Question for Euro members and any one in construction- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Question for Euro members and any one in construction

    What do you drive? I have been going back and forth with some of the guys I work with and we all agree we need to do something about the amount of fuel we all use. But thatís were it ends. Im a carpenter with a large company in CO. We are responsible for providing 90% of the tools we use so we all ave to have a lot of stuff with us dally. All the carpenters that I work with including me drive pick up trucks. I think I can get away with something a lot smaller and better on gas. I know the people that do what I do in Europe donít drive around in big pick ups and cant be confined to a small town for work. So what do they do?

  2. #2
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by pulser
    What do you drive? I have been going back and forth with some of the guys I work with and we all agree we need to do something about the amount of fuel we all use. But that’s were it ends. Im a carpenter with a large company in CO. We are responsible for providing 90% of the tools we use so we all ave to have a lot of stuff with us dally. All the carpenters that I work with including me drive pick up trucks. I think I can get away with something a lot smaller and better on gas. I know the people that do what I do in Europe don’t drive around in big pick ups and cant be confined to a small town for work. So what do they do?
    What about towing a small trailer with a car when you're working, and you keep your tools on that trailer?
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  3. #3
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    What about towing a small trailer with a car when you're working, and you keep your tools on that trailer?

    Thatís a possibility there is a store in town here that has the Thule utility trailers that would work well for that. The only problem with a trailer is it makes getting in and out of a lot of places difficult and I would think it could be a problem when we get a lot of snow or high winds.

  4. #4
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    i work in construction in the summers and i have a small suv (chevy blazer) it can haul quite a few tools and still gets 23ish mpg (combined) and some of the newer hondas or toyota small suvs get even higher than that, granted i cant haul any lumber over 8 foot (except on top), or even a small pickup would be good chevy s10, ford ranger ect i think with a 4 cylinder and manual tranny they get close to 30 mpg, dont quote me on that though

  5. #5
    igoslo
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    I've been in construction for a good many years and here's my take. I currently drive a Honda Element and that meets my needs 95% of the time. It's got plenty of room for the tools that I may carry around on a typical day(compressor, guns, hoses, table saw, miter saw, etc). Yakima rack and gunwale brackets do the job for small material runs. For bigger runs I have access to a company truck(and a laborer to drive it) or I get materials delivered. As for euro construction they use smaller trucks and vans that aren't pulling double duty as 5th wheel 25000 lb toy haulers, hence the use of 90 hp 3 cyl fuel efficient diesels. Of course that's not a very manly approach to manly pursuits.

  6. #6
    used to be uno-speedo....
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    Typically something like this:

    http://www.ford.co.uk/ns7/all_vans/-/-/-/-/-/-

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by uno-speedo
    Typically something like this:

    http://www.ford.co.uk/ns7/all_vans/-/-/-/-/-/-

    Thats cool kind of like the dodge sprinters here. Sux thay arent as small as the fords. I looked in to one thay start at 33K.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoloRider
    I've been in construction for a good many years and here's my take. I currently drive a Honda Element and that meets my needs 95% of the time. It's got plenty of room for the tools that I may carry around on a typical day(compressor, guns, hoses, table saw, miter saw, etc). Yakima rack and gunwale brackets do the job for small material runs. For bigger runs I have access to a company truck(and a laborer to drive it) or I get materials delivered. As for euro construction they use smaller trucks and vans that aren't pulling double duty as 5th wheel 25000 lb toy haulers, hence the use of 90 hp 3 cyl fuel efficient diesels. Of course that's not a very manly approach to manly pursuits.

    The element is still the front runner for me right now. But I know what you mean most of the guys have big full size trucks and pull toys all weakened. Im still surprised bye all the $50,000 trucks I see driving around. I just think things have to change.

  9. #9
    Braaaapp!
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    I see a lot of these in Mexico, and simular car/trucks when I was in Sweden. Some of them looked to be operated by contractors.



    I would love something like that here. Room to throw my bike & dirt bike in the bed, and good gas mileage. I really could car less if it takes me 20 seconds to get to 60 mph. In hindsight I should not have sold my old S-10. A bed to haul stuff and 28-30 mpg, not a bad combo.

  10. #10
    MAKE MY DAY!
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    The reason a lot of people do not recognise
    opportunity is because it usually goes
    around wearing overalls looking like hard work.

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