Cycling Team Needing to Haul Many (15-20) Bikes- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Cycling Team Needing to Haul Many (15-20) Bikes

    Hey all,

    So, I've searched and searched, but am yet to find an optimal solution. I'm the president of Gonzaga Cycling and with a massive growth in racer membership, I'm looking for feasible solutions to hauling people/bikes to races this year as efficiently as possible.

    The situation:

    20 People
    20 Road bikes
    1 15 passenger Van (Rented), no hitch
    1 GMC Sierra 1500 Extra Cab (Rented), 2" receiver, no trailer brakes

    Currently owned: 5 hitch bike rack

    So, I'm looking for an affordable option to get as many road bikes on/in/behind the truck as possible. I don't have the budget to buy an enclosed trailer, and the only one I have free access to requires trailer brakes.

    Without modifying a vehicle, what can I rent, manufacture, purchase to do this?

    How many road bikes (I know we're on MTBR) could I expect to fit in a "full size" bed?

    Thank you--


    SL

  2. #2
    wawe member
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    Rent an enclosed U-Haul trailer and load the bikes inside using old blankets/moving blankets and/or flattened cardboard boxes to protect the bikes from each other.

    Another option is to make a wooden frame which can be assembled/disassembled inside of the rental trailer, using fork mounts on that frame to hang the bikes on either wall. Staggering the height of the mounts will allow you to hang 10 bikes per side in a 12' trailer and then the floor of the trailer is free for luggage and wheels.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the response. Yes, the U-Haul option had crossed my mind as well. Every time I've been in a U-Haul I haven't really thought of it for hanging bikes. How would you attach a 2x4/6/8 (whatever) to the wall to hang bikes from?

    I've been trying to visualize how many bikes I could stagger in the bed of the truck using fork mounts...

    Anybody else thought creative ideas?

  4. #4
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    Since they're road bikers just have them ride for training haven't y'all seen American Flyers?

    Seriously renting a Uhaul box van or trailer would probably be the best option.

  5. #5
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    Why do you need to have trailer brakes to move the trailer that you have access to? They work just fine without the truck having an electronic control box. The brakes just don't work. All those bikes and gear will not be heavy enough to really need to use trailer brakes.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by slampe
    Thanks for the response. Yes, the U-Haul option had crossed my mind as well. Every time I've been in a U-Haul I haven't really thought of it for hanging bikes. How would you attach a 2x4/6/8 (whatever) to the wall to hang bikes from?

    I've been trying to visualize how many bikes I could stagger in the bed of the truck using fork mounts...

    Anybody else thought creative ideas?
    Seems like you will need the bed of the truck for luggage / gear bags. Renting a u-haul for the road trips seems like a good idea. That way the bikes are covered. When you park the truck overnight, don't just lock the cargo box, back it up against a wall or building for extra security.

    Instead of hanging the bikes, you could box them as someone else mentioned. Or you could buy a bunch of those fork mounts that bolt to the bed of a truck, and bolt them to your own pieces of wood that you put in the back of the u-haul.

    Regarding that 15 passenger van: Be really thoughtful about who drives that and how it is driven. Maybe its just that I'm old enough to have a child in college, but every year, it seems like I read about some group getting wiped out because they rolled one of those things - typically going too fast, or a driver falling asleep.

    Have you looked into sponsors for the bike team?

  7. #7
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    Frame out a wall for either side using a 3-way metal joist hanger on each outside corner. (Used for building wood decks, etc., Home Depot item) Use a beam to brace across each corner, making a box frame within the trailer box. The side walls remain built, only the braces are disassembled when the rig is stored. You can use ratchet tie down straps as well, but the idea is to have it wedged against either side instead of having to attach it to the trailer wall. Hope that makes sense without a visual, I helped build a similar rig to use inside a larger rental truck but can't find a picture right now.

    I didn't think about how narrow the inside of the U-Haul trailers are though, so it may not be wide enough to hang bikes on 2 walls.

    I know using blankets and boxes sounds kind of cheesy, but it works well and is the best way to fit the most bikes into a space. Blanket will protect the finish, flattened frame box between bikes prevents pedals, rear der. and spokes from harming each other. Bikes are upright and you don't need to remove a wheel or adjust anything on the bike. You can even make a second "level" on top of the bikes with a layer of flattened boxes. If the trailer is not completely full, a couple of ratchet straps will hold the last row in place.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by HarryCallahan
    Seems like you will need the bed of the truck for luggage / gear bags. Renting a u-haul for the road trips seems like a good idea. That way the bikes are covered. When you park the truck overnight, don't just lock the cargo box, back it up against a wall or building for extra security.

    Instead of hanging the bikes, you could box them as someone else mentioned. Or you could buy a bunch of those fork mounts that bolt to the bed of a truck, and bolt them to your own pieces of wood that you put in the back of the u-haul.

    Regarding that 15 passenger van: Be really thoughtful about who drives that and how it is driven. Maybe its just that I'm old enough to have a child in college, but every year, it seems like I read about some group getting wiped out because they rolled one of those things - typically going too fast, or a driver falling asleep.

    Have you looked into sponsors for the bike team?
    Yes, I will probably need truck space for gear/tent/tools/etc.

    I also work at a shop, so I have access to boxes/fork mounts.

    The school is very cautious of who rents vans. Drivers must be 21, have a background check, and pass a driving test. Both of us drivers are quite experienced, but caution is always appreciated.

    In terms of sponsors, we've been really been able to grow the team alongside support from the community. If anybody is interested, www.gucycling.com, and we have a great group of riders (about 40) and a solid group of sponsors...

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Black Bart
    Frame out a wall for either side using a 3-way metal joist hanger on each outside corner. (Used for building wood decks, etc., Home Depot item) Use a beam to brace across each corner, making a box frame within the trailer box. The side walls remain built, only the braces are disassembled when the rig is stored. You can use ratchet tie down straps as well, but the idea is to have it wedged against either side instead of having to attach it to the trailer wall. Hope that makes sense without a visual, I helped build a similar rig to use inside a larger rental truck but can't find a picture right now.

    I didn't think about how narrow the inside of the U-Haul trailers are though, so it may not be wide enough to hang bikes on 2 walls.

    I know using blankets and boxes sounds kind of cheesy, but it works well and is the best way to fit the most bikes into a space. Blanket will protect the finish, flattened frame box between bikes prevents pedals, rear der. and spokes from harming each other. Bikes are upright and you don't need to remove a wheel or adjust anything on the bike. You can even make a second "level" on top of the bikes with a layer of flattened boxes. If the trailer is not completely full, a couple of ratchet straps will hold the last row in place.
    Yes. It seems like the box option may be the easiest. Storing materials, frames, etc. I can see being problematic in the off season and as I graduate and leadership changes.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rehuel
    Why do you need to have trailer brakes to move the trailer that you have access to? They work just fine without the truck having an electronic control box. The brakes just don't work. All those bikes and gear will not be heavy enough to really need to use trailer brakes.
    The owner of the trailer is stipulating we have something with trailer brakes. I've towed boats, trailers, cars, campers for most of my life. It's a dual axle, 16 foot enclosed trailer. With it being so light, I didn't really think we needed something with trailer brakes--but I have to follow the rules.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by slampe
    The owner of the trailer is stipulating we have something with trailer brakes. I've towed boats, trailers, cars, campers for most of my life. It's a dual axle, 16 foot enclosed trailer. With it being so light, I didn't really think we needed something with trailer brakes--but I have to follow the rules.

    have you looked into a brake controller for the trailer?? you can get them cheap, less than 100, and even cheaper if you'd like. and the truck should have all the connections needed under the dash....

  12. #12
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    Get yourself a 90' something Diesel School Bus on E-bay for $2000, then gather up your Team and remove a few rows of the seats for storage and build some racks for bikes. To make it unique, get some cheap paint and paint it up and add some big team decals to it and call it done!

    Images of Converted School Buses




    Last edited by GEARHEAD_ENG; 03-09-2010 at 06:01 PM.

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