the Taco was the unofficial vehicle of all things mountain biking. Where are all the die hard supporters?

    What is truly amazing is the level of loyalty, and resale value, given what appear to be significant known issues.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    And here I thought that this thread would be filled with endless posts about how truly epic the TRD Pro is. I actually thought that the Taco was the unofficial vehicle of all things mountain biking. Where are all the die hard supporters?

    What is truly amazing is the level of loyalty, and resale value, given what appear to be significant known issues.
    TRD PRO is overkill fluff. the most basic taco 4 cylinder with 4wd is just as awesome as a TRD pro of course it won't win a drag race with a 6cylinder, but for normal people it goes anywhere the TRD PRO will* and save a lot of change doing it

    *obviously on paper you can come up with a mudhole situation where the TRD has crawl control and can squeeze out of crappy situation better, but come on the base model w/4wd is 99.99 just as good. I look at the PRO trimmings as a mall-crawler waste of time really...I do have a 2013 TRD because e-locker but I don't even need that e-locker much.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    TRD PRO is overkill fluff. the most basic taco 4 cylinder with 4wd is just as awesome as a TRD pro of course it won't win a drag race with a 6cylinder, but for normal people it goes anywhere the TRD PRO will* and save a lot of change doing it

    *obviously on paper you can come up with a mudhole situation where the TRD has crawl control and can squeeze out of crappy situation better, but come on the base model w/4wd is 99.99 just as good. I look at the PRO trimmings as a mall-crawler waste of time really...I do have a 2013 TRD because e-locker but I don't even need that e-locker much.
    Unless I am missing something, the comments above apply across the board for all Tacos. The tranny, anemic engine, uncomfortable seating position, shit gas mileage relative to a V8 full-size, and all the other stated issues appear to be present across the entire model line. At least the TRD Pro might feel less like a Russian utility vehicle, creature comfort-wise.

    Styling is subjective. Apart from the Desert Air Intake (and the TRD Pro is available without it), I like the design cues on the TRD Pro. I think they look bad ass AF. I understand that in some places, bidding wars ensue over the few that are available, and they often go for $10k over MSRP.

    Maybe they are ďdentistĒ trucks to some I suppose...
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    I went truck shopping last year. I wanted to love the taco but at over 6 feet tall I felt way too confined in the driver's seat. I owned an F150 at the time but it was starting to fall apart at 100,000 miles with expensive repairs and ongoing problems. The Rams are nice trucks, and both the F150's and the Rams have better 'expert' reviews than the Tundra. The Tundra is said to be outdated, more road noise, etc. But when you look at reviews from owners you get a different picture because of the Tundra's reliability. I went with the Tundra 4x4 TRD limited. It's a big truck and it doesn't drive as smoothly as the F150, but its is still really comfortable, I can haul all my toys, there are less parts to break, and I'm not worried about it breaking down in a couple years.

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    Quote Originally Posted by drich View Post
    I went truck shopping last year. I wanted to love the taco but at over 6 feet tall I felt way too confined in the driver's seat. I owned an F150 at the time but it was starting to fall apart at 100,000 miles with expensive repairs and ongoing problems. The Rams are nice trucks, and both the F150's and the Rams have better 'expert' reviews than the Tundra. The Tundra is said to be outdated, more road noise, etc. But when you look at reviews from owners you get a different picture because of the Tundra's reliability. I went with the Tundra 4x4 TRD limited. It's a big truck and it doesn't drive as smoothly as the F150, but its is still really comfortable, I can haul all my toys, there are less parts to break, and I'm not worried about it breaking down in a couple years.
    Not basing this on any empirical evidence, but I suspect some of the people in the demographic for North American full size trucks beat those poor basturds to death, and expect them to be running smoothly at 100k with little to no servicing. I service my vehicles and I have had 3 Rams in a row with zero issues. ZERO. As in not one problem with any of them. All 5 years old and 100k+.

    That said, I know guys in the oil sands who tell me that the older Tacos used to run perfectly at 300k after being abused to death.
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    You may be right, and good to hear you have had such a positive experience with the Rams. They are really nice trucks. I took care of my F150 and my experience might be anecdotal, but it started to fall apart at 100k with major repairs and left me stranded a couple of times. The Toyota truck I owned before the F150 (1989 4x4) was still going strong at 200k+ with no major problems and the original clutch! I still regret selling that truck.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    Not basing this on any empirical evidence, but I suspect some of the people in the demographic for North American full size trucks beat those poor basturds to death, and expect them to be running smoothly at 100k with little to no servicing. I service my vehicles and I have had 3 Rams in a row with zero issues. ZERO. As in not one problem with any of them. All 5 years old and 100k+.

    That said, I know guys in the oil sands who tell me that the older Tacos used to run perfectly at 300k after being abused to death.
    There are anecdotal stories of all kinds for all types of vehicles. But for me, Toyota, AND Ford, Ram and GM have all performed well. No major issues. Family and a friend who use all 3 domestic makes, and work in the commercial construction industry have all driven their trucks (bought new) to 200k+ before selling them off and getting another one. There may be little things here and there, but they've all done well without leaving them stranded, ever. The thing is, they were all meticulous about maintenance. Oil changed on time, drivetrain serviced, etc.

    Before I bought a new F150, I seriously considered the Tundra. The 3 things that I just couldn't get over:
    1) Poor payload. Only 1,100lbs on the model I was looking at. (4WD Crewmax SR5)
    2) Poor MPG. They're getting 3/4 ton mileage.
    3) Poor Safety rating. IIHS crash test indicates the worst of all fullsize pick ups tested. I often have my kids in the truck, so this was an important factor.

    Good engine and drivetrain, but factors above had me look elsewhere.

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    ... ZR2, yeah.

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    I think I must be brain washed.

    I don't think I could buy a North American mid size truck. I would want the full size V8 (or equivalent).

    Just like I don't think I could buy a full size foreign truck. Again, I would want the full size domestic.

    But a mid size foreign truck might have been a cool change of pace.

    Never, ever a Ridgeline though.

    I am still waiting for an onslaught of the Taco faithful to set us all straight here. How can so many mountain bikers be wrong? More shockingly, how could they be so quiet?
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    I am still waiting for an onslaught of the Taco faithful to set us all straight here. How can so many mountain bikers be wrong? More shockingly, how could they be so quiet?
    I don't have Taco (own a 4runner though). I think the main appeal is reliability and styling. Both the Tacoma and 4runner are very reliable. FCA (and GM) as a whole score poorly in reliability. I had considered a Grand Cherokee before getting the 4runner and just couldn't get over the fact that every source I could find pointed to these having relatively poor reliability. Even on the Jeep forums, most guys admitted they're not that reliable. My dad (who is a die hard Mopar guy) just a got a new Ram and had to take it back to the dealer three times in the first couple hundred miles for small issues. I'm not saying I wouldn't own a Ram (I wouldn't buy a Jeep though) and I don't think reliability has to be the main criteria (especially for sports cars) but there's also something to be said for not having to take the vehicle in for repair (major or minor) once or twice a year.

    The downside to Toyota is that part of why they're so reliable is because Toyota is slow to change. The current gen 4runner is going on 11 years now. However, people don't buy 4runners and Tacos looking for the latest gizmos and widgets in their car.

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    Interesting thread... I've been in a forester for the past 5 years and with geolander AT tires it does amazingly well in snow/ice. I had a basic 4cyl standard cab taco for 7-8yrs back in the day and it was a great truck, other than the seating position. Also had a 4runner during that time and it was a fantastic vehicle, other than the mpg.

    I'm seriously considering getting a new (or lightly used) SR5 4runner with a 3rd row to replace my subaru. I need more room since my 3 kids (and dogs) are often coming with me on rides/adventures. I haven't yet test driven a modern 4runner and wonder if the seating position is going to be a deal killer..

    To the OP, as much as I love tacos and wouldn't consider any other mid-size PU, stick with the full size. Putting anything in a standard taco bed is ridiculous. I've had full-size chevy work trucks in the past and if you're going to have a bed, make a full-size (at least width!). I actually don't see the point in mid-size beds.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    However, people don't buy 4runners and Tacos looking for the latest gizmos and widgets in their car.
    So true - I want another 4runner for the LACK of tech

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    Quote Originally Posted by 29ftw View Post
    Interesting thread...I actually don't see the point in mid-size beds.
    That's pretty subjective.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 29ftw View Post
    So true - I want another 4runner for the LACK of tech
    Talk about lack of tech. I have a 2000 Tacoma. It's been in the family since the day it was purchased off the lot. Bench seat, manual roll-up windows, fixed steering column position, original radio. Only 85000 miles! About once a month someone puts a note on the windshield asking if we'd like to sell it, running or not, lol.

    I had an 89 4Runner for many years that I really loved even though it didn't have factory AC, and I live in Phoenix, so that was a bit of a problem. it had the v6 engine and was a beast off-road but that motor was terribly inefficient. It hated going uphill for any length of time and would seemingly slow down the longer the hillclimb was at least at highway speeds, and it got really crappy gas mileage...but I do miss it. It was probably the most fun vehicle I have ever owned.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post

    ...I don't think I could buy a North American mid size truck...
    If you're in the market you owe it to yourself to at least test drive one. It might surprise you. I'm no big 3 cheerleader, but I took a chance on the "new GM" after the bailout and I've had very few regrets with my Canyon.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveF View Post
    That's pretty subjective.
    It is.. but as someone who regularly hauls dirtbikes, firewood and other stuff (in a 5x8 trailer), a mid-size bed is barely useful.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 29ftw View Post
    Interesting thread... I've been in a forester for the past 5 years and with geolander AT tires it does amazingly well in snow/ice.

    I'm seriously considering getting a new (or lightly used) SR5 4runner with a 3rd row to replace my subaru. I need more room since my 3 kids (and dogs) are often coming with me on rides/adventures. I haven't yet test driven a modern 4runner and wonder if the seating position is going to be a deal killer..
    Have you looked at the Subaru Ascent? Looks pretty cool.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    I don't have Taco (own a 4runner though). I think the main appeal is reliability and styling. Both the Tacoma and 4runner are very reliable. FCA (and GM) as a whole score poorly in reliability. I had considered a Grand Cherokee before getting the 4runner and just couldn't get over the fact that every source I could find pointed to these having relatively poor reliability. Even on the Jeep forums, most guys admitted they're not that reliable. My dad (who is a die hard Mopar guy) just a got a new Ram and had to take it back to the dealer three times in the first couple hundred miles for small issues. I'm not saying I wouldn't own a Ram (I wouldn't buy a Jeep though) and I don't think reliability has to be the main criteria (especially for sports cars) but there's also something to be said for not having to take the vehicle in for repair (major or minor) once or twice a year.

    The downside to Toyota is that part of why they're so reliable is because Toyota is slow to change. The current gen 4runner is going on 11 years now. However, people don't buy 4runners and Tacos looking for the latest gizmos and widgets in their car.
    FCA has come a long way, but as a whole, they're still a bit behind Toyota as far as reliability. But not that far. I had a 2018 Tacoma. It wasn't problem-free like my old Tacomas and 4Runners. With only a couple thousand miles on the truck, it stalled for no reason. Dealer couldn't figure it out. Happened twice. The front radar acted up as well. Not to mention the transmission issues.

    So to your point, Ram, Ford have their issues, but it's mostly small issues due to tech implementation in the truck. As I experienced, Toyota is not impervious to the problems, either, as the they cram more tech into it (and YES, people definitely want the latest gizmos and widgets in their 4Runners and Tacomas). And this is the reason, when I bought my F150, I went with a base model. No power steps, blind spot, cooled seats. Just a plain ol truck.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mlx john View Post
    Have you looked at the Subaru Ascent? Looks pretty cool.
    For sure, it's #2 on the list.. but I don't want a CVT trans in a vehicle that big and I want real off-road capability. It's also about the same $ as a 4runner and the real world mpg isn't much better

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    Quote Originally Posted by 29ftw View Post
    It is.. but as someone who regularly hauls dirtbikes, firewood and other stuff (in a 5x8 trailer), a mid-size bed is barely useful.
    I would agree a midsize for real truck duties will leave you wanting. But they do have their place. They're real nice for driving around and fitting into parking spots. Some trails are too tight for fullsize trucks and less prone to desert pin striping. And I found the bed plenty useful. It's much better to have an open bed for utilitarian purposes than an SUV (for me).

    But in the end, for me, fullsize makes more sense. The MPG is the same. Much more power. Towing and hauling capabilties. Plenty of room for the kids. Price was maybe 3-5% more, which is nothing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 29ftw View Post
    For sure, it's #2 on the list.. but I don't want a CVT trans in a vehicle that big and I want real off-road capability. It's also about the same $ as a 4runner and the real world mpg isn't much better
    They've got more interior room, and according to Fuelly, MPG is much better.

    Subaru Ascent MPG - Actual MPG from 208 Subaru Ascent owners

    Toyota 4Runner MPG - Actual MPG from 3,925 Toyota 4Runner owners

    But I have to agree on the CVT. We had one in our Outback. It was actually just fine and mated to the 2.5L almost perfectly. But I just couldn't trust it. My inlaws have 70k miles and already having some issues with their CVT. Plus, no lo-range.

    If I were looking at an off-road capable small SUV right now, I'd probably go Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    ahh, negative. tacoma most reliable. if you want to keep it, long term you pay FAR less maintaining any toyota
    This is an utterly ridiculous comment. The things that need to be maintained on any truck (gearboxes, oil changes, etc.) are the same on every truck. How is a Toyota going to be cheaper to "maintain" than a Ford or Chevrolet? How many quarts of oil does a Tacoma take vs. its competition? And who cares anyway?

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    Quote Originally Posted by twodownzero View Post
    This is an utterly ridiculous comment. The things that need to be maintained on any truck (gearboxes, oil changes, etc.) are the same on every truck. How is a Toyota going to be cheaper to "maintain" than a Ford or Chevrolet? How many quarts of oil does a Tacoma take vs. its competition? And who cares anyway?
    Not to mention, the difference in the cost of the parts. Dealer parts are still expensive for both, but seems to be about a 30% difference for most parts (Toyota is more expensive). Availability of parts is another factor. There are more parts available at local parts stores as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2:01 View Post
    Not to mention, the difference in the cost of the parts. Dealer parts are still expensive for both, but seems to be about a 30% difference for most parts (Toyota is more expensive). Availability of parts is another factor. There are more parts available at local parts stores as well.
    I was going to mention that as well, but I've had my Ram for over 14 years and I don't think I've installed $500 worth of parts on it in that time. I just replaced the front brakes this year for the first time and the rears I did about 2 years ago. The original batteries lasted from 2005-2018. Certainly I've replaced a bunch of filters and oil, the OE balljoints were crap, etc, but the rest has been really solid. I would imagine that most modern vehicles are this way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by eatdrinkride View Post
    Talk about lack of tech. I have a 2000 Tacoma. It's been in the family since the day it was purchased off the lot. Bench seat, manual roll-up windows, fixed steering column position, original radio. Only 85000 miles! About once a month someone puts a note on the windshield asking if we'd like to sell it, running or not, lol.
    How much do you want for it? ;-)
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    I'll say that my 2005 Taco has been extremely reliable over the 150,000 miles that I've owned it. I bought it used with 50k.

    It still runs awesome and I'll keep it until it falls apart, whenever that may be.

    Dislikes? Well the seating position is not the most comfortable and the off-road suspension is pretty stiff. The gas mileage is not good. The power is acceptable, but not great.

    However, it handles pretty well and does quite well off road, especially with the locker in the rear.

    Coming from a Ram to a Taco, I'd expect that the Taco would perform better off-road, be much less comfortable, noisier, and slower. However, it would keep going until the end of time
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    My girl just traded in her '17 Honda Pilot in for the '19 Ridgeline and I'd have to say, its a pretty impressive package.
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    Quote Originally Posted by twodownzero View Post
    This is an utterly ridiculous comment. The things that need to be maintained on any truck (gearboxes, oil changes, etc.) are the same on every truck. How is a Toyota going to be cheaper to "maintain" than a Ford or Chevrolet? How many quarts of oil does a Tacoma take vs. its competition? And who cares anyway?
    because ridiculous stuff doesn't break often on toyotas....chevy valve seats will break down and you will be going through a quart every 3000 miles when the motor has 70,000 miles on it. I've owned many vehicles long term and toyota by far is the best overall bet if you plan on keeping things. if you have to be convinced of this, then just don't get one then and remain in your fantasy world that ford or chevy is better at longevity and cost of repairs LOL

    if you swap vehicles every 5 years then it doesn't matter, you are shoving your ford or chevy problems to someone else

    my 270,000 mile 4runner loses 3mm of oil on the dipstick in 10,000 miles. my 96,000 mile tacoma loses about 2mm in 10,000 miles. my 98,000 mile yaris is the same. fricking rock solid reliable, no perceivable engine wear that matters, always run mobil 1 and 10,000 mile changes, and do the scheduled maintenance stated in the maint guide. Oh and all the other stuff (all electrical, all body) all works fine nothing breaks. all that has happened is exhaust heat shields eventually rot and fall off, that is it. on the 4runner TPS sensor died, as well as af and o2 sensors....all of that between 130,000 miles - 170,000 for the three sensors, which is normal wear for these items.

    and absolutely nothing has left me stranded, dead, need a hook job...


    and agree this thread is largely 'don't care' [useless]. if you have to ask 'toyota???' then just no, don't get one. go do your thing
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    I too have a Tacoma and can also attest to it not being the nicest truck made. The automatic on the new ones does not match the engine at all. I would say just about every other new truck drives better. And I knew that when I bought the truck.

    The reason to buy a Tacoma is for resale and reliability. If those two things aren't top of your priority list then get something else.
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    Upkeep is sort of a funny conversation.

    Im a professional very certified mechanic. I've heard SO SO SO many people say "my car has been amazingly reliable, I havent replaced anything!"... and then I inspect it, and its obvious they havent replaced anything, and now the car is basically ruined to the point where repair is absurd. Those claims need to be taken with a grain of salt. Or maybe the whole salt shaker.

    Basically everything on the market is clapped out at 200k. Everything is rusted out, loose, worn, leaking. Except tacomas and most toyotas. At 200k they tend to still be pretty well kept together. They might need a strut, or an oil pan gasket, or minor stuff, but they wont be in shambles.

    If you want a truck and you're planning on driving it 350,000 miles, i'd put the tacoma up against anything out there. Thats getting pretty silly though, when most people dump cars before the warranty is up.

    As a new car, the tacoma compares pretty poorly. Its competitors have more room, more power, similar capabilities etc. That crazy ultra high mileage claim to fame probably holds less water these days.

    We were selling a TRD package runner for $47k used at work. Thats insanity.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    ...and agree this thread is largely 'don't care' [useless]
    Agree with whom? Who else said the thread was useless? I for one have learned a fair amount from this thread. I think it has been a great discussion and am thankful for those who have participated.
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  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    because ridiculous stuff doesn't break often on toyotas....chevy valve seats will break down and you will be going through a quart every 3000 miles when the motor has 70,000 miles on it. I've owned many vehicles long term and toyota by far is the best overall bet if you plan on keeping things. if you have to be convinced of this, then just don't get one then and remain in your fantasy world that ford or chevy is better at longevity and cost of repairs LOL

    if you swap vehicles every 5 years then it doesn't matter, you are shoving your ford or chevy problems to someone else

    my 270,000 mile 4runner loses 3mm of oil on the dipstick in 10,000 miles. my 96,000 mile tacoma loses about 2mm in 10,000 miles. my 98,000 mile yaris is the same. fricking rock solid reliable, no perceivable engine wear that matters, always run mobil 1 and 10,000 mile changes, and do the scheduled maintenance stated in the maint guide. Oh and all the other stuff (all electrical, all body) all works fine nothing breaks. all that has happened is exhaust heat shields eventually rot and fall off, that is it. on the 4runner TPS sensor died, as well as af and o2 sensors....all of that between 130,000 miles - 170,000 for the three sensors, which is normal wear for these items.

    and absolutely nothing has left me stranded, dead, need a hook job...


    and agree this thread is largely 'don't care' [useless]. if you have to ask 'toyota???' then just no, don't get one. go do your thing
    Valves are not "maintenance" items. I do not swap my vehicles every 5 years. The vehicles in my driveway are 31, 15, and 15 years old. None of them have OHC engines, timing belts, nor have they ever needed anything other than normal maintenance items (parts expected to wear out) as repairs.

    I hear people talk like you're talking all the time, but I've been working on cars since I was 12 years old. It is all a bunch of ridiculous nonsense. There is nothing about Toyotas or any other car that makes them more "reliable." In fact, many vehicles, Toyotas included, have unnecessarily sophisticated designs that are demonstrably less reliable and certainly much more costly to repair. While a single sensor is not a big deal, a throttle position sensor should last the life of a vehicle; such a part is not a maintenance item.

    If you think your car is great and nothing breaks (I fail to see how that is "reliable," as that sounds much more like "durable" to me) then rock on with yourself. But if you think n=3 is somehow a sample to judge worldwide production of vehicles, then nothing I type into this box is going to make any difference.

    And, FWIW, I don't own a modern Chevrolet, but you are absolutely insane if you think that the heads last 70k miles. That engine design is probably the best OHV V8 ever manufactured. A poster in this thread alone has already testified to 300k mile life and I can tell you I certainly believe him. Long piston ring life is a byproduct of much better control over fuel metering than ever before, itself a byproduct of consumer demand for fuel economy and clean emissions more than any brand name or production technique. This accounts for your low oil consumption, and is universal across the market, not just one brand.

    I certainly have to ask "Toyota?" because like many other posters in this thread, I am intrigued that the market continues to value these vehicles so highly when they so obviously lack the capability (payload in weight, capacity in space in the bed, towing, horsepower, and perhaps fuel economy) of their competition. I am not (and likely will not ever) be in the market for this category of vehicle because I need a truck that can tow and haul much more than it is capable of. But as a car enthusiast, I can't help but watch from the sidelines and wonder what someone could possibly see in these things--especially reading all the posts about taller dudes who don't even fit in them. If I had a car that was uncomfortable to sit in, it would be gone from my driveway in a week. I've also seen the youtube videos and other reviews of the new Ford Ranger, and while I'm not ever going to buy one of those, either, I can't help but observe its technology has long since left Toyota behind.

    And the comment about them still having drum brakes in the rear, that is pretty shocking actually, as I think the last American (at least full size) pickup truck that was made with drum brakes in the rear was in 2001. There is actually nothing wrong with drum brakes if they are clean, adjusted correctly, etc., but if your idea of reliability is that the adjusters seized up a decade ago and the shoes don't move far enough to wear out, I suppose the drum brakes must be brute force reliable...
    Last edited by twodownzero; 3 Days Ago at 11:53 AM.

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    https://youtu.be/_ibGrVact24

    Go to 2 min
    https://youtu.be/kSmLH0svmJQ

    New Wranglers have this problem as well.

  74. #74
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    Every vehicle with a wet sump (normal oil pan setup) will smoke if you tilt it enough. Its not really an issue. Its certainly not great for the car, but with 6+ quarts of oil sloshing around, its going to roll into the intake when tilted.

    Look how long those trucks had to sit tilted like that before smoking... thats not bad! I used to track toyota MR2's, and those would smoke on long sweepers after 5 seconds or so.

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    Unfortunately 2011 Dakota has drum brakes in the rear. Drums are needlessly complicated and lose power in the wet vs. discs.

    Other than that my mid size v8 4x4 does everything I need. 1500 lb payload, 6500 lb towing capacity, 4 full size doors and a bed to haul stuff. If I towed anything I could have bought a ram 1500 or bigger, but this truck fits my needs. Itís actually a 1500 truck, just narrower.

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    Since some are wrapping 4runners into this thread, I think this ought to be said...
    As much as Tacomaís and 4runners are similar vehicles, theyíre also very different.
    The 4Runner feels more spacious and you definitely have more legroom in the backseat. It also has more weight over the rear tires so itíll stick to the road/mud/snow better than a Taco. And the 4.0L V6 is a phenomenal motor, with a perfectly geared tranny; I have 155K miles on mine and drive all sorts of conditions, including towing an inboard boat...never once thought about my transmission being improperly suited.
    I drove an Ď18 Tacoma last dec and was considering a purchase...until I drove it. Felt too small for me compared to my 4runner. But I see them all over the place so they must be good for the masses in my area.
    If youíre still considering a Taco, rent one for a weekend and see what you think. I did that with a Jeep a few years ago and that sealed it for me about not having one as a daily driver.
    Best of luck!

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by BK512 View Post
    And the 4.0L V6 is a phenomenal motor, with a perfectly geared tranny; I have 155K miles on mine and drive all sorts of conditions, including towing an inboard boat...never once thought about my transmission being improperly suited.
    I have to agree that my 4.0 and transmission have been rock-solid. Even towing a 17-foot camper trailer. I kind of have to stick with a Tacoma so that I can load the family's bikes in the bed when we take the trailer out on vacation. I'm too old to be hoisting them up on a roof rack.

    Also, I carry piles of smelly environmental sampling gear in the bed for work that I don't want to breathe while driving.

    Other than those practicalities, I'd really love to have a 4-runner.
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  78. #78
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    I traded in my 2014 F150 ecoboost crap for a 2020 TRD off-road and love it
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Taco TRD Pro as a daily driver?-ca4b258c-fa79-43c4-98a5-2746a876b67e.jpg  

    Taco TRD Pro as a daily driver?-32ac78cc-025e-4434-bfe6-1e3e85806342.jpg  


  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vin829 View Post
    I traded in my 2014 F150 ecoboost crap for a 2020 TRD off-road and love it
    Nice! Dare I ask what happened with your F-150?
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  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    Nice! Dare I ask what happened with your F-150?
    What didnít happen. Crappy mileage. First gen eco boost so intake valves were carboned up. Noisy waste gates. Plus the fact I didnít need a full size truck anymore

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    Quote Originally Posted by Curveball View Post
    I have to agree that my 4.0 and transmission have been rock-solid. Even towing a 17-foot camper trailer. I kind of have to stick with a Tacoma so that I can load the family's bikes in the bed when we take the trailer out on vacation. I'm too old to be hoisting them up on a roof rack.

    Also, I carry piles of smelly environmental sampling gear in the bed for work that I don't want to breathe while driving.

    Other than those practicalities, I'd really love to have a 4-runner.
    Get a 2015 Tacoma instead. Or a Ranger.

    I was hauling 3 bikes with 3 passengers up a 6-7% grade in the new Tacoma. It would constantly down/up shift. 5k rpm, to 2.5k rpm. To 5k rpm. Over and over again, every 3 seconds. It was embarrassing and frustrating. You can put it in Sport mode and lock out the gear, but that's a bandaid solution.

  82. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2:01 View Post
    Get a 2015 Tacoma instead. Or a Ranger.

    I was hauling 3 bikes with 3 passengers up a 6-7% grade in the new Tacoma. It would constantly down/up shift. 5k rpm, to 2.5k rpm. To 5k rpm. Over and over again, every 3 seconds. It was embarrassing and frustrating. You can put it in Sport mode and lock out the gear, but that's a bandaid solution.
    Yeah, I'd likely get a low-mileage 2015 Taco once mine wears out.

    The Ranger is interesting, but I've never really gotten along with Fords. A matter of personal preference more than anything.
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