Dakine Pick Up Pad- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Dakine Pick Up Pad

    I'm thinking about purchasing the Dakine Pick Up Pad for my truck. However, I have a few questions for anyone that owns/uses one.

    Does the pad work well for long drives? Would I need to strap down the bikes for the long drives? Should I use a cable lock for security? Do the front tires mark up/damage the rear bumper?

    I usually transport 1-3 bikes at a time and I like the ease of placing the bikes in the bed without removing the front tire.

    Any advice would be appreciated!

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  2. #2
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    I like mine, I use it for one bike only most of the time. I'll put my bike far to one side, so the pedal is touching the inside of the bed. A little added stability. Works great with my trail bike with a single crown fork, front wheel ends up parallel with the bumper. Bike never moves. When I'm carrying my DH bike with a dual crown fork the stanchions prevent the front wheel from riding completely perpendicular from the frame. That being said, my DH bike sways from time to time in turns but I have no worries about it falling out/over. Ill usually run a cable lock through the frame to a bed cleat for a little added security.

    One thing to note with the new pads, especially the model for full size trucks, is that the top section of the pad is designed to fit newer truck tailgates with the big fat plastic top caps. My truck (Nissan Titan) has a thinner top cap. It was obnoxious at first because it threw off the the hole for the tailgate handle. My solution was to take a foam pool noodle and cut a 1" strip out of one side and slip it over the tailgate lip. Extra padding and it fills out the top of the pad, win win.

    As far as driving distances, I drove from Phoenix AZ to Jackson WY and back this summer with bikes on the tailgate. Never had an issue


    Be careful how hard you reef on the cinch straps too, mine started to tear at the seams. Dakine has a lifetime warranty, but it's not that big of a deal for me right now.

  3. #3
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    I should also add, I got some 1" self sealing foam, copper pipe insulation from Home Depot and cut three 2" pieces. I took the pieces and put them on the bottom of the tailgate where the straps passed over. Works well to preserve paint on potential rub spots.

  4. #4
    Pale Rider
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    Wow this site rarely fails. I looked all over internet bike shops for a pic with bikes on it. Looked in reviews and did not find the product by name, then came to this subforum and BAM! there it is.

    Thanks for the info - I am thinking about going this way for my '93 T100.

  5. #5
    gran jefe
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    I'm gonna go out on a limb here and say that if your truck is nice enough that you'd be concerned about a tire marking up the bumper, you'll want a different way to carry bikes.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill in Houston View Post
    I'm gonna go out on a limb here and say that if your truck is nice enough that you'd be concerned about a tire marking up the bumper, you'll want a different way to carry bikes.
    Why is that? Have you seen bumpers or tailgates damaged by bikes on the gate? My truck looks just like the one in the photo -- not much bling on it -- so I'm not too worried about it.

    I don't like to carry bikes on the gate if I'm going up a really rough road that will cause bouncing and stuff, or if I'm going a real long distance. In that event, I tie them up motorcycle-style. But I love throwing them on the gate for a quick trip to the trailhead. So easy and stable.
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  7. #7
    gran jefe
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tystevens View Post
    <snip> so I'm not too worried about it.
    Yeah, so it would be perfect for you. See what I mean? You aren't worried, so it works great for you. Another guy might be worried about his bumper, so he might want to think of another way to transport bikes. If the looks of someone's bumper are so perfect that a bike tire rubbing it might mess it up, then something you throw over the tailgate of a truck might not meet the level of non-scratchingness required.

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the responses!

    I not concerned about tire marks as they can be removed. I was more concerned of permenant damage. I read a review from a magazine that said it "damaged" the bumper, which made me think that actually damage, not scufff marks occurred.

    Most of my concern is if this method is good for driving long distances. I have to drive about 20-30 mins to the nearest trailhead. I also would like to Lake Tahoe (3-4 hours away) with the bikes. Any other pros / cons regarding the pad?

  9. #9
    gran jefe
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    Depending on the suspension travel, brake hardware, and tailgate configuration, I guess I could see something sharp hitting the bumper.

  10. #10
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    I use this method as well, using a tarp. This keeps the frame and or forks from scratching the tailgate. I also use a small strap to hold the bike in place, although I don't think it's needed. The bike is very secure whthout it.

  11. #11
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    Well, I purchased the Pick up pad a few weeks ago and have used it several times. I must say, I'm very pleased with how stable my bikes are when driving. I do use a tie down strap over the top tube for extra security. I'm very happy with this purchase and method for hauling bikes!

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  12. #12
    dirt visionary
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    I would like to add I have now had a dakine on a few trucks..They all had bumper damage from wheels,spokes or rotors.The only truck that didin't was a 2004 ford f series because its tailgate is taller never allowing anything but rubber near the tailgate.
    Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of
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  13. #13
    dirt visionary
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    Agreed forgot to mention that part. Each truck suffered from so sort of paint rub or clear coat marring...I didn't really care but others that seen it were like WTF did that pad do that . I just smiled yup. I am also the type that rides so often it stays on all the time.
    Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of
    arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body.

  14. #14
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    I have a 2004 F-150 XL and will say that it is a white work truck and I keep it well detailed and nice, but will say the pad itself has rubbed the paint on the outside of the tailgate. Now I have kept it on most of this year, but it has pretty muched ruined the paint finish on the tailgate. I have not tried to buff out the marks and just decided to keep the cover on. If you have a super nice truck and drive alot of dusty roads beware of whats happening under the pad on the paint. I def. would not use the pad/leave it on for more that short journeys on a personal vehicle.

    brian

  15. #15
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    I have a toyota pickup. Its older and not the prettiest truck around but as long as I own a truck I will always own a dakine pad. I never strap my bikes in and I drive twisty tight mountain roads all the time. Also, its nice not to worry (too much) about your buddies pedals in your spokes, what have you. I have not noticed any damage to my truck either. Just buy one...easiest, simplest, pretty darn safe way to carry your bike in your truck

  16. #16
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    I've just been using an old blanket for the short shuttles we do around here but it's not ideal. The bikes flop around and the blanket doesn't pad the tailgate very well.

    I just order the Dakine Pick-up Pad from Huck-n-Roll based on the recommendations here and the reviews on Huck-n-Roll.

    Thanks guys.
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  17. #17
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    i thought i found another option beside thule, but it seems the small version of dakine's pad is also 54" in width. my 01 s10 is a stepside and the tailgate is 44". guess im stuck using a blanket

  18. #18
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    Bringing this thread back to life. Just wondering if there's any benefit to the Da Kine over just a folded up piece of carpet? Way cheaper. $85 for a vinyl covered pad?!
    We Ride In God's Country!

  19. #19
    dirt visionary
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    Yes many ...Better padding ...looks better....stays in place without bikes due to straps...has straps for each bike...doesn't mess up your paint as bad...

    Now on the other hand I would use a moving blanket over carpet anyday .As a matter of fact I use a big moving blanket under my old and worn out Dakine pad. The abrasive back on normal carpet will chew thru paint in short order plus looks ghetto
    Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of
    arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body.

  20. #20
    dirt visionary
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    Softride makes one also ..My buddy has one on his tacoma however Dakine's is made from better materials hands down
    Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of
    arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body.

  21. #21
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    The pad is well worth the 85 dollars. The only way to do it with a truck IMO. Easy and effective.

  22. #22
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    I have a Roll-N-Lock cover on my bed and was wondering if anyone has tried to use a tailgate cover in conjunction with this type of bed cover. It appears from looking at the pictures of these that the tailgate cover may interfere with roll-n-lock rails with the tail gate closed.

  23. #23
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    IMO the shuttle pad is the best way to carry bikes in my truck (04 dakota). I bought one after getting to the trail head after having to make a emergency stop on the freeway. When we got to the trail head the rear derailleur on my bike was all messed up from my daughters bikes shifting in the stop( Took 30mins to fix). went out and bought the dakine pad the next day. haven't had a problem with it. also IMHO you should always strap down anything in the back of your truck period. the shifting was the only complaint the guys at mountain bike action had on there review but IMO every truck owner should have some tie down straps and use them. just recently took 5 bikes on the tail gate to the park one being a DH rig with no issues for my daughters birthday. Love love love my shuttle pad.

  24. #24
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    I use a pad myself. I have a newer 2011 tacoma and I use a packing blanket underneath for alittle extra thickness. No problems at all, nor any rubbing on the bumper. Like others said though- Dont leave it on all the time, dust can get under there and chew the paint off right quick.

  25. #25
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    Moving blanket here. Works great and it's cheap. I only do this when I have more than one bike to haul. If it's just me, I lay my bike down in the bed of the truck.

  26. #26
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    If you are going to leave it on there quite a bit or for long trips, you can go somewhere that does clear bras and have them wrap your tailgate. Then the pad won't rub the paint off your tailgate.

  27. #27
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    Has anyone every tried to put a road bike on a pickup pad? Any issues?
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    Always happy to help.:D

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by De La Rosa View Post
    Has anyone every tried to put a road bike on a pickup pad? Any issues?
    You need to make sure you the pickup pads has straps near the middle to secure the road bike. Road bars can scratch the sides of the truck if mounted to close side of the truck.

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