Bike hitch haulers to avoid and to recommend- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 35 of 35
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    31

    Bike hitch haulers to avoid and to recommend

    There are so many of them out there. I don't want my new 2k dollar bike falling off going down the road.

  2. #2
    Adobo Lover
    Reputation: 95Stumpy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    984
    Yakima Hookup, Thule T2, and the Saris version are the ones that are very popular at this time. No attachments to your 2K frame. Holds the bike in by the tires. Use the search, because there is a ton of threads on these three racks alone. I don't think you can go wrong with any of the three.
    National Athletic Trainers' Association, www.nata.org

  3. #3
    thecentralscrutinizer
    Reputation: mopartodd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    2,790
    I use hitch racks on my car and truck. The truck rack is a Yakima and the car rack is some closeout thing I picked up at Performance.
    The best advice I can give you is to get a rack that use trays, rather than supporting the bike by the frame.
    2015 Kona JTS
    2014 Scott Scale 710
    2019 Giant Anthem Advanced 1 29

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    31
    So you dont want it holding the bike by the frame?

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,011
    Quote Originally Posted by qwerty11
    So you dont want it holding the bike by the frame?
    If you have a GF that rides and her bike gets scratched up you'll know why.

    You'll want something that loads fast, keeps the bikes apart, and contacts only the tires.

    My Sportworks does all that. Sportworks was bought out by Thule has an updated version called the T2.

  6. #6
    Three sheets to the wind
    Reputation: Bawitdaba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    736
    Fresh from the factory at Bawitdba Industries, cost me 120 bux...
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #7
    #1 Ho
    Reputation: MPauB1386's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    272
    Yes I have also had a horriable experiance with bikes that have been held on by the frame. And If you do get a hitch one I would only have one bike on it. The pedals sometimes can spin around and hit the other bike on the rack usually right at fork level.
    [Go big then go home

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 11 Bravo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    963
    Quote Originally Posted by Bawitdaba
    Fresh from the factory at Bawitdba Industries, cost me 120 bux...
    Do you have contact information for Bawitdba Industries? I did a search and didn't come up with anything.
    I'm not very smart, but I can lift heavy things

  9. #9
    Rohloff
    Reputation: bsdc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,601

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    857
    Quote Originally Posted by MPauB1386
    Yes I have also had a horriable experiance with bikes that have been held on by the frame. And If you do get a hitch one I would only have one bike on it. The pedals sometimes can spin around and hit the other bike on the rack usually right at fork level.
    Are you being serious?

    Having an assortment of bungee cords is something every man should have.

    Comn people, let's use our own intuition every once and and awhile.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: crankpuller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    591
    that softride one won't work with alot of full suspension frames, will scratch up your frame and is a PITA to load the bikes compared to the designs that 95stumpy recommended.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    70
    I think hitch racks in general are the way to go. I have a 1 1/4" in hookup that I would highly recomend.

    http://http://yakima.com/Product.aspx?id=102

    My first rack was a (trunk mount) Yakima Mighty Joe. This supported the bikes by the frame and I also used 3 Bunjee (sp?) cords to help secure the bikes. Two were used to wrap the tires together so that the front tire didn't sway and the pedals wouldn't turn. I also wrapped one around the mid section of the two frames to make things a bit more solid. All and all it was a great rack it just took a while to set things up. With a hitch mount this would obviously cut much time from this.

    In the spring I had a hitch installed on my car and bought a hookup. The biggest difference to me is how secure of a set up it is. When you use the swing arm you really push down hard on your tire to lock things into place. Another big bonus is that I can load a bike in less than ten seconds. When you get done riding the last thing you want to do is to have to struggle with a rack.

    My GF and I ride hardtails so the frame mount wasn't really that bad. If I had a FS there is no way the frame mount would have ever worked. The downtube has to have a decent length to it for it to work out well.

    I've the thule a couple times and it looks like a really good rack as well so I would try and look at all 3 brands. Either way I hope whatever you find works out great for ya .

    Austin

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    31
    Yea this rack is going to be for FS bikes

  14. #14
    Slow climbin' clyde
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    190
    Completely agree with the comments about hitch racks that hold by grabbing the frame. At best it's a great way to chew through decals and clearcoat and cut a lot of resale value. If you go with a hitch rack go with one that holds the wheels, otherwise go with a fork-mount roof rack and toss your front wheel in the trunk.

  15. #15
    Rohloff
    Reputation: bsdc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,601
    Racks that hold the bike by the frame don't work for all bikes. I like them because they make nice work stands. I can clean my bike, do a tune up, oil the chain, etc. The wheels spin freely, so you're not limited as you are with a wheel tray style bike rack. The Softride mechanism allows you to raise and lower your bike depending on what you are working on. It makes it easy to get the the tailgate of my SUV. I'm not worried about small blemishes on my frame because I ride pretty rough, rocky terrain and my bike gets scratched up.

    If I were looking to keep my bike looking pretty or had a suspension that wouldn't fit on a frame mount system, I would look into other racks. Each system has it's pros and cons. For me, Softride was the best.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: wickerman1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    3,364

    look at his name

    Quote Originally Posted by 11 Bravo
    Do you have contact information for Bawitdba Industries? I did a search and didn't come up with anything.
    I think he made it himself.

  17. #17
    2 wheel drifter
    Reputation: blackbart's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    198
    I picked up the Thule 916 t2, thing rocks. doesn't get any easier to put the bikes on and folds up when not in use and down when you need to access the liftgate. Highly recomended - I've never seen one better.

  18. #18
    Hi!!!
    Reputation: BelaySlave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    3,544


    Been using the Thule Sumpin'Sumpin' for the past couple of years now with my Yeti.
    Idaho Biking Yahoo! Group
    Support these shops: www.CustomMtnCycles.com & Reed's Cycle

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: titleist990dci's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    74
    I use a Hollywood hitch mounted rack and it holds my bike by the frame...and damned if it didn't scratch my bike's frame...actually it rubbed some paint off... So I would not recommend one that holds the bike by the frame..My NEW C'dale is now scratched but hey, it's scratched in other places from crashing....but if I had it to do over I would get another bike rack...
    Oh, and it's a biatch trying to get three bikes on there...really no way to do it without having them touch each other and risk possible damage...not good.
    愛友誼秀麗力量激情

  20. #20
    Livin' the Dream
    Reputation: Asbury's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    506
    I ended up going through a spare tire mount Yakima (sold my Jeep), and then a Hitch mount frame carrier yakima (only worked w/ my top tube bike), until I finally wised up and bought the hitch mount Saris that holds the bike by the tires. It works flawlessly and it will work on every car I buy (w/ a hitch) and every bike I may want to buy (as long as it has wheels). I can't say enough good things about the Saris. It is easy to get the bikes on and off. You just drop them in and slide the latches over the wheels. It also has an extension for adding 2 more bikes if you decide to. I really liked this b/c I don't need to carry more than 2 usually, but I like knowing I can make it 4 if I ever want to.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    857
    Quote Originally Posted by Asbury
    I ended up going through a spare tire mount Yakima (sold my Jeep), and then a Hitch mount frame carrier yakima (only worked w/ my top tube bike), until I finally wised up and bought the hitch mount Saris that holds the bike by the tires. It works flawlessly and it will work on every car I buy (w/ a hitch) and every bike I may want to buy (as long as it has wheels). I can't say enough good things about the Saris. It is easy to get the bikes on and off. You just drop them in and slide the latches over the wheels. It also has an extension for adding 2 more bikes if you decide to. I really liked this b/c I don't need to carry more than 2 usually, but I like knowing I can make it 4 if I ever want to.
    How much $$$ was that?

  22. #22
    Livin' the Dream
    Reputation: Asbury's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    506
    Cost is the bad part, I got the Cycle On Pro and it was right at $400. You can get the regular Cycle On for about $350, but you don't get the locking hitchpin and cable. Those are convenient, but they're not integrated the way Yakima's are, so if you want to save the $ and use your own locking pin and rubberized cable, you'd be ok. There is an eyelet in the frame for you to run any cable through and the hitch has a knob on it that will tighten the rack up against any hitch pin. I went ahead and head and go the Pro b/c I couldn't find the regular version and I wasn't sure how integrated the lock was. I guess the biggest benefit is being able to use the same key to unlock the bikes from the rack and the rack from the hitch.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JeffSkisMontana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    2,974

    New question here. Honda Ody w/ Thule T2 or Yakima Hookup.....

    Does the rack end up hitting the ground when you head up a steep incline? I have had the hitch hit a few times when it is a steep angle. Wondering if anyone out there has the T2 or Yakima Hookup on their Honda Ody? Thx.
    There are two paths you can go by but in the long run........

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hizzity's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    474
    one of my buddies has the swagman xc and it works great, and it is alot cheaper than thule and yakima ones. It might look kindof cheap and crapy but it holds two 50lb downhill bikes with no problem. I am going to get one for my car this winter. www.webmountainbike.com/swagxccrosco.html
    It's go time

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    90

    Thule T2

    It's pricey but worth it. Holds my and my buddy's 6" travel, FS bikes no problem. And you know we trust the T2 because our two steeds are $8,000 total in value. They're held solidly in place by the tires and so mounting and dismounting is easy (takes 30 secs/bike, and that includes double checking!). I have to laugh everytime I see guys having to haul up their bikes onto the racks. What a PITA.

  26. #26
    I am the law
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    211
    Quote Originally Posted by JeffSkisMontana
    Does the rack end up hitting the ground when you head up a steep incline? I have had the hitch hit a few times when it is a steep angle. Wondering if anyone out there has the T2 or Yakima Hookup on their Honda Ody? Thx.
    My Thule T2 is mounted onto a Nissan Altima and I guarantee I don't have the ground clearance as your Honda. Never had a problem with departure or approach angles on inclines. It's a good rack.

    One thing tho: I'm not impressed with the fact that the screw in bolt only goes about 1/2 way into the hitch. I ended up sawing off 1/2 of the bolt that came with the rack and used a snug tite lock on the other end. Now I have a more solid connection between the receiver hitch and the beam on the rack. I'll probably drill out the threaded hole on the T2's beam and just slide a standard locking hitch pin instead of the snug tite lock. Why oh why did Thule do this, I don't know. Probably to sell more snug tite locks. hahah.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    90

    I called Thule about that

    I asked why the hitch bolt goes only halfway through and they said that it results in a better, tighter fit with less sway. They said that this was based on their years of experience in producing hitch racks. It seems to me that it would be a silly way for them to save money on material, so I think I believe them.

  28. #28
    I am the law
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    211
    It definitely does NOT produce a more secure system. I had the snug tite lock hitch bolt work its way out of the hole and that's why I had to bolt it from both ends. The only "secure" way to secure a hitch is to slide a bolt all the way through and lock it from the other end. That way, the load forces are distributed across both sides of the receiver unit. I don't think Thule did this to save money, but rather sell their locking system if you wanted to lock the rack to the receiver. What they didn't realize is that one could drill out the hole on the rack to equal the size of the receiver hole and just use a standard locking bolt.

    When I called Thule about this issue the lady said: "There is NO way that the bolt could work its way out." Well, it did. Thule didn't have any answer to it other than it might be a defective bolt. And, I must have cranked that thing on there as tight as I could without stripping the head.

    I'm not an engineer, but as a highway cop who has inspected many a trailer hitch assembles on roadside stops I can tell you that I've never seen a properly installed standard locking hitch bolt work its way out of a receiver unit. However, Thule's design needs a little more thought. Other than the snug tite lock thingy, the rack is a great way to move your bikes around.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    90
    Quote Originally Posted by skygod74
    It definitely does NOT produce a more secure system. I had the snug tite lock hitch bolt work its way out of the hole and that's why I had to bolt it from both ends. The only "secure" way to secure a hitch is to slide a bolt all the way through and lock it from the other end. That way, the load forces are distributed across both sides of the receiver unit. I don't think Thule did this to save money, but rather sell their locking system if you wanted to lock the rack to the receiver. What they didn't realize is that one could drill out the hole on the rack to equal the size of the receiver hole and just use a standard locking bolt.

    When I called Thule about this issue the lady said: "There is NO way that the bolt could work its way out." Well, it did. Thule didn't have any answer to it other than it might be a defective bolt. And, I must have cranked that thing on there as tight as I could without stripping the head.

    I'm not an engineer, but as a highway cop who has inspected many a trailer hitch assembles on roadside stops I can tell you that I've never seen a properly installed standard locking hitch bolt work its way out of a receiver unit. However, Thule's design needs a little more thought. Other than the snug tite lock thingy, the rack is a great way to move your bikes around.
    I have the snug tite hitch lock bolt from Thule and installed it. That, too, goes only halfway through. That is, it does NOT go through to the other side of the hitch receiver. What do you make of that? If this set-up were less secure, Thule would be opening themselves up to major lawsuits, and perhaps even deaths caused by racks falling out onto oncoming traffic. I'm not denying what you're saying, but it seems hard to believe that a company as established as Thule would be incompetent in engineering a hitchbolt set-up....

  30. #30
    3xv
    3xv is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    130
    A pic of the Swagman XC in action

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,762
    Yeah the Thule T2 or Yakima seem the best, since they clamp down onto the front wheel. The Swagman is an ok budget option, but you notice it clamps down on the frame, and my thinking is a suspension bike might move around a bit.

    The tray-type hitch racks I think are better than the hook-style also because the wheels aren't dangling near the exhaust, or ground.

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation: wickerman1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    3,364

    I looked at that one...

    Quote Originally Posted by 3xv
    A pic of the Swagman XC in action
    but was highly advised to not put a dh/fr bike on it... too heavy.

  33. #33
    3xv
    3xv is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    130
    We've been using the swagman over a year now, no problems whatsoever. The bikes (full sus or hardtail) do not move around since the top "clamp" is locked-on by a ratchet mechanism. Total weight of the two bikes in the pic is 65lbs.. Load or unload the bike in 30sec..

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation: wickerman1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    3,364
    Quote Originally Posted by 3xv
    We've been using the swagman over a year now, no problems whatsoever. The bikes (full sus or hardtail) do not move around since the top "clamp" is locked-on by a ratchet mechanism. Total weight of the two bikes in the pic is 65lbs.. Load or unload the bike in 30sec..
    that sounds awesome, but I'm talking about 2 40+ lb bikes.... do you think it could handle it? are the tire slots wide enough to fit a 2.6+ tire in it?

  35. #35
    3xv
    3xv is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    130
    Wicker- The "tire slots" will definitely fit a 2.6+ tire, but these "slots" might be the weak part in carrying 2x40+lbs bicycles IMO. I've stood on one of the arms of the rack, and it was able to hold my 190lbs., don't know about the slots, and I'm not going to try it out . The car did lean a little though, hehehe . Good luck .

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.