Suggest me a vehicle...

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  • 02-02-2010
    Jekyll_Jockey
    Suggest me a vehicle...
    Ok I need some help thinking outside of the box here....
    I'm not going to say what I have though of as I do not want to sway your creative juices...

    With the recent death of my Cherokee due to an accident... I need a new mode of transportation for my bikes and me.

    A quick summary of what I need:
    - ability to run a 2" hitch receiver EDIT: to run a Thule T2 (4 bikes) not to pull a trailer....
    - ability to fit 4 adults in the car with relative comfort
    - decent gas millage (hoping for better than 20mpg hwy)
    - good highway driver with enough off road capability to get me to the trail head
    - either 4wd or AWD


    Thanks for the help :cornut:
  • 02-02-2010
    Ken
    My personal faves if I were in the market:

    Honda Ridgeline
    Subaru Outback
    Honda CR-V (if they still make the AWD model)

    If you are plugging something other than a bike rack into that 2" receiver (like a hitch for towing) then my list might not be suitable (maybe the Ridgeline though).
  • 02-02-2010
    yurtinus
    There are tons and tons of vehicles that will do what you want. Your need for a 2" receiver cuts out a lot of the smaller wagons and SUVs that would otherwise do the trick, though. You're throwing an awfully wide net here, will want to narrow down some categories.

    My generalized list for you:
    - Smallish SUV (Cherokees, 4runners, xterras, elements)
    - Crew cab smallish pickups (tacomas, frontiers, colorados)

    There are an awful lot of tradeoffs on the pickups (peruse the "who has a pickup truck" thread and try to navigate through the vitriol for some excellent points :) ). 20 MPG is doable in most smaller SUVs and pickups and a few of the full size trucks. Personally, I prefer a smaller pickup to an SUV as a bike hauler-- but they are more of a challenge as a commuter if it's to be your daily driver.

    If you can get a different rack, smaller wagons can be amazing!
  • 02-02-2010
    G_Blanco
    Mazda Tribute
    Pontiac Vibe. Last I saw they were have a $3500-$4000 rebate.
  • 02-02-2010
    Crack Monkey
    Price range?

    I really like my Lexus RX330.

    Bike racks are cheap (relative to the cost of a car), so I'm not sure I'd make that my limiting factor.
  • 02-02-2010
    billy goat1
    1 Attachment(s)
    Subaru Tribeca :thumbsup:
  • 02-02-2010
    wilonpill
    A Tacoma or a Grand Cherokee might fit the bill.
  • 02-02-2010
    Jekyll_Jockey
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Crack Monkey
    Bike racks are cheap (relative to the cost of a car), so I'm not sure I'd make that my limiting factor.

    That's a good point and if I have to change I can but I really like the way the T2 works (espically with DH rigs).
  • 02-02-2010
    drsmonkey
    If you can wait...
    ...and it actually happens. Subaru might (please, please, please) be releasing their diesel Forester in the US later this year, and it will most likely be available with a 2" receiver. Great gas mileage, lasts forever, reasonably capable off-road, rumored to tow 4400 pounds (hence likely to have a 2".)

    Clickies

    here

    here


    and here
  • 02-02-2010
    yurtinus
    Oh if only! Everybody is so afraid to bring small diesels to the states. Hopefully the continued success of the VW TDI will change that.
  • 02-02-2010
    RIS
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jekyll_Jockey
    Ok I need some help thinking outside of the box here....
    I'm not going to say what I have though of as I do not want to sway your creative juices...

    With the recent death of my Cherokee due to an accident... I need a new mode of transportation for my bikes and me.

    A quick summary of what I need:
    - ability to run a 2" hitch receiver EDIT: to run a Thule T2 (4 bikes) not to pull a trailer....
    - ability to fit 4 adults in the car with relative comfort
    - decent gas millage (hoping for better than 20mpg hwy)
    - good highway driver with enough off road capability to get me to the trail head
    - either 4wd or AWD


    Thanks for the help :cornut:

    I'll be happy to help.

    A few questions to get us started in the right direction:

    1) Any particular price range?

    2) Why are you hoping for more than 20 mpg?

    3) Are you actually shopping for a car to fit your bicycle rack?
  • 02-02-2010
    Jekyll_Jockey
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by RIS
    I'll be happy to help.

    A few questions to get us started in the right direction:

    1) Any particular price range?

    2) Why are you hoping for more than 20 mpg?

    3) Are you actually shopping for a car to fit your bicycle rack?

    1) Mid to Upper 20's is about my max

    2) I do a lot of highway driving about 4k miles a month so any help in the mpg area makes a big impact on my wallet

    3) as strange as it sounds... yes:thumbsup: well kinda. I'd like to keep it if possible but if its not going to work then o well I guess I'll be getting a new rack
  • 02-02-2010
    Jekyll_Jockey
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by drsmonkey
    ...and it actually happens. Subaru might (please, please, please) be releasing their diesel Forester in the US later this year, and it will most likely be available with a 2" receiver. Great gas mileage, lasts forever, reasonably capable off-road, rumored to tow 4400 pounds (hence likely to have a 2".)

    Clickies

    here

    here


    and here


    Not gona lie but that pretty sweet!
  • 02-02-2010
    spazzy
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by drsmonkey
    ...and it actually happens. Subaru might (please, please, please) be releasing their diesel Forester in the US later this year, and it will most likely be available with a 2" receiver. Great gas mileage, lasts forever, reasonably capable off-road, rumored to tow 4400 pounds (hence likely to have a 2".)

    Clickies

    here

    here


    and here

    +INFINITY if subie brings the clean diesel to the US later this year...It will hands down be my next vehicle
  • 02-02-2010
    pfarrell
    mercedes/dodge sprinter (all mercedes except hood ornament)
    diesel
    20 mpg
    can fit al the bikes you want plus tools and gear etc. inside without worry of thieves when you park.
    sell the beloved hitch rack
  • 02-02-2010
    pulser
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by spazzy
    +INFINITY if subie brings the clean diesel to the US later this year...It will hands down be my next vehicle


    Don't hold your breath there going hybrid.
  • 02-03-2010
    RIS
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by pfarrell
    mercedes/dodge sprinter (all mercedes except hood ornament)
    diesel
    20 mpg
    can fit al the bikes you want plus tools and gear etc. inside without worry of thieves when you park.
    sell the beloved hitch rack

    But:

    1) It won't work well off road

    2) If it's in a cargo configuration, won't carry more than two people.
  • 02-03-2010
    RIS
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jekyll_Jockey
    1) Mid to Upper 20's is about my max

    2) I do a lot of highway driving about 4k miles a month so any help in the mpg area makes a big impact on my wallet

    3) as strange as it sounds... yes:thumbsup: well kinda. I'd like to keep it if possible but if its not going to work then o well I guess I'll be getting a new rack

    You have an unusual situation, and it may require an unusual solution. I have some ideas, but I'd like to give you the most accurate information that I can, so I'd like to ask you a follow-up question:

    4) How many miles are for each task?

    For example, are you driving 3,500 miles a month (solo) delivering newspapers and 500 miles a month (off-road) shuttling four bikes that can't be ridden up a hill, or 3,000 miles a month car-pooling on the highway with three other people and 1,000 miles a month driving back and forth by yourself to the mountain to the trail head, or what?
  • 02-03-2010
    RIS
    I would appreciate it if those of you who are among the Birkenstock wearing / wool beanie attired / lifetime college student collective would please quit with the knee-jerk recommendations for vehicles that are more suited for overweight female vegans that have never seen a bar of soap or a razor.
  • 02-03-2010
    spazzy
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by RIS
    I would appreciate it if those of you who are among the Birkenstock wearing / wool beanie attired / lifetime college student collective would please quit with the knee-jerk recommendations for vehicles that are more suited for overweight female vegans that have never seen a bar of soap or a razor.

    LOL that made my morning! :D
  • 02-03-2010
    NWcanuck
    Lexus RX400
    I picked up a 2006 Lexus RX400h last year for under 30 K. I have the Thule bike rack attached to it. The car is incredible comfortable and has the clearance you need plus it gets excellent mileage for its size of the vehicle.
  • 02-03-2010
    Jekyll_Jockey
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by RIS
    4) How many miles are for each task?

    4) I'm going to break this down weekly if you dont mind....
    - I spend 650 miles a week solo on the highway to and from work.

    - I spend probably about 20-50 miles a week in town

    - Then I spend anywhere between 50-300 miles on the highway with bikes on the back to and from ride locations... (this is where I usually have passengers)

    - I don't really do a lot of shuttling, but I do do it every once and a while.

    - As far as off-road capability goes I need something that will go up a fireroad when necessary to get to a trail head... but as far as mileage goes here it really not a lot in total
  • 02-03-2010
    drsmonkey
    I use (as opposed to just drive) a truck and have been waiting for years for somebody (every company sells them outside the US) to bring a compact diesel pick-up to the US.

    This Subi is the next best thing, and hopefully will crack open the floodgates. There are also rumors that if the Forester sells well than the diesel will be available in the imprezza and outback. My wife's car is a new (gas) imprezza and we get 30+ mpg. It would be so much better with that diesel in it.

    I have been participating in surveys for Subaru since we bought the new car and tell them to import the diesel in the comments every chance I get.

    DRS
  • 02-03-2010
    drsmonkey
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by RIS
    I would appreciate it if those of you who are among the Birkenstock wearing / wool beanie attired / lifetime college student collective would please quit with the knee-jerk recommendations for vehicles that are more suited for overweight female vegans that have never seen a bar of soap or a razor.

    [JOKE]
    I think you just implied that my (extremely fit, elk eating) wife is an overweight, stinky, vegan. You forgot to add lesbian ;) .

    ...and by the way, I wear boots, a camo ballcap, hunt, and dropped out of grad school. I'm just confident enough in my penis size that I drive her Subi instead of the truck every chance I get because it makes sense :thumbsup: .

    J.J. is secure enough to realize he has a transportation need and not an ego boost need.

    Rant over, so...what do you drive RIS?
    [JOKE/]
  • 02-03-2010
    A1an
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by drsmonkey
    ...and it actually happens. Subaru might (please, please, please) be releasing their diesel Forester in the US later this year, and it will most likely be available with a 2" receiver. Great gas mileage, lasts forever, reasonably capable off-road, rumored to tow 4400 pounds (hence likely to have a 2".)

    Clickies

    here

    here


    and here

    That will be a great vehicle if they can keep the cost reasonable (i.e. well under the $30k mark). US definately needs more small diesel options.
  • 02-03-2010
    pfarrell
    1) mine is off road enough to get me trail heads
    2) seat? throw a couch in there and be comfy, gives you a great place to change shoes

    the op said "outside the box", i assume that meant ouside of subaru/toyota that fill every trailhead
  • 02-03-2010
    RIS
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jekyll_Jockey
    4) I'm going to break this down weekly if you dont mind....
    - I spend 650 miles a week solo on the highway to and from work.

    - I spend probably about 20-50 miles a week in town

    - Then I spend anywhere between 50-300 miles on the highway with bikes on the back to and from ride locations... (this is where I usually have passengers)

    - I don't really do a lot of shuttling, but I do do it every once and a while.

    - As far as off-road capability goes I need something that will go up a fireroad when necessary to get to a trail head... but as far as mileage goes here it really not a lot in total

    Cool.

    Like I said, your situation is unusual. Your needs may be best met with an unusual solution. I don't often recommend this, but if your fire roads actually require four wheel drive, I think your needs may be best served by two vehicles that (combined), cost no more than the $20K or so that you're talking about. This unusual solution also leaves you with a spare vehicle for when one is being serviced or you need a vehicle to loan out.

    My recommendations:

    Vehicle # 1: For the nearly 3000 miles a month (solo), I'd recommend the newest, simplest Japanese-built Honda Civic that you can afford (used). Look for the "J" as the first digit (the "World Identifier") in the vehicle's VIN number. I'm talking stick shift, roll-up window Civic DX hatchback. If you do not require A/C, I'd skip that too.

    Vehicle # 2: For the 200-1000 miles a month (with four bodies and four bikes and 4x4 fire road capabilities), there are a number of vehicles that would work, and the choice becomes less critical:

    If your mileage tends to be closer to the 1000 mile a month mark, I'd recommend the newest, simplest Japanese-built (again, look for the "J" in the first position) 4 cylinder stick shift Honda or Toyota 4-door truck or SUV that you can afford (used).

    If your mileage tends to be closer to the 200 mile a month mark, your choices get really easy. Most people don't realize it, but In the grand scheme of things, gas is cheap. At this point, a 4-door F150 would work. Preferably one of the uglified contractor/fleet/work truck type ones from the XL series with rubber mats, vinyl bench seats, roll-up windows, and no A/C.

    NOTES:

    1) If you can get by without four wheel drive on vehicle # 2, skip the four wheel drive. Four wheel drive means twice the gearboxes, which costs more to buy, costs more to maintain, costs more to repair, reduces fuel mileage (with no practical benefit trade-off) and even makes a lot of non-4WD related repairs cost more. If vehicle #1 will actually work for both purposes, you may not even need two vehicles- just pick a 4-door Civic DX (with a "J").

    2) Like I said, gas is cheap- your 3000 mile a month commute is unusual and is the only reason that you need to even consider fuel mileage. At 200 miles a month for vehicle # 2, fuel mileage simply doesn't matter enough to even be a factor in your decision.

    3) If your needs vary much from my understanding of your needs, a different solution might work.
  • 02-03-2010
    cracksandracks.com
    i have been driving a honda element since 2004. i have a roof rack for a cargo box and bikes on top, but also installed a 2" receiver hitch on the back for extra bikes if we take our road bikes too.
    the awd is sweet, and handles awesome in the snow, altbeit a bit hard on tires. the gas mileage is good, around 20-22mpg, which isn't bad for an suv, and it's super comfortable, esp. for the people in the back - it's like stadium seating.
    loaded up, they're not very expensive, but very reliable.
    i love this car, but would like some more creature comforts, so i've thought of getting a new pilot....hmmm..
  • 02-03-2010
    bweide
    My favorite is a crew cab mini-pickup (currently a Tacoma) with a long bed and a camper shell. I can put up to five bikes on a roof rack on top of the shell and sleep in the shell. Setting up camp consists of rolling out a sleeping bag and the next day I can be on the road immediately. I built a platform to sleep on with space underneath to store gear. With a locking tailgate I have hidden, locking storage.
  • 02-03-2010
    RIS
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cracksandracks.com
    i have been driving a honda element since 2004. i have a roof rack for a cargo box and bikes on top, but also installed a 2" receiver hitch on the back for extra bikes if we take our road bikes too.
    the awd is sweet, and handles awesome in the snow, altbeit a bit hard on tires. the gas mileage is good, around 20-22mpg, which isn't bad for an suv, and it's super comfortable, esp. for the people in the back - it's like stadium seating.
    loaded up, they're not very expensive, but very reliable.
    i love this car, but would like some more creature comforts, so i've thought of getting a new pilot....hmmm..

    Except that it's off-road abilities are no more than that of a Civic, and at 3000 miles a month, the difference in fuel mileage between the Element and the Civic will make the car payment on the Civic.
  • 02-03-2010
    bdundee
    Subaru

    Ford Freestyle

    Taurus X

    Really like our Freestyle.
  • 02-03-2010
    RIS
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bweide
    My favorite is a crew cab mini-pickup (currently a Tacoma) with a long bed and a camper shell. I can put up to five bikes on a roof rack on top of the shell and sleep in the shell. Setting up camp consists of rolling out a sleeping bag and the next day I can be on the road immediately. I built a platform to sleep on with space underneath to store gear. With a locking tailgate I have hidden, locking storage.

    I like your thinking (within the context of the OP's needs for vehicle # 2), but I don't think that you can get the 4-door 4x4 Tacoma with a 4-cylinder, and the V6 costs more to buy, costs more to maintain, costs more to repair, and gets worse fuel mileage, with no benefit applicable to his stated needs
  • 02-03-2010
    yurtinus
    No, you can't get a 4x4 Tacoma with four doors and four cylinders-- but you can get the i5 Canyon/Colorado with (slightly) better gas mileage. I tend to agree that you'd you want to get two vehicles-- a high mileage low cost commuter and a used truck/SUV. Anyhow-- if you list an F150 as the option for a second vehicle, why wouldn't a quad cab Tacoma or Frontier have a benefit applicable to his stated needs?

    On the flip side-- for one vehicle a smaller wagon (subarus... does anybody else do awd in a small wagon?) or SUV (thinking CRV/Escape here, high 20s highway mileage) may strike the balance between efficiency and utility.
  • 02-03-2010
    RIS
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by yurtinus
    No, you can't get a 4x4 Tacoma with four doors and four cylinders-- but you can get the i5 Canyon/Colorado with (slightly) better gas mileage. I tend to agree that you'd you want to get two vehicles-- a high mileage low cost commuter and a used truck/SUV. Anyhow-- if you list an F150 as the option for a second vehicle, why wouldn't a quad cab Tacoma or Frontier have a benefit applicable to his stated needs?

    On the flip side-- for one vehicle a smaller wagon (subarus... does anybody else do awd in a small wagon?) or SUV (thinking CRV/Escape here, high 20s highway mileage) may strike the balance between efficiency and utility.

    Legitimate questions all. :thumbsup:


    I just got called in to work, I'll have to address them later.
  • 02-03-2010
    bdundee
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by yurtinus

    On the flip side-- for one vehicle a smaller wagon (subarus... does anybody else do awd in a small wagon?) or SUV (thinking CRV/Escape here, high 20s highway mileage) may strike the balance between efficiency and utility.

    Like stated above...Ford Freestyle of Taurus X both won't get high 20's but great crossovers and seat 7. AWD is also an option.
  • 02-04-2010
    tednugent
    VW Tiguan, which Hidden hitch makes a neat Class III hitch that is almost too simple to install.
    http://www.etrailer.com/pc-H~87600.h...eid=2009203633

    Subie Outback/Tribeca/Forester have aftermarket Class III hitches available (i would lean to a Subie 4-cyl, non-turbo, since it takes 87 octane)
  • 02-04-2010
    matsoki
    Audi S4 4.2 V8 Avant........

    I'm on the hunt for one as we speak

    edit *but may be a bit pricey in the US*
  • 02-04-2010
    kntr
    I hate having my bikes on a hitch rack. Rocks, dust, rain, and road debri are hard on the bikes. I like my pickup with the 4 bike-T2 mounted in the bed. They will still get rained on, but the cab sort of protects them. Then if Im going somewhere and I have to leave the bikes in the back I take the T2 out and throw the topper on. The bikes can still be stolen, but at least they are locked up and its a deterant.

    My vote is for a pickup, Honda Element, or even a Honda Odyssey. People laugh at minivans, but they get decent gas mileage, you can store the bikes inside, and they can haul a ton of stuff. Plus the new Odyssey gets on it pretty good IMO.
  • 02-04-2010
    jonw9
    How about Ford Sport Trac? 4 doors, open bed, 6' with tailgate down.

    I had an '02, and now drive a 2007. I think you could get a good deal on a used 2005. Old body style, solid rear axle. All 2007 on up come stock with a hitch, and all have a roof rack that you can carry stuff up top as well.
  • 02-04-2010
    Jekyll_Jockey
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by tednugent
    Subie Outback/Tribeca/Forester have aftermarket Class III hitches
    available (i would lean to a Subie 4-cyl, non-turbo, since it takes 87 octane)

    Thats what I was thinking when I first posted....

    And RIS 2 car option really has me thinking too...
  • 02-04-2010
    Crack Monkey
    Just remember that with the two-car option, you pay more in insurance, registration, personal property tax, etc. Now, at thousands of miles a month, it might pay, but you should do the math to be sure.
  • 02-04-2010
    RIS
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by yurtinus
    No, you can't get a 4x4 Tacoma with four doors and four cylinders-- but you can get the i5 Canyon/Colorado with (slightly) better gas mileage. I tend to agree that you'd you want to get two vehicles-- a high mileage low cost commuter and a used truck/SUV. Anyhow-- if you list an F150 as the option for a second vehicle, why wouldn't a quad cab Tacoma or Frontier have a benefit applicable to his stated needs?

    On the flip side-- for one vehicle a smaller wagon (subarus... does anybody else do awd in a small wagon?) or SUV (thinking CRV/Escape here, high 20s highway mileage) may strike the balance between efficiency and utility.

    The Canyon / Colorado, as well as all the other domestic small and mid-size trucks, are steaming hunks of doggy doo-doo. If you're buying domestic, most people save little to nothing over the expense of a full-size truck. The smaller trucks are disproportionately expensive to buy, maintain, repair, and insure, and the potential fuel mileage savings usually won't make up for it. You're basically buying less car for the same money.

    I used the F150 as an example, to demonstrate my point. A quad cab Tacoma or Frontier would certainly be a better vehicle, but they are smaller, cost more (for comparable features), and at 200-1200 miles a month (and in the "second car" role), it really doesn't matter as much that the domestic trucks aren't usually built as well as the Japanese ones.

    Plus, as we have both already mentioned, it's hard to get 4-door, 4WD, and 4 cylinders. The additional complexity of the V6 engines in the quad cab Tacoma or Frontier really diminishes any potential benefits. And the Nissan V6 in particular, has a long history of obscenely expensive exhaust manifold related problems, along with the fact that you have to substantially disassemble the front suspension to perform many under-vehicle drivetrain repairs.
  • 02-04-2010
    RIS
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Crack Monkey
    Just remember that with the two-car option, you pay more in insurance, registration, personal property tax, etc. Now, at thousands of miles a month, it might pay, but you should do the math to be sure.

    He's driving 4000 miles a month, or almost 50,000 miles a year. That's 3-4 times the mileage of the average driver. That's why I said that his situation is unusual, and may require an unusual solution.
  • 02-04-2010
    RIS
    Here's an off-the-wall example to demonstrate how viable the 2-vehicle solution is, for the OP's unique situation:

    Let's say that vehicle # 1 was a C5 Corvette, that gets about 25 mpg (for the 3000 miles a month).

    And for vehicle # 2, I'll pick an absurd one from my past: a 3/4 ton 4x4 Suburban with 20" of lift, 5.13 gears, detroit lockers in both ends, and 44" Swampers, that got 6 mpg (for the other 200 miles a month).

    Combined, they average just about 21 mpg, and would certainly be within his budget of $20K or so.

    I am NOT recommending this as a solution for the OP, I'm just using it as an example.
  • 02-04-2010
    RIS
    And before the enviro-idiots show up, I'd like to point out that driving a rusty old hoopty pickup that gets 13 mpg is infinitely more green than buying a Prius. I cannot fathom the inert logic of putting a 5000 pound truck in a land fill and then turning around and raping the planet, making parts it look like a nuclear holocaust, strip-mining for nickel to be used in Prius hybrid battery packs just so pseudo-intellectuals can assert their smug, pious ignorance on their way to Starbucks.

    It's called "recycling". :thumbsup:
  • 02-04-2010
    RIS
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by spazzy
    LOL that made my morning! :D

    If you think that was good, price a starter or an alternator replacement on a late-model Subaru. I remember seeing my first $1,000 alternator replacement. It was for a Subaru, and it was about 25 years ago.
  • 02-04-2010
    Restoman
    Here is something that will fit your needs.

    www.monsterrig.com

    On topic I really wish car makers would bring diesel options to the states.
  • 02-04-2010
    RIS
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Restoman
    Here is something that will fit your needs.

    www.monsterrig.com

    That's just ghey. Heck, I've seen motorcycles with over 700 horsepower, they don't need to be towed to and from the dyno (like the truck in the link), and apparently they don't blow up as much, either:

    http://thekneeslider.com/archives/20...ower-hayabusa/
  • 02-04-2010
    Black Bart
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by pfarrell
    1) mine is off road enough to get me trail heads
    2) seat? throw a couch in there and be comfy, gives you a great place to change shoes

    the op said "outside the box", i assume that meant ouside of subaru/toyota that fill every trailhead

    Not to mention the Sprinter can be had in just about any configuration imaginable.

    If you haven't caught on yet, there's only 3 ways to do something:
    1. The ghey way.
    2. The wrong way.
    3. The RIS way. (Isn't that the wrong way? Yes, but faster!)*

    *apologies to "The Simpsons"
  • 02-05-2010
    RIS
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Black Bart
    Not to mention the Sprinter can be had in just about any configuration imaginable.

    1) The BASE MSRP for the Sprinter is approximately TWICE the OP's stated budget.

    2) I see no 4WD versions listed on their web site.

    3) The manufacturer makes no quantifiable fuel mileage claims.
  • 02-05-2010
    Black Bart
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by RIS
    1) The BASE MSRP for the Sprinter is approximately TWICE the OP's stated budget.

    No, the base MSRP of a NEW '09 Sprinter is about 36K, minus some incentives/rebates what have you and a bit of dealing, I'm sure he could find one pretty close to 29-30K, and his stated limit, after he was asked as he originally did not give a price range, was "upper 20's". So not far off, besides, shouldn't he be looking for a used one? BTW, whats the base MSRP on a Vette?

    2) I see no 4WD versions listed on their web site.
    Per the OP, " - As far as off-road capability goes I need something that will go up a fireroad when necessary to get to a trail head"

    My old RX7 could make it up most fireroads when necessary, one does not need an H2 to drive in a bit of dirt.

    I'll also direct you to yourself:
    1) If you can get by without four wheel drive on vehicle # 2, skip the four wheel drive. Four wheel drive means twice the gearboxes, which costs more to buy, costs more to maintain, costs more to repair, reduces fuel mileage (with no practical benefit trade-off) and even makes a lot of non-4WD related repairs cost more. If vehicle #1 will actually work for both purposes, you may not even need two vehicles- just pick a 4-door Civic DX (with a "J"). -RIS, 2 days ago.


    3) The manufacturer makes no quantifiable fuel mileage claims.

    What kind of granola crunching panty wearing fruit-loop gives two rats behinds about "fuel mileage claims"? You can take your flannel wearing, bookstore browsing butt and beat it if you think it matters how much fuel you burn.

    Oh, and I know several people who use these to travel around and they regularly return 20mpg or better.
  • 02-05-2010
    updownride
    we were in line for a toyota highlander, then the recall cancelled that. we went with a hyundai veracruz, we are very happy so far. good deal. might have to buy a receiver hitch(370$), it is an option too. meets all your needs. great warranty. first road trip coming up next week, will really know how we like it after.
  • 02-05-2010
    RIS
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Black Bart
    What kind of granola crunching panty wearing fruit-loop gives two rats behinds about "fuel mileage claims"?

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Jekyll_Jockey
    ... I need a new mode of transportation for my bikes and me.

    A quick summary of what I need:

    - decent gas millage (hoping for better than 20mpg hwy)

    Thanks for the help :cornut:

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Black Bart
    You can take your flannel wearing, bookstore browsing butt and beat it if you think it matters how much fuel you burn.

    :rolleyes:
  • 02-05-2010
    Black Bart
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by RIS
    I would appreciate it if those of you who are among the Birkenstock wearing / wool beanie attired / lifetime college student collective would please quit with the knee-jerk recommendations for vehicles that are more suited for overweight female vegans that have never seen a bar of soap or a razor.

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by RIS
    And before the enviro-idiots show up, I'd like to point out that driving a rusty old hoopty pickup that gets 13 mpg is infinitely more green than buying a Prius. I cannot fathom the inert logic of putting a 5000 pound truck in a land fill and then turning around and raping the planet, making parts it look like a nuclear holocaust, strip-mining for nickel to be used in Prius hybrid battery packs just so pseudo-intellectuals can assert their smug, pious ignorance on their way to Starbucks.

    It's called "recycling". :thumbsup:

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by RIS
    just pick a 4-door Civic DX


    :rolleyes:

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Black Bart
    Oh, and I know several people who use these to travel around and they regularly return 20mpg or better.

    Is it me, or is 20mph or better pretty similar to "- decent gas millage (hoping for better than 20mpg hwy)"?

    :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

    Still clear to me:
    1.ghey way
    2.wrong way
    3.RIS way (which can only be done by RIS, you may do the same but it's not the RIS way as only RIS can be RIS. You got that or do I need to tase it into you? BTW, did you know that in some parts of the country, they call it getting "RISed", not getting "tased"? True story!)
  • 02-05-2010
    RIS
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Black Bart

    Is it me, or is 20mph or better pretty similar to "- decent gas millage (hoping for better than 20mpg hwy)"?

    :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

    It's just you.

    20 mph is pretty similar to 29.3 feet per second (or Mach .026), but it has no direct correlation to any particular fuel mileage.

    I would say that 8.5 kilometers per liter would be pretty similar to 20 mpg.
  • 02-05-2010
    Black Bart
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by RIS
    It's just you.

    20 mph is pretty similar to 29.3 feet per second (or Mach .026), but it has no direct correlation to any particular fuel mileage.

    I would say that 8.5 kilometers per liter would be pretty similar to 20 mpg.

    I figured the average person would have to cognitive skills to figure out the meaning even with a typo, but I forgot you're a civil servant. My bad, I totally RISed the pooch on that one.
  • 02-05-2010
    G_Blanco
    Did I read you do 50,000 miles a year. Dam hello VW TDI wagon. I hear people are getting 50mpg with them. A wagon should have plenty of room also.
  • 02-05-2010
    Black Bart
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by ffwlwhite
    Did I read you do 50,000 miles a year. Dam hello VW TDI wagon. I hear people are getting 50mpg with them. A wagon should have plenty of room also.

    That's an excellent suggestion, except RIS didn't mention it so it's ghey. And not 4x4. And it may not have better off-road capabilities than a Civic DX.

    Oh, and if RIS did suggest it, it would still be ghey for you suggest it.
  • 02-05-2010
    Black Bart
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by RIS
    If you think that was good, price a starter or an alternator replacement on a late-model Subaru. I remember seeing my first $1,000 alternator replacement. It was for a Subaru, and it was about 25 years ago.

    Is there anything you spew that's not 100% BS?

    Alternator prices from AutoZone:
    2006 Subaru Legacy - $152.99
    2006 Honda Civic DX - $222.99
  • 02-06-2010
    pointerDixie214
    Subaru Outback.

    Both problems solved. Super reliable. Super safe. Plenty of room for passengers.

    Could fit bikes in the car or in a hitch.

    30 mpg on the hwy and 23 around town (that's what I get in mine).

    AWD and higher clearance will get you anywhere you need to go (Within reason).

    And you could find a used 2008 for under $20k easily.







    RIS- I have to admit, I almost spewed water when I read your hybrid comparison to the 13 mpg truck. So true. I couldn't agree more.

    But you're WAY off on the alternator. New Alternator for the Subaru Outback is $150. Plus it's mounted right in front/top of the engine bay, so anyone that can change a tire could do it themselves. Have you ever changed an alternator on a Honda? I have. Takes about 5 times as long as the 30 minutes the Subaru does. (+ more $$$)



    To the OP- Drive an Outback before you discount them. Great highway cars, great biking cars, etc...
  • 02-06-2010
    reynantevargas08
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  • 02-06-2010
    RIS
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by pointerDixie214

    RIS- I have to admit, I almost spewed water when I read your hybrid comparison to the 13 mpg truck. So true. I couldn't agree more.

    Thanks.

    Quote:

    But you're WAY off on the alternator. New Alternator for the Subaru Outback is $150.
    With all due respects, a "New Alternator for the Subaru Outback is" NOT "$150". The price you're quoting is for a rebuilt alternator, not a new one. And at that particular price point, probably a crappy aftermarket one from a chain store.

    I have over a quarter of a century experience in this area, and I have learned that there is nothing in life that cannot be done a little worse for a little less money.
  • 02-07-2010
    RIS
    1 Attachment(s)
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by drsmonkey
    [JOKE]
    Rant over, so...what do you drive RIS?
    [JOKE/]

    When I'm not driving my work car, I ride this:
  • 02-07-2010
    pointerDixie214
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by RIS

    With all due respects, a "New Alternator for the Subaru Outback is" NOT "$150". The price you're quoting is for a rebuilt alternator, not a new one. And at that particular price point, probably a crappy aftermarket one from a chain store.

    I have over a quarter of a century experience in this area, and I have learned that there is nothing in life that cannot be done a little worse for a little less money.

    With all due respect, there is no such thing as a brand new alternator except for brand new cars. Why do you suppose they charge you a core fee to recycle the alternator.

    Alternators on this car range from $150 to $350 depending on brand. There is no $1000 alternator.

    I promise you that if you have a mechanic put an alternator in your car it is not a brand new one. They are all refurbs. I have a little experience in this field myself.


    The fact you drive a crotch rocket does explain quite a bit. I was going to guess that or a 24" lifted diesel pick up.
  • 02-07-2010
    spazzy
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by RIS
    Thanks.



    With all due respects, a "New Alternator for the Subaru Outback is" NOT "$150". The price you're quoting is for a rebuilt alternator, not a new one. And at that particular price point, probably a crappy aftermarket one from a chain store.

    I have over a quarter of a century experience in this area, and I have learned that there is nothing in life that cannot be done a little worse for a little less money.

    A quick google search netted me a NEW OEM alternator (dont know a ton about them, so the brand is unkown to me) for $183, with refurbished going from $140-$350 depending on brand

    http://www.autopartswarehouse.com/de...SALT-3034.html

    http://www.autopartswarehouse.com/se...)&No=15&Npp=15

    Granted the cheapies might be junk but i cant see the whole replacement costing any more than $450, even with the more pricey model and labor
  • 02-07-2010
    kntr
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by pointerDixie214
    With all due respect, there is no such thing as a brand new alternator except for brand new cars. Why do you suppose they charge you a core fee to recycle the alternator.

    Alternators on this car range from $150 to $350 depending on brand. There is no $1000 alternator.

    There are alternators close to $1000. I paid over $700 for a car stereo alternator a few years back and it was brand new and not a reman.
  • 02-07-2010
    pointerDixie214
    That is true, I hadn't thought about other types of alternators.

    Touche'! :)
  • 02-07-2010
    RIS
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by kntr
    There are alternators close to $1000. I paid over $700 for a car stereo alternator a few years back and it was brand new and not a reman.

    Yes.

    And although the vast majority of replacement alternators are used/rebuilt, not all of them are.

    When a completely new car comes out, there would be no used toasted alternators available to rebuild. If an alternator in one of them takes a dump, the only available replacement would probably be a brand new one.

    And new alternators generally aren't cheap- that's why the market for rebuilt alternators exists.


    And as I pointed out earlier, there is nothing in life that cannot be done a little worse for a little less money. No matter how crappy a rebuilt alternator is, there is probably somebody out there who can put together an even crappier one for a few bucks less. If you shop for the absolute cheapest one you can find, you're probably going to get the absolute worst one available. I've seen folks go through 5-6 rebuilds just to find one that even worked. And since they paid the labor each time, it ended up costing them MORE than simply buying a decent alternator to start with. Not to mention the cost, risks, and inconvenience of having a cheap aftermarket rebuilt alternator (that barely works to start with), suddenly decide that you need to walk in the rain, arrange a tow, pay for a repeat repair, rent a car, and miss out on a day's pay.

    The most comedic version of this is when some shade-tree hack is guessing. They think it might need an alternator, so they remove a functional OEM alternator to install a non-working cheap aftermarket rebuilt alternator. Now they've got TWO problems (the original undiagnosed concern, in addition to the one that they installed), and they still can't find their butt with both hands and a map.
  • 02-08-2010
    Jekyll_Jockey
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by pointerDixie214
    Subaru Outback.

    ...
    To the OP- Drive an Outback before you discount them. Great highway cars, great biking cars, etc...

    yeah my bro has one.. real nice it near the top of my list, I mainly just wanted to see if I was missing anything else...
  • 02-09-2010
    mullen119
    honda element.... it has everything you are looking for + ride with only one other person... you can store up to 3 bikes inside it standing up without removing anything from the bikes. everything in it is water resistant and made of easy to clean materials. you dont have to worry about how dirty you get from riding. its the perfect car for an outdoorsman.