20mm Axle lock?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: 20mm Axle lock?

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cobi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,839

    20mm Axle lock?

    So how are people locking their thru axle bikes to the vehicle? I don't much like (trust) cable locks.

    Is there a lock that goes through your thru axle adapter and locks the bike to it?

    I have one of these (which I can lock):


    and use it along with one of these (which I have no way to lock the bike to).


    Store bought or home-brewed solutions welcome.

  2. #2
    code: mtbr2011
    Reputation: cracksandracks.com's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    1,046
    check out the rocky mounts driveshaft....problem solved.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,393
    I never could fiqure why people dont trust a cable lock, but trust the locking mechanism on the rack or the other guys adaptor. A cable lock is way more secure and I have been using and recommending cables for years.
    But, we are also giving in to the non believers of cable locks, not because we know that they work, but because of pressure from the industry. In the short future, all Fork Up models, including the Thule and Yakima models will be set up to accept a locking mech that will be far more secure, user friendly and cost less to boot then the Fork Up copies that are on the market, and they will be like they alway have been, "made in the USA" by economy supporting American workers .

  4. #4
    code: mtbr2011
    Reputation: cracksandracks.com's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    1,046
    Quote Originally Posted by Hurricane Jeff View Post
    I never could fiqure why people dont trust a cable lock, but trust the locking mechanism on the rack or the other guys adaptor. A cable lock is way more secure and I have been using and recommending cables for years.
    But, we are also giving in to the non believers of cable locks, not because we know that they work, but because of pressure from the industry. In the short future, all Fork Up models, including the Thule and Yakima models will be set up to accept a locking mech that will be far more secure, user friendly and cost less to boot then the Fork Up copies that are on the market, and they will be like they alway have been, "made in the USA" by economy supporting American workers .
    Jeff-
    There are some really strong cable locks out there, certainly. some, upwards of $100. while the OP says he doesn't trust cable locks, perhaps he hasn't really looked at some of the beefier and more expensive ones.
    pressure from the industry, as you say, probably means that what you are hearing from consumers that they don't want an external device to lock their bike (in this case TA's)...but rather have it built-in to the rack. this is congruent with what i hear as well from consumers in our store and online.
    we look forward to the day that you make a locking version of your product, and will likely carry it in our store, alongside the existing locking versions.

    i will say, one big advantage of using the rocky mounts driveshaft over other hurricane style TA adapters is that the user doesn't need to steady the bike while threading the ta through the fork, then the adapter, and back out the other side. instead, the TA gets reinstalled onto the fork and then rested into the "cradle" of the TA adapter. this makes loading easier especially for heavier bikes on taller vehicles - and this advantage is a tipping point for consumers.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cobi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,839
    I dont trust the cheaper style cables. And i also didnt like having a lock and big honkin' cable rattling around in the vehicle, under the seat, wherever when not in use. I just figured a thru axle lock made sense, would be easy, and convevient.

  6. #6
    mtbr member extraordinair
    Reputation: Stupendous Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,075

    What am I missing here...the rocky mounts driveshaft appears to lock over the axle. Whats to prevent someone from just removing the axle and removing the bike?? My fork uses a RS Maxle that is easily removable. From the picture it looks like I could undo it the same way as a regular fork up, the lock would do nothing.
    ?
    Grit, spit, and a whole lot of duct tape!

  7. #7
    code: mtbr2011
    Reputation: cracksandracks.com's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    1,046
    the clamp over the maxle is tight...you wouldn't be able to turn the maxle to unscrew it.

  8. #8
    Old school BMXer
    Reputation: Blaster1200's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,696
    I haven't found a cable lock that can't be easily cut by Park derailleur/brake cable cutters. I've had to cut my own 5/8" cables locking my bikes in the garage when I've lost the keys. If you knew how easily bike lock cables can be cut, you'd never trust them. Yes, that size was not an error - 5/8".
    May the air be filled with tires!

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,393
    Let me educate you at CracksandRacks and to whoever reads this post. The Fork Up products were designed to install the Fork Up while the bike is still on the ground. I have heard from some who stated just what you have have stated about the bike being hard to install while the Fork Up is mounted on the bike rack, but would'nt common sense come into play, the bike with a Fork Up installed is just like putting a bike that has standard 9mm axles into a fork mounted rack, very simple.

    As far as locks are concerned, be it, barrel lock, cable lock, bank vault, etc, if someone wants your bike, they can very easily get it. I look at locks as a deterrent, Im I gonna lock my bike to a rack and leave it out overnight in downtown LA?...nope!, but if I run into a store or some semi-secure place, maybe.
    The locks in which a Fork Up equipped bike or a non Fork Up equipped bike are probably the worst of any type of lock availible, again, just deterrents.
    So I hope this clarifies things up to those who are wondering and I hope that I did not offend anyone, as far a RM goes, thats a different story which has some legal issues pending.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cobi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,839
    So, long story short.... Nobody apparently makes what I'm looking for? The original response looks promising but I just bought the Yakima adapter last weekend. Was hoping to not completely replace it.

    Guess it's a cable lock or come up with something on my own.

  11. #11
    code: mtbr2011
    Reputation: cracksandracks.com's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    1,046
    Quote Originally Posted by Hurricane Jeff View Post
    Let me educate you at CracksandRacks and to whoever reads this post. The Fork Up products were designed to install the Fork Up while the bike is still on the ground. I have heard from some who stated just what you have have stated about the bike being hard to install while the Fork Up is mounted on the bike rack, but would'nt common sense come into play, the bike with a Fork Up installed is just like putting a bike that has standard 9mm axles into a fork mounted rack, very simple.
    Jeff-
    Allow me to provide you with a little education myself. this subject will cover the difference between theory and reality. and with all due respect.....
    while you claim that hurricane products are designed -IN THEORY -to be installed on the fork, then the rack, THE REALITY is that people don't want to remove/unlock their fork up, stash it in the car, and rummage around looking for it when they need it. on top of that, IN REALITY, people lock their fork up to their bike rack and installing their bike as needed. the convenience of leaving the TA adapter locked on the rack outweighs the minor inconvenience of threading the TA while it's on the roof.
    i see this all the time - because we are servicing and installing alot of roof bike racks, and every year, more and more folks are riding TA forks. not only do we see this, but we HEAR it too from people who now have an alternative that is both convenient and secure..
    in my opinion, (which you could probably care less about right now) - that is the common sense approach to using a TA adapter.
    jeff, i credit you for bringing the fork up to the marketplace. it's certainly a good product, and more than adequately satisfies a need in the bike/rack community...but like everything, smart people make smart things better. if this wasn't the case, we'd still be driving model t fords.
    i give big props to bobby and his crew at rocky mounts for creating the driveshaft, because it is an excellent product, satisfies a different pricepoint than hurricane products and creates a secure and convenient alternative to "traditional" TA adapters

    all that said, jeff - we're looking forward to what hurricane has coming down the pike because we'll want to have it in the store for sure.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,393
    Scott, I appreciate and take to heart what you say on your post.
    I invented and patented the Fork Up back in 1996, made up to 9 different types of them, sold zillions of them thoughout the world, been to tons of events, races and tradeshows and talked to a bunch of Fork Up customers. From what I know and hear from 99% of my customers is that they use the Fork Up as directed, Im not saying anyone has to, or that it would void the warranty if they did'nt, but it really is'nt that hard to unlock and lock your rack, with or without your bike on it. I even heard from some riders what a pain it is to take the front wheel off, damn, riding bikes is a pain sometimes too, much easier to twist a throttle and go.
    The complaints you mentioned have been, at least to me, pretty much unheard of, but you have had customers with those concerns and problems, so I cant argue. The reason Im posting to make myself clear in the Fork Up's intended design, but once the customer buys it, they are free to use it either by mounting it on the bike or in the rack.
    thats my $1.50 worth....

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Chasintrane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    490
    Jeff, I've purchased 2 fork ups and a Yakima adapter (same thing). I install them like Scott mentioned. On the rack first, then I simply lift my bike up as if I were a regular 9mm drop out. Using the RS Maxle makes this quite easy. I had no idea the adapter was "supposed" to be mounted to the fork first. Are there instructions that come with these things? I'm remembering the packaging as being very minimal.

    My only complaint about the Hurricane is the cheap powder coat job they get. That junk peels from day one of use around the rack contact area. I'd pay more for some kind of zinc plating or something along those lines.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,393
    Unfortunatly, I dont head production of the Fork Up's and pretty much sit on the sidelines for alot of what Hurricane does. I sold Hurricane back in 2003, was brought back as a consultant in 2007, that did'nt work out to well. Now Im brought back to head up design of some new products coming down the pipeline.
    As I see it, Hurricane and the Fork Up's will always be thought of my "babies" because of the hard work and dedication I put into the company from 1996 to 2003.
    As far as the cheap powdercoating, I'll bring that up, your not the only person who mentioned it, and see if we can get that fixed. I have always listened to my customers while I was at the reins and will do what I can.
    Allied Manufacturers, which own Hurricane now, is a huge, multi-national company which makes products for the sporting, automotive, medical and aerospace industries. They also just picked up Ellsworth Cycles to produce there line of aluminum bikes

  15. #15
    sadly, like the element
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    400
    Semi-related question regarding using one of these 15/20mm adapters.

    I have an older model Yakima Shop Bike Top Viper and I'm using the rocky mounts driveshaft. Is it normal for the adapter to basically just rotate backwards and forwards with not much pressure? And trust me, I've got the 9mm skewer cranked down and removing the black paint from the driveshaft.

    At this point, I put the bike into it laying at about a 30 degree angle resting back on the top of the tray because I know it'll just end up there anyhow due to me accelerating and braking in my car. And I don't want it rotating forward and smashing into my brake caliper on the fork. So now that it's rotated backwards, my rear wheel is barely still on the tray.

    How do people get these adapters to stay pointed straight up? I'm tempted to jerry rig some kind of rear brace to keep the thing in a somewhat upright position.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,393
    You need to have the rear tire strapped, so your bike cant roll forward/ backwards. Problem solved.

  17. #17
    Old school BMXer
    Reputation: Blaster1200's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,696
    Quote Originally Posted by Hurricane Jeff View Post
    You need to have the rear tire strapped, so your bike cant roll forward/ backwards. Problem solved.
    WTF? In a previous thread of using the adapters in the bed of a truck, I commented that they sucked because you have to secure the rear wheel to keep the bike from moving fore and after rotating the adapter. You said that you never heard of such problem and that it was an isolated case. Now you say that you have to secure the rear wheel? Was this a new revelation?

    http://forums.mtbr.com/car-biker/20m...on-730950.html
    May the air be filled with tires!

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    862
    I suppose a fork lock might discourage the kind of casual thief that doesn't have an allen wrench. But if they are resourceful enough to have allen keys then its a matter of unscrewing 5 bolts and you're left with just a fork locked to your rack.

    Cable locks aren't that much better, but at least they have to have a cable cutter of some sort, and the frame and wheels are secured.

    Either way a rack lock is just something to protect the bike for a few minutes while you run inside a store. In my neighborhood thieves have been known to steal the rack and bike both.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,393
    WTF..to you, you need to read the message again. I never said that I never heard of it happening, I said I rarely hear the complaint, my definition of "rarely" is, it can happen, but it does not happen all too commonly. Maybe it happens more then I know, but not many complain to me about it.
    If your adaptor rotates, what is the big deal? I have used motorcyle type tie downs and had my back end of my bike flop all over, so what is the alternative if you have a truck? are there any better mounting systems? not saying the Fork Up is for everyone, just getting feed back...and what gives, Blaster 1200? you seem to have alot of anger at me, do I personally know you?

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-16-2010, 11:31 PM
  2. 20mm Fork Up with Lock?
    By jojotherider in forum Cars and Bike Racks
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 10-13-2009, 08:19 PM
  3. 20mm axle converter down to a standard axle
    By 29ERCAT in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 10-26-2008, 07:02 AM
  4. 20mm Center Lock CrossMax ST?!
    By TC3 in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-02-2007, 07:26 PM
  5. 10mm nutted axle / 20mm thru axle
    By spacoli in forum Downhill - Freeride
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 02-03-2005, 09:37 AM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.