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Thread: Class I hitches

  1. #1
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    Class I hitches

    I have a Chrysler 200. I can only put on a class I hitch. This limits the tongue weight to 200 lbs. I'll be hauling a fat bike. It seems that I'm pretty limited on racks that will haul a fatbike, ideally two

    The Yakima hold up evo looked like the ideal rack, but it has to be a class II, 1.25" hitch, which is rated for a 350 lb tongue weight.

    There's a Yakima singlespeed , which is a single rack and should work for 90% of the time, but I don't want to limit myself same with the 1up single rack

    It looks like the kuat transfer is a 2 bike, 1.25" rated for fat bikes.

    Should I be concerned with having two 45 lb fat bikes and a 40 lb rack (130 lbs ) in a hitch a ayes for 200? Does wind resistance put a lot of stress on the rack?

    Thanks

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    Your drivetrain and suspension cannot handle TOWING anything beyond class I, but this does not mean you cannot a different class receiver on the car to handle the rack you want to use. If no one makes a class II, III, or IV that fits your car, you can always adapt a universal rack to fit.
    The only thing you need to consider with bikes and cargo trays is how much weight you are going to place back there, and where you are going to place it. itís not quite as simple as adding the weight of your bikes and rack, but itís not difficult either.
    Tongue weight is how much weight a trailer places upon the ball at the end of a standard length draw bar, which tends to be 12-14Ē from the where the receiver tube Is structurally tied in to the support structure of the hitch. Bike racks and cargo trays extends that length. Ex: if you have a 50lb bike sitting in the first tray and itís about a foot further than where a tow ball would sit, that bike will exert 100Lbs of force on the receiver. A second 50lb bike might exert 150Lb of force, etc.
    I would NOT recommend putting two 45lb bikes on a class I receiver. If itís not built well beyond itís rating, you have a solid chance of critical failure if you use the rack regularly. Iíd skip class II as well, get a 2Ē receiver so you can use any rack, cargo tray or draw bar you want (except class V) without needing a 1.25-2.0 adaptor.

    A rack's design is well beyond being affected by wind resistance. Would have to be a crazy cheap rack before I'd worry about the wind at speed damaging the rack.
    I will suffer no butt-hurt fools!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flamingtaco View Post
    I would NOT recommend putting two 45lb bikes on a class I receiver.
    A rack's design is well beyond being affected by wind resistance. Would have to be a crazy cheap rack before I'd worry about the wind at speed damaging the rack.
    I was more worried about the hitch failing (drawtite) more so than the rack or the frame.

    Is there a comprehensive list of 1.25" hitch racks. Would there be value if I put that together ?

  4. #4
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    just buy a 1.25 to 2 receiver adapter at wally world and stick a 2" rack on and go


    even a toyota yaris can handle a curt 1.25 hitch, a 2" adapter, a 2 bike 1up and 2 am bikes loaded

    you aren't towing, so the 1.25 to 2 adapter is fine
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

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    If you are going to use a Class I hitch, use a support strap. Not only does it take a little weight off the hitch when it bounces, but it gives you a visual that everything is still ok.

    CURT 18050 or similar.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaker View Post
    Should I be concerned with having two 45 lb fat bikes and a 40 lb rack (130 lbs ) in a hitch a rated for 200? Does wind resistance put a lot of stress on the rack?
    No, it will be fine.

    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    just buy a 1.25 to 2 receiver adapter at wally world and stick a 2" rack on and go

    even a toyota yaris can handle a curt 1.25 hitch, a 2" adapter, a 2 bike 1up and 2 am bikes loaded

    you aren't towing, so the 1.25 to 2 adapter is fine
    Just NO. The 1.25" to 2" adapter only makes his concern worse by increasing the distance of the loaded rack from the hitch which puts more torque on the hitch, effectively reducing it's tongue weight rating. There are tons of good 1.25" racks available, so no reason to do this.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustMtnB44 View Post
    No, it will be fine.


    Just NO. The 1.25" to 2" adapter only makes his concern worse by increasing the distance of the loaded rack from the hitch which puts more torque on the hitch, effectively reducing it's tongue weight rating. There are tons of good 1.25" racks available, so no reason to do this.
    are you kidding me ? this is about maybe 80 lbs, which is FAR BELOW tongue weight which is 200lbs on a class I.

    oh my god there is no issue with an adapter which extends out another 8 inches to haul bikes. this is no where near any limit unless you installed the hitch itself incorrectly. the weight doesn't change (except the adapter may weigh 5 lbs)

    if you see the videos on installing the common types of hitch on a chrysler 200 you see it has a solid connection to a box section on both sides.
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    are you kidding me ? this is about maybe 80 lbs, which is FAR BELOW tongue weight which is 200lbs on a class I.

    oh my god there is no issue with an adapter which extends out another 8 inches to haul bikes. this is no where near any limit unless you installed the hitch itself incorrectly. the weight doesn't change (except the adapter may weigh 5 lbs)

    if you see the videos on installing the common types of hitch on a chrysler 200 you see it has a solid connection to a box section on both sides.
    Wrong - the added leverage of an extended adapter will significantly increase the loads on the Class 1 hitch. Add in the dynamic forces from bikes bouncing up and down, and you'll see frame and hitch failure, or at least bending. Three fatbikes on a class III hitch on my Jeep Cherokee is a pretty massive load. There ain't not way I put that load on a class I.
    I would advise not taking my advice.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by watermonkey View Post
    Wrong - the added leverage of an extended adapter will significantly increase the loads on the Class 1 hitch. Add in the dynamic forces from bikes bouncing up and down, and you'll see frame and hitch failure, or at least bending. Three fatbikes on a class III hitch on my Jeep Cherokee is a pretty massive load. There ain't not way I put that load on a class I.
    ok tell it to my 2010 yaris then,

    I load 3 bikes on an I to II extended rack zero issues.
    Last edited by 127.0.0.1; 08-20-2018 at 05:33 PM.
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

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    Alrighty, another twist.
    Apparently class I hitches have a stop installed in them to prevent using a class II designed rack in them. Anyone else seen this?

    Thanks for all of the insights.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JustMtnB44 View Post
    1.25" to 2" adapter only makes his concern worse by increasing the distance of the loaded rack from the hitch which puts more torque on the hitch, effectively reducing it's tongue weight rating
    Quote Originally Posted by watermonkey View Post
    the added leverage of an extended adapter will significantly increase the loads on the Class 1 hitch
    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    ok tell it to my 2010 yaris then,

    I load 3 bikes on an I to II extended rack zero issues.
    127.0.0.1, let me be the third person to tell you that you are wrong. Sure, might work out for your hitch, but using the adapter is increasing the load on your hitch. Go Google torque, watch some YouTube, enlighten yourself.

    Heck, try this:
    LMGTFY

    Also, don't confuse Class with Size. Class is the weight carrying rating. Class I and Class II are both 1 1/4". The extender does not increase the Class (actually reduces).

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaker View Post
    Alrighty, another twist.
    Apparently class I hitches have a stop installed in them to prevent using a class II designed rack in them. Anyone else seen this?

    Thanks for all of the insights.
    My previous daily driver was a 2007 Impreza and could only find Class I hitches. I tried both the Curt and Draw-tite hitches which were available. For the rack stops, you can either grind or drill them out but be aware that they are there for a reason. Both hitches worked fine with a Yakima Dr Tray (1.25" version, no extenders) and a 30 lbs bike. The problem is when adding a second 30 lbs bike, the hitches would flex and bounce a lot. If I were to do it again, I would have a custom hitch welded together with a 2" receiver as the available Class I hitches were just too wimpy. But ultimately this ended up being another reason to get a different vehicle where I could get a higher Class, 2" hitch.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaker View Post
    Alrighty, another twist.
    Apparently class I hitches have a stop installed in them to prevent using a class II designed rack in them. Anyone else seen this?

    Thanks for all of the insights.
    Yes, this is all class I receivers.
    I will suffer no butt-hurt fools!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    ok tell it to my 2010 yaris then,

    I load 3 bikes on an I to II extended rack zero issues.
    Typical comment born out of lack of knowledge. Tongue weight is about how much the attached device can exert pressure AT THE TOW BALL, no where else! When people that TOW use an extended draw bar, they must calculate the force at the EXTENDED POINT OF THE TOW BALL, the MFG's of such devices will even tell you to do so, because they physics AND ignorant people, and don't want them damaging their products, then badmouthing their quality.

    Have you ever inspected your receiver? Could be cracks starting to form at the welds. You'd never know if you didn't get up under the vehicle and check with a magnifying glass.

    Sure, your receiver might NEVER fail. Or it could fail tomorrow. If you've never bothered to calculate the torque load you are placing on it, you will never know because you don't know if you are overloading it or not.

    I play it safe because I don't want my trailer loaded with two tons of gravel rolling past me on the
    highway and killing a family of eigth on a summer vacation.

    Or my bikes on a tray bouncing down the road behind me, crashng through the windshield of a couple on their way to see their newborn grand-child.
    I will suffer no butt-hurt fools!

  14. #14
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    In the rest of the world people will tow a gigantic trailer with a 1.0L economy car on a hitch they welded together from galvanized fence pipes

    Class 1 hitches can pull a 2000lb trailer with 200lb on the tongue. I think a little common sense says a 2000lb trailer going down the road at 55mph isnt going to be a steady load. You have a HUGE lever arm of the trailer which will bump and shift according to the road, increasing and decreasing the tongue weight.

    Thats not even getting into the astronomical load created by wind drag of a trailer at 55mph. Its a lot. Your vehicle doesnt start sucking gas like crazy for no reason.

    The hitch makers know some jackass is going to overload the hitch and use it anyway, and they build them accordingly. I wouldnt be surprised if their safety factor was double and its fully designed around a 400lb tongue weight on a 4000lb trailer.

    Bikes on racks are a whole different game than towing trailers. The stress is dramatically lower. I put 2 bikes on a class 1 all the time.

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    OP, howzabout the Thule Pro XT? I've run T2's in both the 1.25" and 2" sizes and the main difference is that the 1.25 won't accomodate the 2 bike "add-on" that a 2" version can. I don't think a 4 bike version is an option anymore but I recall they have the ability to handle Fat Bikes. You might need to buy the kit with the new tire cradles if you can't get it out of the bo that way. Great racks!

    I'd buy only a quality Draw-Tite or Curt hitch from eTrailer, get the drawbar tightening bolt to prevent any looseness and rattling while using, and roll with it. You'll be good. Check the hitch periodically as should be done with ANY of them for loosening or defect. The install kits that come with these are great as are the videos they provide for installation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaker View Post
    Alrighty, another twist.
    Apparently class I hitches have a stop installed in them to prevent using a class II designed rack in them. Anyone else seen this?

    Thanks for all of the insights.
    Yes, it was on mine, but it's nothing a good sharp metal file can't fix. I filed mine down so that I could use a bar that I already had that was a bit long.

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    Flamingtaco, Watermonkey and Oktavius are all correct! Thule, Yakima and Kuat all test their racks and would not state the class information if it didn't matter. Bottom line, if you use a rack not recommended for your hitch class on your vehicle and the rack or hitch fails don't bad mouth the company when they don't reimburse you for damages, you made your choice.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flamingtaco View Post
    Typical comment born out of lack of knowledge. Tongue weight is about how much the attached device can exert pressure AT THE TOW BALL, no where else! When people that TOW use an extended draw bar, they must calculate the force at the EXTENDED POINT OF THE TOW BALL, the MFG's of such devices will even tell you to do so, because they physics AND ignorant people, and don't want them damaging their products, then badmouthing their quality.

    Have you ever inspected your receiver? Could be cracks starting to form at the welds. You'd never know if you didn't get up under the vehicle and check with a magnifying glass.

    Sure, your receiver might NEVER fail. Or it could fail tomorrow. If you've never bothered to calculate the torque load you are placing on it, you will never know because you don't know if you are overloading it or not.

    I play it safe because I don't want my trailer loaded with two tons of gravel rolling past me on the
    highway and killing a family of eigth on a summer vacation.

    Or my bikes on a tray bouncing down the road behind me, crashng through the windshield of a couple on their way to see their newborn grand-child.
    holy balls man, I have yaris, with such a curt hitch and bike rack setup, and load three bikes on it --all the time--, and can still stand on it with three bikes (road, 21 lb, fat, 31lbs, mtb, 22lbs) and me and it doesn't have any issue, nothing bends,


    I am not towing a frickin set of horse bums, I am just talking about 3 bikes under 100lbs total

    no don't take my advice. however in my setup, it is FINE. I am an engineer by trade and --study systems-- and think really carefully about safety when in a vehicle or working on them (I change brakes before they are due, I change tires way before they are due...use multiple jack stands, torque wrenches...research materials before I do anything... and etc...despite my posting history on mtbr I am not a moron...) get a grip
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

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    Ya, this guy is basically the reason there are no longer any cars (not trucks, CUV's or SUV's) sold in North America that are allowed to tow within warranty. While in Europe and many other countries around the world the same vehicles are given tow ratings.

    Too many people like this guy who say "Oh I know what I'm doing, I'm an engineer by trade... these silly rules don't apply to me...". Then a couple years down the road, after the stresses of being overloaded for years have weakened his hitch mount, he'll hit a big pothole on the highway, the rack will fail and he'll kill a family behind him and wonder "what the **** happened". These are the exact scenarios that led to manufacturers not wanting to **** around with the liability of idiots and just simply blanket not allow towing on small cars at all.

    Frankly, I'm glad we North Americans aren't given tow ratings on our small cars... just too many idiots out there who think they know what they're doing.

  20. #20
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    Ya HEAR THAT Mr 127.0.0.1??!! YOU and YOU ONLY are the reason we can't have nice things!



    I can't believe a hitch rating thread just jumped the shark. There are no limits in this place.

  21. #21
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    yes I hear it. despite me being reasonable, and unreasonably paranoid with my own tools, vehicles, and how I use them...there is no way I can pull it off safely and correctly, because the internets is against me.

    so be it. I'll have to take my popsicle stick bike and candy cane car ideas elsewhere

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    for what it is worth a 2010 yaris with curt hitch 11050 Curt Class I Trailer Hitch Receiver with Drawbar with 6 bolts, is unsafe at any speed ...according to THEM

    despite my actual installation, my actual usage, and careful underbody inspection
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

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