Protecting bike on long roadtrips- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Protecting bike on long roadtrips

    I drive one of my little Mustangs down to Tucson, AZ from Vancouver every winter. I've got a bike rack for my ol' 'Stang, but I'm a little uneasy with putting the bike on the rack for the entire duration of the trip. I could potentially dismantle a lot of it and fit it inside the car instead. If I were to keep it on the rack, does anyone have any recommendations on how one might protect the bike? I've heard saran wrap mentioned someplace before...
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shaker666
    I drive one of my little Mustangs down to Tucson, AZ from Vancouver every winter. I've got a bike rack for my ol' 'Stang, but I'm a little uneasy with putting the bike on the rack for the entire duration of the trip. I could potentially dismantle a lot of it and fit it inside the car instead. If I were to keep it on the rack, does anyone have any recommendations on how one might protect the bike? I've heard saran wrap mentioned someplace before...
    A friend takes wheels and seat off and gets his bike in a wide roof box.

    Otherwise we've graduated from Mustangs to wagons and minivans but I still carry bikes on roof when minivan is full of 5 people, 100 pound dog and stuff. My mountain bikes are not babies and designed for rough use and it seems reasonable quallity hubs and head sets keep enough water out.

    Good luck.

  3. #3
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    Thanks. Locally, I tend to haul my bike in my 4x4, but for a long distance trip that needs to be done with some speed and efficiency, the car is far superior. I might wrap up the seals and joints with something to prevent the road grime from getting into them since they're definitely known to be corrosive. Who knows... I may have enough space inside the car to stuff it in there too. It's a hatchback.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shaker666
    I drive one of my little Mustangs down to Tucson, AZ from Vancouver every winter. I've got a bike rack for my ol' 'Stang, but I'm a little uneasy with putting the bike on the rack for the entire duration of the trip. I could potentially dismantle a lot of it and fit it inside the car instead. If I were to keep it on the rack, does anyone have any recommendations on how one might protect the bike? I've heard saran wrap mentioned someplace before...

    IMO bikes are somewhat better off facing backwards on roof racks (air flow goes more up and over) and ride much quieter in my case. (Especially nice in bug weather at night.) If you mount a bike backwards, be sure to use a safety strap on the rear wheel (maybe on old toe strap or something), which will now be in front. If the clamp on that wheel were to release, the bike can rotate around the fork in back, not good. I'd take seatpost, pedals and chain off, perhaps. Have a nice drive.

  5. #5
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    One thing to watch for on longer trips is that rain at 70 mph, getting driven into small openings on shifters, cables, and other normally inaccessible nooks and crannies will have a much more destructive effect than it will when riding through a creek or washing with a hose. While normal "trips on the roof to get to the trailhead" that we all do from time to time in decent weather will not likely harm our rugged steeds, longer exposure to a blast of air and/or water/bugs/salt/road grime/etc... will damage components, and especially saddles. Snuggly wrap your handlebar controls and grips in a thick plastic and tape it up good. Taking the chain off is not a bad idea either, and wrapping the rear derailluer (and cassette too) if you will be mounting the bike backwards is a bit more insurance. Remove your saddle and put a large rubber "cork-style" stopper in the seat tube. Remove the pedals and wrap a piece of duct tape around each crank to keep the threads from getting crap in there. Also, plastic taped around the fork stanchions will protect this smooth surface from pebbles or rocks kicked up from other vehicles. Rear-mount racks tend to get less wind-blast and this reduces the infiltration of water and dust to like what you get when riding fast in the same conditions. Have a great trip!

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