No, No Cars > Motorbike + Bicycles = Happyness- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    No, No Cars > Motorbike + Bicycles = Happyness

    I start a posting on the passion forum but I guess will be better suited for the segment of MTBR.



    Rain or shine it work just fine.


    I live near San francisco and I can lane split lanes (go in between cars legally) all day long.


    Enjoy
    Last edited by patineto; 11-23-2007 at 07:19 AM.

  2. #2
    Just learning.
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    That is the coolest thing I have ever seen. awesome!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyle h
    That is the coolest thing I have ever seen. awesome!
    Oh Kyle is much more from were does came from.


    I can also carry some very serious "Tools" when the job require.


    Two 45 pound bikes and a ton of gear and trip becomes very interesting, very fast.


    I made the rack out of old wasted bicycle parts in 1996 and so far I have about 150,000 miles carrying bikes and other stuff on her (bike is 385,000 miles old).

    this is one of the earliest picture I have.


    The record so far four complete bicycles, one frame and a bunch of parts, from Berkeley california to a swap meet in colorado a few years back.
    Ps: sorry I did not have a camara then, but if somebody has pictures of my bike I will love to have them.

  4. #4
    VPI
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    This is great. I have been thinking about something like that for my bike. It would save me a ton in Gas $$$$ every year.

  5. #5
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    We end up with a very nice "Bird" after the Turkey ride today at Repack.


    She was totally cool and playful, in fact if you are ever around fairfax (the "Birth place" of Mountain bikes) at turkey day you need to come to the ride, at least 1000 rider did Re-pack this morning, including many of the legends.


    She was seating on my friend Dale "Actual Size" KTM 950


    I'm in the Green vest and i'm 6.2", I guess you get the picture, well the top tube on his bike is about 25,5 long and he can pedal like a mad man too.


    Actually if anybody is interested Here is a whole gallery full of concept drawings like this, very helpful to make your own rack.

  6. #6
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by tasha
    That is a nice bike you have guys...
    How I wish I can also take pictures and post my of brother's bike which has a SPORSTER satellite radio in it..





  8. #8
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    Nice

    Crashmaster aka Crazy Andy had one on his moto, IIRC. He said it felt funny on the freeway because the bikes dragged so much it made the front end lighter.

    Are you seeing that with your rig?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    Crashmaster aka Crazy Andy had one on his moto, IIRC. He said it felt funny on the freeway because the bikes dragged so much it made the front end lighter.

    Are you seeing that with your rig?
    Nope, well you need to be careful because is a lot more mass on the rear end.

    The cross winds are also a issue but is not a big deal.

    For sure over the years I try to install racks on other model bikes and a learn a ton of thing along the way including that most of the bikes are not stable enough, strong enough, not even my tall KT 640 was fit for rack dutty..



    Even then that front tire end up touching the ground even if is 16" away from the ground.


    Again so far I have travel many, many miles and never ever have a problem do to the bicycles (well hit to mirrors on Ford F-150 but by now I know better), even lane splitting on the freeway and the bridges is not a issue.

    for sure is not for everybody, I don't drink, i'm super careful and I'm being riding for a long time carrying tons of heavy loads
    Last edited by patineto; 11-28-2007 at 07:57 PM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    Crashmaster aka Crazy Andy had one on his moto, IIRC. He said it felt funny on the freeway because the bikes dragged so much it made the front end lighter.

    Are you seeing that with your rig?
    andys was sick









    AZ has the best mountain bike gathering ever

  11. #11
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    bikes on motos, big deal. I did it with my 82 CB450f back in 87 and there's a guy here with racks on his HD and his Goldwing. Get the bikes off the motos and post some images of some trails.
    Authorities speculate that speed may have been a factor. They are also holding gravity and inertia for questioning.

  12. #12
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    this is the "car & biker" forum .... so check out one of the other areas of MTBR if you want to see trail pics
    AZ has the best mountain bike gathering ever

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Melt
    andys was sick









    That is actually the typical way they being made, not exactly creative but works.


    The main problem is that the fork and specially the handlebar compress the space of the rider a lot, making it unconfortable and for sure unsafe.

    personally i think the side system is a lot better, besides I can carry a passenger and there bike too.




    Still better than this.
    Last edited by patineto; 12-05-2007 at 09:48 PM.

  14. #14
    tl1
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    Wouldn't it be more stable to...

    ...just rig up a bike trailer? Especially in a cross wind?
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Caffeine Powered
    bikes on motos, big deal. I did it with my 82 CB450f back in 87 and there's a guy here with racks on his HD and his Goldwing. Get the bikes off the motos and post some images of some trails.
    Any Pictures..!?!?
    I will love to see it.

    How many bikes were you able to carry.?
    room for the girlfriend..?
    even a back pack...??

    On mine I can carry a track bike on one side and a downhill bike on the other including a passenger and all the loads, hell see people with Hummers puzzle trying to carry two bikes.

    What I don't understand is how you guys and gals need a whole section to talk about racks for cars..

    I'm just trying to show how minimal can you really go.

    "I use to Complain about my shoes, Until I meet a fellow with out his Feet"

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by tl1
    ...just rig up a bike trailer? Especially in a cross wind?
    Wow that is one of Tony Foale motorcycles.

    Do you have any bigger pictures of it..

    I have plans (blue prints) for a multi bike single wheel trailer, but really I never found the need to make it.

    thanks for the awesome photo.

  17. #17
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    Hey man that's awesome! Nice bike! I have a 2006 Yamaha R6, so don't think I could really do this, and also, it's not my main transportation, more of a fun escape kinda thing to get out for a day(which I suppose the bike could just be an extension of that), But I also like to take the bike to the track and stuff, so I dunno how all that would work. But anyway, that's an awesome idea, and 385,000 miles on a bike, that's nuts! More power to you man!! lol

    Also, you said lane splitting is legal in Cali...Are you sure of that? I think I remember reading somewhere that it's not technically "legal" there, and that if a cop wanted to, they could give you a ticket for it, it's just they usually look the other way and don't care too much....Just wondering though, I could be wrong. Lane splitting is illegal here in NJ, but sometimes I do it, and it's awesome passing through all the traffic or sliding down the side of cars to make right turns and stuff, lol.

    Anyway, two wheels all the way!!!(although I love my car too) Keep it up and stay safe out there!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by scotty878
    Hey man that's awesome! Nice bike! I have a 2006 Yamaha R6, so don't think I could really do this, and also, it's not my main transportation, more of a fun escape kinda thing to get out for a day(which I suppose the bike could just be an extension of that), But I also like to take the bike to the track and stuff, so I dunno how all that would work. But anyway, that's an awesome idea, and 385,000 miles on a bike, that's nuts! More power to you man!! lol
    I beyond the whole speed thing on the street this days, but I can understand the exitment of going ultra fast specially on a proper track, actually i do that in the dirt, I'm no rock star by any means but I can chase some pretty fast "Dakar" guys and is super fun to be doing a 100mph in the desert (not in my black bike for sure, well not on this black bike, I just don't want to start a whole crazy motorcycle topic since this is a bicycle forum)
    Also, you said lane splitting is legal in Cali...Are you sure of that? I think I remember reading somewhere that it's not technically "legal" there, and that if a cop wanted to, they could give you a ticket for it, it's just they usually look the other way and don't care too much....Just wondering though, I could be wrong. Lane splitting is illegal here in NJ, but sometimes I do it, and it's awesome passing through all the traffic or sliding down the side of cars to make right turns and stuff, lol.
    Well thank "John & Ponch" for this rule that only apply to california..

    The Old Kawazaki ZX1000 were aircool engines (no water cooling) and they require constant flow or air, for that very reason the engines can suffer and over heat if run at slow speed, specially in stop and go traffic, Anyway somehow the law apply to every motorcycle not just to police machines..

    Is truth that is rules about doing it and you need to be prudent, is not like riding in paris that you can go as fast as you want, but the rules are slack enough that you can ride as fast as your heart content ( 80mph in between cars is more than I can handle for hours on end)
    Anyway, two wheels all the way!!!(although I love my car too) Keep it up and stay safe out there!
    I don't even know how to drive a car and sincerely i never really found the need, even if getting older the more Guzzy Guzz I become.

  19. #19
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    Oh yeah, I completely agree about the speed thing, on the roads, I don't go very fast at all when I'm out there, and that's the reason I try to get out to the track a lot and release the "need for speed."

    But anyway, digging the bike rack, and I think it's even cooler that it's made out of bike parts.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by scotty878
    Oh yeah, I completely agree about the speed thing, on the roads, I don't go very fast at all when I'm out there, and that's the reason I try to get out to the track a lot and release the "need for speed."
    Sure this bike is more of a "Pick up" truck than anything else, skinny agil cheap and fast, specially in heavy traffic.


    But anyway, digging the bike rack, and I think it's even cooler that it's made out of bike parts.

    Yeah I don't think I show you gals and guys how it was made.

    This bend tubes are actually road bike handlebars that were defective (Bianchi recall 1996) I just cut them in half and unite them with the longitudinal tubes.


    The front wheel holders are just your standard Yakima wheel things, they work great, currently I have a version I made to carry the 20MM axle.

    The cross tubes are just mountain bike handlebars that were to bend to be use on a bicycle.


    24" inch BMX rims used as "compression struts"


    One more view.


    The main tube parts were made out of a "windsurf Hawai" boom I broke at the head..


    the rest came fror a snowboard plate, trek 8000 delrin bushings (Came on the boxes before build up) and thule car towers.




    The rear mounts can be rotated backwards if I need to carry something really bulky, long or whatever.


    Again this rack end up being made this way, because those are the parts I found on the bike shop dumpster that day (most of them at least) if I was to make it again, I'm sure will be different in terms of crafting even if the core concept will be kind of the same..

  21. #21
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    P1010339.JPG

    P1010338.JPG

    P1010337.JPG

    my honda silverwing with my rush on the back. i have taken my scooter to my local trail 3 times this week and all is going well so far. alot of drivers looking at me funny though.

  22. #22
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    has anyone experimented carrying a lefty on a scooter or motorcycle? I just posted some pics of mine on my honda silverwing and i'm aware that its not the best way to carry it on the stock rack but it has to do for now.any ideas?

  23. #23
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    This is how I roll:

    '94 RSBikes Stampede (commuter), '05 Prophet, '09 Scattante XRL Team, '10 Slice 4
    Retired: 97 C-DaleSuper-V, 05 C-Dale R5000

  24. #24
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    Alright, Y'all got me inspired! Now I've got a new project to work on while waiting to be able to ride both my two-wheelers, motorized (Triumph Sprint RS) and fat-powered (Me).
    I had a few ideas kicking around but seriously after seeing what everyone is doing here I've got to get wrenchin'.
    Bikes=Sanity

  25. #25
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    Hey Dwayne,
    do you have a pic of the rack itself or a better pic? That is cool.
    many thanks
    Danny

  26. #26
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    Okay I don't really have many pictures of carring my tandem on my moto,


    Yesterday I took it for a little ride from berkeley to san francisco, not long but the bay bridge with the wind and many cars is always kind of "Fun"




    A profile water bottle cage as my "Red Flag" maybe the only good use for a Profile cage anyway.


    At American Cyclery visiting some old friends




    I guess the fact that I'm writing this shows that everything when well on the trip..

    Someday I will make a proper tandem mounts, far more forward so the frame do not stick out so far but is actually no big deal, it just looks scary..

    Enjoy and Wuss about carrying bikes on your car.

  27. #27
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    I wonder what where the liability would lie, if there would be a catastrophic frame failure and bike crash as the result.

    I'm sure that all the motorcycle companies legal departments are thrilled to see all of these modifcations to their bikes.

    After all aren't m/cs inherintly dangerouse? They only have two wheels and will fall over on their own device unless there is enough enertia to keep the wheels up right.

    just kidding! most of those racks look very cool. the one on the yamaha with wood base structures is questionable at the least.

    Keep the shinny side up.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by nagatahawk
    After all aren't m/cs inherintly dangerouse? They only have two wheels and will fall over on their own device unless there is enough enertia to keep the wheels up right.
    They're only dangerous because you don't have the safety of a ton or two of metal surrounding you in case things go bad. As far as stability goes, yes, at a standstill they fall right over, however, the gyroscopic effect of the wheels once you're moving makes a motorcycle relatively stable.
    '94 RSBikes Stampede (commuter), '05 Prophet, '09 Scattante XRL Team, '10 Slice 4
    Retired: 97 C-DaleSuper-V, 05 C-Dale R5000

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by nagatahawk
    I wonder what where the liability would lie, if there would be a catastrophic frame failure and bike crash as the result.

    I'm sure that all the motorcycle companies legal departments are thrilled to see all of these modifcations to their bikes.
    if car companies havent gotten mad that people put yakima racks on their cars, i dont see the problem .... furthermore i had my yakima rack loaded with 3 bikes fly off my 94 accord on the freeway back in 2004 ... yakima took no responsibility
    AZ has the best mountain bike gathering ever

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Melt
    if car companies havent gotten mad that people put yakima racks on their cars, i dont see the problem .... furthermore i had my yakima rack loaded with 3 bikes fly off my 94 accord on the freeway back in 2004 ... yakima took no responsibility
    I wonder about that all the time..

    Actually many years ago I spend way to many hours working, making and designing a "Universal rack" for motorcycles, and as difficult as it was the issues were nothing compare with dealing with the "Ambulance chasing lawyers" to the point I end up abandoning the project do to liability heackackes.

    In my case Basically the price of the product will need to be multiplied by three just to pay for the insurance cost making the product unfeasible to produce.

    This type of comitments are for sure not for everybody (you need tons of skills, B^lls, comun sense) and even more not for every Bike,

    The BMW GS is pretty much the ultimate platform for this kind of use do to how stable and planted it is, but many other bikes, (sport bikes specially) will make for a horrible bike carrier, for the very same reason they are so fun to ride, fickable, agile, whillie prone and fast.

    again here is Stage one of the "rack that never...." for the world to share.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dwayne
    They're only dangerous because you don't have the safety of a ton or two of metal surrounding you in case things go bad. As far as stability goes, yes, at a standstill they fall right over, however, the gyroscopic effect of the wheels once you're moving makes a motorcycle relatively stable.
    Motorcycles are extremely dangerous, Hell if i have one when I was 18 years old a will get kill at least ones a week, but if you learn to respect them and know your and their limits they are a very feasible way to transport yourself and as you can see pretty much everything you will ever need (realistically)

    I start pretty late at age 32 and 15 years later I log in about 570,000miles with out counting the many rider in the dirt and/or with motorcycles with out a speedo and so far still in one piece (Knock on wood) actually I have way more injuries from Bicycling and even more from Skateboarding (18 years old=Kill)

    Actually Bicycles are the easier things I carry, they maybe be bulky but they are also pretty light.


    For example this was my most stupid load.


    180 pounds cast iron Industrial belt sander and also my self standing 16,5inch drill press that was about the same mass.


    So freaking heavy, I did not really measure but I guess I have about 360/370 pounds of extra load, that is equivalent as carrying (specially lifting and man handleling) two extra adult passengers always on top of the bike.


    I inflate the back tire to 42psi (normal 37psi) and still look and feel flat.


    This i will never do again, the steering feel like a "Hover craft" but I was in a hurry to finish a project so I took the risk.


    Well now at least I know the Limits.
    Last edited by patineto; 01-21-2008 at 08:06 PM.

  32. #32
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    Ricky! I should have known I'd find you here! For those of you who don't know or are picking on Ricky, you should see some of his designs. VERY impressive. He's generally a crap rider- motorized or non- so don't worry about that either. Just kidding Ricky. Get sick of the BS on ADV again?

    Anyway, cars are dumb, lane splitting is legal here in CA, and no, it is not dangerous to carry your bike on the back of your bike. It is basically like having a fat person on the back. If you aren't TWO, then don't suspect to know what you are talking about. The GS is an amazing bike and better than any car I've ever owned. I've lane split by cops with the mtb on the back and have recieved no guff.

    Here's my boring design on the last GS and the latest one:



    And now the latest GS Adventure:


  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by longtallsally
    Ricky! I should have known I'd find you here! For those of you who don't know or are picking on Ricky, you should see some of his designs. VERY impressive. He's generally a crap rider- motorized or non- so don't worry about that either. Just kidding Ricky.
    yeah that is me, all my bikes are always shiny, clean and well keep inside a heated garage...

    Plus I never ever ride them in the dirt and i always sleep on Hotels no matter what..

    Not....!!!!!!!!!


    Get sick of the BS on ADV again?
    ADDrider What..!?!?!

    BS Just a little, I like to have "Intellectual" conversations not S.P.S. (Small Penis, Sindrome) compensation contest with a bunch of people that don't even ride their bikes ..

    Not you, but way to many others.

    Anyway, cars are dumb, lane splitting is legal here in CA, and no, it is not dangerous to carry your bike on the back of your bike. It is basically like having a fat person on the back. If you aren't TWO, then don't suspect to know what you are talking about. The GS is an amazing bike and better than any car I've ever owned. I've lane split by cops with the mtb on the back and have recieved no guff.
    The day i was carrying my new TOTO Toilet home I have a "Poncharello moment"


    Two brand new CHiP R1200Rt's when by me at top speed, then I see their brake lights and i have a "Oh Sh^t moment", they slow down enogh to be by my side, the two of them look at me in a very "Village people" way if you catch my drift, then the guy farder away from me lift his hand and gives me a "Thumps Up" sign, then they drop a gear and regain "Warp speed" status,

    >>>Insert CHips Soundtrack Here<<< and I keep singing it all the way until I got home.

    Here's my boring design on the last GS and the latest one:



    And now the latest GS Adventure:

    hey It works...
    Last edited by patineto; 01-26-2008 at 11:26 AM.

  34. #34
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    A small but useful update on the rack structure.

    After 12 years of heavy usage only one structural issue has developed into a problem.

    I use to support the back of the rack from flexing with a "Compression strut" the problem was that the lower attachment for this support rest on the original saddlebags of the motorcycle and the loads where wearing on the bag mounting points do to the excessive loads, not a big deal after all they are really old but still a issue i like to fix.


    Well the other day, i came up with this idea of making a "Bridge" from the passenger footpegs to the rack and How else to do it but using some old bicycle parts in this case 26" heavy Downhill rims.

    The basic concept.


    Mounting point to the passenger pegs


    The final and simple structure.


    The curve structures connect from the very end of the aluminum rack to the middle part of the rim are the key structural feature here, they main "Hub" is just to support this little arch.


    They hold the whole structure in a very sound way, but also permit "Sway" so the bikes and the rack can move under load (flex, twist) something really important so the mass of the bicycle will not affect the steering of the motorcycle.


    You can varelly see it, but it works really well.




    Small 200mile round trip to the russian river to a small motorcycle rally just to test the new structure.


    Last week ride to Skaggs point with my super "Pocket rocket" girlfriend, So, So much fun.


    Enjoy.
    Last edited by patineto; 05-13-2008 at 11:13 AM.

  35. #35
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    What a great thread. To those with the mounts on their rides, very impressive. I'd love to ride a touring bike, but the pegs put too much bend in my knees and after an hour or so they start to get sore. Awesome though, just awesome.
    The red couch has moved from Alaska to Florida...

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by patineto
    A small but useful update on the rack structure...

    Enjoy.
    Damn, props to you, dude. That is one of the coolest, most creative things I've seen in a long time.

    And I though I had an unwieldy load when I had 5 sheets of heavy duty, 4x8' architectal lattice on the top of my old Saturn.

    I have the same Ridgid drill press, and that thing is freakin' heavy, not to mention big. The box would not fit in my car, even with the seat down, and I had to break it down in the Home Depot parking lot. And you got that thing, plus the belt sander on on the back of your bike at once...amazing.

    I had a CBR 600F2 when I was in my early 20s, but I got rid of it while I was still in one piece. Like you said, young + very fast moto <> good idea.
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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Diesel~
    Damn, props to you, dude. That is one of the coolest, most creative things I've seen in a long time.
    Thanks senor your comments and open mind is what keeps me posting.

    How about this for a "Plastic surgeon" fix.





    Just cheap Pop rivets and a old stretch out and useless bicycle chain.



    And I though I had an unwieldy load when I had 5 sheets of heavy duty, 4x8' architectal lattice on the top of my old Saturn.
    that is a lot of heavy wood, that is something I can not carry.

    I have the same Ridgid drill press, and that thing is freakin' heavy, not to mention big. The box would not fit in my car, even with the seat down, and I had to break it down in the Home Depot parking lot. And you got that thing, plus the belt sander on on the back of your bike at once...amazing.
    well that trip was really scary, most people will not be that dumb to even think about it, but even then they will refuse to ride the bike.

    I had a CBR 600F2 when I was in my early 20s, but I got rid of it while I was still in one piece. Like you said, young + very fast moto <> good idea.
    Motorcycles are amazing but you always need to remember they are like sleeping with a grumpy rothwiller dog, so know your boundaries and don't push you luck to far.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Chris
    What a great thread. To those with the mounts on their rides, very impressive. I'd love to ride a touring bike, but the pegs put too much bend in my knees and after an hour or so they start to get sore. Awesome though, just awesome.
    Oh Chris is a bunch of things you can to keep your knee's happy, don't let that stop you.

    thanks for the compliments.

  39. #39
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    those are all great ideas, some are way over the limit. I still gringe when I see motorcycles used for what they are not designed for. It is all left over from when I worked at American Honda Motor Co. in Customer Service. We would be privy to seeing the results of modification to customers motorcycles that ended up in fatal disasters. for instance, some customers would chrome the fork castings. the chroming process would crystalize the alloy and the fork would break. I've also seen frame failures where modification were made. hopefully the BMW will sustain the continuouse stress of bearing weight suspended on a lever, support struts notwithstanding.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by nagatahawk
    those are all great ideas, some are way over the limit. I still gringe when I see motorcycles used for what they are not designed for. It is all left over from when I worked at American Honda Motor Co. in Customer Service. We would be privy to seeing the results of modification to customers motorcycles that ended up in fatal disasters. for instance, some customers would chrome the fork castings. the chroming process would crystalize the alloy and the fork would break. I've also seen frame failures where modification were made. hopefully the BMW will sustain the continuouse stress of bearing weight suspended on a lever, support struts notwithstanding.
    Oh I hear you loud a clear, I will not do this with any other bike.

    When I build the rack in 1996 I keep checking for cracks, bend tubes, twisted bolts, but nothing.

    I guess the GS's (BMW's in general) are so overbuild is kind of pointless to ride them with out load..

    So far after this years nothing has fail structurally on the bike, well I just replace the engine after about 375,000miles of riding, just because I got a newer one for cheap, but the old one was still working well.

    Actually just look at my Light for proof, I'm, actually kind of a "safety freak"



    LED Row at the very top, with two modes one for running, brighter for braking.

    I update the original tail light from a simgle bulb to a double bulb light for "Redundancy" reasons.

    then at the bottom I got a aftermarket light from a SV650 and install it "upside down" like a fender, this light also has working turn signals for added visibility.



    Yeah A little much but I'm still alife and that is all it counts.

    Look at the amount of color stickers on the license plate.


    Same for the front Kawazaki ZX7 headlight running two 4500 HID's



    Plus a few extra lights, even one that moves with the handlebars for better light path control.

  41. #41
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    Your "lightship" is a testament to BMW's quality and robust design. I owned a 3 series Yuppymobile for a couple of years and wasn't that impressed with it, however the BMW motorcycle is another story altogether. I believe the flat twin BMW was originally designed as the ALL Motorcycle back in the 30's, haul passeengers and equipment on and off road. and the redundancy was built in for the military. And thus the armor plated frames that can withstand bullets and bike racks!! I remember when my motocross bike did not have the suspension travel of a stock RS touring Motorcycle.

    I no longer ride motorcycle but I can still appreciate the good ones.
    continue having a blast!

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by nagatahawk
    Your "lightship" is a testament to BMW's quality and robust design. I owned a 3 series Yuppymobile for a couple of years and wasn't that impressed with it, however the BMW motorcycle is another story altogether. I believe the flat twin BMW was originally designed as the ALL Motorcycle back in the 30's, haul passeengers and equipment on and off road. and the redundancy was built in for the military. And thus the armor plated frames that can withstand bullets and bike racks!! I remember when my motocross bike did not have the suspension travel of a stock RS touring Motorcycle.

    I no longer ride motorcycle but I can still appreciate the good ones.
    continue having a blast!
    Well usually overbuild end up being kind of a waste, specially if you need to push them and/or lift it around in the dirt, or ride them very little and don't carry anything heavy or bulky, in short just like a "Possermovil".

    But in a case like mine makes for a wonderful trouble free platform, even if they are 100's of pounds heavier than they need to be.

    needless to say, I love this freaking thing.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by patineto
    Well usually overbuild end up being kind of a waste, specially if you need to push them and/or lift it around in the dirt, or ride them very little and don't carry anything heavy or bulky, in short just like a "Possermovil".

    But in a case like mine makes for a wonderful trouble free platform, even if they are 100's of pounds heavier than they need to be.

    needless to say, I love this freaking thing.
    Bah! They aren't heavy. We finally christened the new pig a couple weeks ago at WARPED and I picked up really easily.


    Sorry I missed you up in Guerneville- I stopped by for a short time but had to fly out of town the next day for work so couldn't even stay a night. I live only about 30 minutes from Skeggs now so send me a note if you want to hit it there some evening- going to El Dorado this weekend.

    Loaded and 2 up for only 850 miles on the weekend.




  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by longtallsally
    Bah! They aren't heavy. We finally christened the new pig a couple weeks ago at WARPED and I picked up really easily.

    Sure sometimes I even drop them on porpuse, just because is fun to lift them up again...


    Well I guess now you just need to make a rack so the BigPig can become a complete do it all vehicle.

    Make sure to say hi the next time in person and with out a helmet.

  45. #45
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    Very cool stuff...

    But, what do you do with your MC gear while riding? And if you wreck the MTB, and/or bonk, how do you get yourself home? I can drive my car with road rash and/or when totally spent after a hard a ride, but I wouldn't want to pull on leathers or trust myself on the MC on the way home...

    Great stuff for certain situations tho.
    Citius. Altius. Fortius.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by livinlite
    Very cool stuff...

    But, what do you do with your MC gear while riding?
    Easy....
    Big^ss Cobralink lock (Like a chainlock but for real) goes inside all the sleeves, actually real motorcycle boots (big, long stiff) still present a problem since they don't fit inside the saddle bags, so far I hide them inside the rear wheel well of the bike with out any troubles to report.

    And if you wreck the MTB, and/or bonk, how do you get yourself home? I can drive my car with road rash and/or when totally spent after a hard a ride, but I wouldn't want to pull on leathers or trust myself on the MC on the way home...
    Dude You are smart, can I be your friend

    That is been something that concern me for many years and also experience a few times.

    So far is only been a matter of "Toughen Up" with hypothermia, crack ribs of dislocated fingers, but I'm sure the sad day will come when I need more than "Manllyman" guts to get home.

    Another very real fear is how will I "Eject" of the motorbike if I crash it, will I become "impel" into the handlebars or something horrible..!?!?
    needless to say I ride far more carefully then I have the bike, even if I have been known to be a "Squit" Hunter from time to time.
    Great stuff for certain situations tho.
    Well if the day comes, when I start to like lady's with Makeup, high heeled shoes, perfumes and also Cars i will have more choices, so far the bike is the only way to travel for my friends, me and my bikes.

  47. #47
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    A few more updates on the rack.

    After building the new "Compression struts" a bunch of new choices have become possible, for example I was afraid of the "low" wheels getting in contact with the motorcycle wheel, but before I did not have a easy way to "fence them up"... well now I do.

    So I made this "Crossbar" out of some motorcycle hand guards brackets and a fancy Vintage easton purple hyperlight handlebar.


    As a side effect the support rims become even more rigid (Braced togheter) not like is necessary, but hey if is no penalty I take more structural rigidity and redundancy any day.


    I did notice two problematic things about the setup, first the exhaust pipe note was infernal A.K.A. loud as hell (a Air vortex generated by the shape of the handlebars, I'm guessing)

    To complete the view of the License plate was obstructed, no bueno.

    So I change the Purple bar, for a high rise bar that move the bars away from the exhaust pipe of the bike.

    Here shown with the rhodegear wheel holder already install


    And as you can see now the license plate now is full visible.
    Last edited by patineto; 05-17-2008 at 05:16 PM.

  48. #48
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    Another project.

    Fully Independent and adjustable "Low wheel mounts"

    For a few years I have two set of Yakima wheel holder mount it pointed down so I can carry two more spare wheels (two for the main the front wheels of the bikes, two more for "just in case") but sometimes the wheels were a little to close for my liking (since they are co-dependent on the adjustment and setting on the main rack)

    Something like this.


    well time to fix that problem too.

    The new "Piggyback" rack attaches to the main aluminum platform via a pair of old and obsolete 7/8" KTM handlebar mounts, the yellow/orange/pink tube is a old piece of a broken klein mission control handlebar.


    From there two pairs on Acerbis handguard mount (attach togheter using a threaded rod) form a rotating arm, that can be adjusted in a variety of angles and heights.



    Kind of confusing i know, but here is how the lower wheel mount work now.


    full tilt upwards


    Rotated to high to be useful (the wheel will not fit), but showing how far the structure can be more up.


    To make this perfect, i just need to find a 7/8" high rise handlebar (moto-bar) that is really narrow and really bend (like on a cruiser) so the Yakima mounts can be set on a angle (not vertical or perpendicular to the ground) to gain ground clearances by pointing the wheels as close to the center of the motorcycle as possible.
    Last edited by patineto; 05-17-2008 at 05:21 PM.

  49. #49
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    I'm sure After you see this you will never Whine about Carrying your tandem on a car, Hell even a single bike I hope...

    I finally figure out a simple, easy way to carry the tandem on my motorcycle...


    BMX Stem attaches to the 22mm tubes of the footpeg bracket like it was made for it.


    Old manitou one fork tube serves as the main structural member


    The manitou tube happen to be 1 1/8" so I connect a stem with a "highRise" to provide as much leg clearance as possible


    From there, I attach a One inch quill stem to the lower stem, this provide me some range of lateral adjustments if is necessary. .


    Something like this, just to Illustrate the flexibility of the system.


    I spread the members of the rear rack as much as possible, the front one next to the front bottom bracket, the rear one as far back as possible.


    This is how the whole thing looks,


    sadly mountain the forks more forward will impair movement a little to much..


    The Gf as captain


    The super Gf as stocker.


    Knee, leg clearnace.


    As wide as my shoulder are, is no really a clearance problem.


    I only need to lose two 6 mm bolts and is gone, 5 seconds max.


    hell I can almost keep attach to the bike since is so small


    I when for a Ride and the whole thing is super stable, ready to go anywhere, except i did not have a place to go riding today.

  50. #50
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    All pictures are awesome!!
    but i have one confusion?
    Motorbikes + bicycles will not increase the weight,
    can we easily drive the bike?
    Search Analyst and Webmaster at Infibeam.com

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by infibeam
    All pictures are awesome!!
    but i have one confusion?
    Motorbikes + bicycles will not increase the weight,
    can we easily drive the bike?

    Well senor Much less than taking Miss Piggy for a ride..

    Yes for sure with two downhill bikes at the very back and a passenger get a little difficult, but nothing a little of skill and perseverance can not solve.

    Put it this way I can ride at 80% of my usual solo speed on bendy & twisty roads with the bikes and pretty much the same speed on straight easy roads, just consuming a little more gas to to aerodynamic issues.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Diesel~
    Damn, props to you, dude. That is one of the coolest, most creative things I've seen in a long time.

    And I though I had an unwieldy load when I had 5 sheets of heavy duty, 4x8' architectal lattice on the top of my old Saturn.

    I have the same Ridgid drill press, and that thing is freakin' heavy, not to mention big. The box would not fit in my car, even with the seat down, and I had to break it down in the Home Depot parking lot. And you got that thing, plus the belt sander on on the back of your bike at once...amazing.

    I had a CBR 600F2 when I was in my early 20s, but I got rid of it while I was still in one piece. Like you said, young + very fast moto <> good idea.
    I was hauling 1/8" paneling to dump after a job on my Yakima rack tied real tight. This is how strong those racks are. I came up over a bridge and hit a gust of wind. The first one just lifted a little,... the second one lifted the car a foot off the ground until the panel snapped in half. I thought I was going to fly over backwards! The Yakima rack lifted my Corolla hatchback off the ground. Eeeek!
    "Don't give up, Never give up!"

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by thebigred67
    I was hauling 1/8" paneling to dump after a job on my Yakima rack tied real tight. This is how strong those racks are. I came up over a bridge and hit a gust of wind. The first one just lifted a little,... the second one lifted the car a foot off the ground until the panel snapped in half. I thought I was going to fly over backwards! The Yakima rack lifted my Corolla hatchback off the ground. Eeeek!
    Airfoils on a motorcycle can be really dangerous, they can change the direction of the moto in no time, plus they are very unpredictable because the shape of the vortex can change dramatically pedending on the speed you are going, from "positive" to "negative" specially Killer if the object is place on the sides of the vehicle (not top or horizontal)

    I'm just glad I'm not into Kayaks, surfboards or rowing boats.

  54. #54
    7&7
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    Nice setups.

  55. #55
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    I have an '05 Kawi KLR650 and I was thinking about removing the rear wheel of my mountain bike and using a quick release setup off a passenger peg from the KLR to hold the rear of the mountain bike (which will put the MTB handlebar at the back and out of the way and will allow me to keep my non-QR front wheel on my fork, a Marz 888) and then part of a trunk mount rack off the KLR's cargo hold to support the top tube or the MTB with one of those rubber strech overs. Sound good? Only thing that bothers me is that a blinker might be partially blocked and give me crap from cops... Anybody else with lower side mount bicycles have this problem?

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by 7&7
    I have an '05 Kawi KLR650 and I was thinking about removing the rear wheel of my mountain bike and using a quick release setup off a passenger peg from the KLR to hold the rear of the mountain bike (which will put the MTB handlebar at the back and out of the way and will allow me to keep my non-QR front wheel on my fork, a Marz 888) and then part of a trunk mount rack off the KLR's cargo hold to support the top tube or the MTB with one of those rubber strech overs. Sound good? Only thing that bothers me is that a blinker might be partially blocked and give me crap from cops... Anybody else with lower side mount bicycles have this problem?
    Do you self a favor and before doing and/or frabricating anything for real, mount everything "KaddyWompas" on the KLR using straps, bungees, whatever you can find on the just to make sure everything is sound and fits.

    Personally i try some "lower" and "Away from center" mounts (to the side of the bike) (on my KTM 640) and I encounter ground and lean angle clearance problems.

    Remember the suspension will compress, so do all you measurements on a "worst case scenario" (when the suspension is fully compress) and then add the amount of clearance you are going to lose then the bike is lean over the side (on a turn, sidewalk's, etc)

    Basically The closer to the center line of the motorbike you place the bicycle the less ground and specially lean angle clearance you are going to lose.

    All that will be a good basic measurement of how low you can hang the bike, also remember the 135MM rear spacing is a little more fragile and prone to miss alignment than the front fork.

    Oh do you self a favor and Upgrade (upsize) the lower mounting bolts on your KLR subframe before really trying to load her up, since they are famous for breaking in half.

    if you want, take some pictures of your muckup and we can try to figure out something here

  57. #57
    7&7
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    Quote Originally Posted by patineto
    Do you self a favor and before doing and/or frabricating anything for real, mount everything "KaddyWompas" on the KLR using straps, bungees, whatever you can find on the just to make sure everything is sound and fits.

    Personally i try some "lower" and "Away from center" mounts (to the side of the bike) (on my KTM 640) and I encounter ground and lean angle clearance problems.

    Remember the suspension will compress, so do all you measurements on a "worst case scenario" (when the suspension is fully compress) and then add the amount of clearance you are going to lose then the bike is lean over the side (on a turn, sidewalk's, etc)

    Basically The closer to the center line of the motorbike you place the bicycle the less ground and specially lean angle clearance you are going to lose.

    All that will be a good basic measurement of how low you can hang the bike, also remember the 135MM rear spacing is a little more fragile and prone to miss alignment than the front fork.

    Oh do you self a favor and Upgrade (upsize) the lower mounting bolts on your KLR subframe before really trying to load her up, since they are famous for breaking in half.

    if you want, take some pictures of your muckup and we can try to figure out something here
    Yeah, I see what you mean about clearance. I was hoping that since the passanger pegs are higher than the rider's pegs it would be ok. The rear should be ok since it's a Santa Cruz Bullit I want to carry and they're notorious for being over built. Also wouldn't the wider than a fork spacing in the rear (135mm) be more stable than a fork mount? Think I'll get police problems with partially blocking a blinker from the side view of the bike?

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by 7&7
    Yeah, I see what you mean about clearance. I was hoping that since the passanger pegs are higher than the rider's pegs it would be ok. The rear should be ok since it's a Santa Cruz Bullit I want to carry and they're notorious for being over built. Also wouldn't the wider than a fork spacing in the rear (135mm) be more stable than a fork mount?
    Sorry I don't have any better pictures

    This bikerack rest on the Footpegs but the fork mount was way higher do to clearance.


    You can see part of the left rack here (cover by the saddle bag) and the Kona resting on the right side of the bike.


    Even as high as the bike was the rear wheel got scrub with the ground a few times and the front wheel mounted down low suffer at least two "Explosions" and a few very worn out tires from contacting the road surface at speed and the lowest point on the low wheel rest at about 19" high, so you do the math.

    Here is a cheesy diagram of how the system will work.

    Think I'll get police problems with partially blocking a blinker from the side view of the bike?
    Dude your blinker lights are the least of your problems, besides you can always relocate them to a better place, if not make a "Remote" turn signal (with a extension cable) that you can hang from the bicycle somehow.
    Last edited by patineto; 06-05-2008 at 03:32 PM.

  59. #59
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    Maybe I'll go with plab B then which is like another pic I saw on this thread (wish I could see more close ups of it) which involves removing both front and rear wheels and mounting the bicycle on the center of the KLR's rack so less stuff will hang off. One change would be having the bicycle on backwards to keep the handlebars off the back and out of the way to make the KLR roomier and more comfortable to ride. Do you know if he quick released the fork and rear or just the fork with some other holder for the rear end?

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by 7&7
    Maybe I'll go with plab B then which is like another pic I saw on this thread (wish I could see more close ups of it) which involves removing both front and rear wheels and mounting the bicycle on the center of the KLR's rack so less stuff will hang off. One change would be having the bicycle on backwards to keep the handlebars off the back and out of the way to make the KLR roomier and more comfortable to ride. Do you know if he quick released the fork and rear or just the fork with some other holder for the rear end?
    Show me the picture you are taking about and maybe I can help who it belongs or at least understand how it works.

    I think your approach is sound, you just need to be aware of the constrains to make it work.

  61. #61
    7&7
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    Quote Originally Posted by patineto
    Show me the picture you are taking about and maybe I can help who it belongs or at least understand how it works.

    I think your approach is sound, you just need to be aware of the constrains to make it work.
    Page 1 of this thread, 29th image from the top. Seems to be the tightest bundle to support a bike which hopefully will give me the least amount of police trouble. Connecticut cops can be ball busters just looking for something to pull you over for... By the way, you have the biggest balls ever for carrying an industrial standing sander and drill press on your bike. The tandum bike gets a close second just for looking so freaking awkward!

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by 7&7
    Page 1 of this thread, 29th image from the top.
    This one..??



    Sorry I don't have a bigger copy


    Seems to be the tightest bundle to support a bike which hopefully will give me the least amount of police trouble. Connecticut cops can be ball busters just looking for something to pull you over for...
    Well around california and the whole west coast (oregon is horrible) they are not that nice but somehow the Rack charms them and they never give you trouble

    By the way, you have the biggest balls ever for carrying an industrial standing sander and drill press on your bike. The tandem bike gets a close second just for looking so freaking awkward!
    The Tandem is actually really easy, you don't even feel it, just need to remember to not lane split as aggressive or cut in front or cars with very little space in front of them.

    The drill and the Sander, well that was just plain stupid, is like carrying two Anna Nicolle Smith's on her megaPiggy days

  63. #63
    7&7
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    Yeah, that's the one. Wish I could see another angle on that. What do you think he's holding up the rear of the bike with?

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by 7&7
    Yeah, that's the one. Wish I could see another angle on that. What do you think he's holding up the rear of the bike with?
    Let me study it a little depper, but it can be as simple as a little Tower to account for the chainring height and then something as basic as a toe strap to hold the frame.

    Personally I love this rhode gear pads, simple, cheap, sturdy, long lasting and the work really well.


    For wheel, frames, windsurf booms whatever you need.

  65. #65
    7&7
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    I was given a Rhode Gear rack that I don't use and it has 4 of those exact rubber grabbers. I definitely want to use them on the KLR project because of how well they hold and that you can put them anywhere you can put a pipe. Just noticed how well they appear to work as tire holders too.

    I like the DH rim parts you use for supports with "give". Trying to think if I need it for supporting only one bike and I know I'll get crap for partially covering the blinkers from different viewing angles (I know, I'm paranoid). Maybe just 2 short pieces of stout aluminum angle bolted to the cargo rack.

    Fun project. Gas is $4.19 at the cheapest place I know so if I don't use the KLR to carry my bike, some of my favorite mountain biking spots might get out of reach. NEVER!

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by 7&7
    I was given a Rhode Gear rack that I don't use and it has 4 of those exact rubber grabbers. I definitely want to use them on the KLR project because of how well they hold and that you can put them anywhere you can put a pipe. Just noticed how well they appear to work as tire holders too.
    try to use as made "already made" parts as possible, just go to salvation army or a friendlly bike shop and look for Ski, snowboard, bike brackets, whatever that can be useful for you project.

    The way I do it, I think "In Guide lines" you know a direction to follow and then adapt the design according to the objects I can find

    For example Bicycle stems are wonderful, collapsible, adjustable, plentiful and really strong too.

    For example My mount for the tandem.


    In use.


    Collapsed and out of the way , The silver tube is a Old manitou One fork leg.


    I like the DH rim parts you use for supports with "give". Trying to think if I need it for supporting only one bike and I know I'll get crap for partially covering the blinkers from different viewing angles (I know, I'm paranoid). Maybe just 2 short pieces of stout aluminum angle bolted to the cargo rack.
    First of all do Not confused Rigid with Strong this is a very common mistake, in general the mount for the bike need to be able to absorve the extra mass of the bicycle (specially if is located really far from the center of mass of the motorbike) so it does not get transmitted (as much) to the motorcycle steering and handling.

    My route was to make the rack somehow flexible and this has work wonderfully but i'm sure other approaches can bring great result too.

    The turn signal, well do whatever you need to do to make you happy since is all about having fun, and worrying about stuff does not contribute much to the experience

    Fun project. Gas is $4.19 at the cheapest place I know so if I don't use the KLR to carry my bike, some of my favorite mountain biking spots might get out of reach. NEVER!
    tell me about, moto's are not that cheap, but for sure cheaper than a big^ss car.

  67. #67
    7&7
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    Quote Originally Posted by patineto
    try to use as made "already made" parts as possible, just go to salvation army or a friendlly bike shop and look for Ski, snowboard, bike brackets, whatever that can be useful for you project.

    The way I do it, I think "In Guide lines" you know a direction to follow and then adapt the design according to the objects I can find

    For example Bicycle stems are wonderful, collapsible, adjustable, plentiful and really strong too.

    For example My mount for the tandem.


    In use.


    Collapsed and out of the way , The silver tube is a Old manitou One fork leg.

    First of all do Not confused Rigid with Strong this is a very common mistake, in general the mount for the bike need to be able to absorve the extra mass of the bicycle (specially if is located really far from the center of mass of the motorbike) so it does not get transmitted (as much) to the motorcycle steering and handling.

    My route was to make the rack somehow flexible and this has work wonderfully but i'm sure other approaches can bring great result too.

    The turn signal, well do whatever you need to do to make you happy since is all about having fun, and worrying about stuff does not contribute much to the experience

    tell me about, moto's are not that cheap, but for sure cheaper than a big^ss car.
    Yeah, I can see where some flex would help keep stuff from snapping. I like the use of old threadless stems for holding stuff. I used two of them with a short section of 1-1/8" tube to add a handlebar to a three wheel speed stroller to give a higher hold which allowed me to roller blade with my toddler.

    Thanks for the pictures. I can see a section of 1-1/8" pipe coming from an area above the passenger pegs on your bike. What is that tube from and what are you attaching it to on the motorcycle frame?

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by 7&7
    Yeah, I can see where some flex would help keep stuff from snapping. I like the use of old threadless stems for holding stuff. I used two of them with a short section of 1-1/8" tube to add a handlebar to a three wheel speed stroller to give a higher hold which allowed me to roller blade with my toddler.
    Bravo...

    That is the spirit ...

    Thanks for the pictures. I can see a section of 1-1/8" pipe coming from an area above the passenger pegs on your bike. What is that tube from and what are you attaching it to on the motorcycle frame?
    Oh easy..

    the tube is a slider tube from a old manitou One fork and atahces to a 1 1/8" BMX stem that has 22mm pretty much the same as the 7/8" tubes of the BMW subframe, no shim require or anything funky.

    In my case a "Haro" stem.


    here is how it looks with the tube attach to it, really easy to take in and out.

  69. #69
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    [QUOTE= the tube is a slider tube from a old manitou One fork and atahces to a 1 1/8" BMX stem that has 22mm pretty much the same as the 7/8" tubes of the BMW subframe, no shim require or anything funky.

    Brilliant. I have a bunch of old stems laying around knowing I'd have a future use for them (and because I'm a bit of a gear whore when it comes to MTB!) I have some simular exposed subframe on my KLR and an old fork with blown seals even. I'll have to see how some of my stems will work when I get home tonight. -Thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by 7&7

    Brilliant. I have a bunch of old stems laying around knowing I'd have a future use for them (and because I'm a bit of a gear whore when it comes to MTB!) I have some simular exposed subframe on my KLR and an old fork with blown seals even. I'll have to see how some of my stems will work when I get home tonight. -Thanks
    Stem's are some of my favorite, specially the ones with the detachable face, they are usually light, super strong, plentiful and just remember 25.4mm is the same as One inch so you can use them to construct all kinds of racks and structures using stock 1" tubes

    I'm really glad I can help and inspire you a little too.

  71. #71
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    What an awesome thread! So many great ideas.

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    Quote Originally Posted by toyota200x
    What an awesome thread! So many great ideas.
    thanks senor...

    The best part is that most of concepts can be apply to any other type of problem, in fact more than anything is the way of "Open" way of thinking that really makes a difference.

    Please shows us your own "pennyTech" accomplishments too.

  73. #73
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    Great thread! Looking to do something like this on my Kawasaki Concours 1400.

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    Carrying a 29er on a Kawasaki Concours 14 / GTR 1400

    Quote Originally Posted by dog.gone
    Great thread! Looking to do something like this on my Kawasaki Concours 1400.
    Okay, I need some specific ideas as to how I might carry my 29er on my Kawasaki Concours 14. I'm not the most mechanically inclined, mind you, but I do need a way to carry my bike on my motorcycle.

    I'm not opposed integrating a standardized product like a Yakima Copperhead or Blockhead, I'm just not sure how to do it without modifying the bike or manufacturing something.

    Here are a couple of shots of the bike - albeit not necessarily great shots...
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Triumph Tiger

    Here is my bike set-up on my Tiger 1050.





    Although not shown in these pics, I can still carry my Givi side bags with the bike. I can take enough stuff to go out for a weekend of riding - even including a light camping setup.

    Honestly, I hardly notice the bike when I'm riding the moto. The weight of a bike, 25lbs or so, isn't much different from a typical load in a topbox. THe bike is rock solid on the rack. There is a bit more push in sidewinds but nothing unamanagable.



    The tiger is assymetric left to right, so I had to cut/shape one of the verticals to avoid it slicing the seat.

    The rear luggage rack is an SW-Motech, drilled for mounting the angle aluminum that supports the bottom bracket.



    Last edited by TwoWheelMan; 09-19-2009 at 06:58 PM.

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    I had to do some changes to my design a number of months ago based on this:







    No damage to the bicycle or the motorcycle, but this was an obvious failure. Oh yeah, you notice the bags on the back of the bike and someone asked about riding gear when getting to the trail. I'm ATGATT to the nth degree and wear a full suit just like I would in regular riding to the trailhead. Then I use side panniers to store the suit and the helmet lock for the lid. My boots are the only thing not locked up, but I've not had a problem in a number of years of doing this.

    So I added some trusses from some aircraft aluminum an aerospace engineer buddy had and moved the moment back a bit. It truly feels attached to the subframe now.







    Here is the lame part. I agreed to buy a car today. I've been unemployed for a bit and some toys have to go and a bit of practicality brought in. So the track bike and the Jeep are going in favor of a- very cool- econobox.

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    Here's what I'm using. The tray is reinforced with a piece of 3/4" square tubular aluminum ($6, home depot). The cross bars attach to the 4 stock rack mounts.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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  79. #79
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    I'm new to the forum. Looks like i'm in good company. Here's my old setup:
    " width="549">

    Traded the KLR. I'm working on a different setup for my Wee Strom. Here's the mockup-the finished product may change quite a bit but you get the idea.
    -keith
    " width="549">

  80. #80
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    Reviving this thread to ask a simple question. What do you guys do as far as parking so you're not worried about your gear getting stolen while off riding. I realize the jacket, boots, pants will fit into the hard cases, but is that secure enough? Or do you try to park in a secure location then ride to the trail?
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  81. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by rearviewmirror
    Reviving this thread to ask a simple question. What do you guys do as far as parking so you're not worried about your gear getting stolen while off riding. I realize the jacket, boots, pants will fit into the hard cases, but is that secure enough? Or do you try to park in a secure location then ride to the trail?
    It's an issue for me. It has always involved some compromise to get the mc to a secure spot. As you can see, that was tough with all my gear tied onto the KLR. Sometimes i had to stay in a motel instead of camping. I'm hoping the trailer will solve it for me. I'm content with the hard bags for security. I'll also have the whole mess tied together with a cable lock or two.

    My project has been on hold through the winter. I hope to get it built within the next few weeks.

  82. #82
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    This would be a nice alternative, albeit with a bicycle on the back instead of a motorcycle. A small, secure, aero shaped trailer light enough to be pulled by a motorcycle would be awesome. (Autostream- ADVRIDER)



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    Quote Originally Posted by rearviewmirror
    Reviving this thread to ask a simple question. What do you guys do as far as parking so you're not worried about your gear getting stolen while off riding. I realize the jacket, boots, pants will fit into the hard cases, but is that secure enough? Or do you try to park in a secure location then ride to the trail?
    I put my pants, jacket and gloves in my side panniers, the helmet on the bike's helmet lock leaving the only thing exposed to theft being my boots which I just kinda stuff under the bike.

    I've since relocated to Germany for a couple years, but the local spots I would generally hit in the Bay Area were pretty well patrolled by the rangers- in a good and bad way- so I never really worried too much.

  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by longtallsally
    I put my pants, jacket and gloves in my side panniers, the helmet on the bike's helmet lock leaving the only thing exposed to theft being my boots which I just kinda stuff under the bike.

    I've since relocated to Germany for a couple years, but the local spots I would generally hit in the Bay Area were pretty well patrolled by the rangers- in a good and bad way- so I never really worried too much.

    I do something similar. Fit everything I can in lockable panniers and run a cable lock through jacket, helmet, etc.I think if someone wants your stuff bad enough they're going to take it. Over the past couple of years I've been carrying my bike on the motorcycle I haven't had a problem. There are break ins occasionally here on the front range (CO) but not very often. It's one of the reasons I wanted to get lockable aluminum panniers. Out of sight/out of mind.

  85. #85
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    I've finally got this project off the back burner. It is still very much a work in progress. Some days i think i'm on the right track and some days i think i should just scrap the whole deal...


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    '82 Yamaha Vision and my Specalized 6er hard tail

    Mounted the bike perpendicular to the motorcycle. At 70 mph, I had no wind shear problems or movement.
    A couple things I noticed: 1) the rear suspension needed to be stiffened due to location of the weight 2) skewers need to be stowed (glad I did this) 3) hydrate like crazy BEFORE hopping on the motorcycle; going from the motorcycle to the mtb trail is not the same as car/truck to the mtb trail.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails No, No Cars &gt; Motorbike + Bicycles = Happyness-vision_bike_edit.jpg  


  87. #87
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    Awesome rack, especially with the tandem bike squeezed on!!!

  88. #88
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    How do you guys go with the law? In Australia any luggage cna not exceed the with of the bike or 300mm past the rear wheel, which makes things difficult
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    TyranT-
    In South Dakota the laws concerning motorcycles are quite lax (compared to Australia). I did get an odd look by a city cop; it is the highway patrol that enforce most of the motor vehicle laws.
    Will a trailer work?

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    So I made a "Tiny Bike rack" for my other GS, my needs have change I don't ride really long distances anymore or carry camping gear or even a passenger so this little thing will work just fine..

    For now this is a proof of concept and so far is very promising, but hopefully I can make it a lot more compact and almost "Invisible" by the time I'm done..



    I did a little loop around the block and I will go for a ride to the trail head a little later today.


    For the "Official" version I want to make a SPD retention plate that will be really small and almost invisible to hold the pedal to the rack.

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    It got me to the trail head..:ricky

    The rack is working great as it is, no body intrusions, zero flex, really close to the center line so the mirrors work a 100%, really happy is already working after less than a hour of fabrication.


    Another day, another bike..


    I made the rear mount a little smaller and also paint it black..


    Still think in way to make it smaller, actually I know the ways, I just don't know how to make them with the very few tools I have..

    I was a little bother by a alignment issue at the pedal mount (about 3-5deggres) so I try a longer stem at the bottom of the front mount with the welcome side effect of been able to drop the fork mount about six inches (I can do even more too), now I just need to find a old school four bolt long stem (around 110/120mm), since the two bolt is kind of weak.




  92. #92
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    My current ride isn't really setup for carrying a mountain bike. Besides, what do you do with the riding gear when you get to your mountain biking destination?


    No way am I hacking up this bike to make it do something it was never designed to do.

  93. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by sandiego View Post
    My current ride isn't really setup for carrying a mountain bike. Besides, what do you do with the riding gear when you get to your mountain biking destination?
    I just have a big cobralink lock (massive 1" wide 6' long lock) that I tread to the sleeves of the jacket and pants, but I never figure what to do with my boots, so I just put them under the bike, so far never trouble after 15 years of doing it..


    No way am I hacking up this bike to make it do something it was never designed to do.
    Oh you are right I will never recommend a Monster for rack duty, what makes they so flickable also makes they extremely unstable, the big GS's on the other hand are perfect for it..

  94. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by patineto View Post
    I just have a big cobralink lock (massive 1" wide 6' long lock) that I tread to the sleeves of the jacket and pants, but I never figure what to do with my boots, so I just put them under the bike, so far never trouble after 15 years of doing it..

    Oh you are right I will never recommend a Monster for rack duty, what makes they so flickable also makes they extremely unstable, the big GS's on the other hand are perfect for it..
    I love the GS. My next bike might be a sport oriented touring bike and I'm kind of leaning toward the Multistrada. Probably keep the Monster too. I've put 15,000 miles on this bike. I really like it but would like something a little more comfortable to do some longer distance riding on.

  95. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by sandiego View Post
    I love the GS. My next bike might be a sport oriented touring bike and I'm kind of leaning toward the Multistrada. Probably keep the Monster too. I've put 15,000 miles on this bike. I really like it but would like something a little more comfortable to do some longer distance riding on.
    My black GS has 362.000 miles on the original engine, drive shaft and final drive, the transmission has been change 4 times and the clutch about 7 maybe 8, hell the engine is so settle by now it does not even need the valves adjust (half a hour job by the way) totally awesome machines, even if under power by today standards.

  96. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by patineto View Post
    My black GS has 362.000 miles on the original engine, drive shaft and final drive, the transmission has been change 4 times and the clutch about 7 maybe 8, hell the engine is so settle by now it does not even need the valves adjust (half a hour job by the way) totally awesome machines, even if under power by today standards.
    One of the guys on the Ducati forums has over 200,000 miles on his 1993 Monster 900.

    My bike is the last of the air-cooled Monsters, it is 1100cc. I need to adjust the valves soon and change the timing belts. I'm going to do it myself with the help of a buddy of mine. He owns 2 air-cooled Ducatis and has done valves/belts on them so he has the procedure down and between us we have all the tools needed.

  97. #97
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    With the help of a new stem I got to move the front mount about 4" forward and 1" down (and I think I can move them even more since I have at least 3" forward) in any case the bicycle seats a lot more horizontally now that better and sticks a lot less too.


    Ultra heavy duty "downhill" stem from the early days of suspension, useless on a bicycle since they are so heavy but perfect for this application.

  98. #98
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    Okay I did it, I move the main stem all the way forward next to the vertical gusset, also exchange the uppermost stem for a shorter one so the fork mounts are a little more forward..


    To do this, I replace the Manitou I fork leg with a piece of a hanglider tube (that I use to make our "Spinning" wedding cake) so I will always have it with me.


    Now the angle of the bike is "forward" from normal, very compact.


    To compare here is a early picture, also notice the angle of the cranks as reference.

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