Roof rack haulers to avoid and to recommend- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Roof rack haulers to avoid and to recommend

    A tangent from another thread....

    There are so many of them out there. I don't want my new 2k dollar bike falling off going down the road.

  2. #2
    Meathead
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    I just installed 2 Yakima Raptor racks on top of my vehicle's roof two days ago. They were assembled and installed in 20 minutes or so. That part was easy, and loading/unloading the bikes was easy enough. The main thing I liked the most about this rack is the fact that I don't need to take the front wheel off, the whole bike just straps right in.

    For your viewing pleasure:

    (not my bike, although I am considering a Kona, or vehicle - pic from dealer's website)

    I put my beater bike on the rack for the first road test. I purposely drove faster and cornered harder than normal to make sure the thing was on, it seemed solid enough. (Disclaimer: This drive was at 5:00am on my way in to work out, so I wasn't endangering drivers since I'm usually the only car on that route at that hour.) I had my driver's side mirror all the way up so I could watch it periodically, and it didn't even wobble once.

    So, after 2 days, and one short road trip, I'm happy with the Yakima Raptor. I'll let you know after my first real road trip.
    Last edited by jdub24; 11-01-2006 at 11:28 AM.

  3. #3
    The Dog.
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    Avoid Thule V2

    I would avoid the Thule V2. Mine failed on me while I was out of town...what a pain. It is a bad mechanism that Thule has since changed for their 07 models. The outer clamp pins screw into a plastic threaded bushing in the middle that commonly strips out leaving you screwed. This is especially bad because it is so hard to get adequate clamping force so that the dropouts don't move on the clamping axles. Also, the clamp has been known to open on its own if you don't lock it.

    In summary...avoid Thule V2, not worth the high cost. Try a simpler long-throw quick release disc-compatible fork carrier like a rockymounts (though their quick release interferes with some suspension fork bottoms).

  4. #4
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    I recommend Thule or Yakima, but I prefer the kind where you take off your front wheel and use the locking fork mount. Yeah it takes about a minute more and you have to store your wheel in either a fork up mount (what I use) or you can toss it into your trunk. For some reason I don't trust the kind that use an arm that attaches to your frame. My reasoning is that besides not looking cool (wicked important) if one of the straps break (and they have been known to) it seems that the bike might have a tendency to tilt sideways. Of course this may be entirely untrue and if so I revert to my first reason.

  5. #5
    Meathead
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    Quote Originally Posted by fred3
    .......My reasoning is that besides not looking cool (wicked important)......
    Very subjective, but funny...


    Quote Originally Posted by fred3
    ....... if one of the straps break (and they have been known to) it seems that the bike might have a tendency to tilt sideways.....
    I'm sure over time the straps could break. They're plastic. If that happens to me, I would just order more straps, rig up my own ratcheting straps out of some heavy-duty material, or just make do with some small bungee cords.

    Personally, I like the idea of not having to take off the front wheel, especially if that bad boy is dirty. I don't like the idea of throwing muddy/dirty bike wheels inside my ride.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdub24
    Very subjective, but funny...




    I'm sure over time the straps could break. They're plastic. If that happens to me, I would just order more straps, rig up my own ratcheting straps out of some heavy-duty material, or just make do with some small bungee cords.

    Personally, I like the idea of not having to take off the front wheel, especially if that bad boy is dirty. I don't like the idea of throwing muddy/dirty bike wheels inside my ride.
    Also, if you are running a 20mm front end, it makes it that much more of a pain to take the wheel off (unless you have the RS Maxle). Those ratchet straps are pretty cheap, replacing them when they start to discolor is cheap insurance.

  7. #7
    Prez NMBA
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    I use the yakima vipers on the roof, they accomodate any type of disk brake and the adjustment mechanizim is really easy to work. I prefer this style that locks in the fork, just feels more secure. Ive seen too many wobly types that dont. but honestly other than one who's clamp opened, wasnt locked, Ive never really heard of any failures. After I saw that, I always lock mine

  8. #8
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    Not Rocky Mount!

    I had a friend talk me into these, I looked at the reviews that were pretty good and I think they are exactly what you pay for if you want the cheep gotta look cool fork mounts.
    The paint is cranking off, head is rusted and is QR is very difficult to use after 1 year.

  9. #9
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    If you don't trust the straps, wrap velcro straps around as well, just in case.

    I posted this question elsewhere, but how the heck do you get real locking protection with Yakima Mighty Mounts? Even with the Raptor locked, someone could just unscrew the three mounts and *poof* there goes the bike!
    Hi!
    Location: Richmond, VA
    Style: Mid-Atlantic roots, rocks, & poison ivy

  10. #10
    aka Dick Dangle
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    to the trail then home

    I would never leave my bike alone on my car so it can get stolen.

  11. #11
    I am the law
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdub24
    I

    I put my beater bike on the rack for the first road test. I purposely drove faster and cornered harder than normal to make sure the thing was on, it seemed solid enough. (Disclaimer: This drive was at 5:00am on my way in to work out, so I wasn't endangering drivers since I'm usually the only car on that route at that hour.) I had my driver's side mirror all the way up so I could watch it periodically, and it didn't even wobble once.
    .
    Ya know, if I pulled you over for speeding and you told me: "I was just testing the stability of my new bike rack" I'd almost have to laugh and I'd probably just let ya go w/o a ticket because that'd be the first time I've heard that excuse.

  12. #12
    Meathead
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    Quote Originally Posted by hanshananigan
    .....I posted this question elsewhere, but how the heck do you get real locking protection with Yakima Mighty Mounts? Even with the Raptor locked, someone could just unscrew the three mounts and *poof* there goes the bike!
    I guess if you wanted to, you could chain the mounting points of the Raptor to the vehicle's roof rack itself. Then again, if someone wanted your bike bad enough, and it was left alone long enough, they could simply cut the chain.


    Quote Originally Posted by it hurts
    I would never leave my bike alone on my car so it can get stolen.
    Exactly. The purpose for my roof racks is strictly convenience. I don't have to take the bikes apart and I don't have to throw dirty/muddy equipment inside my ride. Plus, my 4runner can simply get to certain places easier than I can on my bike. I never leave my bike on my rack unattended.

  13. #13
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    I agree jdub- if someone wants it, they're gonna get it.

    With the lock on the Raptor, I feel comfortable running into the supermarket (in most neighborhoods) and leaving the bike on top. On rare occasions I'd like to leave my bike on the rack at work in our parking garage (it's a VA Hospital- low crime parking lot), but I don't think I could ever do it without worrying about it all day.
    Hi!
    Location: Richmond, VA
    Style: Mid-Atlantic roots, rocks, & poison ivy

  14. #14
    Meathead
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    You'd probably be fine running in/out stores with the lock on the Raptor. However, I wouldn't park it outside the movie theater and go enjoy a flick, or the mall parking lot during Christmas shopping though.

    I would totally be like you if I left my bike on top of my vehicle all day while I was at work. I'd be paranoid the whole time, unless I could park it right outside my 1st floor office window where I could watch it.

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