Best Frame Adapter for a Hitch Mount Bike Rack...- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Best Frame Adapter for a Hitch Mount Bike Rack...

    hi folks...newbie here.

    browsed this section and also tried search. looks like most of you use a different rack than i have. i have a full suspension Trek and the Thule i have doesn't mate well due to the frame. i believe i need to use a frame adapter.

    i've found the following at this site:http://www.bikerackshops.com/grouphitchmount4bike.html

    Swagman DLX Frame Adapter Bar - $25.00
    Thule TU984 Frame Adapter Bar - $26.00
    Swagman SG6404 Frame Adapter Bar - $25.00

    curious if anyone with experience with these can make a recommendation or suggest a better model.

    thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
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    IMO, all frame adapters suck, but that's just me.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tk1971's Avatar
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    For whatever reason, the Thule adapter didn't fit my Specialized FSR at the rear (seatpost would be a very tight fit). It does fit, then after some driving, it would wedge itself really tight to the seatpost.

    tk

  4. #4
    Slowest Rider
    Reputation: BigLarry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk
    IMO, all frame adapters suck, but that's just me.
    My opinion too. I got two of those adapters for FS and all my family's girl bikes. I only used them once and kept getting freaky feelings about maybe the seat post coming loose and dumping the bike on the road. But worse is that those adapters don't hold on tight and let the bike fly around totally loose, making lots of scratches and damage.

    With dual arm bike racks, I found much better success just finding a way to solve the puzzle and getting the bikes onto the arms. The technique with the girl bikes is to put one arm under the down tube, behind the front tire, and the other somewhere inside the frame main triangle. This way the handlebars are higher up out of the way for less interference with neighboring bike and seat. Also the bike sits a little higher with less chance of dragging on the ground, which happens to me with lower car and van hitches.
    It's not slow, it's doing more MTB time.

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