Hauling two bikes inside: my how-to- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Hauling two bikes inside: my how-to

    Introduction:
    Hello MTBR members! I decided to write somewhat of a how-to on building your own interior bike carrier.

    The problem:
    The first weekend I had my 4Runner I was presented with the challenge of carrying two mountain bikes to our local trail head. My trunk mounted bike carrier did not work, seeing that I do not have a trunk. I couldn't put the bikes onto my hitch mount carrier because, well I don't have a hitch. I'm sure there are attachments for my factory roof rack, but I didn't have time to order parts and wait around for them and truth be told, the roof rack on my 4Runner is tiny and mounted all the way to the rear of the roof. I've seen bike carriers that mount to the spare tire, but that seems a bit silly to me. If only there were a way to get two bikes into the interior where they could be locked up and secure while away from the vehicle... oh, and they have to be secure so as to not bang and clang against one another or go flying in the event of an accident.

    Temporary Solution:
    My local bike shop is great. I've known the shop owner for a good number of years now and consider him my friend, more so than I consider him my mechanic. He had a few of Hollywood Rack's fork mounts in stock, so I looked them over to see what they were all about. They are a simple setup that you mount to a secure location, then clamp down the bike using the fork's drop-outs similar to any other fork mount bike carrier. I bought 2 of them and pondered how to make it all work. I am not one for drilling holes in my vehicles, so I had to be creative in mounting them. For that first weekend ride, the solution was ghetto, but it worked:

    We folded a large box onto itself a few times, punched holes in it with an awl and zip-tied the mounted to the cardboard.



    With a heavy toolbox on top of the cardboard it sort of stayed in place. The bikes had to have their bars rotated and stuck out the back window (requiring it to be down). This was not a good setup and it killed my cargo space.



    Better Solution:
    The temporary setup got us through the weekend, but there was no way I was keeping that. Fearful of drilling holes in my floor I envisioned cutting a sheet of plywood to the shape of my cargo area, carpeting it and mounting the fork mounts to it. A setup of that nature would not move around if it were cut just right and wedged into place firmly. But first, I wanted to test fit the bikes in different positions to maximize my cargo space and be able to roll the rear window up.

    I mounted the mounts on a scrap piece of wood and experimented with locations. I settled on this as the final location.


    Two bikes, only 1/2 of the rear seat folded down and they do not hit each other at all. The rear seat passenger has ample space and shoulder room, plus both of the bike's removed wheels fit on the passenger side of the bikes, thus taking up no extra usable space in the cargo area.


    As you can see, the bikes are mounted close to one another but are offset enough so they do not to hit.


    I bought a sheet of 3/4" OSB, a roll of carpeting, spray adhesive and 4 tie down anchors for the project. It isn't the best stuff in the world, but it is dirt cheap and good enough to test my idea. You will need to measure, mark and cut the board to fit your cargo area. This might require you to test fit the board a few times before you get it right. After the board was cut I used my temporary mount to find where the bikes needed to be, then marked everything.


    No pictures of the carpeting process, but basically it involved spray adhesive and staples on the back side. Since I was covering up my 2 rear tie down points I added 4 tie down points to the final product.


    Everything in place and ready for use. The floor isn't 100% flat on my 4Runner, so there is a slight gap between the bottom of the board and the floor in the very rear. This is not an issue.


    The carpet doesn't match. That's okay with me. I'll probably redo the carpet on the tailgate and the seat backs so it matches, but the wheel well covers will remain original (or maybe get covered with spray on bed liner?).
    Too many bicycles to list...

  2. #2
    I Tried Them ALL... SuperModerator
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    Superb!!! I'm gonna do the same!!! Is it a pain removing the bikes?
    Last edited by Cayenne_Pepa; 09-27-2010 at 07:30 PM.
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  3. #3
    Fueled by Tigerblood
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    Nice!!

    Very clean, i like it!!

    now how long will the carpet not be muddy!?

    haha

    gret job again man!

  4. #4
    Digital Toast
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    uber clean sir...well done.

  5. #5
    Cthulhu fhtagn
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    very nice job! where do you get those floor mounted skewer thingys?

  6. #6
    Kaishingo
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    Looks great! I especially like the additional tie-downs you added.

    I did something similar with a VW GTI I used to own. Of course being a small hatchback, only my trials bike would fit inside!

  7. #7
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    Thanks guys. The fork mounts were purchased from my local bike shop, but I am sure you can find them online as well. They are made by Hollywood Racks. Putting the bikes in place takes a bit of work, such as lowering the seat and then raising them back up so they press against the ceiling. It took me a few practice attempts before I could get the bikes in and out quickly, but now it only takes a minute or two. Well worth it to have the bikes inside and safe.

    The carpet has gotten muddy already, but being marine carpet, it doesn't mind the moisture.
    Too many bicycles to list...

  8. #8
    I Tried Them ALL... SuperModerator
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    ^^WTF? Spammers here???

    Moderators: BAN THIS USER!!!
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  9. #9
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    Looks awesome.
    I wish my hatchback could fit bicycles in an upright position.

    Oh and did I miss something? What spamming?

  10. #10
    I Tried Them ALL... SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by jtyler05si
    Looks awesome.
    I wish my hatchback could fit bicycles in an upright position.

    Oh and did I miss something? What spamming?
    A spammer used his very first post to blatantly shill his wares, on this thread. Thx moderators of addressing this issue promptly.

    Back on topic - here is what I did on my 2002 Audi allroad 2.7 twin turbo...based the the OP's suggestions:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Hauling two bikes inside: my how-to-17080225351.284027762.im1.main.565x421_a.562x421.jpg  

    Hauling two bikes inside: my how-to-bikes_allroad.jpg  

    "This is a male-dominated forum... there will be lots of Testosterone sword-shaming here" ~ Kenfucius

  11. #11
    mtbr member
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    For a minute I thought you were calling me a spammer. No worries.

    Your setup looks very simple and effective; I love a good wagon!
    Too many bicycles to list...

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah
    A spammer used his very first post to blatantly shill his wares, on this thread. Thx moderators of addressing this issue promptly.

    Back on topic - here is what I did on my 2002 Audi allroad 2.7 twin turbo...based the the OP's suggestions:
    Hows the piece of wood held down? Dont feel like drilling through my floor right now.

  13. #13
    I Tried Them ALL... SuperModerator
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    Wood is now held by bungees on hooks mounted to the end of the wood beam.
    "This is a male-dominated forum... there will be lots of Testosterone sword-shaming here" ~ Kenfucius

  14. #14
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    I hate to say it but, I'm totally going to copy you. This set up is so well done, that I bought all the stuff to make one for my Mazda5. If I'm only hauling two bikes, I'll keep them in the car so I can save a little on gas and be a bit more secure. Keep the bikes out of the elements and what not.

  15. #15
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    That's a good way to go--I've seen similar set ups before. Good use of limited space.

    It's too bad more small SUV's don't have removeable back seats--it opens up a lot of possibilities. I can put two bikes, upright with the wheels on in the back of my 2nd generation RAV4 and the thing is tiny. It's only possible because the hatch opening is huge and the back seats are completely removeable. With them out, it's just a big box on wheels...

    We even carry our tandem in there--it fits cross-corner from the front passenger seat to the driver's side rear corner with the wheel off, and Anne sits behind me in one half of the rear seating, similarly to your set up. Here's a not great pic from my vacation last summer--one week of mountain biking and another on a supported road tour. There are two bikes (with both wheels on) in there along with 1/2 dozen small packs and bags, a suitcase, a big duffel full of camping gear and a cooler:



    ...it also works well to have a bike on either side, with the gear in the middle

  16. #16
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    First off, thanks so much for making this post. I am definitely planning on doing something similar and this has been a great guide.

    Question- Do you use anything to keep the back tire in place and to prevent the handlebars from turning?

  17. #17
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    I was just playing around with my bike in the back of my Xterra...is support for the back even necessary?

  18. #18
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    In my 4Runner I would raise the seat so that it pushed up against the ceiling; that applied pressure on the rear tire so that it would not hop around from side to side. I imagine you could also strap it down if you have somewhere to attach straps.
    Too many bicycles to list...

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