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  1. #1
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    1up rack on back of cargo tray

    eTrailer says itís a no-no, but they have a lot of lawyers. Has anyone had luck mounting a hitch style bike rack on the tail end of the Curt/Reese style cargo trays?

    Know the 1up cargo tray has the capability but itís pricy.

    Thanks!

    1up rack on back of cargo tray-hitch.jpg

  2. #2
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    What vehicle you would you be putting that on? you'll lose carrying capacity pretty quick.

  3. #3
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    Outback - only bring one bike (super duty single)

  4. #4
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    I would guess 1 bike would be okay since the 1-up cargo works with 2, but its bikes are closer to the cargo tray... as long as you're not talking a 50lb bike and keep the cargo weight down.

    I'd also cinch the cargo tray down with a stowaway2 style hitch tightener.
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  5. #5
    since 4/10/2009
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    You'll see in various places that using a hitch extender cuts your tongue weight capacity by 50%, and that's what this basket is effectively serving as - an extender for the bike rack, so you can effectively double the weight of anything you're hanging off the back of the cargo carrier.

    The Subaru Outback has a tongue capacity of 200lbs, fwiw.

    This similar basket from Cabelas weighs 53lbs empty.

    200lbs - 53lbs = 147lbs left to work with.

    a 1upUSA Super Duty Single weighs 28lbs.

    147lbs - (28lbs*2 for safety factor of extender) = 91lbs to work with

    Let's assume a fairly average trail bike weight of about 30lbs. Maybe OP's bike weighs less, but maybe it weighs more. OP can adjust as necessary.

    91lbs - (30lbs*2 for safety factor of bike on extender) = 31lbs left for cargo in the tray.

    None of these numbers are going to account for the extra "sag" in the system from the multiple connections (bike rack to cargo tray and cargo tray to vehicle), or the extra vertical movement from the weight of the bike hanging way off the end of the system (there's a reason hitch rack manuals always say to load the heaviest bicycle closest to the vehicle). The longer that distance is, the more the system is going to bounce, and that's going to increase the chances of something bending and/or breaking. My bet is that it'll be the cargo platform right where it inserts into the receiver. I've lost count of the number of these things that I've seen bent and drooping as they're being driven down the highway because they were overloaded.

    The problem is your Subaru having insufficient capacity. You'll note that the 1upUSA description for its cargo carrier is that it requires a Class III or higher hitch receiver (which your outback does not have), which means a vehicle with the ability to handle the higher tongue weight that such a receiver is made to handle. Frankly, I think that if you don't have enough capacity inside the Outback for whatever gear you have, you're far better off using a rooftop carrier of some kind.

  6. #6
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    I would agree. Rooftop box for cargo would be way better.

    The 1up cargo tray does have the advantage over Curt of sitting higher.

    Guessing the OP is looking for thrift... cargo boxes are spendy
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    [WTB] 1987 Cannondale SM800, 20", Pink with airbrushed graphics.

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the detailed responses, guys! To clarify, the hitch itself is a Class III (2Ē) Ecohitch with a tongue weight rating of 350lbs.

    Also - to some of the other thoughts - Iím starting to plan ahead for summer vacation this year. This year we will have a toddler and a newborn to bring along, so there is going to be a lot of kid stuff. My question is under the backdrop of already stuffing our Thule Cascade roofbox. The cargo tray seems like a good place for some of the larger items by size (eg pack and play, high chair, etc) but not necessarily by weight that are difficult cramming into the trunk or up top.

  8. #8
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    Honestly- the real answer is just to get a Suburban - but canít bring myself to have such a monstrosity that we only use a couple times a year to its full potential.

  9. #9
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    My first thought is that I would be hesitant to do so, but could maybe talk myself into with some information you're seeking. Maybe compare the total length of your 'contraption' (cargo tray + bike rack) and compare that to 3 and 4 bike racks. Do people carry 3 or 4 bikes on their Outbacks? I don't recall seeing one...their usually on larger trucks/SUVs. But if so, that might be comparable to cargo tray + 1 bike rack.
    If you're only talking about a once or twice a year vacation travel, maybe also consider renting a van or larger SUV for your trip. If you can plan months ahead in advance, rentals can be super cheap. Although you have to be sure it has a hitch for your bike rack.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by MatthewBaker View Post
    Thanks for the detailed responses, guys! To clarify, the hitch itself is a Class III (2Ē) Ecohitch with a tongue weight rating of 350lbs.
    Just because your hitch has a higher tongue weight rating does NOT increase the rating of the vehicle. For instance, I have a class III on my forester with a claimed towing capacity of 3500 lbs, but the car is only rated for something like 1500. So your hitch won't break from the extra load, but the mounting points might rip out of the car...

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by MatthewBaker View Post
    My question is under the backdrop of already stuffing our Thule Cascade roofbox. .
    2 roof boxes?

    Small trailer?
    --------------

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  12. #12
    since 4/10/2009
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    It's worth pointing out hitch ratings here:

    1up rack on back of cargo tray-randp-hitch-1.gif

    Class III hitches have a 500lb tongue weight. The hitch in question would be considered a Class II, but the vehicle is rated for 200 so that is your limit.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    You'll see in various places that using a hitch extender cuts your tongue weight capacity by 50%, and that's what this basket is effectively serving as - an extender for the bike rack, so you can effectively double the weight of anything you're hanging off the back of the cargo carrier.

    The Subaru Outback has a tongue capacity of 200lbs, fwiw.

    This similar basket from Cabelas weighs 53lbs empty.

    200lbs - 53lbs = 147lbs left to work with.

    a 1upUSA Super Duty Single weighs 28lbs.

    147lbs - (28lbs*2 for safety factor of extender) = 91lbs to work with

    Let's assume a fairly average trail bike weight of about 30lbs. Maybe OP's bike weighs less, but maybe it weighs more. OP can adjust as necessary.

    91lbs - (30lbs*2 for safety factor of bike on extender) = 31lbs left for cargo in the tray.

    None of these numbers are going to account for the extra "sag" in the system from the multiple connections (bike rack to cargo tray and cargo tray to vehicle), or the extra vertical movement from the weight of the bike hanging way off the end of the system (there's a reason hitch rack manuals always say to load the heaviest bicycle closest to the vehicle). The longer that distance is, the more the system is going to bounce, and that's going to increase the chances of something bending and/or breaking. My bet is that it'll be the cargo platform right where it inserts into the receiver. I've lost count of the number of these things that I've seen bent and drooping as they're being driven down the highway because they were overloaded.

    The problem is your Subaru having insufficient capacity. You'll note that the 1upUSA description for its cargo carrier is that it requires a Class III or higher hitch receiver (which your outback does not have), which means a vehicle with the ability to handle the higher tongue weight that such a receiver is made to handle. Frankly, I think that if you don't have enough capacity inside the Outback for whatever gear you have, you're far better off using a rooftop carrier of some kind.
    Quote Originally Posted by MatthewBaker View Post
    Thanks for the detailed responses, guys! To clarify, the hitch itself is a Class III (2Ē) Ecohitch with a tongue weight rating of 350lbs.

    Also - to some of the other thoughts - Iím starting to plan ahead for summer vacation this year. This year we will have a toddler and a newborn to bring along, so there is going to be a lot of kid stuff. My question is under the backdrop of already stuffing our Thule Cascade roofbox. The cargo tray seems like a good place for some of the larger items by size (eg pack and play, high chair, etc) but not necessarily by weight that are difficult cramming into the trunk or up top.
    I concur with Harold and his outline. The longer hinge point with the weight of the bike so far away isn't the best solution.
    And I don't like that you are planning a cargo carrier to strap your toddler to for your long bike trips. TeeHee -just kidding.

    Second solution is to leave the toddler home -he/she doesn't have a bike to ride anyway. Duh.

    All kidding aside, I suggest not using that arrangement. Ever watched how much a bike rack bends and twists going over bumps. That is when it's mounted direct to the hinge point.
    Steel stresses are sheer and torsional. Don't forget to consider how much twist is introduced with your proposed setup.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by J_Westy View Post
    Small trailer?
    Some VW Bus buddies use this AE46 with a bike rack mounted on the lid.

    https://www.alumaklm.com/enclosed-trailers/single-axle
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  15. #15
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    No way... top box.
    Denver, CO

  16. #16
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    Iíd go with 2 cargo boxes and a hitch rack. Or if you really want the cargo tray, put the bike on top.

  17. #17
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    Ok - you all have convinced me. Many thanks for the input!

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