How effectively can bikes be secured on a rack?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Saskatchewan, Canada
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    How effectively can bikes be secured on a rack?

    I'm about to order a Thule T2 and would really like to be able to secure the bikes so I can go to a restaurant, or whatever, after a ride.

    I worry about cable locks, though. Can a bike be secured effectively?

  2. #2
    thecentralscrutinizer
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    I feel pretty good about locking mine with cable locks. I run one through the hitch safety chain point then through the rack. I have a smaller diameter cable that runs through the seat and rear wheel to another large diameter cable. I use a fork mount rack too with locking skewers. Mutliple lines of defemse can go a long way.
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  3. #3
    Derailleurless
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    The problem? Good luck running a cable through your overpriced brake caliper, your mega-bucks seatpost and saddle, your bling-bling rear wheel, your uper-expensive rear derailleur, your fancy Ti water bottle cage.... you get the picture.

    I don't know if this happens often, but I've heard of it happening.

    It was one of my motivations for switching to a roof rack. More conspicuous. Easier to keep an eye on from a restaurant or coffee shop or bike store. I always felt obligated to find just the right parking spot with my hitch rack.

    Thieves are brazen and I'm some unhealthy combination of jaded and paranoid.
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  4. #4
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    I have a T2 and use a cable run through the front wheel and around the frame for when I need to step out of the car for a few minutes. The longest I've left a bike on it unattended is about 2 hours in a supermarket parking lot. I removed the seat post, too.

    Yes, there's no way to protect everything and using a rack, in my mind, sort of implies that you'll be nearby to keep an eye on it. I don't think that having it on the roof is any great deterrent; if someone wants it, they'll take it. I've heard of people stealing kayaks off roof racks.

    My most recent cable lock purchase (Kryptonite) came with instructions to use multiple locking methods. You might consider that if you'll be leaving it unattended.

  5. #5
    Derailleurless
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobonli
    Yes, there's no way to protect everything and using a rack, in my mind, sort of implies that you'll be nearby to keep an eye on it. I don't think that having it on the roof is any great deterrent; if someone wants it, they'll take it. I've heard of people stealing kayaks off roof racks.
    Sorry if I was unclear -- I don't sanction leaving a bike unattended on a roof rack, either. I'm just suggesting that it's easier to keep an eye on bikes perched high up, and I've been less picky about using a parking space a little farther away from whatever establishment I'm heading into, as long as the bikes are still in view.

    Anybody up to no good would stand out trying to remove parts from a bike on the roof.

    Just because I've got 'em on the roof, I wouldn't duck into a windowless bar, for instance.

    But one of the memorable stories I read here on MTBR was of a fellow who left his bike on the roof overnight, in a residential neighborhood, and came out the following morning with a bunch of parts missing.

    So no, roof racks aren't any more theft-resistant than hitch racks, just more visible.
    speedub.nate
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  6. #6
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    Thats always an consideration for me. Put the bike inside and its totally secure. Well, actually its only secured by glass windows which are easy to break. I do have a cable lock I use while going in to the store to get a sports drink. But I won't leave it any longer than that. Two things concern me.

    1. I'm near a biking place where bike criminals may be prepared to cut cable locks.
    2. I'm near home where someone knows I may be if I ride routinely, and they may be prepared to violate my security.

  7. #7
    jrm
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    Plenty..

    Using a cable
    I can get through the rack and the wheels & frames of both bikes on the rack. If your using a QR post take out the post and the QR.

  8. #8
    Never trust a fart
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    You can use this type of security.



  9. #9
    thecentralscrutinizer
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    Quote Originally Posted by Speedub.Nate
    The problem? Good luck running a cable through your overpriced brake caliper, your mega-bucks seatpost and saddle, your bling-bling rear wheel, your uper-expensive rear derailleur, your fancy Ti water bottle cage.... you get the picture.

    I don't know if this happens often, but I've heard of it happening.

    It was one of my motivations for switching to a roof rack. More conspicuous. Easier to keep an eye on from a restaurant or coffee shop or bike store. I always felt obligated to find just the right parking spot with my hitch rack.

    Thieves are brazen and I'm some unhealthy combination of jaded and paranoid.
    I agree, to a point. The handlebar and controls are left unsecured, but the frame and major componentry are locked to the rack since they can't get the bike off the rack to remove the rest.

    Fact of the matter is, if they want it bad enough, they're going to get it.
    2015 Kona JTS
    2014 Scott Scale 710
    2019 Giant Anthem Advanced 1 29

  10. #10
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    there is no such thing as a lock that will stop a skilled thief that wants your bike. I use multiple locks, figuring a thief might decide it wasn't worth the time to get through 3 locks where one might have been.


    by the way, I've had a bike stolen from inside a car - guys smashed the back windshield, apparently every homeless person knows how to do that without making noise. Way I see it, the bike probably would have been safer locked to a rack and a rear windshield runs $4-500.

  11. #11
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    Like they say in Alaska... You don't have to be able to outrun the bear. You just need to outrun your friends.

    In this case, just make sure your bike is harder to steal than the next guys...

    If you have a hitch rack, make sure you have a locking hitch pin as well as locks for the bikes as well.

  12. #12
    Single(Pivot)and Happy
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    If I have to leave my bike on my hitch rack unattended for 0-30 minutes, there are 3 locks on it. Any longer, I put it inside or try not to take it.
    The suspension of your bike sucks if it's different than mine. Really. It sucks. Big time.

  13. #13
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    jeeze seems kinda overkill for around my parts, just a simple retractible cable lock for me if im gone for awhile, truck is unlocked still lol, i guess its all about where you are

  14. #14
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    I'm glad I'm not a city folk anymore. I live in a small rural town on the wide open plains of Montana. I don't have to worry about my bike getting stolen. Who's gonna steal it? The cows grazing around me?

  15. #15
    Tossin the salad.
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    Run a backup battery in the trunk. Put in a car alarm system and make sure to put a shock sensor on the hitch (inside the hollow tube). Any light movement on the hitch bike rack................Alarm goes off!
    Get the glock out, pop a few rounds!

    A gelcel type battery is what I would run

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