Fork mount or upright Thule bike rack?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Fork mount or upright Thule bike rack?

    I am debating on a fork mount or an upright bike carrier for my blazer. I think the fork mount would be more secure, less moving while driving and more secure theft wise, due to the locking fork mount. On the other hand the upright mount is easier to install without taking off the front wheel. Seems like personal preference.

    What would you do or what do you have?

    Mike

  2. #2
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    I have the Yakima upright hitch rack now, I like it. It's convenience and easy to load. I used to have an upright King Cobra and High roller, love them both. Fork mount looks cool but you still have to take the front wheel off, sometimes it's just a hassle I think.

    If I were to get another hitch rack I'd get the Kuat, that's one sweet rack.

  3. #3
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    I'm only looking for Thule and roof mount. Yeah I am thinking it might be too much of a pain to keep taking off and putting on the wheel. Thanks for the info.

  4. #4
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    I have used a fork mount for several years now . . . and I just got a new bike that has a 15QR so I decided to get an upright mount as well.

    I'll never go back to a fork mount . . . too much hassle.

  5. #5
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    That is what I was thinking as well. Thanks!

  6. #6
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    i have been using a thule sidearm for 3 years now and find it to be totally solid.
    it now works on factory installed crossbars too. an advantage it has on factory bars is that 16" of the tray extends forward of the front crossbar, leaving less of the bike tray behind the rear crossbar and in many applications that alleviates interference with hatchbacks or rear liftgates when opened.

  7. #7
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    I'm very happy with my Thule T2, which I guess is similar in concept to the Sidearm. It's convenience is outstanding. Bike security is probably its weakest link, even with the lock accessory. But my bike is rarely left alone on the car. Good luck with your choice.


  8. #8
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    I have the sidearms and won't go back to fork mount. I rarely leave my bike out of direct line of sight, though.

  9. #9
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    I will plan on getting the side arms then. Thank you. I also plan on using a cable lock to if the bikes would be unattended.

    Mike

  10. #10
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    I used to use a fork mount and then moved to a SideArm. The SideArm is a lot more convenient in terms of putting the bike on and taking it off and keeps dirty wheels out of the vehicle and leaves the space available for other gear or people. Having dirty wheels outside the vehicle is especially handy in wet winter weather.

    You mentioned you have a Blazer. I think you should strongly consider one of the hitch mounted tray-style racks. Lifting bikes on or off a roof rack on a sedan is not too big a deal for me, but it can be an issue for small people (especially women). Putting a roof rack on a tall vehicle puts it out of reach of almost everyone. It is really tough to use the SideArm on my wife's minivan because of the height. I suspect your Blazer will be even worse. You may have to pack a small ladder in the back in addition to the front wheels.

    The hitch-mounted tray racks have all of the advantages of the roof-mounted tray racks like the SideArm in terms of convenience and space, but it is a lot easier to put bikes on and take them off. It is also easier and faster to take the entire hitch rack on or off the car (though some can be pretty heavy). The roof racks can create a lot of wind noise and tend to reduce your gas mileage. It seems like the bikes tend to wobble a bit more in the roof racks due to air resistance as you drive and they can cause noticeable effects in high cross winds. The hitch racks don't hit low overhangs or garage openings like a roof rack (I know from personal experience) but are exposed to rear-end collisions and can stick out in small parking spaces. Hitch racks require the addition of a hitch if you don't already have one, but roof racks can mar you roof over time or cause scratches if you are not careful.

    The summary of all of this hot air is that I think tray racks are better than the fork mount and hitch racks are better than roof racks, so a hitch-mounted tray rack is a good way to go.
    Let the good times roll.
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  11. #11
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    Thanks for the info, I do carry a little ladder platform with me it works great!

    I already have a cargo box on top of my truck to deal with, so I don't think I roof bike tray is going to be that big of a deal, especially with the handy ladder platform, Another problem with the hitch mount is storage while not on the vehicle. I do not have too much room around the house to store the hitch style, plus with the weight. But it is definitely something I am going to consider, It doesn't look too much to store off the truck. hmmm, things to think about!

  12. #12
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    i load my bike on the roof of my element, and sometimes it's just a little high, so i carry one of these stepstools....folds flat in the car and is 12" tall...plenty for me to get my bike up top.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by cracksandracks.com
    i load my bike on the roof of my element, and sometimes it's just a little high, so i carry one of these stepstools....folds flat in the car and is 12" tall...plenty for me to get my bike up top.

    Nice little stand you have there.

    I think our vehicles are just about the same height. That kind of reassures me that it isn't going to be too high.

    Mike

  14. #14
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    I just got a roof bike rack for my sedan. I think removing the front wheel is a hassle not to mention the dirt/mud would get in the wheel/hub axle (I have a 20mm fork). And if the front wheel is dirty, it would have to go in the car too. :-I

  15. #15
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    Hi, I have a question. For hybrid and road bikes would the Sidearm be just as efficient?

  16. #16
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    sidearm works great for road and mountain bikes....

  17. #17
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    Damn im so upset i could of got a used sidearm for 80 shipped but stupid me i waited.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by cracksandracks.com
    i load my bike on the roof of my element, and sometimes it's just a little high, so i carry one of these stepstools....folds flat in the car and is 12" tall...plenty for me to get my bike up top.
    That stool is sweet, I need one of those for garage and garden.
    Get off the couch and ride! :)

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by nyczbubba
    Damn im so upset i could of got a used sidearm for 80 shipped but stupid me i waited.

    That's cheap! I'd buy another one at that price.

  20. #20
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    I previously had the Thule fork mounted carriers. They were quite good.
    Being very secure & bringing the height of the bike down. Another good thing was, the Thule carriers came with both the standard quick release fork mounts & the maxle mounts, which catered for my previous Felt Redemption1.
    The only down side Is after a gloopy winter ride, putting the mucky front wheels In the boot (trunk).

  21. #21
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    I've got a Thule 591; it makes MTBing a lot easier. Easy to put the bike on, easy to take the bike off. No faff with dirty front wheels being removed.

    However, my mate bought the Thule 530; it has a different clamping system that clamps the outer sides of the down tube (rather than the top and bottom sides with the 591). His bike came loose one journey and if it wasn't for the uber strong tyre straps his bike would have been a goner.

    Having looked at both systems, the 591 is much better and stronger and easier to operate - the torque dial to tighten the arm up is genious and easy to use.
    If i had an MTB name, it'd be Muff Bagel...

  22. #22
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    I ended up buying the sidearm, but have yet to use it!!!! I'm probably going to use it soon, as my bike is at the LBS.

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