Mounted my bike on saris bones, is this correct?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Gabe3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    798

    Mounted my bike on saris bones, is this correct?

    I just got a bones 2 bike rack, not that impressed with it, the anti sway strap seems like a joke and its hard to even reach. heres some pictures with my bike mounted, does it look right? did the anti sway strap work for you guys, or did you secure it further? I bought this rack hoping it would be less hassle than my old one, which required me to use a few straps to secure the bike. also, I tightened the thumb screws but the two arms still rock.

    you can see in the last picture, the sway strap doesn't align with the frame. its really awkward to tighten and release it, since its behind the bike.








  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: joeinchi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    470
    The seat tube should rest on top of the post for the anti-sway stap. In your pics, you've got the seat tube aligned next to it ... the square, grey plastic part.

    Just loosen the straps, tilt the wheels towards you and slide the bike over to the right. You should have a bit more strap to work with. Let me know if that's unclear.
    Joe
    Chicago, IL

  3. #3
    Big Gulps, Alright!
    Reputation: Berkley's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    3,223
    Just pull the strap through so the buckle sits out front.

    Are the arms fully on the splined section? Looks like you've got quite a gap between the legs and the edge. Maybe move them out further so you can get the arms on there more?
    Axle Standards Explained

    Founder at North Atlantic Dirt, riding & writing about trails in the northeast.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Gabe3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    798
    Quote Originally Posted by joeinchi View Post
    The seat tube should rest on top of the post for the anti-sway stap. In your pics, you've got the seat tube aligned next to it ... the square, grey plastic part.

    Just loosen the straps, tilt the wheels towards you and slide the bike over to the right. You should have a bit more strap to work with. Let me know if that's unclear.
    See the last pic. I can't slide the bike to the right anymore because of the frame getting thicker around that joint. the rack would work better if the frame wasn't carbon. I wish I could slide that gray plastic part to the left.

    Quote Originally Posted by Berkley View Post
    Just pull the strap through so the buckle sits out front.

    Are the arms fully on the splined section? Looks like you've got quite a gap between the legs and the edge. Maybe move them out further so you can get the arms on there more?
    yes the arms are fully on the splined section. thanks I figured out I could flip the strap around.

  5. #5
    Big Gulps, Alright!
    Reputation: Berkley's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    3,223
    Quote Originally Posted by Gabe3 View Post
    See the last pic. I can't slide the bike to the right anymore because of the frame getting thicker around that joint. the rack would work better if the frame wasn't carbon. I wish I could slide that gray plastic part to the left.


    yes the arms are fully on the splined section. thanks I figured out I could flip the strap around.
    Just checking. I've used a bunch of these and there is usually a little amount of play, but it should not be excessive.
    Axle Standards Explained

    Founder at North Atlantic Dirt, riding & writing about trails in the northeast.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: joeinchi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    470
    Quote Originally Posted by Gabe3 View Post
    See the last pic. I can't slide the bike to the right anymore because of the frame getting thicker around that joint. the rack would work better if the frame wasn't carbon. I wish I could slide that gray plastic part to the left.
    Okay, gotcha' One thing you could do is raise the right arm a notch or two. That would angle the seat tube over to the right and allow for a more secure attachment with the tube resting on top of the grey part.

    It's not ideal, of course, and makes the rack virtually useless for more than one bike. But if you're only hauling your bike, I think it's worth a shot. You'll need to see how badly the angle affects the "cradles" and strap closures for the top tube, as well.
    Joe
    Chicago, IL

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Gabe3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    798
    Quote Originally Posted by joeinchi View Post
    Okay, gotcha' One thing you could do is raise the right arm a notch or two. That would angle the seat tube over to the right and allow for a more secure attachment with the tube resting on top of the grey part.

    It's not ideal, of course, and makes the rack virtually useless for more than one bike. But if you're only hauling your bike, I think it's worth a shot. You'll need to see how badly the angle affects the "cradles" and strap closures for the top tube, as well.
    I tried that, but the angle was too extreme.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: joeinchi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    470
    If you need to stick with the Saris, maybe a bar adapter will give you the seat tube angle you need. Secondhand, you might find one for approx $20



    Those bars can be a little problematic (they twist) but you can remedy that with a bolt through the shaft.

    Joe
    Chicago, IL

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.