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  1. #1
    Devo
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    Devo & The Dummy

    rather than hog up a whole thread about misc Devo & The Dummy stuff, i guess i should go ahead and start a new thread.

    obviously I'm very happy with the Big Dummy. I've had it built up for a whole of 12 days.

    in that time, I've managed to get a good solid impression of it. i guess it also helps that i rode the Xtracycle for awhile, and I've used these rigs for various hauling duties...

    ok..blah blah blah...

    on with it!

    well, i loaded up the Dummy, with a ton of stuff, camping gear, laptop, lights, food, tipi, clothing, and a whole lot of misc items.

    this outing a trip to LA to visit my brother Dylan who ended up in the ICU after having an emergency operation to remove an abscess out of his trachea/bronchia area. i still need to review his chart and see exactly what is going on.

    yesterday was a 14hr travel day

    the day before, i had made a resolve to load up everything, and try travel with The Dummy.

    and I mean, its loaded up! 4 man kifaru tipi, clothing, and probably about a weeks worth of various backpacking-esq foods.

    much to my elation, the trip was pretty easy.

    i did get a flat last night around 9pm, dead smack on Wilshire Blvd, i guess in Korea Town. there i was on the side walk with a fully loaded Dummy 2 BOB trailer bags filled beyond any reasonable packing job, with a flat. i decided to not unload the rig and tip it onto its side to remove the wheel, and deal with the flat.
    then... the kick breaks! arggh! i freaking snapped the kickstand. it BROKE!
    where it broke was around the pin it pivots on. in all fairness, its the original stand off of the Xtracycle, and I've tortured it a ton. i really dont think they intend it to be used as a "jack strut" where i simply pivot the whole rig, loaded, and all, on the kickstand, to get to the rear wheel, with out unloading.

    Conti town & country tyres, i guess taken to their limit, or perhaps a chance occasion simply getting a flat.

    actually the flat occurred clear back in Salinas, about 1 block away from the AmTrak station, BUT... the Slime in the tube, did its job. Not until i got onto the streets of LA, did the whole snotty mess come undone. i did try to limp it for a stupid amount of cycles of "hissing" and "not hissing" as the puncture would self seal, then come undone. Slime did buy me time. I guess that is its ultimate design purpose. was i thinking that it was "self Healing"....? in many ways, i was.

    i was hoping... as i was pedaling thru the downtown streets of LA in the middle of the night. ya... i was hopeful. instead i had the occasion to repair the rig, with the night people of LA walking the streets.

    there i was with this crazy loaded rig, and the seedy people scoping me out.
    i dont know who thought who was crazier. as I so typical of my tactics, that is to be friendly and try to always make friends. soon enough i had an audience. for a moment, i had even thought of removing my helmet, and laying it upside down, to take donations.

    this morning as i recovered from the 14hr day, i found green slime all over the snapdeck, and on the most rearward of the water bottles.

    AmTrak, was a TOTALLY AWESOME! Super accommodating and the trip went very SMOOTH!

    over the years, I have mulled over all the info on websites, etc. trying to figure out how to use the bus, train, whatever, with a bike.

    AmTrak states that bikes have to be boxed up. when you call the 800, they say the same.

    so it was, that i go about making the reservation, calling, making sure a box is available, the whole 9 yards. I even time my trip to give me about an hour before the train arrives, simply to get things boxed up.

    however when i get to the station, it turns out that a Bus/train combo is faster, and the bus only had about 8 passengers, the Big Dummy simply laid on its non-drive side, under the bus, with the 2 BOB Trailer bags positioned around it, to act like some sort of cushion, if needed.

    I get to San Luis Obispo to change from AmTrak Bus to the actual train. I think the train is called "Pacific Surfliner"

    sure enough we just put The Dummy in the baggage car, with the 2 duffel bags. In the Baggage Car, I simply leaned the rig up against the wall, and used a tie-down to secure it. for additional stability, I turned in the disc brake, outboard adjusters to put the pads against the disc. effectively locking the wheels.

    when I arrived at Union Station, in LA, The Dummy had not moved. PERFECT!

    in a brief, round about way, it was somewhat reminiscent of loading Howitzers, and Humvees onto rail, but of course, its nothing like that... NOTING AT ALL.
    its just a nice little train ride with my bike from Salinas to LA, complete with a Snack Bar. how cushy could it get?

    the fair was a total of $46.

    I left the house around 830a, arrived in Salinas around 1030a.
    loaded The Dummy by 1055a, and arrived at Union Station around 8pm i think.
    i arrived at my sisters around 930pm. sleep came sometime after midnight...

    using the Nylon straps that come with the Xtracycle has proven to be a great choice compared to rope.
    round rope vs flat nylon strap, it seems to me that the "flat" profile gives more "bite" compared to round rope. the flat strap, stays put, with less effort.

    consequently, somehow, I came across an additional length, that is about twice as long as the pieces that come with the Xtracycle.

    my favorite method seems to be to turn the BOB trailer bags on their sides, position the yellow end to the rear of the rig, as to provide a degree of "yellow" safety for traffic, and the nice flat section that is effectively the bottom of the DrySack, that flat section fits nicely up against the V-racks.

    so i load the non-drive side first. being that its on a kick-stand.
    and put the BOB trailer bag up against the LongLoader, and secure the deal with 1 strap running from the middle of the WideLoader, then over the SnapDeck, under the opposite side V-rack, and back onto itself, and tied off with 2 half hitches, i guess thats a full hitch.
    i do the same on the other side.
    but i also double up with the long piece of nylon strap i have.
    i run that from one WideLoader, over the SnapDeck, to the other WiderLoader, and back onto itself, again tied with a full hitch. this way...
    when you load, and tie in this method, the V-racks are not being "pulled" apart, instead they are being "squeezed" together, with the SnapDeck in the middle.

    with this method, i have not even come close to loosing a load, or even having it shift around.

    so far the trip has been easy.

    this morning i unloaded the Dummy, removed the wideloaders, and took off for Cedars-Sinai. the ride is easy, i decided to ride in my keen sandals, and the bike rack facility is great. a bike rack located less than 15ft away from the garage parking kiosk, right infront of the ER entrance. Hospital Staff helpful, and i feel the rig is secure.

    Dylan seems to be in good condition. they extubated him lastnight, and i arrived to find him with a grin, and talking a bit.

    with laptop in hand, we've been sitting here, me showing him video, and pics of the new rig. I keep prompting him to take care of himself, and get up to Monterey, where we can go ride.

    if nothing else, i seem to keep emphasizing that we are products of our environments. and with that, perhaps our only Freedom of Choice is to try to choose our environments.

    for my brothers, its been a lifetime of living in the Hollywood area. inner city kids all grown up with the years of lifestyle are starting to show.

    so here i am, in the ICU at Cedars-Sinai
    wow...
    what an awesome hospital
    in many ways, it makes me want to go back to work...

    for now... i have a new rig, that is proving to be "doable"
    i'm packed to the hilt with gear, and maybe I'll be riding north once this ordeal comes to a head.

    Ventura? maybe... who's to say how i feel about going back to see my dad and grandparents... if nothing else, i can simply ride away.

    peace...d
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  2. #2
    Devo
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    pics

    pics

    big dummy in secure parking (lets hope!)

    Dylan feeling better
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  3. #3
    Lighten up.
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    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    pics

    big dummy in secure parking (lets hope!)

    Dylan feeling better
    Thanks for the long writeup, Devo. Glad Dylan is doing well, and that your travels with the Dummy were schmoov.

  4. #4

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    Good story, really good. and proving that actually, you can take it with you*, wherever you go. And wherever you go, there you are, maybe on the streets of LA, changing a tube. Ha! Excellent attitude.

    ( *. . .said the Lemonheads, along with with: you can be too rich and you can be too thin).

    -A

  5. #5
    mtbr member
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    Devo, glad to hear your brother is doing better. I imagine they intubated him as a precaution given the location of the surgery, to keep his airway clear incase there was swelling.

    Looking forward to reading and seeing your adventures on the BD.

  6. #6
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    Hey Devo, really hooked on your posts. Love all the "bohemian" life style photos you keep taunting us with. Glad your bro is doing better. I see you're adjusting to civilian life and letting your hair out. Keep the posts and pictures coming as they are all really really cool. Your "Pug's Life" thread really reeled me in. I need to find a way to add a Pug to my fleet and get it past my "significant-other". I'll keep chipping away at her. Thanks again.

  7. #7
    Devo
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    thanks for all the support, and positive feed back...
    dylan is doing a lot better.
    extubated and discharged from ICU, in a step down unit for the moment, and now its been 24hrs on a cardiac unit, now off of telemetry, so its off to another nursing unit, i think this evening.
    dylan walked up and down the halls
    talking, eating a bit, drinking enteral nutrition (chocolate Boost)

    so ya... it moving right along

    here's a pic of the Dummy locked up to a bike rack.
    one thing that i think i love about LA, is the MEGA SECURITY.
    that is...
    there is such a degree of necessity, that Security is almost everywhere.
    any mall you go to, Security
    Union Station... Security
    you name it.

    and what does this mean to the average cyclist?
    well, from what I've experienced, Security is your friend.
    the bike rack is typically right close to the office, kiosk, or whatever it is that Security is based out of. in many ways, its like having your own personal Guard.

    yesterday i stopped by a bike shop and bought a new kickstand. $6 for the stand.

    but its one of those aluminum deals, that you are supposed to cut to length.
    in my opinion, I think I will end up breaking that kickstand too.

    so it kind of comes down to a couple of options.
    A: be mindful of limitations, and perhaps use it with discretion. like limit the abuse i'd subject it to with payload.
    B: simply dont use the kickstand when loaded. as it is, the duffel bags are big enough to simply lay the entire rig onto the duffels.
    C: find a stronger kickstand.

    but really....

    from what i know of using the Xtracycle, etc...
    when things are crammed into duffels, i think its really just easier to lay the rig onto its side.

    the kickstand works great when on level ground. as soon as you start to work on loading the bike, etc...
    when you are in the dirt, the ground is not level, so its a bit of consideration to place the kickstand in a spot that is actually stable.

    kind of like putting the kickstand down, on a motorbike, on hot asphalt... the kickstand just digs in, and the bike tips anyways...

    of course the rig naturally wants to be on the ground. so why fight it right? why precariously perch your rig onto a skinny kickstand?

    so whatever about kick stands. its all of a $10 piece of equipment, so take it into context as needed.

    for now, I'm suspicious of kick stands.

    but they sure are nice, and your bike looks nice as its propped up by itself.
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  8. #8
    Devo
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    here's a little vid

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AzlLtpG3QIM


    peace...d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  9. #9
    ballbuster
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    I wonder....

    ... if such a thing as a scooter style stand for bicycles? Like the double stands that you kick down and pull the bike back on it so it stand vertically on it. Like, it lifts the back wheel off the ground. I would imagine that would work out great on a bike with a big load.

  10. #10
    Devo
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    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    ... if such a thing as a scooter style stand for bicycles? Like the double stands that you kick down and pull the bike back on it so it stand vertically on it. Like, it lifts the back wheel off the ground. I would imagine that would work out great on a bike with a big load.
    ya, they make center stands, and a variety of other types.
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  11. #11
    A Surly Maverick
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    Hey Devo,
    good to see your brother is feeling alot better !

    Best wishes,
    Dr FG
    Life IS a Beach and then you Corrode :)

  12. #12
    Devo
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    still rambling

    notice the flame coming out the chimney

    kifaru 4man tipi
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  13. #13
    Devo
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    so it looks like i have a minute or two.

    i left Ventura on Xmas all in a huff, family dynamics, etc

    3 months later, here i am.

    at first it was just to stop by and let my dad and grandparents know that my brother Dylan is now at home, etc.

    3 months has gone by, and it seems like we are getting along. the tipi is pitched in the backyard, and i'm staying the night.

    maybe i'll order pizza. dad and I getting along, etc.

    tmrrw i'll be leaving, heading North.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Big Dummy:

    of what I've experienced.

    ok... I have A TON of gear! Holy smokes! I mean... its crazy.
    i packed this way intentionally.
    that is... to "over pack" and try it out. 2 BOB trailer bags filled to the max.

    the wiggle? uhh... well, i hate to say. its still somewhat there. I've come to discover that the big giant panniers upfront are too big. they tend to wiggle, as the junk I put in them, is somewhat loose. so that gives the bags a jiggle motion.

    the rear bags... they are just huge. and a bunch of weight. i need to reduce. that will be easy.

    like traditional backpacking method. I simply keep track of what i actually use. everything you pack should be at least DOUBLE functional.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    the ride:

    with the mega load, I've come to embrace the method of "long, low & slow".
    i dont "force" things. pick easy gears, and not necessarily "spin", and not "grind away" either. but kind of like hiking. a sort of "stride" i guess.

    try to be mindful of what your doing on the bike, try not to put yourself in situations where sudden movements are limited, etc.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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  14. #14
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    I noticed the wiggle on mine, too. I do think, however, that the frame is much better on the Dummy than the Xtra. When the bike is not loaded, it is much more tolerant of out-of-saddle grinding than my Xtra/Instigator was. I found that it only started to swingin' when I intentionally put heavy loads in the bags. This makes me think that it's the V-racks that are doing most of the swingin' now.

    Of course you're a skinny little bastard, Devo. I'm sure I have 100 lbs on you so I probably stress the thing a bit more without a load than you do. I can't say I've put near the cargo on mine yet, tho.

    Not a big deal, when you think about what we're doing here. I mean, you just can't drive a pickup the same way as a sports car.

    Man, I'm so ready for summer weather here in the north wet. I'm dreamin' about comfy camping on the Dummy up in them thar hills.
    Bikeys is good fun!

  15. #15
    Devo
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    this is the bike path over the Santa Clara River going from Ventura to Oxnard.

    ok....

    so pop says its like a $50M new bridge

    nice bike path. i like the facility. its absolutely awesome!

    but look at it.

    its FULL OF TRASH!

    its so.... uhhh...
    symbolic of SoCal and bicycles.

    the path is barely used. its full of broken glass, and remnants of elicit activity.

    sad

    the roads are cleaner.

    SoCal totally bites when it comes to riding a bicycle. the amount of debris is just insane. there is so much, that what i think i'd need are some kind of tyre that does not use air.

    on that note....

    here i am in Oxnard, waiting for AmTrak. heading home.

    i also learned that its much more difficult to get OUT of the city.

    that is...

    there are so many people in SoCal that mass transit is packed.

    i arrived to find the Coast Starlight booked full.

    so its an alternate train/bus trip to Salinas.

    this will put me in Salinas around 8pm, and from there about a 2hr ride back to Monterey.

    all in all

    the trip has been good

    family dynamics are what they are, I am glad to NOT live in proximity.

    and the Big Dummy with my mega load of excess is some what of a challenge when it comes to use of infrastructure. ie; trains, stairs, doorways.

    security just flocks to it. i guess its the mega bags of mystery contents.

    but it seems to be totally doable

    this trip has been an exercise in "what is too much".

    the Dummy proves to haul all that i care to pedal, and then some.


    peace.....d
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  16. #16
    Devo
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    home

    train: Oxnard to Santa Barbara

    bus: Santa Barbara to Salinas


    then.... !!!

    i lucked out and scored a shuttle ride from Salinas to Monterey.

    Salinas to Union Station, LA $46

    Oxnard to Salinas $40

    Salinas to Monterey $0

    camping at Leo Carillo State Park Beach, $3
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  17. #17
    Devo
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    The LA Trip
    -------------------------
    was... a total trip, how it is that I end up in SoCal so much, just blows my mind. its not the ideal place to go ride a bike, and try to enjoy some outside time camping.

    none the less... i feel that the trip was a success.

    Success in the aspect, that I managed to go there and back for $86
    camping was $3

    and of course, I managed to actually get there, visit family, and stay with my brother until he made it home.

    all with a bike.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    as to packing...

    well... dylan's unexpected situation happened to coincided with the timing of the Big Dummy, the season, and good weather.

    i opted to make the most of the situation, and attempt to both, visit family, and do a shake down on the Big Dummy.

    shake down it was.

    i am happy to report not a single complaint.
    but of course i have some thoughts...

    the only mechanical issue that came up was a flat tyre. and that is not even really a mechanical problem. its a reality of riding a bike.

    oh... i did break the kick stand

    on kick stands...
    with the load i was carrying and using the WideLoaders, the kick stand i found to be something i opted to not use.
    that is, after i broke the original somewhere around Korea Town in LA at 9pm.

    the replacement stand i bought cost $6, and for some goofy reason, it keeps loosening up. its a huge 6 or 8mm (i forget) allen bolt, and it still works loose.
    so I'm starting to view the kick stand as an annoyance.

    the packing was MEGA
    I purposely over packed. there was enough clothing to handle everything but snow.
    about a weeks worth of groceries
    the smaller of my tipis... a 4 man Kifaru complete with wood burning stove

    and about 3 complete sets of cycling clothing.

    laptop
    lights
    batteries
    etc

    even extra tyres... dirt sets.
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    the idea was to max out the packing to experience the load, and come to an understanding of what is "too much"

    and to see exactly what i actually use. how long will 1 set of cycling clothing last? basically... how long do you care to wear the same clothes?

    i had extra sets of AA rechargeable batteries for the digi cam, and some lights.

    again... its just excess

    I even brought an extension cord, and the chargers for everything.
    and that is, laptop, iPod, headlamp(s), AA's, and cell phone.

    its just crazy... way too much.

    i need to figure out the light situation. its crazy to carry so much.

    and of course that was the point.

    to carry 2 BOB Trailer bags FULL. i think i had about 100lbs of cargo.

    even the front panniers were loaded up.

    of which, I think I'm gonna change back to the small set (front panniers) and put away that large (rear pannier set) set.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Dummy can handle the load.

    my main concerns were always the tyres!
    it seems to me that with my 180lbs and maybe the 100lbs of cargo, that tyres take a beating
    really what it is, is the crappy condition of the urban streets of SoCal.

    Ventura is by far the worse. there is so much glass and debris that its amazing i didnt flat in Ventura too.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    now that I'm home, I've spent the day, pretty much just inventorying everything, and noting what i did not use. which is pretty much about 80% of the stuff i hauled.

    as i whittled away the excess, I've come down to a very slim packing.
    in a backpacking sense... the cargo is still huge
    in a bicycle touring sense, its a bit much... mostly due to the luxury of the tipi and the week's worth of food i hold as a standard to pack by. of course if a route would dictate a week long series of jaunts from town to town, a week's worth of food would not be needed. however, in a "training sense", that is, in a sense of my mind, the excess in packing, the weight, the bulk, the speed, and effort, is a safe "standard" to use as a bench mark.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    as to the actual gear...
    all of the stuff i used, I've used over and over time and again. all of my equipment, i commit myself to learn and understand like 2nd nature.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Most Significant Challenge

    was... the bulk of the rig.
    the sheer physical size is the biggest challenge.
    getting this rig, loaded, unloaded, tied, untied, locked, unlocked, things packed, dug out, things packed in order of use... that is... priority of use in regards to particular "mode".

    just getting it on the train, is a trip.
    its an unconventional size, therefore it does not fit into any "policy" at AmTrak.
    it was by pure grace of the staff that i was allowed to get the bike on. and believe me... its always me, doing the loading, unloading, lashing down, etc.

    typical bikes, are supposed to be boxed up, and checked in as Checked Baggage

    however, I was doing something in between the commuter mode, and Baggage.

    i used a combo of AmTrak train and bus
    on the busses I simply laid the bike on its side
    the trains were a different story, as each has different facility
    going from train to bus, often has about a 10 min overlap, so you got to get with the program, and get busy. make sure you know exactly what you are doing. when it comes to transporting things thru a transit plaza.


    the rig as a whole, is long, wide and heavy.
    at Union Station it could BARELY.... and i do mean BARELY fit thru the doors to get out!
    really i should have unloaded it all, etc

    often times, i found myself in "Tourist mode" as I'd browse thru town, a farmers market, etc.

    the rig is long and heavy. the load is relatively low. and its pretty easy to track stand.

    i found myself using the granny gear a lot. a lot of granny gear and the first 4 cogs as I'd slowly ride down sidewalks, thru plaza's, up ramps, etc.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Ride on The Road

    its heavy. much heavier than The Pug.
    its WIDE
    cars give you much more room... its great
    uhh...its not as easy to make you way down the shoulder, or lane split
    often times, the WideLoaders are just high enough to clear a curb. so you can run your tyres in the concrete cutter, and have the WideLoader just inches over the curb. its a sketchy move, and i dont like to do it. but i've done it every so often. its kind of difficult to gauge that distance. you really need to try this out before hand.
    I've practiced a few times at places like a mall, where there are short curbs for planter islands, and i'd simply roll the rig up to the curb to see where its at. then I'd try to keep a mental note of what that size curb looked like.

    its a totally sketchy proposition.
    throw in there variables, like, night time, different city, pot holes, etc.

    the weight is a trip.
    its easy to get rolling on flat
    on the slightest of downhill, it rolls.
    44x11 is pretty easy to shift into on gentle descents. i found that i was quick to utilize "momentum management", and settle into an easy spin, or a big gear, and let the rig roll along.

    uphills... you'd be amazed how quickly 22x34t comes.
    be ready to grab the granny.

    i found that if i was quickly shifting, and once i hit 32x the 3rd cog down, i was quick to grab the granny and 1 cog down, cuz then it was just a matter of those same quick short shifts until you settle in 22x34t.

    that 34t, i was pretty comfy with. but it was pavement, in an Urban setting. not too much pitch found in LA. its not like being on a fire road, much less a trail.
    on that tangent, i often wonder of the Rohloff Hub, and if it could be geared down to be something like 22x38t or 40t.
    i can only imagine what a 20% grade with 50lbs of cargo would feel like in the dirt.

    on the pave, 22x34t was adequate.

    the brakes were fine. I was very pleased to not burn up a set of Avid pads. and to top it off, the pads I'm using are a stock set of Avids. I have yet to try out the Ceramic pad set(s) i have as backup.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Payload

    that is, the actual lashing down of the BOB Trailer bags.

    we all know about V-racks flexing and the SnapDeck popping off.

    lashing the bags from a WideLoader to the opposite V-rack, makes everything "pull together", and the SnapDeck being squeezed in between.

    i've also learned to NOT use the FreeLoaders.
    its a trap! dont fall into the trap of using the FreeLoaders to try to lash down a set of full BOB Trailer bags.
    FreeLoaders are great for smaller things. they like to swing around. you really need to SQUEEZE your Payload AGAINST the rig.
    the straps of the FreeLoaders snap together on the opposite side too...
    so you can place things on the deck, and use the straps of the FreeLoaders to reach across, and lash things down.
    this is actually about the best use of the FreeLoaders at this point.

    i use a LongLoader on the non-drive side.
    i place a BOB trailer bag onto the non-drive side WideLoader.... FIRST
    and push it up close to the LongLoader, as to use it as a "bump stop" of sorts.
    from the WideLoader, I use 1 long length of Nylon strap (of which i want to buy more of, and try more ideas)
    and run it to the opposite side V-rack. run the strap under the V-rack, up and over the snapdeck, and then back down the WideLoader, but now, further back on the WideLoader, under and around, then back to the V-rack on the same side, but now at the back.

    the drive side, i load with a BOB trailer bag
    and use 2 of the nylon straps that come with the FreeRadical Kit.
    those 2 straps i use each, front and rear, run them under and over the opposite side V-rack

    this effectively puts all the "Squeeze" into the Frame of the Big Dummy and the XtraCycle racks.

    I've been loading and unloading this rig (xtracycle racks) for about 2yrs now. and the above method is what i have found to be the easiest. use 1/2 hitch & full hitch knots. or "trucker's knots" as my dad taught me.

    *BOB trailer bags: i found the best way to load them is to put the "bottom" of the bag against the frame of the BD, and the yellow end facing rear. makes for nice big yellow caution signs. yellow and black reflective safety tape is good too.

    however....

    I have my thoughts, and ideas of how to load a rig, and I'm working on it.
    look forward to some kind of funky video coming...
    something like... "how to tie cargo to your cargo bike"
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    as to WideLoaders with Cargo

    often the Payload is large enough to simply lay the rig onto its payload. dont even use the kick stand. just lean it over, and let it be.

    Cargo often is large enough to change your mental approach to "loading"
    that is...
    for instance... there you have your cargo bike, on the kick stand, sitting there nice and stable like.
    now you have a 50lb bag to put on it...
    now try 2 bags

    in the land of cars, and everything else we do, we typically put things onto things or into them.

    i've found that often its easier if you tie the straps or rope first, lay it down, and place the cargo ontop of the straps, then pull the cargo and bike together.

    if the cargo is large enough and heavy enough, its more like putting the bike up against your payload, and then pivoting the rig up onto its tyres, and flopping over onto the the other side to repeat the process, and hopefully having things fairly balanced.

    obviously you place the cargo close to the bike. avoid having to pick up and place the cargo "onto" the bike. simply put the cargo close to the bike, and pull it all together with rope.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    the trip was somewhat tiring.
    the AmTrak staff and the hustle bustle of the city, was crammed, fast, and somewhat rude.

    going from Salinas to Union Station was easy. the bus was empty, the train was empty, the staff was courteous and helpful
    in Oxnard, the train was full, so i had to wait until 2pm. which was a 4 hour wait. so i simply rode around, and found myself eating pastries at a Farmer's Market.
    the train was not what i rode the time before.
    the Conductors gave me a little bit of grief. kind of like Drill Sergeants. luckily i was in the Army so i know how to respond to "Authority". and i luckily got things to work.
    in Santa Barbara I had to jump from the train onto a bus. both the bus and train were packed.
    on the bus, the BD goes on its side underneath. so its off with the wide loaders in a hurry. so you need to be very proficient and speedy at lashing and unlashing, your cargo, and reconfiguring the Xtracycle racks.

    when the train stopped, the bus was waiting and people were already loading.
    the WideLoaders came off, when i got off the train. as the train still had another stop to go, therefore, its stop was BRIEF... so its grab your stuff, and GET OFF

    i had 2 large BOB trailer bags the BD and 2 panniers to get across a transit plaza. i simply removed the WideLoaders, put them in the FreeLoaders, but both BOB trailer bags on the SnapDeck, sideways, panniers on the front rack, and then walked the rig to the bus. none of it was lashed down... wheel barrel mode.
    at the bus, i laid the BD on its non-drive side,with the bottoms of the tyres against the bus's framing, facing forward, as to anticipate, the force of braking being greater than the acclerations, and placed the BOB trailer bags behind the BD. you can see the pic(s) in the other posting.

    when i hit Salinas it was after 8pm, and i was preparing to ride home, which i was thinking was another 2hr ride. so it was to reconfigure the BD with all the junk, lash things down, break out the lights, and get ready to roll thru the night.

    then...

    someone calls out for anyone going to Monterey!

    SCORE!

    i ended up getting a shuttle ride, to Monterey, ultimately being less than 2 miles from home.
    __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ _

    like i was saying...

    the trip was definitely "A TRIP"

    peace....d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  18. #18
    Devo
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    some video
    http://www.asanacycles.com/vid/from_malibu.html

    &

    http://www.asanacycles.com/vid/big_dummy_in_la.html

    gee... i just gave The Pug a new drivetrain. the last one was in May. so that set lasted less than 1 year. all new chainrings, chain, and cogset. found out that the BB needs replacing too...

    too many bikes, i think...

    peace...d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  19. #19
    Devo
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    Hecho en Watsonville

    took the BD up to Sunset State Beach yesterday.
    spent the night in the tipi...
    fire place and all....
    cook right on the stove... little to no dishes

    today went and picked up something special!
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  20. #20
    mtbr member
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    There it is.
    I was wondering when you'd finally get it.

    Don't leave us hanging too long...
    Quote Originally Posted by azdog View Post
    I think he was born around the time of the Chernobyl fallout which would explain a lot.

  21. #21
    Devo
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    thats the tipi...
    that aint new...
    i happened across the stove instructions for 2001 stove models

    now i know I'm getting old... when something like 7 years just flys by.
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  22. #22
    Devo
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    this is new...
    Hunter 29er
    with all braze-ons
    also got a rigid fork for it.

    Hecho en Watsonville

    I'll probably start building this tmrrw....

    :-)

    holy smokes! its so crazy swank!
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    Last edited by SelfPropelledDevo; 03-27-2008 at 11:16 PM. Reason: edit picture
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  23. #23
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    Very nice!
    Just when we all thought you were down-sizing. There must be a story there.
    Bikeys is good fun!

  24. #24
    Lighten up.
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    Um Hmmm... I thought you were downsizing, too. Instead, you've reminded us ALL that this addiction is like a freight train. It stops for no man.

    Devo...I notice that you only use the BOB bags with the Wideloader...true? Are they just too darn big to fit on the regular Longtail Kit rack...or completely unable to attach to the Longtail Kit rack?

  25. #25
    mtbr member
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    Frame

    [QUOTE=SelfPropelledDevo]thats the tipi...
    that aint new...
    QUOTE]

    I wasn't referring to the Tipi...
    I was talking about the new frame. Right away I knew what it was.

    I was wondering if you were still getting it.
    Looks great!
    Quote Originally Posted by azdog View Post
    I think he was born around the time of the Chernobyl fallout which would explain a lot.

  26. #26
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    As for the tipi, it looks great... especially with the stove!! I just wish Kifaru wasn't so expensive. I have a Golite Hex3 but it's not as big as your Kifaru 4 man.

    What will be the purpose of the hunter? Off-road touring???

    Can't wait to see it built!

    Mojoe in Iowa... going to camp in the tipi in my yard this weekend.

  27. #27
    Devo
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    back when I was still working, etc.
    i had ordered the Hunter frame, and at the time, I had only put down a deposit.
    strange bcz, at the time I kept thinking to myself that I should simply pay for it in full...
    anyways...

    the Ventura gig popped up, and suddenly i found myself without a job, the money ebb and flow, family dynamics, etc.
    then came the decision to start selling things off when i was in Ventura.
    along came the big Fiasco of Ventura, and i was gone...

    all the while, this frame and fork was in process, and my finance here and there.
    the Hunter deal was something i committed to before i left for Ventura, and a lot had occurred on the in between.

    either way, I owed Rick Hunter for the job i asked him to do.
    i sat, wheeled, dealed, and sold, off a bunch of my stuff...
    along came...
    The Big Dummy
    and the Hunter frame, almost at the same time. Suddenly I was facing not just the finance to build the BD, but also to deal with the Hunter.

    as luck has it, I am able to keep moving things.
    and viola! there it is.... a new rig.

    the Hunter should be really cool
    i think I will be selling off my road bike, as its not of much "use".
    i mean its a pure sport bike. i dont use it.
    and to top it off... for the most part i can keep up in a road group while on a MTB.

    this Hunter rig, is a 29er, and initially I will use a set of Mavic SpeedCity wheels with 28c Conti road tyres. it should be plenty fast!
    plus it will obviously take CX tyres, so its easy to carry another set of tyres, if needed, to travel in the dirt. but the question comes to be, "how will CX tyres hold up with a load?" and that takes me to further thoughts of simply doing away with racks, and using only compression bags. (more on this, to come)

    I'll feel the situation out. possibly I'll need to get a MTB 29er wheelset.

    the Hunter rig will be the fancy showy, go fast bike.

    bikes come and go.
    I've found how easy it is to produce a bike, and sell it.
    the Cdale I will probably sell too, as I have my doubts about my brother actually going on bike tour with me. again... more family dynamics.

    reducing and getting out on the road is not so simple.
    I'm finding that its a constant ebb and flow

    everyday, i seem to be very busy, with all of this stuff.

    today I should be able to pick up my old Ibis Xtra Mojo frame.
    my buddy managed to get every thing un-stuck out of the frame... I'll sell that frame off, along with some other parts that are of "proper vintage". (another little project)

    i also have this computer gig to deal with too.
    24" iMac that i love to use, but obviously I will need to primarily rely on my MacBook.
    so i just received Leopard for both computers, that arrived while i was camping.
    something is going to have to happen with the iMac. i hate to sell it.
    the iMac is something that i dont think would be a wise decision to sell off. its faster, it has 750GB of HD space, plus a 500GB external hard drive, and its my home base. i need to learn how to access this iMac via internet from my laptop while anywhere in the world. i think that will happen thru Leopard, Bonjour, or perhaps simply thru the server that i have my website located on.
    oh... and i have a 160GB EHD (external hard drive) that is USB powered, on the way for the MacBook. the idea is that i will be able to CRAM all the media onto it, and publish the website thru the MacBook. and all of this on a 5hr batter charge from the laptop? uhhh... maybe... more strategy... right? (sigh)

    as you can tell... reducing is not only just selling off personal property, but also things like... bills... accounts... etc. luckily there is the computer. and that too, needs to be addressed, managed, and morphed to suit a life on the move.

    over all...
    things are reducing. some days gain, but overall, its a reduction.

    so for instance... in about 2hrs, I'm supposed to meet a buddy to buy $70 worth of bike stuff. i should be able to sell this stuff off in the somewhat near future. i should be scoring 2 NiteRider lights:
    1 headtrip with NiMh battery
    1 dual beam classic with the huge NiCad battery in a waterbottle
    and an Easton CT2 27.2mm carbon seatpost. but i think its a road seatpost.
    come Fall, i should be able to sell off those lights, and the seatpost I may use.
    so you see... its things like that... for $70 i think i can make a little profit off of the bike stuff.

    the Fondriest road bike, I think i will sell off... the Zipp 404's alone should give me a few bucks.

    and then of course there is still Asana Cycles. its actually a registered biz, and i need to think about what I'm going to do with it. which i think ultimately means more money... right? and money i dont have.
    that is... i dont generate any income, as i dont have a job

    and to jobs... well...
    I spent 14yrs at my last job, and i'd like to not have to "go find a job", that is... i'd like to work for myself. so i have to figure that out too...
    but that is still in the future...
    what I'd like to do, is something with bikes, my website, camping, writing, etc.
    you know... what i do naturally.

    basically, I've got a loose plan that spans a year or two.
    i think that if i am to commit to an academic program, i.e. 4yr degree, I think I'll put that into motion come Fall 09' i'd assume that would mean student loans which is actually debt, and then jumping back into the world of "Careers" which i think also means a solid 10yr obligation.

    timing is something i have to constantly reinforce. that is... its a constant thing to sit here with the computer and heed my timetable.

    its like i was telling my girlfriend, "it about time i go now. cuz every day i sit here and not out on the road, is another day, well... NOT ON THE ROAD." May will be here real fast. the weather here in Cali has already broken. On the coast the lows are around 40F, and mostly clear skies. I'm already starting to be concerned about water. that is... the amount of natural run off in places like The Ventana Wilderness that is so close by.
    Which is actually a Shangri-La, and I'd like to further explore.

    in fact... The Ventana is so close, and so nice, that I could spend the entire year getting to know this area better. and thats just the Ventana! its close, and probably the most "viable" of my objectives. that is... its so close, that the finance is dramatically off set, as compared to say... a trip to Vancouver Island and the San Juans.

    Mental and Physical ability, is also a constant ebb and flow. days loose ground and somedays gain. over all, its a gain, but its somewhat of a slow go, so it seems.
    its like this:

    imagine trying to get out on the road, reducing your life, etc, and all the while, fitness needs to be maintained, or gained. How about a 60 mile hilly ride on the BD with 75lbs of gear? Solo of course. so that kind of stuff has to be approached. even with the years of experience, its something that should not be taken for granted.

    its so easy to get caught up into the daily minute details, that another day goes by, and suddenly 40 miles on a loaded rig could be an issue. thats a big reason i dont drive a car, bcz, i figure that at this point in my daily bicycle lifestyle, there is enough fitness depth, to propel me thru the next year. i imagine that i will also loose weight. depending on how much time i actually spend out of doors.

    its alot of stuff to think about, and that too can be somewhat of a trap. eventually there comes the deadline and you have to simply just GO!

    Dylan's deal down in LA was perfect timing to shake down the BD.

    the trip to Watsonville was perfect timing, to try a somewhat reduced load, and get re-acquainted with the tipi, and life in general when not living in doors. what i'm saying, is that its a shift.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    the next month is a biggie. I've somewhat come to resign to the idea that I will not accomplish all that I'd like, but that is ok.

    i have more finance suddenly available, and i need to figure out what I'm going to do with it. maybe i could be lucky enough to not actually use the money, but stash it somewhere and let it draw a buck or two. even that, the money is not that significant. i think for the 4 months its been tied up, it will only draw about $200 in interest. and the quarters to come, look a lot more bleak. so maybe it would be in my favor to not "tie it up", but still... i wish i could make it make more money... (sigh)

    Sea Otter Classic is coming up, my local club is active in these kinds of things. there is also a "Sustainable" group that I've been somewhat around for the last year or so. and then of course there is the growing number of Xtracycles in Monterey. all of which is crying out for me to somehow bring together... (biz opportunity?)

    i dont know... and of course i want to be out on the road too. i keep thinking that the "link" will be the laptop.

    this month, i need to build up the Hunter, sell off the road bike, sell off the Cdale, and i think BOB trailer too, unless, i want to buy a 29er fork for it, and drag it behind the Hunter, which is a possibility. Deal with the computers, Leopard, and websites. double check with the Cali State Board of Equalization, as to my taxes, and filings for Asana Cycles. Luckily my personal taxes have been long since done... thanks to the computer.
    i need to move just about all of my stuff from storage, or change the size of storage, something...

    and to top it all off...
    the guy who lives downstairs is moving out this week. i dont even know what its like, but its a small space. definitely big enough for my stuff, and possibly big enough to run Asana Cycles out of.

    i think at some point i will need to have a yard sale!

    or simply take on the space downstairs (another bill! like i need that?) and occupy it. stay around town, work on some kind of way to generate income, and keep riding, as much as possible. after all... The Ventana and Big Sur are right here.

    its a lot to think about, a lot to put on paper (computer screen in my case), a lot to plan, AND most of all, a degree of commitment... so its a juggling act. somehow, someway, there is a way to do it all, and be fun!

    peace...d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  28. #28
    Devo
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    Quote Originally Posted by mangoman
    Um Hmmm... I thought you were downsizing, too. Instead, you've reminded us ALL that this addiction is like a freight train. It stops for no man.

    Devo...I notice that you only use the BOB bags with the Wideloader...true? Are they just too darn big to fit on the regular Longtail Kit rack...or completely unable to attach to the Longtail Kit rack?
    on loading the BD:

    ok gang: this is the deal right now. at the moment, I've been playing with the idea of WideLoaders, or no WideLoaders. Hopefully by the end of next week, I'll have something presentable to everyone.

    basically it goes like this. the WideLoaders are very easy to use. FreeLoaders have a tendency to sway around, and i especially dont like the idea of relying too heavily on plastic buckles to hold your cargo, which in this case, i'd really hate to have dump off.

    so i've been playing with ways to lash things down, the exact best method so far, etc.

    in the mean time, here are some pics.

    FreeLoaders are great, its just that I wouldn't want to put too much emphasis on them. they are handy, and you can put a bunch of stuff in them.

    when you have the WideLoaders on and you use the FreeLoaders, your cargo doesnt rest on the WideLoaders. which makes a person wonder... "do i need WideLoaders?" but then comes something like a book case... and yes... you need to WideLoaders for a bookcase.

    do i need WideLoaders for touring? i'm thinking not, and that ultimately comes down to how precise i want t be in my packing, and method of bags vs tie down technique(s).

    its another "works in progress"

    peace...d
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  29. #29
    Devo
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mojoe
    As for the tipi, it looks great... especially with the stove!! I just wish Kifaru wasn't so expensive. I have a Golite Hex3 but it's not as big as your Kifaru 4 man.

    What will be the purpose of the hunter? Off-road touring???

    Can't wait to see it built!

    Mojoe in Iowa... going to camp in the tipi in my yard this weekend.
    ya Kifaru tipis are expensive. now that i dont have a job, i'm not sure if i'd be comfortable buying one.

    sometime in the night i decided to let the fire go out. around 530am it was 40F, nature call had me up, so i decided to re-stoke the fire. Instant heat!, and enough pieces of bark to let simmer thru the rest of the morning.

    wake up, dont even get out of the sleeping bag, roll over and toss in more wood, water heats up. sit up, and make coffee. luxury.

    something magical about having a fire next to you without the smoke. oh... and safe too.

    the tipi is another piece of the equation, but i think i'll stick to using it as my shelter. its my "house".

    peace...d
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  30. #30
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    That Hunter frame really is a piece of art. Did he make you a swoopy fork to compliment the swoopy seat stays? There's a thread with a Hunter fork in the 29er forum right now, it's like nothing else I've seen. I hope we can trust you to take lots of pics as it goes together.


    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    this is new...
    Hunter 29er
    with all braze-ons
    also got a rigid fork for it.

    Hecho en Watsonville

    I'll probably start building this tmrrw....

    :-)

    holy smokes! its so crazy swank!
    Bikeys is good fun!

  31. #31
    Devo
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forrestf
    That Hunter frame really is a piece of art. Did he make you a swoopy fork to compliment the swoopy seat stays? There's a thread with a Hunter fork in the 29er forum right now, it's like nothing else I've seen. I hope we can trust you to take lots of pics as it goes together.
    believe brother...

    its all that...

    remember the Moto Rapido? well...

    viola...

    Cafe... 29er Adv Tour
    thinkin of doin only bags, no racks...

    i think this guy can help
    http://carouseldesignworks.com


    d-
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  32. #32
    Devo
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    so far

    check it out...

    :-)
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  33. #33
    Devo
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    today i replaced the bearings with a set from Enduro.

    i like the tools. they are fun to use... (i must be a geek)

    but it looks like its going together real nice like.
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  34. #34
    Lighten up.
    Reputation: mangoman's Avatar
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    Sweet setup, D. Nice color (black and green), too.

  35. #35
    Devo
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    Hunter 29er Adv Cafe Style

    check it out...
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    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  36. #36
    ballbuster
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    Nice!

    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    check it out...
    Daddy like!

    I've always had a thing for green bikes. Reminds me of military kinda utilitarian stuff.

  37. #37
    Devo
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    a little bar wrap

    bar wrap finishes it off...
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  38. #38
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    How are those bars to ride Devo? I was thinking of getting a set for an old road bike but was worried that the sweep on them might put your wrists at a funny angle.

  39. #39
    Devo
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    I had been playing with this setup for about a year now

    first i was trying it out on the Moto Rapido, the wheels, etc.

    but 700c with road tyres on a 26" MTB was kind of twitchy... i guess the combo of a heightened BB and the wheelbase not changing... it just made the bike feel twitchy.
    but i liked how fast it was.

    I placed the bars on sometime back, and have done a bunch of miles on it like that. Mostly a bunch of road rides during the time I was in Ventura.
    the roads in Ventura seemed to me to eat tyres. I took out the road bike a few times, and I could hardly come to justify those nice 404's on crapy roads, and ultimately for what? to be riding around Suburbia USA? it just wasn't happening.

    the times I did take the road bike out, was just for a group roadie ride, where i was trying to get to know the locals....
    even then... i felt it was just way too much over kill.

    i guess I'm kind of like a "fair weather cyclist" in that manner.

    i mean... if i'm gonna take out the swanky road bike... i guess it would be for someplace like here in Monterey, where the roads are typically nice and smooth, little to no trash.

    my god... the trash in SoCal! enough with it already!

    anyways... the last few times I rode the Moto Rapido, I had it set up with Maxis Holy Rollers 2.4, and I was pretty much able to keep up on the pave with a group. but still somehow, "that bike", I never did get it dialed. it felt like I was always fighting it.

    like somewhere, the exponetial effort came on sooner than you'd think. it was like, i'd put the torque to the pedals, and at a certain point, the resistance was going out the roof.

    you know... that feeling like the brakes are on or something...

    rather than sit there and try to figure out what was up with the Moto Rapido, i just decided to try something different.

    so the Hunter had been ordered quite some time back... and now its done.

    i rode it some today, and its fast!

    when i come to a stoplight, and click out, the top tube is like a gas tank... weird how that is "cool". its fun.

    even when its cabled to a rack, it looks fast...

    peace...d
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  40. #40
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    How did you gear the Hunter? Is that a 44/32/22 crankset or like a trekking-ish one w/ a 48t big ring? Beautiful bike.

  41. #41
    Devo
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    its a 44t big ring, standard MTB crank...

    but dig this...

    just this am i was out on a road ride with a group, when i blow the freaking non-drive side crank arm right off the spindle! damn!

    this crankset has been nothing but trouble since the day i started using it on the Moto Rapido.

    its come loose in the past, and today, i may have ruined it.
    its bolted back together with locktite on it, but the spline pattern inside the crankarm is somewhat beat up.

    now i need a new crank...

    and when i had it on the Moto Rapido, i blew out the bearings.

    so its got new Enduro BB bearings, and now i screw up the non-drive side crank arm.

    yesterday...
    in the am, i dumped a full cup of hot coffee into the wireless keyboard for my iMac.
    that cost me a solid $100, for a new keyboard, and a rubber skin...
    laffs huh...

    well... its all just stuff, and I'll take my lumps in small doses if i have a choice.

    its a good thing to blow out that crankarm, today, as compared to the day when I'm out somewhere in the boonies...

    i guess i should order a new crank...

    peace...d
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  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    its a 44t big ring, standard MTB crank...

    but dig this...

    just this am i was out on a road ride with a group, when i blow the freaking non-drive side crank arm right off the spindle! damn!

    this crankset has been nothing but trouble since the day i started using it on the Moto Rapido.

    its come loose in the past, and today, i may have ruined it.
    its bolted back together with locktite on it, but the spline pattern inside the crankarm is somewhat beat up.

    now i need a new crank...

    and when i had it on the Moto Rapido, i blew out the bearings.

    so its got new Enduro BB bearings, and now i screw up the non-drive side crank arm.

    yesterday...
    in the am, i dumped a full cup of hot coffee into the wireless keyboard for my iMac.
    that cost me a solid $100, for a new keyboard, and a rubber skin...
    laffs huh...

    well... its all just stuff, and I'll take my lumps in small doses if i have a choice.

    its a good thing to blow out that crankarm, today, as compared to the day when I'm out somewhere in the boonies...

    i guess i should order a new crank...

    peace...d
    Sounds like a Mr. Whirly is in your future...

  43. #43
    Devo
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    I'm already regretting this...

    i just received the new Truvativ Noir crankset i ordered thru CBO
    and the BB is missing....
    huh?
    ya...
    weird...

    CBO sent me an an email stating the order was on the way via UPS, tracking number, etc.
    the tracking number hadn't shown up on the UPS website in the last day or more, then just now, FedEx arrives, with my order.
    the Truvativ box, is opened, the tape cut, and the box looks a little beat. as if its been tossed around a little. you can definitely tell that the contents had been moved around some.

    plus an invoice is was not in the FedEx box.

    so i sent CBO an email complete with pics.

    so what do i do?

    i regret this already. I should have just shopped at Universal Cycles like i typically do. it was just that CBO had the crankset listed.

    damn...

    the irony, is that, all i need is the crankset.

    i think the leprechaun is still around these days...
    little pieces of havoc keep popping up in my life.

    peace...d
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  44. #44
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    I second the UniversalCyles site. Great prices and great customer service. I dig the new cafe style Hunter, she looks wicked. More pics please.

  45. #45
    Devo
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thommy
    I second the UniversalCyles site. Great prices and great customer service. I dig the new cafe style Hunter, she looks wicked. More pics please.
    the new Hunter is nice. i just got back from the local Saturday Morning Ride with Velo Club Monterey, and i can manage to hang with the group on it. so it fills the niche.

    i think my road bike is on its way out the door.

    this is my first 29er, but me thinks, the KM would be an awesome all around rig. actually me thinks the KM could be a strong contender with a touring rig.

    the Hunter, has all the braze-ons, so it could take fenders, racks, etc. it even has 3 water bottle mounts.

    but in all fairness... this is a custom frame and fork that i ordered sometime around June of last year.

    for the money, i could have easily bought 3 KM frame sets.

    i just wanted a nice custom bike. Unless my employment status changes, i probably will not be buying custom frames for some time.

    as to the BD, i put fenders on it, and I've been working on re-finishing the SnapDeck.
    yesterday, i cleaned it up, the first since I've had it built up. I think its been about a month now.
    In that time, I've hauled it to LA on AmTrak, rode to Malibu, Ventura, etc..
    and i camped up in Watsonville, then picked up the new frame and fork.

    I think it will come down to The Pug, The BD, & The Hunter.
    everything else I guess I should sell off.

    even 3 bikes is over kill.

    so here's some new pics of the Hunter.

    i put on new Conti 700x47c Top Contact tyres.
    today i rode with the road group, and yesterday i mixed up a ride with both pave, and dirt.
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  46. #46
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    That Hunter is one of the coolest looking bikes I have ever seen, very nice!

  47. #47
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    Good job!

    Devo your Hunter is a realy cool bike, but I think it needs a Titec H-Bar
    Life is like a ten speed bicycle. Most of us have gears we never use. Charles M. Schulz (1922 - 2000)

  48. #48
    Devo
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    wow!

    its 80F today!
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  49. #49
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    WOW! it's up to 43 and it's been raining since Sunday. It's suppose to snow tonight.

    Mojoe

  50. #50
    Devo
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    another day of warm temps

    wake up this morning to straight sunshine, and 70F

    holy smokes!

    global warming... it must be

    just last tuesday the jetstream was going straight down the length of Cali
    cold wind straight off the ocean, the high's were around 55F

    this weekend, a huge difference.

    today... a Big Dummy day... run around town....

    peace..d
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  51. #51
    Lighten up.
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    Chilly here today, so I've made a couple of tweaks to my Dummy's aesthetics. First, some quick (rough) custom-lettering on the tail of the snapdeck:



    Hard to call it The Goat without a swatch of real goat hair on the stem:


  52. #52
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    LUV the snap deck!! It is HAWT!!!!

    The stem..... is sorta creepy

    Mojoe

  53. #53
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    Global warming my arse!!! It's 34 and snowing all day today.

    Mojoe in frigid Iowa

    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    another day of warm temps



    global warming... it must be



    peace..d

  54. #54
    Devo
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    wow!
    far out...
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  55. #55
    Devo
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    Good Old Days Parade

    today is another 80F day here on the Monterey Peninsula

    global warming? i dont know, but last tuesday it was 45F with 20mph W wind.
    the jet stream was running straight down the length of California.
    what the heck huh?

    Today was the Good Old Days Parade in Pacific Grove. Myself and some fellow Xtracycle types rode in the parade representing Sustainable Pacific Grove

    parades are fun. lots of kids... literally we had a troupe of clowns behind us, that kept launching long skinny balloons. kind of like SCUD missiles, as they screeched thru the air. something kind of eerie about a clown with big flat footed shoes, a big cigar, and launching balloons, at passers by...
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  56. #56
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    As long as folks don't perceive us and our BD's as clown bikes!

    Enjoy that heat, D. Gettin' colder here by the minute.

  57. #57
    Devo
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    SnapDeck Mod

    so here is a SnapDeck mod i did.

    the holes are reinforced with copper ringlets i cut out of some pipe.
    i cut the holes with a Dremel tool, so the circles were not perfect... which is good
    and the ringlets i cut out of pipe, i scratched up, notched, gouged, etc...
    and epoxied them all together.
    later... after everything dried... i filled in any gaps, with more epoxy fillets mixed with the copper shavings from the cutting job.
    then beveled the holes, and created nice smooth round rings, so there is no sharp edge...

    the holes are located so that rope, or 1" Nylon strap routes nicely thru the deck, around the V-Racks, frame of the BD, and back up, or you can lace your cargo into position, something like lacing up shoes, going between the WideLoaders, and holes in the SnapDeck.

    plus now there is an easy way to strap, bungee, tie, etc... any kind of bag to the top of the SnapDeck... like a duffel bag would be perfect. and easy to simply lash down with sleeping bag straps, etc
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  58. #58
    Lighten up.
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    DUDE...that ROCKS.

  59. #59
    Devo
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    holes...

    Quote Originally Posted by mangoman
    DUDE...that ROCKS.
    holes... almost Genius!

    the pics dont do the job justice... really... its SUPER NICE!

    definitely BLING!

    and fresh polished copper ringlets, under Spar Varnish.

    I'll post some pics of things like duffel bags lashed down.

    now everything is a no-brainer.

    plus now, when you tie/route thru the ringlets and the same V-rack... instead of now "pulling the V-Racks apart from each other, and allowing the SnapDeck to become loose...

    now the whole of V-Racks, and SnapDeck are lashed together, creating a stronger structure.

    if i was totally "off the hook", i could lay some fine fiberglass across the deck, or some carbon fiber cloth. it would be insanely strong.
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  60. #60
    Devo
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    the old deck

    this is the old deck...

    it was pretty beat up... so i had decided to do a mod job, and had been thinking about it for a long time...

    but of course, i was a bit apprehensive...cuz of course, while cutting holes sounds functional for routing, however, it is CUTTING HOLES!

    so for the first version of the mod, i only used 4 holes. and its plenty strong.

    the 2nd mod i used 8 holes. its plenty strong too. i think I'll replicate the 2nd mod.

    the old deck is cool, cuz there are fade marks where stickers were placed for the couple years or whatever it was.
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  61. #61
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    That varnish job rocks the free world, too. I need to do the same to mine...thanks for the detailed pics, D.

  62. #62
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    Nice job Devo. Xtracycle should sell them like this.

  63. #63
    Devo
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    Devo Mod Job

    Quote Originally Posted by jesusburger
    Nice job Devo. Xtracycle should sell them like this.
    ya thats about what i was thinking too...

    obvious "genius" of the mod job...
    simple, and obvious...

    when the thought came to mind... i laffed for about a week...
    and every time i lashed things down...
    obviously the trip to LA, and just plain simple daily loads...
    i'd laff, as i kept threading nylon strap between the SnapDeck and V-Racks...
    but still... even then... ultimately the load was pulling the V-Racks apart from each other, and the SnapDeck was this loose thing, that wanted to pop off all the time... then when you'd try to lash something to the top of the deck... it was again some kind of awkward method incorporating the V-Racks...

    now with the Devo Mod Job... things work "more together"
    and its so easy!
    so many more tie down options...

    I'm proud of this mod job... it was so easy, and its beyond heck-a-functional now...
    next... I'm working on a duffel & backpack set up

    peace...d
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  64. #64
    Devo
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    yesterday we came across one of these new cars
    and it dawned on me to compare their lengths
    and i wonder how they'd compare when it comes to what can be hauled.

    sounds like a cool contrast/comparison essay or article...
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  65. #65
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    Good shot! Would make a sensible companion to the BD...if you could also carry the BD on the car, if necessary.

  66. #66
    Devo
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  67. #67
    ballbuster
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    Those things...

    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    yesterday we came across one of these new cars
    and it dawned on me to compare their lengths
    and i wonder how they'd compare when it comes to what can be hauled.

    sounds like a cool contrast/comparison essay or article...
    ... have been spinning around Europe for a while. When I was in Prague a few years back, the local cops used them as cop cars. I wonder where they put the cuffed guys in custody.

    They have some pretty good innovation, but gas mileage isn't that great considering the size and weight. IIRC, they are rated at like 37 MPG. Heck, a Honda Fit actually gets like 35 rated, 42 real world MPG, and has 4 seats.

    I'd rather ride my bike.

    *edit*

    found the pic. They are short enough to park sideways in a regular parking space and only stick out a little.




    BTW, nice mod job on the snap deck.
    Last edited by pimpbot; 04-14-2008 at 01:26 PM.

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by mangoman
    Good shot! Would make a sensible companion to the BD...if you could also carry the BD on the car, if necessary.
    Or the other way around :o

  69. #69
    Devo
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    i dont know why they dont simply use something like a CBR600RR motor. heck they pump out something like over 80hp.

    obviously there is something to pushing around a box...

    if they were actually "smart" they'd use those 600cc or liter superbike motors, and put it in something like a Velomobile shape. heck.. at that point... it would need fins... oh wait... that would be like a landshark

    as seen here

    fins and ruder would be designed to enhance handling performance.
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  70. #70
    Devo
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    sea otter

    sea otter...
    75F today in the shade... perfect
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  71. #71
    Devo
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    no volunteer duty today, so i had the chance to sleep in a bit, hang out at the house, and then up to Sea Otter. I stopped by the Surly booth, met Andy and Emily. sat around talking about bikes a bit.

    on a side note, as i was riding up to Laguna Seca, i was thinking to myself, "wow, I might get thru this weekend without spending any cash."

    that went out the window, as soon as i discovered Kenda has 29er folding tyres for $10 each. so there went $20...
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  72. #72
    Devo
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    check out the cars!

    mega cars!
    this is a shot of part of the parking...
    its huge
    mega cars...
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  73. #73
    Devo
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    loads

    the other day i ran my road bike and Pug over to storage.
    Sea Otter has passed
    and summer is knockin
    time to get light, pick things up, and start making loops

    local loops
    into Big Sur
    Ventana

    and then to get ready to make a jump...
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  74. #74
    Devo
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    more on loads...

    so I've already made an earlier run, and it slipped my mind to snap pics...

    so this is the next run to storage
    its 3 tool boxes full of bike tools of course... and a box full of stock bike parts...
    that is... my stash of usable if not new, parts for immediate use...

    the Devo Mod Job

    its cool

    why?

    cuz its easy-ier to tie things
    so i like 1" nylon strap, and the Devo Ringlets are 3/4", giving a ton of room...

    on the non-drive side, I placed the largest tool box...
    and used one of the ties that XtraCycle provides with their FreeRad kits.
    simply loop it around the WideLoader over the toolbox under the SnapDeck, and thru the middle ringlet, tie off with a full hitch knot. make sure to place tool box against LongLoader, as to provide a "bump stop"

    **I dont even bother to use the kickstand for stuff like this. In my experience I have broken them off, and its really not necessary anyways. Just lay the bike onto a WideLoader. I first start loading on the nondrive side. so i tip the whole bike over onto the drive-side WideLoader, then place cargo. in this instance, it was the large black tool box.**

    with the large tool box lashed down, tip the bike onto the non-drive side, and load the other side in the same manner.

    this time, I'm using some nylon utility strap that has buckles on them. 10ft each.
    place the buckle at the top, and run the strap thru a ringlet, out the bottom of the V-Rack, down the face of the FreeLoaders, and BEHIND the frame of the BD, under the WideLoader, then up and over the toolboxes. this pulls the entire load against the frame of the BD. use buckles to cinch cargo down tight.
    **where the BD has what are effectively "Footsies", run the strap behind this, under the WideLoaders, etc... ***

    Now the 2 toolboxes are lashed down.

    the box of bike parts...
    I use 2 Sleep Bag straps... that have nylon no slip buckles too
    run the straps thru 2 pair of holes in the SnapDeck
    place box on SnapDeck, push forward to stoker bar
    **rotate rear blinker light, down, to allow cargo to rest against bar, acting as a "bump stop".**
    use Sleeping Bag straps, and buckles to cinch cargo down.
    i also used the 2nd nylon loop strap that comes with the FreeRadical, to pull the box against the bump stop. i looped the strap thru the bottom ringlet then up to the 1st strap, then 2nd, and tied it all off. effectively keeping the box on the SnapDeck held against the stoker bar.

    the use of the Ringlets in the deck, is super easy
    it facilitates a more secure, and quicker method of lashing down cargo.
    if this was a bunch of odd shaped things, like furniture, chairs, etc...
    lay a tarp on the ground with the straps underneath, and place things on the tarp, then tie together in a bundle. then load the bundle.



    now to go make the drop off...

    peace...d
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  75. #75
    Devo
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    more pics
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  76. #76
    Devo
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    always make sure to tie off any loose ends...

    always make a quick test run before getting into traffic...

    peace...d
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  77. #77
    Devo
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    i use these type of straps.
    they are found in sporting good places...

    plain 1" nylon strap from the fabric store is something like 80cents/yrd
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  78. #78
    Devo
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    Big Sur

    Big Sur here i come...
    an REI Beast duffel bag
    a Gregory Forester backpack

    another huge load... everything and the sink...

    so the bags are loaded into the FreeLoaders
    then, i used 2 straps on each side crossed in an X
    running from the frame of the BD to two of the outboard Ringlets in Devo Mod Job, SnapDeck.

    both sides, in the same exact manner...

    now bags are held in place with FreeLoaders, and secured to the frame of the BD with the straps from frame to deck.

    now the cargo in the FreeLoaders does not sway around.

    2xExtra bed roll...
    i bought a new bed roll at REI, and discovered that i had bought a long length, compared to my old mashed down one... when i fold it in half its just about as long as my old pad...
    then i had to laff, when i piled them together in triple... LUXURY!
    so i decided what the heck... the BD can handle the volume, and they are not that heavy, especially compared to the bulk of other items, like laptop, batteries, wood burning stove, etc...

    at first i had placed the roll along the length of the deck, but then decided it was a waste of space...

    attaching the roll to the stoker bar is by far better...
    now the deck is wide open... perhaps for a small duffel-o-fire wood for the tipi... maybe.

    so its off to Big Sur

    the weather is off the hook!
    Monterey is 75F at the moment...

    peace....d
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  79. #79

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    Nice packing, man. I enjoy getting miles out of my Dummy, while I keep thinking about modifications for better storage capacity. I've got some bumpy shortcuts to town and it's nice to know when everything's lashed down nicely. Carried in the last week: 10' x 2' piece of used slatwall from the bike shop, for interior work shop siding (snugged right up with the longloader), '41 chevy truck radiator dropped off for repair, and the week's grocery run: lotsa cans, beverages, and a 25 lb bag of dog food. Woulda grabbed a 50 lb bag if they had it.

    I picture a second hinged fold-out level built into a snap deck, to throw another layer of stuff onto. It's been a challenge really to overload this thing on my regular errands, which is great for me. And more non-bike people have taken an interest in this than any other bike of mine. Nice diplomatic cross over between demographics; cargo capacity is a great conversation starter.

    -A

  80. #80
    Devo
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    i found WiFi

    i found WiFi, so here's some quick pics
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  81. #81
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    Stunning scenery! Now that's what I call a touring bike (although I might pack a bit lighter than you Devo).
    I get an idea now how compact those little stoves are. Very cool.

  82. #82
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    again i have fallen for the trap of loading way too much stuff. but really this is another exercise in packing, etc.

    i could obviously pack less, and travel much easier...
    this load is pretty much a load that would sustain me for indefinite...
    with exception to food. as to food, i probably have close to a week's worth of meals...
    the one thing i did not bring is Gortex... but its over 90F here in Big Sur

    peace...d
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  83. #83
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    one last one...

    i was amazed that i even noticed these two...
    i guess the flies were around them, as their ears were twitching around...
    that movement caught my eye...
    and sure enough, i was able to get kind of close...

    funny guys....
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  84. #84
    Lighten up.
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    Great shots, D!! So cool of you to make the time to post. Gotta get one of those tent/stove combos......

  85. #85
    Devo
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    back in Main Garrison

    ok... I'm back from my little 5 day trip.

    here's more pics...

    I'll do some write up in a bit

    peace...d
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  86. #86
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    NIce...

    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    ok... I'm back from my little 5 day trip.

    here's more pics...

    I'll do some write up in a bit

    peace...d
    Thanks for the write-up, Devo! Always a good read.

  87. #87
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    5 days, 6 nights = $27.90

    about $5/day to stay in Big Sur, ride your bike, sleep in the tipi, and enjoy the trip.

    trip it was.

    I met cool people, the whole of my kit was more than adequate, and i felt it was enough of anything i cared to take with me, if i cared to actually MOVE! i mean... what i was carrying I could move to just about go anywhere in the world, i suppose. the AmTrak, option is a totally viable method. hands down! this rocks!

    the cargo allure of the Big Dummy got me again.

    this time the trip was obviously up and down the coast of Big Sur. The Devo Mod Job I did on the SnapDeck proved to totally KICK BUTT! it ROCKS!

    it allowed me to not use WideLoaders, and the bags were better secured to the frame than the prior method i used with the BOB trailer bag/WideLoader combo that i hauled to LA and Malibu. that load was stupid huge! and yet... doable. that is crazy talk in its self.

    I am happy to report no mechanical issues of any kind. I repositioned the front caliper and that was it.

    The tipi continues to be a totally awesome thing. the wood burning stove is amazing. I'm always blown away with it. its a system that limited only by how much food you can bring with you.
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  88. #88
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    Would you be interested in creating and selling another one of those snapdeck mods? My wallet's just sittin' here trembling...

  89. #89
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    Devo,

    I love the tipi photos! Your 4 Man is bigger than my Golite Hex 3. I have a bug screen for my Golite. Does Kifaru make a bug screen, or what do do about mosquito's?

    Mojoe

  90. #90
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    the deck is way better

    it now easy to simply strap something to the deck, and not around the v-racks, etc.

    i have my old deck, which is the first mod, i tried, it only has 4 holes, but thats just about all that I've been using anyways...

    simply run a strap with an adjustable buckle, like the sleeping bag straps, i mentioned before, thru a pair of holes at a time, and cinch things down.

    like in this pic.

    this is how it was loaded for the trip back home from Pfeiffer Park.
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  91. #91
    Devo
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mojoe
    Devo,

    I love the tipi photos! Your 4 Man is bigger than my Golite Hex 3. I have a bug screen for my Golite. Does Kifaru make a bug screen, or what do do about mosquito's?

    Mojoe
    its got all that

    mosquito net doors front and rear.

    so you can do anything you want

    bugs, typically fly in, and if they hit the stove pipe, thats it... end of story

    and the negative slope of the inside walls of the tipi drive bugs to the top, which again drives them to the stove pipe... done.

    the skirt can be rolled up to let things vent around the bottom, or toss dirt, leaves, snow, whatever... around the hem, and let it seal up.

    the tipi is truly amazing. it gives you living space. strange...

    the stove is awesome, cuz now you have heat, and can actually cook.

    so this trip i used a kettle, the stainless steel canteen Kipchoge from XtraCycle sent me... i used that to make tea. toss in tea bags in canteen, fill with cold water, pop top open, and set on stove, let warm, as i'd boil water in my kettle to mix veggie burger mix, black beans, hummus, falafel mix, etc... let that set up in a pan, then shape into burgers/cakes, etc... and place directly ontop of stove top...
    set things to the side onto the tray warmer... cook on stove top...
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  92. #92
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    Awesome!!!

    Thanks for the pics!

    Mojoe

    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    its got all that

    mosquito net doors front and rear.

    so you can do anything you want

    bugs, typically fly in, and if they hit the stove pipe, thats it... end of story

  93. #93
    Devo
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    hobo mode vs touring

    my kit, the Hobo Mode kit is much more complete than a touring kit

    the touring method is light, and fast, buying things along the way, and maybe staying in hotels, etc...

    in the book, "BICYCLING the pacific coast", i think i read something about $50/day for about 40 days to tour from Canada to Mexico. i guess thats $2k.

    the Hobo Mode method is to be on the cheap, the idea is to be in it for the duration. you want to be at home where ever you are. you don't want to be obligated to a schedule, be it bound by time, nor logistics.

    so you bring everything

    ultimately food and water will be the grains of the hour glass. at some point you'd have to go to the store.

    morning came around, and Joel only had 1/2 a tuna sandwich and some crackers. with the tipi stove going, i made some breakfast, coffee, etc... and of course, open the doors wide enough to hang out around the heat.

    tipi mode is home. hot water, coffee, cereal, tea, oat meal, soap and water too.

    a water filter, and cloth line space in the top to heat or dry any damp/wet clothing.

    with the tipi, its easy to change clothes, and simply rinse your cycling clothing out, set them up top, and in the morning, they will be dry from the evenings stove use.

    plus its just cool, to sit around reading something, drinking tea, and constantly feeding it fuel.

    sometimes its little stuff, and sometimes I'm lucky enough to find some decent wood.

    lately I've been using MSR groundhog tent stakes as a wedge to split wood if needed.
    also discovered how useful one of Coghlan's Commando Saws is.

    so what do you do when you want to leave camp and go to the beach, creek, or anything? what do you do with all your stuff? pack it all back up and load it on the bike? take it with you?

    i use a PacSafe 120, which is big enough for a BOB trailer bag
    and in this case, i was able to secure both my backpack, and the REI Beast Duffel Bag, all secured with my laptop, etc., to a eucalyptus tree.
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  94. #94
    Devo
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    i should try to put the BD in the tipi
    as compared to covering it in plastic...
    9'x12' 2ml thick plastic tarp
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  95. #95
    Devo
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    Quote Originally Posted by mangoman
    Would you be interested in creating and selling another one of those snapdeck mods? My wallet's just sittin' here trembling...
    i have this deck sitting at storage.

    its the old original deck... the first mod job. its good to go.

    even has some really cool fade marks...
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  96. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    i should try to put the BD in the tipi
    as compared to covering it in plastic...
    9'x12' 2ml thick plastic tarp
    I've seen pics of Dave Gray from Surly with his Xtracycle in a Kifaru 4 Man.

  97. #97
    Devo
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mojoe
    I've seen pics of Dave Gray from Surly with his Xtracycle in a Kifaru 4 Man.
    ya... brother David Sunshine

    i swear... suddenly there was the Pug, and a glimpse of a Kifaru, and i had felt that super secret spies, like Spies Like Us, or Borris and Natasha had been following me about 4 years ago, when i drug a BOB with my Cdale for about 1.5yrs in Big Sur, but with the yellow 8 man Golden Cone...

    at the time, I had re-committed myself to working more, a residence, and the money happened to be there... for the Pug, and a new 4 man tipi, save cash, and a few of "Life's Moment's" here and there.

    gee... i sure do miss my R/C Gliders...
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  98. #98
    Devo
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    Quote Originally Posted by mangoman
    Would you be interested in creating and selling another one of those snapdeck mods? My wallet's just sittin' here trembling...
    I would very much be interested in making stuff like this.

    at the moment, things are kind of sketchy here at my girlfriend's place. only due to the renter whom lives downstairs, is a bit wacky... something is going on there, i doubt the landlord would be too privy to me doing some cutting and grinding with my Dremel. at least not at the moment. once things settle down, i probably can go forward with stuff like this.

    i have a million ideas.

    obviously I'm playing with the packing systems...
    the specific way to strap things down, etc.

    i think i've just about got it dialed.

    next I think I'm gonna ditch the front rack and panniers, and try something like a big handlebar bag.

    its a movement in direction of Adventure Touring

    i even start to think about not using the V-racks and SnapDeck all together

    maybe someway of using compression bags along that big long trellis frame, and using the stoker bar, as i did for the foam bed roll.

    often i think of a Nylon Web type of system to replace the SnapDeck and FreeLoaders.
    with adjustable buckles of course.

    somehow, i think there is something here to work with...
    in my gut i can feel it...
    and as i play with the setups, go between bikes, etc... its getting closer...

    its as if, i can see it, somehow... i know its there...
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  99. #99
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    my bag o pics and thoughts...

    so check out all these things i keep leaning towards...

    crazy panniers! on a scooter somewhere in Asia...
    looks like they could go on a cargo bike

    lots of pannier ideas... its endless...

    i keep thinking of ditching racks all together. i think the idea of using compression bags is much better.

    Jeff Boatman of Carousel Design Works is seriously onto something.

    the long trellis frame of the BD, to me begs to be experimented with.

    when i play with the Hunter, and compression bags, realizing how much i can stuff in one, is really amazing.

    it takes me to the notion of relying more on clothing, and less equipment. specifically compressible base layer stuff.

    i think there is a way to secure the tipi and stove to the frame of the BD with the racks removed. i think strap the stove to the trellis frame, down low, then the poles, and tipi in their bags.

    or perhaps something like 1/3 size (or less) racks, both V-racks and Wide Loaders, no SnapDeck, and secure things like food in compression sacks alongside the wheels, down low.

    run fenders, and limit your load to only the max height of the wheel.

    utilize straps to compress everything to the frame.

    kind of like scrunching down loafs of bread along the length.

    even then... when using the stoker bar, and possibly the H-bar to use as additional mounting for yet more compression bags...

    I think that would be more than adequate.

    and i wonder...

    I think Dirt Rag stated their test BD in 18", same size as mine was around 38lbs...
    so if the BD stripped down, but with light weight compression bags, compared to a touring bike... or the Hunter 29er outfitted in Adventure Touring garb...

    i wonder how it would compare... I'm very curious.
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  100. #100
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    smaller shelter

    i keep thinking of this...
    http://www.kifaru.net/paratarp.htm
    the thing is that i could simply only use the tarp and pole for it, and that would be ultra super lightweight.

    they also make a micro wood burning stove...

    this set up, i could put to the BD with out using any racks...

    the Dummy is so amazingly modular, with the allure of braze-ons everywhere, and the ability to be morphed into a variety of duties.

    while I've been dabbling into the "HEAVY" of cargo bikes...

    i suppose the mind of going further in a set 5-10hr effort day... that thought takes me further into The Ventana

    while its a solid effort with the Hobo Mode to travel 30 miles in Big Sur, I can envision 60 miles with a light kit, still self supported, and solo.

    that would put me at Kirk Creek in 1 day

    that would put me at the base of Nacimiento Ferguson Rd, with a night's rest, to make the climb, and onto the Coast Ridge Road, or into Hunter Liggett.

    pretty soon, I'll have this trip totally dialed in, and I'll be able to offer invites for a first hand guided loop.

    if this place downstairs clears out, possibly i could score it, and maybe offer it up for my cycling/touring buddies to shower, crash, cook food, internet, etc...

    i guess that would be Asana Cycles in many ways...



    i think i could get everything onto the BD without racks... the frame just begs for it.
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  101. #101
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    i think next week, I'll be making another jaunt, same route, but with intentions of hitting Kirk Creek in the first day.

    Big Dummy stripped down.

    i'm pretty sure i could put a solo tent along that giant long trellis seat stay

    maybe the conti t&c tyres will handle fire road
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  102. #102
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    What about using frame bags on the Dummy. That rear triangle seems to be wasted space - fill it with a custom bag. I'm working on getting set up to start building a few things like this for the car replacement crowd, but it will be a while before this gets done over here.

  103. #103
    Devo
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hairllama
    What about using frame bags on the Dummy. That rear triangle seems to be wasted space - fill it with a custom bag. I'm working on getting set up to start building a few things like this for the car replacement crowd, but it will be a while before this gets done over here.
    that is exactly the kind of stuff... 100% on target

    i sit here and stare at it all the time

    the hardest part is finding someone to sew things up

    i guess thats the part where i need to get a sewing machine and get busy
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  104. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by Firebolt1961
    Nice packing, man. I enjoy getting miles out of my Dummy, while I keep thinking about modifications for better storage capacity. I've got some bumpy shortcuts to town and it's nice to know when everything's lashed down nicely. Carried in the last week: 10' x 2' piece of used slatwall from the bike shop, for interior work shop siding (snugged right up with the longloader), '41 chevy truck radiator dropped off for repair, and the week's grocery run: lotsa cans, beverages, and a 25 lb bag of dog food. Woulda grabbed a 50 lb bag if they had it.

    I picture a second hinged fold-out level built into a snap deck, to throw another layer of stuff onto. It's been a challenge really to overload this thing on my regular errands, which is great for me. And more non-bike people have taken an interest in this than any other bike of mine. Nice diplomatic cross over between demographics; cargo capacity is a great conversation starter.

    -A
    Cargo bikes are amazing things...
    i rode it in a local parade. the year before, it was the pug in the parade...
    people do seem to be more curious and less intimidated about the long tail, as compared to other bikes... that is very true.

    just about every kid wants a ride on the back when they see the stoker bar.

    peace...d
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  105. #105
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    well, i tried to ghetto rig some compression bags to the side of the BD, sans V-racks, etc...

    it simply does not work.

    really the whole of the setup would entail custom bags, etc.

    so its back to BOB trailer bags loaded in the FreeLoaders, which is an awesome simple way to go.

    at least now, with the mod job i did to the SnapDeck, I have 2 nylon straps with adjustable buckles running from the frame to the SnapDeck, which compresses the cargo in the FreeLoaders against the frame of the BD.

    no swaying around.

    tmrrw am, should have me heading south again.

    peace...d
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  106. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    that is exactly the kind of stuff... 100% on target

    i sit here and stare at it all the time

    the hardest part is finding someone to sew things up

    i guess thats the part where i need to get a sewing machine and get busy
    Devo- I have a friend that can make you a bag if you can give her measurements. PM me and I can get you in contact with her. Hey you need one of these for your BD. Check out pics 22 and 30.

    http://alexandchristine.smugmug.com/...02089672_mWJCA

  107. #107
    Devo
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    Quote Originally Posted by RockyRider
    Devo- I have a friend that can make you a bag if you can give her measurements. PM me and I can get you in contact with her. Hey you need one of these for your BD. Check out pics 22 and 30.

    http://alexandchristine.smugmug.com/...02089672_mWJCA
    awesome, thank you for the info.

    I'll keep that in mind. it seems to me that it begs for frame bags, or something.

    so its back to FreeLoaders.

    they are so basic, and work easily.
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  108. #108
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    i'm out of here
    heading south again
    this time, i'm gonna try to get to Cone Peak, and then probably thru Hunter Liggett, onto Indians Rd, into Arroyo Seco, and then back to Del Rey Oaks via Carmel Valley Road, and Laureles Grade.

    peace...d
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  109. #109
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    Cone Peak

    Uhh...
    i think this is pretty much off the hook

    in brief, I rode to Cone Peak, in the Ventana Wilderness, hiked to the summit, and rode back, in about 84hrs, with camping 3 nights,

    1 night at Pfeiffer park Big Sur
    1 night on Cone Peak Road
    1 night at Kirk Creek

    and then home... about 11hr day in transit on the way home.

    FYI: Cone Peak is 5150ft, and its the steepest gradient from sea level in the continental US.

    solo effort, unsupported.

    massive amounts of gear and food... of course a tipi

    and in the am on Cone Peak Road, around 5am, a Puma was close enough and walking towards me, to use a couple of shots from the slingshot

    uhh... a hawk, swooped down VERY CLOSE to me, as i was climbing Nacimeinto Ferguson Rd, and the trippy part was that it did it from behind me, and on a huge SLOPE, with solid afternoon wind, and as it swooped, going VERY fast, it pulled up, and tucked its wings, stalling at the top, and looked right at me! i never had that experience!

    some quick pics...

    peace...d
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  110. #110
    Devo
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    and...

    and...

    CONDORS!!!
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  111. #111
    Devo
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    Cone Peak, on $8

    ok... well, i got some kind of wacky prolonged energy burn going on right now.

    once back, the tenant downstairs is having another funky episode, where she stomps around, and slams doors for awhile....

    its like camping in the jungle and having Orangoutangs near by, breaking sticks, and such...


    so whatever.... i could kind of care less, other than it intimates other people, and thats not cool. ill will, and cruelty... not cool
    __________________________________________________ ___________________
    Cone Peak for $8

    day one, Monterey to Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park.
    the fun part is of course the big dumb load, a big cargo bike, and lots of hills.
    right from the get go, its over Carmel Hill, and i swear the Hospital sits at about 700ft, so its this steep little pitch... steep by road bike standards, and it has its moment when it would be steep for an MTB.

    over carmel hill...
    and then drop back down to Rio Rd, and exit Carmel, onto Big Sur, passing Point Lobos, Carmel Highlands, etc...

    hill... hill... hill...

    and oh ya....

    hill

    some wind

    tonight coming home from Big Sur for a solid 2 or 3hrs, it was at least a 20mph head wind, as i was obviously going North...

    at Pfeiffer, i met Fred from London who is touring B.C. to San Diego
    he's 6'7" and rides a Koga touring bike... cool stuff... way cool guy...

    we also met up again at Kirk Creek, as I finished the Cone Peak jaunt.

    camping at Pfeiffer is $3

    DAY 2 was south, and i had thought of Kirk Creek, but this trip, altho i still have WAY TOO MUCH stuff, it is less...
    at Kirk Creek, i decide i have enough day light to give Nacimiento Ferguson Rd a shot.

    however, the 8 mile climb and 3000ft gain, I have no idea of water source(s).
    so at Kirk Creek, i filter water, CamelBak, 3L MSR Dromedary, and 4 large bottles on the dummy

    hours later, at the summit of Nacimiento Ferguson Rd, I still have enough daylight to get onto the dirt road of Cone Peak Rd.

    around 8:30pm, i finally pick a spot, pitch the tipi, stove, etc, and by 10pm, i've sourced water, firewood, heat, Udon Noodle, and egg for dinner with decaf Green Tea, washed up, and put my clothes up to dry in the clothes line up top.

    crash out, sleep like a rock, and something little sniffs around my face thru the tip/lifted skirt hem of the tipi... it runs off after i sniff back.

    4:42am, the birds are OFF THE HOOK!
    ruckus... in the night it was some frogs, and that was cool.
    they'd do their song, and as soon as the slightest change would occur, they'd stop...
    then start up...
    that was nice

    4:42am, i confuse the pre-dawn with what i thought was the moon... but its waning.

    at around 3800ft, the sky is.... amazing... The Ventana Wilderness... wow...
    i love Big Sur, and the Ventana

    around 5am, the birds make a some kind of a ruckus, and later, i look up, as I'm heating water for coffee and oatmeal...

    a puma is walking right down the road, towards me
    so i do as everything I've ever read...
    i hold up my trekking pole, shout... wave, etc...
    it stopped, looked around... and made another step or two...
    then i picked up a rock, and shot at it with my sling shot...
    maybe 50ft away?

    it ran as soon as it heard that rock in the air
    i grabbed a hand full of anything from the ground
    and fired off multiple stones in the vicinity, in what i thought was a suppressive fire pattern, thinking i could further run it off

    from there, not a sound...
    i still fired off a few large rocks in various areas every so often just to feel better.
    drug the Big Dummy out of the tipi, and i felt fine... no worries

    i love a sling shot! its your FRIEND! its really fun to shoot at large trees down far below, with large rocks, and pull way back! makes big NOISE! me feel strong.

    i rode up past where i had last seen the lion, and continued up past the trail head for San Vincente Flats, San Antonio Trail, and ultimately the Cone Peak Trail

    at the old fire lookout atop Cone Peak, its mega fies... its crazy... got to go.

    then it was a decent back to Kirk Creek.

    oh.. in the am, i broke a pulling spoke in the rear wheel, on the drive side...
    i tried to ghetto rig a truing gauge, with an MSR Groundhog tent stake, using a rubber band, lashed down to what would be a stay...

    but the wheel is pretty wacky...

    later in the day, as i had just crossed Nacimiento Ferguson Rd, and onto the dirt section going South, to what I think would be Wild Cattle, Plaskett Creek... etc...
    suddenly i break another spoke... again, same side, another pulling spoke.. only a couple holes away...

    so i figure, its a sign, and i need to think of heading back...

    my notions of dropping into Ft. Hunter Liggett, Indians, Indians Rd, check out the trail head for Junipero Serra Peak... all that is not tossed aside, with the thoughts of a failing rear wheel.

    at Kirk Creek ($5 camping), now Day 3 in the afternoon, i meet more touring cyclists, and i play bike fix it guy, flats, try to work on shifters, etc...
    tall guy Fred... all 6ft 7 inches is beyond enjoying his trip to the US, especially when the pound gets about $1.90

    come morning, everyone packs up, and I'm last to break camp, with my total deluxe set up... dummy and all...

    my notions were to hit Monterey, but i'd settle for Big Sur...
    at Big Sur, I'm realizing that I've got some kind of crazy legs under me these days, and i decide to push for Monterey...

    something like an 11 hour effort, and I'm back.

    all in all, an awesome trip

    the views, simply amazing, i even saw condors flying slope in +20mph winds...
    wow... makes me think of R/C gliders... and amazed at how they fly... my god!

    i still can way reduce my load.
    its mega amounts... at this point i am still playing with max load, thinking here.

    the methodology is to start big and work my way down, and increase distance.

    big loads, long days, short miles...

    Kirk Creek to Monterey 60 miles, me thinks....
    hills, and big wind, with crago... solid effort.

    i'm very happy with my disposition, the way i process things, and how I'm actually moving thru the world...

    the loads will get lighter, i will get more distance, in less time.

    this trip was $8 in camping fees

    plus now i guess i need to think about that rear wheel.

    i dream of a Rohloff and a super strong DH rim.
    maybe 40 hole

    meanwhile the antithesis awaits in full function
    the Hunter 29er, as I'm anxious to get some bags from Jeff at Carousel Design Works.

    a SUPER BIG THANK YOU to Surly for producing yet another amazing design. it totally kicks butt!

    i started having crazy techie notions of a FS Dummy, with lock outs, and that fancy rear hub. dreaming of being able to possibly use a double ring up front, 1 for a super low range, and unlock the rear swing arm, and design it, so that effort makes the bike dig in for traction... use the biggest DH tyre you can find.

    this platform begs for time spent in the backcountry.

    i was bummed out to cut it short

    but this coming week, i should be on a trip to LA, yet again, this time for my nephew's 3rd birthday. so its an AmTrak/Bike trip this week to come.

    so The Dummy is everything i ever wanted in a bike.

    thank you Kipchoge from XtraCycle for the inovation, and genius to create a longtail cargo bike, and thanks for the stainless steel water bottle.
    its awesome, works perfect for making tea.

    soon i think a trip to McKinleyville will come, then it will be to tour and spend time around Arcata and into the woods.

    simply touring the State Parks, in the Bike camping areas, has got to be a totally awesome experience.

    peace....d
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  112. #112
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    more pics

    day break

    MSR tent stake used as a truing gauge

    San Vincente Trail head

    view of Cone Peak from Cone Peak Rd

    and

    Big Dummy at San Antonio trail head on Cone Peak Rd.
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  113. #113
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    and again...

    more yet
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  114. #114
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    last shots...

    last shots... until next trip



    peace...d
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  115. #115
    Lighten up.
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    Rockin' write-up, Devo! Thanks for making the time.

    Are you tracking total miles?

  116. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by mangoman
    Rockin' write-up, Devo! Thanks for making the time.

    Are you tracking total miles?
    no, i haven't used a cyclometer for some years now

    i bet it was close to 150 miles round trip, and a ton of elevation

    i just go by feel

    i know that 100 miles in 6hrs on a road bike is easy doodlin for some years now

    and within the last month or so, i took the Hunter 29er with 2.1" WTB Vulpines on an 80 mile ride with Velo Club Monterey, at group roadie pace

    i'm happy with this last effort

    i like the exhausted feeling, and i love to eat and sleep

    i think its an Army throwback thing for me, its what i was conditioned with at 18.

    from Carmel to Kirk Creek is 60 miles, up Nacimiento i think is another 8
    along Cone Peak Rd is 6 (in one direction).

    so 120 + 16 + 12 = 148 miles

    nominal measure

    i think if i had the Hunter all dialed in for Adventure Touring with a set of WTB Vulpine 2.1's, i think i could consistently pull off 60 mile days on the pave, day after day.
    and be comfortable, not exhausted, etc...

    in the scope of something like the Great Divide Race... well... i don't know if i could pull of 100-150 mile days, over and over, until the Mexican Boarder... thats a whole different story.

    the thing with these last couple of trips, is that i only filter water.
    everything else i have with me.

    in the touring way, people spend $ along the way, buy food, use stores, etc.

    this is old school army style... what you set out with is what you got.

    and that i like

    i think its the factor of time and resource management that i like.

    but hitting the stores, dashing inside for a Coca Cola and a Snickers bar... that sounds fun too. at least then you dont have to carry the mondo huge load.

    hopefully sometime soon, i should get a new solo shelter from Kifaru
    that will be heaps different

    the mode that i went out with, the tipi and all...
    really thats an amazing set up, bcz, it gives you a place to live.... living space

    i never used the SnowPeak butane micro stove that i seem to always carry.
    used only the tipi stove, and sourced from my environment...
    wood, and water

    i'm pretty sure, i had enough food with me, to go a solid week, in comfort.

    heck... i only ate 3 of the 6 eggs i brought.

    peace...d

    time for some real coffee
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  117. #117
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    i think this pic is probably about the best of the lot...

    its day break as seen from my camping spot, along Cone Peak Rd.

    Junipero Serra Peak (5800ft) seen on the left
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  118. #118
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    condor

    this one flips my lid...

    i think i'm gonna be a Condor Junkie...
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  119. #119
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    sound like a great adventure! from the pictures, it looks like you rode to the top of ventana cone? how was that ride? i guess sometimes it can be pretty overgrown and difficult to pass on foot, so i was wondering how riding that beast of bike would be. it makes me think... im not to far from there myself...

  120. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by peanutbutter
    sound like a great adventure! from the pictures, it looks like you rode to the top of ventana cone? how was that ride? i guess sometimes it can be pretty overgrown and difficult to pass on foot, so i was wondering how riding that beast of bike would be. it makes me think... im not to far from there myself...
    I kept to the fireroad for the most part, only riding the dummy up the trail a bit, just to get it off of the road, then cabled it, and hiked up to the top of Cone Peak.

    i still had way too much stuff, but my intentions were to try to get into Fort Hunter Liggett and Indians Rd, Arroyo Seco, and home...

    probably about 3 more days, but i broke a couple of spokes, and the rear wheel has a wobble, so the trip was cut short.

    i think im gonna reduce more yet yet, and try to get more distance in.

    i think there is something to using the Dummy.

    i like the riding position. its nice to stand up, and be able to simply use a "step rhythm" like hiking, and utilize a big gear, then sit, and shift to a low gear to spin, and so forth.

    alternate with this method, and go for a long time.

    which takes me to the notions of a Rohloff hub

    typically, I'd be using the granny gear, spin in the top 3 cogs
    but from granny to middle ring, and stay in the 1st cog... stand... then shift 2 more cogs down in the rear...
    and go into "step rhythm" for awhile
    switch back to seated...
    drop back to granny gear
    and climb the cogset back to the biggest cog...

    lots of chain movement... lots of shifting... timing in step, momentum, etc...

    i can only imagine how nice smooth and linear a Rohloff hub must be... wow.

    peace..d
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  121. #121
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    yesterday, i was happy to get 2 new spokes into the tweaked rear wheel, and much to my surprise, i actually got the wheel nice and true.... wow... its so straight and round!

    i had run into a little problem when i was out on my ramblings, with the rear disc brakes.

    that being the 203mm rotor & adaptor puts the caliper too close to the frame of the BD to get an allen wrench on a multi-tool, into position.

    the other issue was that I could not get the caliper to move "outboard" enough in its adjustment. basically the caliper was very close to the rotor, and the inboard pad was adjusted way out towards the outboard direction.

    yesterday, i replaced the 2 spokes, trued the wheel, replaced the rear rotor with a 185mm, swapped the adaptor to the 185 mount, and took a small round file to the Avid Mech BB7 caliper, and opened up the adjustment slot.

    now the caliper is nice and centered over the rotor.

    awesome!

    back to Conti T&C tyres...

    a few little errands yesterday

    today, is yet another day of shlepping things off to storage, as they are better off there as compared to being out on the deck.

    more packing, more hauling, etc...

    tmrrw, should bring me to another LA Trip
    Salinas to Union Station, yet again... this time for my nephew's Bday
    and being that my Dad actually called me the other day... i will be stopping in Ventura for a quick visit.

    so there you have it...
    the uber usage of a bike...
    the Big Dummy
    from daily errands, groceries, et al
    to camping, and some solo time in The Ventana Wilderness... to the Concrete Jungle(s) of SoCal.

    I look forward to seeing the kids, my siblings, and yet of course concerned for my brother Dylan's disposition these days. I suppose an in person visit is the only way to actually know what's up.

    this trip will be unique in that its the first AmTrak trip using the Devo Mod Job, ringleted SnapDeck.

    so far that mod to the SnapDeck has pretty much done away with the necessity of WideLoaders. yesterday i hauled a few tool, truing stand, etc. but in reality, there is no way in the world WideLoaders could be completely done away with... large items like a book case, end stands, etc... those items will not secure by simply using FreeLoaders.

    Today's runs will more than likely see me with WideLoaders.

    The Big Dummy totally rocks!

    peace...d
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  122. #122
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    storage run

    truing stand, tools, tires, funky green storage bins, full of tires, water bottles, dremel tool, etc... misc bike parts...

    the ringlets in the deck make it very easy to strap things down.

    one side i ran 2 straps parallel of each
    the other side, i ran an X

    still lots of room for more.

    its all about how easy it is to get a loop thru a ringlet, and to the frame or WideLoader.

    packing like this lets you next, use the SnapDeck and the stoker bar to lash things down to.

    at that point its pretty much crazy how much it actually is...

    d-
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  123. #123
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    this just gets easier all the time

    this process is getting easier every time.

    that is.. the method of using AmTrak, the car free lifestyle, bike camping, etc...

    its so easy...

    but you have to have the time to do so.

    right now, I'm in Ventura for the night, then its back to Salinas and finally Monterey.

    the trip has been easy.

    I was amazed to make the trip from Monterey to Salinas in just about an hour flat...
    that was a trip
    suddenly i found myself in time trial mode on the dummy.
    the wind was to my back for a good portion, running 44x 11, 12 & 13t for quite some time.

    in LA i made it to my sisters again... in about an hour flat.
    an hour from Union Station to Melrose/Fairfax area... i sometimes start to wonder if "something" is happening to me...

    i mean... this is not normal... right?
    the car free life... ok, i can see that...
    the couple of years on the Pug... ok... i can see that too
    camping with the Dummy... that too

    but things like Cone Peak?
    uhh... Kirk Creek to Monterey with a silly huge load... uhhh???

    now running around with this abbreviated load... heck... the car traffic on Wilshire had nothing on me... thats for sure.

    anyways...
    the trip is going just fine.

    its good to see family

    not a single hiccup of a problem with the dummy.

    its all easy going.

    heres some pics
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  124. #124
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    hauling duties

    as to hauling...

    for Elias's birthday, i hauled his fire truck, a bunch of party supplies, and of course, toys

    once the bday party was well underway, my brothers and i took a walk around the neighborhoods, and we came across a guy throwing away a tool box that he had side mounted in his toyota pick up... complete with key and all...

    it was a free locking tool box... too good to pass up.

    so i carried that back to the party, loaded it up on the dummy, then more things yet yet on the dummy...

    and even my brother Dylan, rode on the back, to finish it all off.

    Dallas says to drop off the tool box at the shop (Power Plant Choppers)

    so we hang out as Yaniv and crew work on bike that is due to be finished this thursday.

    Dallas has a cool old Schwinn that he's done some mods to

    gives me ideas...
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  125. #125
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    my brothers are a source of inspiration...
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  126. #126
    Lighten up.
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    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    as to hauling...

    for Elias's birthday, i hauled his fire truck, a bunch of party supplies, and of course, toys

    once the bday party was well underway, my brothers and i took a walk around the neighborhoods, and we came across a guy throwing away a tool box that he had side mounted in his toyota pick up... complete with key and all...

    it was a free locking tool box... too good to pass up.

    so i carried that back to the party, loaded it up on the dummy, then more things yet yet on the dummy...

    and even my brother Dylan, rode on the back, to finish it all off.

    Dallas says to drop off the tool box at the shop (Power Plant Choppers)

    so we hang out as Yaniv and crew work on bike that is due to be finished this thursday.

    Dallas has a cool old Schwinn that he's done some mods to

    gives me ideas...
    Alright. NOW you're just showin' off.

  127. #127
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    i a half year my wife and i need a second car.
    seeing you and your dummy makes me think about getting a dummy instead of the car...
    ... big thx for the inspiration!

  128. #128
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    Just ordered my xtracycle today, thanks Devo

  129. #129
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    Tuesday 845pm, been home now since 7pm.

    Salinas to Union Station, LA $49
    Union Station to Ventura $20
    Ventura to Salinas $49
    $109 AmTrak trip

    with the Dummy of course...

    ok...

    so dig this....

    this is the ultra cool part

    This Friday I was in LA
    the Friday prior...
    Cone Peak Road in the Ventana Wilderness
    this past Saturday... playin with my nephews, visiting family
    the Saturday prior... summit Cone Peak
    this past Sunday... Birthday for Elias... carry pick up truck side mount locking tool box, Elias's play fire truck, birthday gifts, and my brother Dylan, to Power Plant choppers where Dallas works... hang out, check out the new chopper Yaniv and his crew are putting together for this thursday's deadline of Chopper Challenge (?), Geico Caveman gig... etc...
    the sunday prior... 11am til 9pm (i think) solid effort with the Dummy from Kirk Creek back to Monterey... straight into the wind! Big Sur coastline...

    so the Dummy is an ultra super cool bike...
    it does a ton!

    my wheel fix held solid and true...
    the only deficiency that has come up, is the pin in the kickstand is working loose, so i need to tap that back into position before i break, yet... another kickstand.

    peace...d

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  130. #130
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    the train ride Ventura to Santa Barbara had all the bike racks full!

    i was amazed... i was glad

    the conductor let me just leave the bike in the isle way...

    i turned in the outboard adjuster knob for the front wheel, effectively "locking" the wheel from rolling...

    the conductor thought that was really cool...
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  131. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by henryhb
    i a half year my wife and i need a second car.
    seeing you and your dummy makes me think about getting a dummy instead of the car...
    ... big thx for the inspiration!
    get an XtraCycle or something, and give it a go...

    probably 90% of the issue(s) are to get all things you need to get done... get that stuff all within a 10 mile radius... i.e. work, groceries, etc..

    you can get a car any time

    the motivation to use a bike is not as common

    seize the moment

    peace...d
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  132. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScaryJerry
    Just ordered my xtracycle today, thanks Devo
    you are gonna like it...

    you will not like being able to simply wheelie the front wheel over simple things like a curb.

    over all... you will like it.

    peace...d
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  133. #133
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    this sucks...

    http://www.ksbw.com/news/16558667/detail.html

    today around 4pm, as I was on the AmTrak bus in King City, i noticed the smoke...

    damn... this really sucks!

    this is exactly the area i wanted to ride next... damn!
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  134. #134
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    this really sucks...

    this pic shows Indian's Rd... to the left would be Arroyo Seco, to the right Ft. Hunter Liggett

    i found this cool website tho...
    http://www.inciweb.org/incident/1298/
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  135. #135
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    That toolbox rules

    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    my brothers are a source of inspiration...
    I especially like the sticker of the hand throwing the devil horns with the American Flag pattern. There is some commentary there, but not sure what.

    I extra credit especially like the fact that you rescued that perfectly usable piece of gear from the landfill and gave it new life.

    I've been giving a bunch of stuff away on craigslist/free lately. Man, that is a great feeling. I just gave away a 24 port ethernet switch (10 base T only, so it was too slow for my home LAN) I got when I worked for a dotcom, they were throwing it out... and a guy gave me a sixer of Negra Modello as a thanks. I also gave away my old Apple Color Laserwriter that needed some cleaning work done to it.... to a non profit who was going to use it for spare parts. That color laserwriter I got in trade to a bud for an old beater PeeCee I rescured from a dumpster. All it needed was a hard drive and software re-installation. 6 years later he is still uses it as a test web server.

    I once worked for a (really sh!tty) ISP, and they were throwing out a perfectly good strawberry gumdrop iMac. I grabbed it, re-installed all the software, put an extra stick of RAM I had laying around in there, and sold it at a garage sale for $200. The new owner was stoked to have it, and was going to give it to her 8 year old. This was like 6 years ago when that computer was still pretty useful.

    Gotta love the free culture!

    Dude, you are soooo lighting a fire under me to try the multi-day adventure thing. I got my old hardtail rigged up with racks and a rigid fork. I just need some front panniers (keeping an eye on CL for those, too) and a weekend to kill (which is hard with a 16 month old baby and a wife who doesn't dig outdoor stuff that much).
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  136. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    I especially like the sticker of the hand throwing the devil horns with the American Flag pattern. There is some commentary there, but not sure what.

    I extra credit especially like the fact that you rescued that perfectly usable piece of gear from the landfill and gave it new life.

    I've been giving a bunch of stuff away on craigslist/free lately. Man, that is a great feeling. I just gave away a 24 port ethernet switch (10 base T only, so it was too slow for my home LAN) I got when I worked for a dotcom, they were throwing it out... and a guy gave me a sixer of Negra Modello as a thanks. I also gave away my old Apple Color Laserwriter that needed some cleaning work done to it.... to a non profit who was going to use it for spare parts. That color laserwriter I got in trade to a bud for an old beater PeeCee I rescured from a dumpster. All it needed was a hard drive and software re-installation. 6 years later he is still uses it as a test web server.

    I once worked for a (really sh!tty) ISP, and they were throwing out a perfectly good strawberry gumdrop iMac. I grabbed it, re-installed all the software, put an extra stick of RAM I had laying around in there, and sold it at a garage sale for $200. The new owner was stoked to have it, and was going to give it to her 8 year old. This was like 6 years ago when that computer was still pretty useful.

    Gotta love the free culture!

    Dude, you are soooo lighting a fire under me to try the multi-day adventure thing. I got my old hardtail rigged up with racks and a rigid fork. I just need some front panniers (keeping an eye on CL for those, too) and a weekend to kill (which is hard with a 16 month old baby and a wife who doesn't dig outdoor stuff that much).
    my brother Dylan has this book in his head, that he'd like to put to words...
    the title, "Playing Peasant"
    the premise, save up some cash, enough to be sustainable, simple life, and have time on your hands... dumpster dive, curb side removal, plant a garden, ride a bike... wear thrift store clothes.

    we are so freaking amazingly affluent... and yet we dont even realize it.
    me... simply at $25/hr at my old job, all the junk I've wasted my life on... Honda Element... house full of things... vacations, etc... only if i would have simply adopted my current lifestyle... if i would have simply done that 20yrs ago... right from the get go...

    oh but the naivety of youth...

    the haunts of my thoughts, when a few years ago, the idea of going to London, and dropping a few bucks into an account. US cash converted to pounds...

    gee... today, i guess, i'd be running around basically paying 1/2 of what the price tag says, as the pound, last i knew... was worth about $1.90

    so ya... there is definitely something solid to be said about "sourcing" from our immediate environment...

    if i were a junk hound... if i had the gumption to dig, and sell... I suppose, I'd entertain myself with the growing stock in Pawn Shops

    while in LA, Dallas, my brother in law, Juan, and I went to The Grove to see IronMan. 11pm showing...

    of course the kids totally want to go see it, and its expensive...

    i suggested that we should hit the Pawn Shops and hunt for a new Big Screen with surround sound, etc. do movie nights at home, invite their friends, etc.

    as to front panniers... perhaps you could simply lash a single stuff sack to the top of the rack
    or hunt Performance Bike... i think their Transit line of bags is pretty darn cheap

    once upon a time, when i had a job, i had ideas of going to Vietnam, Thailand, or Mexico to have panniers made... limited runs of product, in limited patterns.

    as to multi day touring, and time constraints... perhaps shorter jaunts could occur, save til kid(s) are older
    i once knew a 6 year old whom hiked with us from Big Sur Station along Pine Ridge Trail to Barlow Flats. thats a 6 mile hike! at 6 years old. fueled by PB&J, and Gummy Worms

    the days will arrive soon enough... maybe try 24hr get aways...
    you'd be surprised to discover how good it feels to simply ride your bike 6hrs in 1 direction, camp, then turn around.

    in the Bay Area, i imagine that BART would take you pretty far in a couple of hours, from there, give yourself 4 to 6hrs of ride time, camp, and return.

    i imagine a person could hit Marin Headlands, and i suppose there is bike camping at a State Park near by.
    $3

    peace...d
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    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  137. #137
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    That's where I was thinking

    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    i imagine a person could hit Marin Headlands, and i suppose there is bike camping at a State Park near by.
    $3

    peace...d
    I could BART to SF, ride across the bridge and out to West Marin. Gotta find a route, tho... preferably one that doesn't take me up hills that are too steep, or Highway1.

    There has to be a decent route. There is a paved bike path and bike lanes that make their way through Sausalito and most of the way up to Mill Valley, then pick up Railroad Grade or Tennessee Valley, then head North and West on the fireroad system. There would be some shared lanes there with cars, but I could probably minimize that. My house in Oakland to the Lakeshore BART is kinda scary, tho.

    I think I would also need some poor sucker who can pedal lots of gear up a hill and not whine too much about it to go with me. The one guy I had in mind recently told me he doesn't like camping because he is no good at it. Rats.

    Make myself a penny stove, bottle of Everclear to fuel it, tent, food, other gear... keep it simple and light.... I can do this. Heck, now that I think about it, I might try to make a penny stove tonight.



    Yeah, I was looking at those Transit front pannier bags that are on perpetual sale for $60. I'll probably end up with those, but I was hoping to find something better, used and cheaper.

    Oooooh! I did solve my bag-suck-into-rear-wheel issue. I found an Axiom rack that has little support loops on the sides that extend back to support the bags. The added bonus is that it is a much longer rack and gives me tons of heel clearance. I'm going to see if I can talk my mom into sewing on some loops to my rear panniers so I can also attach my trunk bag. She is awesome with a sewing machine, she's retired, and loves projects.



    Funny you should mention the home theater thing. I used to work for GoodGuys back in the day (like 18 years ago), and set myself up with a nice home theater sound system. I was thinking of upgrading the receiver to one that does DTS and the newer Dolby Digital surround, HDMI video and such, so I browsed craigslst for stuff. Man, that stuff looses value instantly! I was looking at what was new a $5-600-ish dollar Denon receiver, and they seem to go for like $150-200 on CL. I can probably swing that.

    Anyway... not a lot of Surly content here... sorry!
    Last edited by pimpbot; 06-11-2008 at 06:10 PM.

  138. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    I could BART to SF, ride across the bridge and out to West Marin. Gotta find a route, tho... preferably one that doesn't take me up hills that are too steep, or Highway1.

    There has to be a decent route. There is a paved bike path and bike lanes that make their way through Sausalito and most of the way up to Mill Valley, then pick up Railroad Grade or Tennessee Valley, then head North and West on the fireroad system. There would be some shared lanes there with cars, but I could probably minimize that. My house in Oakland to the Lakeshore BART is kinda scary, tho.

    I think I would also need some poor sucker who can pedal lots of gear up a hill and not whine too much about it to go with me. The one guy I had in mind recently told me he doesn't like camping because he is no good at it. Rats.

    Make myself a penny stove, bottle of Everclear to fuel it, tent, food, other gear... keep it simple and light.... I can do this. Heck, now that I think about it, I might try to make a penny stove tonight.



    Yeah, I was looking at those Transit front pannier bags that are on perpetual sale for $60. I'll probably end up with those, but I was hoping to find something better, used and cheaper.

    Oooooh! I did solve my bag-suck-into-rear-wheel issue. I found an Axiom rack that has little support loops on the sides that extend back to support the bags. The added bonus is that it is a much longer rack and gives me tons of heel clearance. I'm going to see if I can talk my mom into sewing on some loops to my rear panniers so I can also attach my trunk bag. She is awesome with a sewing machine, she's retired, and loves projects.



    Funny you should mention the home theater thing. I used to work for GoodGuys back in the day (like 18 years ago), and set myself up with a nice home theater sound system. I was thinking of upgrading the receiver to one that does DTS and the newer Dolby Digital surround, HDMI video and such, so I browsed craigslst for stuff. Man, that stuff looses value instantly! I was looking at what was new a $5-600-ish dollar Denon receiver, and they seem to go for like $150-200 on CL. I can probably swing that.

    Anyway... not a lot of Surly content here... sorry!
    you're on the right track...
    all of it will come...its a works in progress for sure...
    just like bikes... next thing you know... SS, MTB, CX bike, etc...

    its easy to end up with a couple of stoves, sleeping bags, tarps, etc...

    obviously the lighter your load, the faster you go...
    but its a balance of sorts...
    big load, more than likely allows you have more comfort, more luxury...
    like eggs... cheese, or in my case, often the 4 man tipi...

    the beauty of it all... is that in many aspects, touring is a self discovery

    i had started thinking about it awhile back...

    so here i am 39 years old

    i think that we, at this age, we were the kids on MTB's when they were becoming mass produced...
    racing ensued, etc...

    now i'm at the age, where I've discovered touring

    touring is nothing new

    MTB touring is nothing new either

    heck... check out Old Man Mountain in S.B.

    i think the biggest hurdle for Adventure Touring is the time constraint(s), and life commitment(s)

    the economy is obviously a huge driver in our culture

    by and large, i think that cyclists are more "free spirited" than our "civilized" brethren
    often we question authority, think outside the box, we are excited to find something new... or to push the boundaries of our existential dilemmas.

    as your world is paved over, and over...
    satellites surveyed the entire planet...
    life on the open plains, the Frontier has physically been completely measured
    but in us...
    we have a Whole World out there to explore

    and that impetus to put our collective wooden boats out to sea...
    well... in my book, in my heart...
    i could never be any more genuine...

    i once told a person, that my most genuine, natural persona comes to the forefront when on the bike.

    i think that is true with many cyclists... to know me is to know me on the bike.

    a Penny stove... planning a route thru Oakland, SF, etc...
    the Bicycle Lifestyle is all of that!

    Asana Cycles... is about exactly just that... our lives, our experiences, and everything in between.

    while i sat at my job in a hospital for 14yrs, a career path became all too similar to an acrylic tube from one hamster nest to the next, with a feed station, and exercise wheel along the way.

    i suppose bike life can be that way too... but my argument is that at least its outside breathing fresh air, bob cats, deer, and fresh water

    i'm quite certain that this world is more than simply Humanity.

    of my travels of late

    i'd say the jewel of discovery are all the people in passing i meet
    the gay guy who would not let up, on hitting on me
    the lady who's boyfriend is a retired US Marshal
    the 6'7" guy from London
    the hobos
    the angered youth... skate punks... along the rails in SoCal
    the little kids that are amazed with a long bike on the train.

    the world
    get out there and check it out
    be careful, be safe, and return home... just go look around... ride around the block

    once upon a time, i remember being a kid, and i rode to the beach in Ventura.
    new people, new kids, new places... get home before the street lights turn on.

    its just an out and back...
    your soul will appreciate it

    even in the worst of times... those moments when things dont go our way... when our best laid plans lay to waste, broken spoke, or as a guy at Kirk Creek had... A Fib (his heart rhythm out of whack), how we cope, how we make our way thru our life... it all plays out.

    in the scope of view, I've come to witness... i think we all could use some time On The Road.

    peace...d

    check out Elias... 3 years old... i think he's walking on Sunshine...
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  139. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    you can get a car any time
    the motivation to use a bike is not as common
    seize the moment
    Nice, Devo

    "Carpe Dummy"

    Steve

  140. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo

    i think that we, at this age, we were the kids on MTB's when they were becoming mass produced...
    racing ensued, etc...

    now i'm at the age, where I've discovered touring

    touring is nothing new

    MTB touring is nothing new either

    heck... check out Old Man Mountain in S.B.

    i think the biggest hurdle for Adventure Touring is the time constraint(s), and life commitment(s)
    Awesome thoughts and well put. I have thought about this a lot.

    There's a great article by Willie Weir in this month's Adventure Cycling mag that echos these sentiments. I try not to dwell

  141. #141
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    Just picked up my Xtracycle yesterday and couldn't be happier. Already thinking about building a second one, probably a dedicated Big Dummy as soon as QBP gets them back in stock in Size Giant.

  142. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScaryJerry
    Just picked up my Xtracycle yesterday and couldn't be happier. Already thinking about building a second one, probably a dedicated Big Dummy as soon as QBP gets them back in stock in Size Giant.
    don't stray to far

    let me tell you...

    while you will enjoy the FreeRadical... there is a very good chance that you will enjoy the BD that much more.

    the Cargo Bike deal is very cool. beyond useful. it puts cars to shame. you dont have to be a joe racer, total athlete type... simply use the bike for as much as you can.

    soon you'd find, that weekly group rides with your buddies, become not so much about the workout, but more of getting together just to ride.

    suddenly just by default of riding every day, everywhere, you no longer "train". but rather, like today, I'll run some light errands, and let my legs spin easy...

    I only used a FreeRadical on my Cdale... and that was not good. I think the Instigator would be the best choice of a HT w/rigid fork.

    so keep that in mind. the BD is gonna be the best choice out there for mass produced Cargo Bikes.

    its a setup that is heavy duty enough to eat kickstands, tyres, wheels, legs, knees, and weeks of groceries. yet its a bike that accepts quality components, that are standard in our American Culture.

    the FreeRadical will amaze you, and the BD will not disappoint.

    peace....d
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  143. #143
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    all in a cup of coffee...

    that is... what comes up over a cup of coffee, and keyboard...

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Winter 1968, i was born in a big ol California Valley town...
    my dad, a long haired blonde hippie, recently married my mom, 1st generation Filipino...

    dad with all the junk in his head from Vietnam, and simply surviving the harsh family dynamics of a post WWII/post depression, father and husband, of the man i know and love as a hard/bigoted/money comes first... thats my grandfather...

    well... dad had this habit of running for the mountains, Kings Canyon, etc...

    of course right?

    as i got up to kindergarten and 1st grade, dad had a regular habit of waking me in the middle of the night, "hey buddy, do you want to go fishing?"

    of course right?

    all of maybe 5 years old, there we'd be, as dad would carry me atop his ruck sack, making our way along the King's River, up and up-top the tree line, Octobers, and Septembers, I remember at times gentle snow fall.
    mostly my gut feeling, the emotional programming, of being outside, alone with my dad, living off of trout, eggs, and maybe beans for as long as that would last... there we were, in God's Country...

    as i learned when i got older, mom and dad would often get in fights, dad would simply "hop the backyard fence", me in tow... i never knew our time was weeks on end, and in those days, the early 70's i guess, backcountry time was isolated, and the only clue we where ever there, was the car in the parking lot.


    the years in Fresno, dad always had a bike... his Vietnam experiences, later i learned had in a way brought him to value the bicycle
    i was always on the back, in a kid's seat... we'd ride all over the place, from hippy buddy's place to the next...
    big ol victorian houses, communal living... clouds of smoke in those tall ceilings, Janis blearing, my favorite toy a paper airplane... as I'd toss it thru the smoke rings, their Zig Zag Zeppelins, mixing in the sky of long hairs, and afros...

    later in life, the 80's, mom and dad split up, there i am living in a 1958 Ford Stepside van (an old Langendorf bread truck. much like a UPS truck) along Rincon parkway, the State Parks, McGrath in Ventura, Camp Comfort, Foster Park, all up above Ojai, etc...
    youth, playing out just like grandpa's, Grapes of Wrath style, but with Devo on KLOS 94.7... 80's here we come...
    it was wonder i stayed in school
    riding from places like Ojai, Carpenteria, etc... just to get to high school in Ventura. it seemed that was all i did... was ride my bike...
    and there were days when pop and i never got along... so i'd just crash in the bushes after the library would close, me in my Army Field Jacket, and boots.
    SoCal weather often let me repeat this for as long as i'd care...
    i figured as long as i could hold that 3.84gpa, and work, i'd bust loose of that orbit
    plus the School District fed me breakfast and lunch 5 days/week... I had all ready found my way to the chow line.

    the Army gave me that ability to accept authority, and to take orders. i was amazed what the human body and mind could do.

    all the while a bike had always been under foot, in various ways...

    i remember 1989, i was not as proficient in land navigation as I wanted, as it was worth promotion points, etc... so i bought a Cdale MTB, put a rack on the back, and set out into the hills of Ft. Ord to get lost, and find the smallest of grid points.

    things seem to melt, and flow into each other...
    Ft. Ord is now BLM property, and of course, The Sea Otter Classic uses it for racing, etc...

    the bike has come around in a circle of sorts... racing... been there done that... searching for the camaraderie, esprit de corps, that i needed to replace, post Military.
    but that degree of cohesion, i never found, but rather, my own proficiency upon the bike, and the peace of mind and heart, that is of the Outdoors.

    i suppose its a genogram, a character trait that somehow, i had consciously put myself into environs to reinforce.

    that is to say... i suppose as a young man, i missed the emotional satisfaction i learned as a child up along the tree line, the Bristle Cones, the King's River, bears, and wild trout.

    i suppose, i put myself into the facets of life, a solid job for 14yrs, married, and i guess ultimately, i was never totally comfortable....

    after years of fighting off the lifestyle i had engaged in, all the junk i've had, the cars, couches, tv's, etc...

    even the social quandary of my peers... after all... how common would my particular background be?

    at any rate...

    its always been about The Bicycle Lifestyle

    while i've managed to amass a few funds, and at 39, i have a solid healthy motor to pedal away...
    but as I've come to know... the "being away" is not never ending...
    ultimately we are totally intertwined. thank you to every person who has toiled their days making bike parts, camping supplies, keeping the roads up, and the Rangers who safeguard our parks... that gratitude is beyond any sole effort a person could make in a lifetime!

    my life is just like that...
    to say... i'd never be able to completely "hop the backyard fence"
    i still have bank accounts, a cell phone, and of course all of this dot com
    taxes, mail, etc... and dont forget residence and a Passport
    a person has to stay "on the books"
    the 19 year old soldier fresh at Ft. Ord, in an Air Assault Light Artillery Unit... that kid simply takes orders
    in my gut i always feel that my Uncle will take care of me, if it comes to that...
    good ol Uncle Sam... gave me that shot to break the pattern of Grapes of Wrath, i didn't want to be that kid sleeping in the bushes, on the outskirts of town, and to ultimately end up like what? probably like most of my then friends... in Juvie, Jail, broke, and with what of a job? blue collar? i suppose... i loved to wrench on cars, and i wanted to be something like a Helicopter Mechanic, cars and motorbikes all the time... but those guys drank way too much beer, slept in their campers at work, raced the weekends, until... i guess they may be still at it? while Tramping in America is an allure deep seeded in my heart, this day and age, i think it the wiser to heed cognitive process, and remember, i have to pay the bills.

    my dad and grandpa are house painters.
    i could be a house painter too

    they were also both "free" and out there on the road... that Genogram, i think is worth reinforcing.
    the spirt of Frontiersman... my soul is starved without it
    my emotional health depends on Nature...
    i HAVE TO HAVE IT!
    i can not live in LA... no way! not even Ventura...

    Xmas morning 2am, i left Ventura... by day break i was stretching my legs out at the rest stop HWY 101 at Camp Roberts...
    20yrs of my history flashing across my mind and heart... (we trained a lot at Camp Roberts and Ft. Hunter Liggett, as there is no room on Ft. Ord to actually have Field Artillery exercises.)
    sun up, steam rises from the frost... i notice a "tree stump" that belows stems in rhythm...
    a bob cat maybe 20ft away on the other side of the chain-link fence... on Camp Roberts property.

    not a car on the road... the morning dead still... my heart felt as if almost home...
    the anchor of a U-haul truck, all the garb i still burdened with... with no real place to stay in Monterey, no job, and $1400 to my name, save til April when my savings tied up in a CD would mature...

    what i'm saying is that, its all a mater of balance.

    assess the situation, and find a viable option.

    even with no job, and little obligations, it seems that a week long jaunt is about the extent of my range...
    something seems to always come up...
    broken spoke... time constraints? its always something...
    i.e. birthday parties, house sitting gig, and dont forget all the fancy new stuff i seem to endlessly buy. i.e. BIKES! and their parts! holy smokes already with the parts list... damn.
    it is just like being in the Army

    go to the field for training, break stuff, return to garrison, re-fit to fight, standby... deploy.
    repeat

    but my Uncle ain't footin this bill...

    ironic that REI is about 1/2 mile from the old CIF (Central Issuing Facility) on Ft. Ord
    instead of that cool 7th I.D. Light Infantry credit card i had for basic unit supplies, like cleaning kits for M16's, now its my own personal ATM/credit card, and REI membership.

    my funds are like a hour glass, the sands of time... right?
    i'll be returning to the Daily Grind sometime... hopefully i can hold out til Fall 09'

    and i'll probably be making a jump.

    18yo Ventura to Ft. Ord (monterey)

    39yo... me thinks Monterey to Arcata

    i got to get there in the next month or so... and hobo, eco tour, assess that jump... is my heart there?

    i think there is NATURE there...

    and by the way it looks... 20yrs has gone by VERY FAST

    me thinks, this is a trend of note worthy cause... that is... TIME GOES BY FAST

    i better make a solid choice as to my next jump... cuz i could be 60 real quick.

    and god only knows whats on the in between.

    i hope its more of the same... bikes and nature.

    somehow, in my gut, i think there is something at Humboldt State, that i could engage in.

    maybe a balance of working as a Rx Tech at the Hospital(s), school, riding the bike, and enjoying the outdoors.

    i wonder if Arcata is a place where I'd want to grown old... 20yrs

    everyday takes effort, we make effort every day... 20yrs of daily effort... that can amount to something, maybe significant.

    and if we are to preserve our environ, i suppose a place surround by National Forest, Redwoods, and a University... maybe thats the spot.


    peace...d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  144. #144
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    not so fast...

    eats kick stands

    this is the 2nd one now...

    at least it didnt break in downtown LA at 9pm, when changing a flat... like the last one.

    well... at least they are only $7

    the whole of the Kickstand/rear wheel access, that whole area begs to be refined...


    d-
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  145. #145
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    Yeah, when are we going to get some good kickstands? I saw this one off an old Raleigh that was a double kickstand. So sweet.

  146. #146
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    onto groceries...

    my life is Dummy centric

    camping, travel, groceries...

    new kickstand, ran me $10.73... whatever.

    groceries ran me $53... holy smokes!

    3 tomatoes 1lb = $2.49

    me thinks... of gardens

    today people actually stopped to watch me load The Dummy
    gallons of water, sodas, etc...

    its a Dummy's life...

    today in Monterey about 80F... feels like SoCal weather, while there are fires both North and South.

    Indians fire last i heard had gone up to over 10k acres, and is out of control

    another fire up in Bonny Dune...

    ???

    d-

    fyi: BOB trailer bags on sale for about $40.
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  147. #147
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    $51?

    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    my life is Dummy centric

    camping, travel, groceries...

    new kickstand, ran me $10.73... whatever.

    groceries ran me $53... holy smokes!

    3 tomatoes 1lb = $2.49

    me thinks... of gardens

    today people actually stopped to watch me load The Dummy
    gallons of water, sodas, etc...

    its a Dummy's life...

    today in Monterey about 80F... feels like SoCal weather, while there are fires both North and South.

    Indians fire last i heard had gone up to over 10k acres, and is out of control

    another fire up in Bonny Dune...

    ???

    d-

    fyi: BOB trailer bags on sale for about $40.
    That's nuthin. When I was hosting a 16 year old exchange student form Germany, we went through $200 a week easy... which is not much less than as I made back in those days. That boy could eat, I tell you what.

    Here he is today on the left:



    This was taken in Denmark about a month ago. Dang, I felt like that box of orange juice was $51 over there. That was early in the morning, and I was all squinty.

    Sorry, I dunno what it is about your threads that make me wanna post random stuff.

    If you have a place for a big pot to plant tomatos, do it. Nothing tastes better than a tomato right off the vine. We used to grow our own, and it made stuff form the store just taste bland as heck... even the organic fresher stuff.

  148. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot

    Sorry, I dunno what it is about your threads that make me wanna post random stuff.
    thats what its all about...

    tomato plants... i think its my next little project... big pot, soil, seeds... water? sun

    this deck is pretty much heck-a-sunny most days, faces dead smack west.

    i think tmrrw's project is a plant box
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  149. #149
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    Yeah...

    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    thats what its all about...

    tomato plants... i think its my next little project... big pot, soil, seeds... water? sun

    this deck is pretty much heck-a-sunny most days, faces dead smack west.

    i think tmrrw's project is a plant box
    ... I guess for some perverse reason I just enjoy little snippets, even boring ones, or people's real lives.

    Tomatoes loves sun, but be careful not to plant them too close to the house, or they get radiation burned from the reflection off the wall.

    Lots of water, good rich soil, and you'll be in tomatoes in a few months. Lemmie ask my wife. She's the tomato master (mistress?). Buy seedlings to save some time over straight DIY planted seeds.

    We haven't done tomatoes in a while since we moved to Oakland back in 2000. We have a small backyard that is only accessible through our garage, and that is just too much of a PITA with all the junk we have, and am trying to get rid of. Ironically, much of that junk is my wife's gardening stuff.

  150. #150
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    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    ... I guess for some perverse reason I just enjoy little snippets, even boring ones, or people's real lives.

    Tomatoes loves sun, but be careful not to plant them too close to the house, or they get radiation burned from the reflection off the wall.

    Lots of water, good rich soil, and you'll be in tomatoes in a few months. Lemmie ask my wife. She's the tomato master (mistress?). Buy seedlings to save some time over straight DIY planted seeds.

    We haven't done tomatoes in a while since we moved to Oakland back in 2000. We have a small backyard that is only accessible through our garage, and that is just too much of a PITA with all the junk we have, and am trying to get rid of. Ironically, much of that junk is my wife's gardening stuff.
    awesome...

    after paying $2.49/lb for tomatoes which turned out to be 3 tomatoes... i could water a plant and have fresh...

    check this out...
    what was waiting for me when i got back from LA

    my new Kifaru Solo shelter. with stove. (Para Tarp)
    super swank is all i can say...
    if its like anything else they make, it will be pure giggles...

    i dig this small stove. (Para Stove)
    stainless steel... and i think its only 2lbs 5oz

    i think the whole thing is 3lbs 2oz, stove, shelter, poles and pegs.

    i'm anxious to get out and try it out.

    wow huh?
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  151. #151
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    Heh... you realize....

    .... you're a total gear hound, right?

    S'okay, I am too.

    Building the kit:

    So far....

    Kelty 2.5 pound tent. Packs up nice and tightly

    Stupid light sleeping bag. It's rated to 40 degrees but I'm finding I freeze my ass off it temps drop much below 50 outside the tent if its breezy. I camped at Sea Otter this last time around, and I was not terribly happy at night. When car camping, I have to supplement with my big snow parka. The big parka is too big to pack on the bike.

    therma-rest type foam sleeping pads. If I pitch the tent on big fluffy grass or a beach, I can probably do without it.

    I built up my old Giant Yukon with a rigid fork, and front and rear racks. I have some low rent saddle bag type pannier bags.

    All of my cooking gear is not designed to be lightweight or easy to pack. Coleman stove, cheap pans, semi-disposable cookware, that sorta thing. I have a bad habit of destroying stuff. At sea otter, I slammed a brand new spatula in my car door, shattered it all to heck, and I owned it a total of two hours before I hosed it. Makes me think twice about spending real dough on nice camping gear.

    Replace in the kit with some light alu or ti pans ($$$!) and a penny stove (). Figure out a wind shield... maybe a folding shield of some sort. I can prolly rig something out of sheet alu and hinges or rings pretty easily. I'm starting to actually browse my Sierra Trading Post catalogs I get in the mail. Dang, some good deals in there. I just checked out the website. Decent pot and pan kit for $25. I might just do that.

    I'm starting to wonder if I can get by without the front panniers. Maybe just strap stuff directly to the front rack. The tent could probably go on one side pretty easily. The trick would be to get straps that are tight enough without tweaking the tent poles... maybe the rolls on the other side.

    Heck, maybe I should just pedal out to Lake Chabot. I can do that on an unloaded mountain bike in a couple hours from my house. If I do that, I will probably be able to get by with a bowl of oatmeal and a banana the next morning. Meaning, simple penny stove, heat a cup of water, eat. I could even do just energy bars if I wanted to suck all the challenge out of it. I have a great talent for making things too complicated, and just throwing tons of gear at situations. Baby steps!
    Last edited by pimpbot; 06-13-2008 at 01:36 AM.

  152. #152
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    ti cookware is getting a lot cheaper than it used to be.
    REI has a nice set for about $100

    but what i had really been waiting for is the solo cookset from SnowPeak, of which i just received in the mail.

    sleeping bags... well... of course the puffier they are, the better the sleeping only by default of cushion. I have a swank down bag, but i dont like it too much, as its thin, and its pretty hot, i end up using it more like a blanket.

    the bag i really like, i think is a Kelty, its a synthetic, and it has a zipper in the toe box! thats the goods right there! why? bcz, your feet and legs generate a ton of heat. when you stop hiking, or in this case, stop pedaling, when you hop in the sack, i guess your legs are in repair mode, and that cellular activity generates a bunch of heat.
    so the zipped open toe box lets you cool down.

    i also use some base layer long john types... i am always amazed to realize that i often sweat a bit in my sleep. my favorite are Patagonia. just like bike clothing, most of the base layer stuff you can find at REI is moisture wicking. and you want that.

    tipi life, often brings me to doing chores... gathering wood, breaking down wood, fetching, filtering water, etc... often this activity produces sweat...

    i keep a small bag of clothing, that i've dubbed, "in position wear", that is basically my clothing for being in camp. As soon as the tipi is pitched, the stove built, and things somewhat settled, i change out of my bike clothes, and let them air out. if there is day light, better yet... flip your shorts inside out, and place them in the direct sunlight. better yet, is to rinse them out, if available.

    bike clothing is pretty awesome too... typically i carry a 2nd set. Jerseys seem to take a beating. I like white, silver, etc... and a dark color like black, etc...
    white to bounce the light off you, if its hot... black to absorb light and generate heat.
    i've slept plenty in my bike clothes. i especially like arm warmers when in my sleeping bag.

    toss all your clothing into a jacket, zip it up, cross the sleeves, make a pillow...

    the whole thing is a process... the gear, the way you use things, where you are camping, etc...

    i've done plenty of rides to work, etc... with my bike loaded down, just to simulate travel with my gear, and when i got home, pitch the tent, in the dark, and do your thing.

    in the army this is like some kind of training. we'd repeat this process over and over, until it became synaptic. Ultimately that is really what you want. to be natural at what you are doing.

    peace...d
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  153. #153
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    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    .

    I'm starting to wonder if I can get by without the front panniers. Maybe just strap stuff directly to the front rack.
    maybe you could try to simply lash a stuff sack right the handlebar.
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  154. #154
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  155. #155
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    Yeah, bike stuff works.

    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    bike clothing is pretty awesome too... typically i carry a 2nd set. Jerseys seem to take a beating. I like white, silver, etc... and a dark color like black, etc...
    there was a while I was working construction as an electrician. The company uniform was a dark blue Carhart tee shirt and Kakhi electrican pants. I would be soaked to the bone in sweat in teh summer. I was really thinking about wearing a bike jersey about the same color, a loose fitting one that could almost pass as a tee shirt. boss didn't go for it.

    At SOC this last time around, I slept in my bike shorts, knee and arm warmers under jeans, a tee shirt, and long sleeve shirt, under my parka, and in the sleeping bag in the tent... and still got cold. Remember those 30 MPH winds blowing all night? I got the blunt end of that on the side of the hill.

  156. #156
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    I stumbled onto the pug thread first, then this one as it took off.
    You've been a constant source of inspiration to me...
    If you can make a success of bicycle life in the US then it'll work anywhere.
    I loved Pug, I see where Dummy is taking you and how it's so versatile. Amazing!
    I also thank you for the Buddhist tip too, been to the WA folks site and downloaded a bunch of stuff, been around "religion" all my life, such a cool thinking philosophy is a breath of fresh air, Big up the Brahm!!
    Dylans ideas for a book have got to go somewhere; do a site, anything! I'm also feeling drawn the same way but I'm in no position at the mo, I've got an obligation of love to my kids to keep them housed, fed and educated for a lot of years yet, and a wife not yet into a frugal style. I'd dearly love to turn on, log in and drop out but it's not fair on them yet IMHO.
    Gardens for food, thrift for clothes, bikes for transport, the precepts for life and soul....
    All good food for the mind, keeps the hope alive..
    Thankyou for doing your thing and spreading the ethos..
    namaste
    Phil

  157. #157
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    Great thread. I could really use a Dummy.

    My current Xtra is a townie cruiser with a four speed coaster.
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  158. #158
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    Quote Originally Posted by thebigred67
    Great thread. I could really use a Dummy.

    My current Xtra is a townie cruiser with a four speed coaster.
    a 4spd, could be rough, coaster at that...

    a setup like that says to me exactly, "townie"
    awesome for around town, no long jaunts, and limited hills.

    the Xtra is definitely an awesome thing... it changes everything
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  159. #159
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    thank you

    Quote Originally Posted by PhilN
    I stumbled onto the pug thread first, then this one as it took off.
    You've been a constant source of inspiration to me...
    If you can make a success of bicycle life in the US then it'll work anywhere.
    I loved Pug, I see where Dummy is taking you and how it's so versatile. Amazing!
    I also thank you for the Buddhist tip too, been to the WA folks site and downloaded a bunch of stuff, been around "religion" all my life, such a cool thinking philosophy is a breath of fresh air, Big up the Brahm!!
    Dylans ideas for a book have got to go somewhere; do a site, anything! I'm also feeling drawn the same way but I'm in no position at the mo, I've got an obligation of love to my kids to keep them housed, fed and educated for a lot of years yet, and a wife not yet into a frugal style. I'd dearly love to turn on, log in and drop out but it's not fair on them yet IMHO.
    Gardens for food, thrift for clothes, bikes for transport, the precepts for life and soul....
    All good food for the mind, keeps the hope alive..
    Thankyou for doing your thing and spreading the ethos..
    namaste
    Phil
    thank you phil for the nice words.

    i've laid off the Buddhist "soapbox" so to speak... as I've come to realize that not all people can view something like Buddhism without the label of "religion".

    basically i just pitch The Bicycle Lifestyle as simplicity and wealth that is uncommon to our society.

    The Bicycle is an awesome machine. its does a million things, and then some.

    The Pug pretty much just sits these days, but i have a new BB for it. I should probably take it out on a nice little jaunt, as I've got my eye on areas like Grover Beach, Guadeloupe, and/or North, i keep eyeballing the Arcata coastline via Google Earth. it seems to me there are plenty of places to explore.

    i suppose a metaphor could work here.
    suppose our thoughts move along neuropathways, initially as electrical impulses...
    those thoughts move thru the familiar and often same pathways...
    new thoughts, are ventures into new territory so to speak...

    so to get out there and discover your backyard, is often times discovering your own mind.
    when something does not go exactly to plan, maybe we discover how our mind moves, and the temperament to come...
    perhaps we witness the calm we experience when watching the sunset, etc...
    maybe we re-appreciate our Townie lives for all the effort of generations past that went into the simplest of things we take for granted, like flushing a toilet.

    as a kid i was always amazed how relaxed people that have been "traveled" seem to be.
    as if "experienced"... maybe its a matter of "scope of view", that which we can compare things to.

    again... thank you for the kind words.

    peace....d
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  160. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    there was a while I was working construction as an electrician. The company uniform was a dark blue Carhart tee shirt and Kakhi electrican pants. I would be soaked to the bone in sweat in teh summer. I was really thinking about wearing a bike jersey about the same color, a loose fitting one that could almost pass as a tee shirt. boss didn't go for it.

    At SOC this last time around, I slept in my bike shorts, knee and arm warmers under jeans, a tee shirt, and long sleeve shirt, under my parka, and in the sleeping bag in the tent... and still got cold. Remember those 30 MPH winds blowing all night? I got the blunt end of that on the side of the hill.
    all i can say is... TIPI
    wood burning stove

    the cone shape of the tipi, wind simply goes around it.
    stack rocks around the firebox, and now there is radiating heat...
    its a whole new experience...

    peace...d
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  161. #161
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    ran out to spin my legs for a bit today
    out and around Ft. Ord on the Hunter, took some cool pics.

    the big fire in Ft. Hunter Liggett at Indians has a HUGE plume of smoke looming overhead, Monterey.
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  162. #162
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    I can't get over that bike....

    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    ran out to spin my legs for a bit today
    out and around Ft. Ord on the Hunter, took some cool pics.

    the big fire in Ft. Hunter Liggett at Indians has a HUGE plume of smoke looming overhead, Monterey.
    Great color, nice lines. I like the tall headtube. Reminds me of a monster cross bike.

    I just found myself eyeing my townie bike, trying to figure out where to strap stuff. Uh, oh. Every now and again, I get a bug about some new project. Two months ago, it was an LED bike headlight. I made a sweet copper slug heat sink for the emitter an everything. Never finished it because it started looked like for what I sank into it, I coulda just bought one. O-well. Imagine my surprised when I found they no longer make pennies out of solid copper, and I tried to sweat a penny onto a piece of copper pipe.

    Anyway.... I think a trip to REI for some straps is in order.

  163. #163
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    i dig this photo

    this photo is crazy... i dont know what it is...
    i guess its the light?
    the sun from behind, coming thru the edge of the smoke plume, then contrast with the darkness of the smoke in the background, coming from the Indian's Fire.

    i have it in a large version too...

    i have it as desktop on my 24" iMac... and man its cool!

    if anyone would like a big copy just email me.. the original is like 12 mega pixels

    i trip out on photos.

    the Hunter is an awesome bike... heck... i think all bikes are awesome.
    but this bike is 100% custom from Rick.

    so far from what I've learned of running a 29er... I bet the KM would be a seriously kick butt Adventure Touring bike! I'm amazed there aint a big ol long KM thread. it begs for it.

    "life with Monkey"

    anyways... peace.....d
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  164. #164
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    Like I said, Gear Hound!

    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    this photo is crazy... i dont know what it is...
    i guess its the light?
    the sun from behind, coming thru the edge of the smoke plume, then contrast with the darkness of the smoke in the background, coming from the Indian's Fire.

    i have it in a large version too...

    i have it as desktop on my 24" iMac... and man its cool!

    if anyone would like a big copy just email me.. the original is like 12 mega pixels

    i trip out on photos.

    the Hunter is an awesome bike... heck... i think all bikes are awesome.
    but this bike is 100% custom from Rick.

    so far from what I've learned of running a 29er... I bet the KM would be a seriously kick butt Adventure Touring bike! I'm amazed there aint a big ol long KM thread. it begs for it.

    "life with Monkey"

    anyways... peace.....d
    I've been thinking about a geared 29er as well. I love the heck out of my 29er Monocog singlespeed. I love the way it rolls.... it rolls forever. It's crazy the amount of speed I can pick up on some of the roller coaster singletrack descents I hit on my regular workout rides. It always puts a big fat grin on my face.

    I keep looking at my FS 26" Stumpjumper, and keep thinking I don't need to buy a lot of parts to make it a 29er. I hardly ever ride the thing anymore. I pretty much ride it on big Sierra rides, but that is really it.... maybe all day epic kinda rides... but really not much.

    A couple of hoops, rear hub, fork... I can rob the 29er Reba from my SS and go back to rigid. I have a decent front hub I got at a swap meet. I have a hook-up for access to a library of spokes and a spoke cutter/thread rolling machine. I can roll myself a wheelset pretty easily and cheaply.

    So that leaves a frame. I ultimately want a Ventana El Ray, but I might just go low rent for now and get one of those Motobecane hardtails off Ebay for $109. I would love to have something with gears and the roll of big wheels. A full boingy bike would be nice, but that can come later. I was thinking KM as a possibility, but I think that would be out of my range for now.

    Yeah, nice photo. Good light, good composition.
    Last edited by pimpbot; 06-14-2008 at 12:54 AM.

  165. #165
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    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    a 4spd, could be rough, coaster at that...

    a setup like that says to me exactly, "townie"
    awesome for around town, no long jaunts, and limited hills.

    the Xtra is definitely an awesome thing... it changes everything
    It is very flat in the valley here. I wanted a hauler and it works great for that. I use it for my handyman work and it fits all my tools. Haven't tried the ladder yet.
    "Don't give up, Never give up!"

  166. #166
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    Quote Originally Posted by thebigred67
    It is very flat in the valley here. I wanted a hauler and it works great for that. I use it for my handyman work and it fits all my tools. Haven't tried the ladder yet.
    whoa! tools, handyman work, 4spd coaster... and maybe a ladder... wow... thats great!
    whats not to love about a useful bike?
    its pure genius...
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  167. #167
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    uh oh....

    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    I've been thinking about a geared 29er as well. I love the heck out of my 29er Monocog singlespeed. I love the way it rolls.... it rolls forever. It's crazy the amount of speed I can pick up on some of the roller coaster singletrack descents I hit on my regular workout rides. It always puts a big fat grin on my face.

    I keep looking at my FS 26" Stumpjumper, and keep thinking I don't need to buy a lot of parts to make it a 29er. I hardly ever ride the thing anymore. I pretty much ride it on big Sierra rides, but that is really it.... maybe all day epic kinda rides... but really not much.

    A couple of hoops, rear hub, fork... I can rob the 29er Reba from my SS and go back to rigid. I have a decent front hub I got at a swap meet. I have a hook-up for access to a library of spokes and a spoke cutter/thread rolling machine. I can roll myself a wheelset pretty easily and cheaply.

    So that leaves a frame. I ultimately want a Ventana El Ray, but I might just go low rent for now and get one of those Motobecane hardtails off Ebay for $109. I would love to have something with gears and the roll of big wheels. A full boingy bike would be nice, but that can come later. I was thinking KM as a possibility, but I think that would be out of my range for now.

    Yeah, nice photo. Good light, good composition.
    Last night I was night-owling as I sometimes do, and started to put my kit together. I forgot my mom gave me all her camping and backpacking gear. I found the bin last night and it turns out she gave me a tiny single burner stove with a cook set. Sweet!

    I strapped some stuff on my city bike (the one with all the racks) just to see how things went. I got my foam mat and sleeping bag on the front racks, just directly strapped to the racks. Seems to work well. Tent on the top of the rear rack. Rear panniers have the camping stove and jacket, and I still have half that pannier bag to fill with goodies. The other side is still empty. I can take a backpack wtih a Camelbak bladder for food and water, and still have room for more. Slap some bigger dirt treads on there instead of the 1.25" slicks, and I'm good to go.

    I popped by the army surplus store in Berkeley yesterday for the straps. they had canvas panner bags for like $10. They have mounts on the back, but not specifit to bike racks, so I'd have to McGuyver something there. Also, they are not likely to be rain proof. I was tempted.

    Write up here:

    http://pimpbot.wordpress.com/

    I can totally do this!

    Getting warmer! I'll post a pic later. I'm supposed to be doing housework right now.
    Last edited by pimpbot; 06-15-2008 at 04:11 PM.

  168. #168
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    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    Last night I was night-owling as I sometimes do, and started to put my kit together. I forgot my mom gave me all her camping and backpacking gear. I found the bin last night and it turns out she gave me a tiny single burner stove with a cook set. Sweet!

    I strapped some stuff on my city bike (the one with all the racks) just to see how things went. I got my foam mat and sleeping bag on the front racks, just directly strapped to the racks. Seems to work well. Tent on the top of the rear rack. Rear panniers have the camping stove and jacket, and I still have half that pannier bag to fill with goodies. The other side is still empty. I can take a backpack wtih a Camelbak bladder for food and water, and still have room for more. Slap some bigger dirt treads on there instead of the 1.25" slicks, and I'm good to go.

    I popped by the army surplus store in Berkeley yesterday for the straps. they had canvas panner bags for like $10. They have mounts on the back, but not specifit to bike racks, so I'd have to McGuyver something there. Also, they are not likely to be rain proof. I was tempted.

    Write up here:

    http://pimpbot.wordpress.com/

    I can totally do this!

    Getting warmer! I'll post a pic later. I'm supposed to be doing housework right now.

    sounds like you are well on your way.

    fyi: at the moment I really like WTB Vulpine 2.1's, i have them on the Hunter, and have bought a set in 26" for The Dummy. they seem to be good tyres. they roll fast on the pave, and have enough of a MTB tread to actually go in the dirt. On fireroads, combined with me on the Hunter, its the fastest setup I've had to date for a bicycle rigged as such.

    my thoughts have been, that if i find a tyre like the Vulpine seems to be... that if i find a tyre i like, I'd only carry 1 extra tyre, and even at that, I'd be rotating thru, so I'd be basically using 3 tyres, and that kind of a setup would last a long time.

    as compared to what? using a set of Conti Town and Countries, which are steel bead, and then carrying 2 folding MTB tyres? Like i did for the Cone Peak trip.

    if the Vulpines can handle a bit of weight, I think they will now be my choice tyre... getting out of the Urban Jungle of SoCal also helps with the tyre equation. that is... here in Monterey the roads are nice enough to not demand a hefty tyre like T&C's

    but to the T&C's credit, they do work in the dirt, to a limit, and that is fairly broad.

    Vulpines run around $38ea and they are folding bead. so that is a huge plus, in my book.

    as to packing/camping/bike ridding, just try to keep in mind how much TIME you'd be spending either in camp or on the bike. that pretty much tells you how much of what stuff you'd be inclined to take.

    for instance: i like to get somewhere, set up camp, and stay a couple of days. relax, maybe meditate, and bliss out.
    so for me, i really like the luxury of the 4 man tipi and wood burning stove. not to mention the huge bag of food i like to take.

    if i were to be doing some 24 to 36hr jaunts, out and back, and i had to cover 100 miles total... with say at least 5hrs of ridding each way. so 10hrs of pedaling, and 100 miles...
    i might consider carrying a lot less.

    for me at this point... my trips have been held to a certain idea.

    when i was in the Army at Ft. Ord, 7th Infantry Division Light... we where combat ready, 24hrs wheels down, anywhere in the world. mostly trained for Central America...

    when the US went to Saudi, it took something like 6 months to get a battle force ready.

    so when the US changed from maintaining i think it was 3 theaters to now i think its been 5 theaters... the concept of a Medium sized deployable force came about. instead of heavy mechanized calvary divisions, the use of LAV's (Light Armored Vehicles), etc... came to the forefront.

    instead of a fighting force being deployed and into position in 24hrs, or 6 months... it was something like 90 days.

    so camping is kind of like that analogy.

    the more stuff you carry, the longer it takes to get to your destination. but when you get there, maybe the things you've packed, lets you stay there longer. 4 man tipi, wood burning stove, food, and clothing. maybe a book?

    as a cyclist, its often hard for use to stop "pedaling", everything we think is about actually being in motion on the bike. its easy to become a weight weenie, as they say, and suddenly we've focused our efforts to produce an experience that is solely on the bike.

    well... these days, i get off the bike. i like to hang out, look around, eat, etc.
    but conversely, everything i own, has been schlept into position under my own power via bike.
    ok... the trip from Ventura back to Monterey i used a U-haul.
    trips to LA i utilize the train.

    but i think we get the gist here.

    as to a traditional HT with racks, panniers, and a semi light to light load of equipment... well... it seems like a small range of variables, but you'd be blown away to learn that a pint of liquid white gas for a weekend trip, is really a large amount of fuel to carry, and that type of stove, is actually heavy compared to a micro stove like the SnowPeak Giga which comes in around 2.5oz, then you use a 110g fuel canister.
    suddenly now you eek out your fuel use, and your packing is that much lighter. but now this is leaning in the direction of "Travel"

    I'd choose a white gas stove over a canister type, simply cuz coleman fuel is way cheaper, and you can actually sit around and cook what is almost like real food. suddenly you dont have to limit your experience to only boiling water. cuz now you have a stove and maybe over a liter of fuel. but its weight.

    the only way to really figure things out, is to go out there and give it a shot.

    i have noticed that as the weather is colder, typically i burn more fuel for heat, hot water, coffee, food, etc.
    as the weather gets wet, I spend more time inside... so those little coffin like solo tents are depressing to spend a bunch of time laying down, with the rain over head.

    its really nice to have the living space of a larger shelter.

    years back, my first shot at this type of pseudo lifestyle, i used an 8 man tipi, as compared to the 4 man that has been in most of these posts. The 8 man is obviously twice as large. the stove is awesome, as its large enough to actually accept small logs, so the heat is awesome, and its large enough to squat and bathe in with warm water, sponge bath style.

    so what am i saying here?

    i guess, its just that there are a million combos of gear out there, and a million little nuances to play with. how your trip comes out, is largely dependent upon the things you carry, or lack there of. Plenty of folks out there burn thru $50/day on average, with using Hostels, motel rooms, restaurants, etc...

    me... i try to be self contained, and be on the cheap... bcz my life is up in the air, and i have no job. so being self contained, self sufficient, self propelled, al of that is a big part of my method, and ideology.

    peace...d
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    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  169. #169
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    Thanks for the insight, Devo

    Shows how much I know. My mom's stove is actually a canister stove. I have a coleman stove for car camping I got at a garage sale for $5, but have yet to fire it up. The canister stove is nice, easy to light, comes contained in a bunch of cookware. I have no idea how to gauge how much fuel is left, which makes me want to carry a spare can.

    Here is the rig so far:





    Tonight I hope to get a moment to mount up some knobby treads. Fenders probably won't fit around fat tires. Oh, and I have a tire pile that I'm actually kind of ashamed of. I mean, there are starving kids in Africa, and here I have this 6 foot high pile of tires. Yeah, baby. Those are real live bar ends on riser bars. Yeah, 'cause I roll like that.

    *edit*

    Wups! I just noticed the front tire is on backwards. Yeah, 'cause I roll like that.
    Last edited by pimpbot; 06-15-2008 at 09:47 PM.

  170. #170
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    you could probably stuff the tent itself into a pannier, and put the poles in the foam roll, and put that on the rear deck. if you have a stuff sack laying around you might be able to strap that to the seatpost/saddle rails.
    you never know... you could try something under the handlebars too. obviously what you need are front panniers. if you had those... it would a done deal.

    if you have any choices in LED headlamps, you could try to pick one that would be "doable" as a bike light. strobe mode is a good thing. if nothing else it lets you be seen.

    over all, i think that bike is 100% on the money. you'd be surprised to see what you can do with it.
    www.AsanaCycles.com
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  171. #171
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    Thanks...

    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    you could probably stuff the tent itself into a pannier, and put the poles in the foam roll, and put that on the rear deck. if you have a stuff sack laying around you might be able to strap that to the seatpost/saddle rails.
    you never know... you could try something under the handlebars too. obviously what you need are front panniers. if you had those... it would a done deal.

    if you have any choices in LED headlamps, you could try to pick one that would be "doable" as a bike light. strobe mode is a good thing. if nothing else it lets you be seen.

    over all, i think that bike is 100% on the money. you'd be surprised to see what you can do with it.
    I was thinking about the load, and thought the best plan would be to strap the light stuff up front, and load down the panniers with food and other heavier stuff. This is by no means my final rig. I'm just test fitting stuff right now. I rode it around the block and it felt pretty good.

    I have a NR Digital Pro12e... an older, but plenty bright light.. another CL $50 find! I got a bigger battery for it so I get around 2 hours of runtime on full blast, 5 hours on low. In addition I do night rides with a NR Head Trip and a Black Diamond 5 LED light on the lid. The LEDs make a nice glow around the bars, and throws enough down the trail so on slow fireroad climbs. I can shut all the other lights off and still see what I'm doing. I was in the process of building a Cree Q5 LED light to save some weight, but got stalled on the build. It my testing, it was as bright as my 10 watt Head Trip, but used 1/3 the current.

    My primary training in woodsmanship basically came from cub scouts, my dad's once a year car camping weekend, and my own adult experience a couple times a year for mtbr events and SOC.... not much. I hack my way through it. I'd like to think I have a decent head on my shoulders, and can figure stuff out, but its always good to hear what works for other folks. I don't really have any experience in solo self supported kinda stuff without a car. Cars are easy. You just throw every piece of gear you own and work it out when you get there. When you throw in the whole weight factor... what you can bring with you... things get trickier. I don't trust my skills enough to try and build a campfire from gathered wood, tho. I'd be scared shyteless I would set the woods on fire, and be like one of those knuckleheads that started the Tahoe fire a couple years ago. Or, stay in a state park camp, but with no wood left to be gathered to make the fire in the first place.
    Last edited by pimpbot; 06-15-2008 at 10:51 PM.

  172. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    I have a NR Digital Pro12e... an older, but plenty bright light.. another CL $50 find! I got a bigger battery for it so I get around 2 hours of runtime on full blast, 5 hours on low. In addition I do night rides with a NR Head Trip and a Black Diamond 5 LED light on the lid. The LEDs make a nice glow around the bars, and throws enough down the trail so on slow fireroad climbs. I can shut all the other lights off and still see what I'm doing. I was in the process of building a Cree Q5 LED light to save some weight, but got stalled on the build. It my testing, it was as bright as my 10 watt Head Trip, but used 1/3 the current.
    i have a crazy HID light, and the irony is that i never use it.
    typically what I've come to know of lights, is that they are way too bright. and they almost always cycle on, from the highest setting then down... and that blows my mind.

    why dont lights cycle UP? marketing. a bright light is much more "sellable"

    anyways... i mean, to have a single light that functions both as a headlamp for in camp use, and also a bike light.

    more than likely your night riding time, when camping, is going to be limited. when its dark, its all about food, then bed.

    lights = batteries = weight

    so think small lights, for tasking
    and maybe the light would be bright enough to actually ride by.
    and keep in mind run times. you dont want to go out with a light that only has 4hrs burn time on it.

    strange huh? bike camping lights are opposite of "bike lights", cuz in the world of commuterism, sportsmen, you get to go home and plug in.

    camping... well... no plug

    my favs run on AA, and i choose 2500mAh NiMH batteries, which is what goes in my digi cam. i keep thinking of a handheld GPS too.

    from what i can see, its all about a common power source, and having a way to rotate them, if needed.

    there is a backpacking way of thinking about things... whatever it is you carry it needs to have at least 2 functions, it has to be useful in at least 2 ways. if not, it should be for a very specialized and critical task.

    lights...

    d-
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    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  173. #173
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    Sorry about that...

    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    i have a crazy HID light, and the irony is that i never use it.
    typically what I've come to know of lights, is that they are way too bright. and they almost always cycle on, from the highest setting then down... and that blows my mind.

    why dont lights cycle UP? marketing. a bright light is much more "sellable"

    anyways... i mean, to have a single light that functions both as a headlamp for in camp use, and also a bike light.

    more than likely your night riding time, when camping, is going to be limited. when its dark, its all about food, then bed.

    lights = batteries = weight

    so think small lights, for tasking
    and maybe the light would be bright enough to actually ride by.
    and keep in mind run times. you dont want to go out with a light that only has 4hrs burn time on it.

    strange huh? bike camping lights are opposite of "bike lights", cuz in the world of commuterism, sportsmen, you get to go home and plug in.

    camping... well... no plug

    my favs run on AA, and i choose 2500mAh NiMH batteries, which is what goes in my digi cam. i keep thinking of a handheld GPS too.

    from what i can see, its all about a common power source, and having a way to rotate them, if needed.

    there is a backpacking way of thinking about things... whatever it is you carry it needs to have at least 2 functions, it has to be useful in at least 2 ways. if not, it should be for a very specialized and critical task.

    lights...

    d-
    ... I was still editing.

    I have a few small LED flashlights. LEDs rule. Wave of the future. The little LED cheapo flashlights are great for camping. They are small and run for frickin ever. My Black Diamond 5 LED light on had the batteries changed once in the 2 years I owned it. Slap in some fresh batteries the day I leave, and I'm pretty confident it will be good for as long as I want to be out in the woods. Hang one of the little cheap ones off the hook in the top of my tent to read by. Harbor Freight sells decent small ones for like $6. They are bright enough to just about strap one to the bars and actually be able to ride non-techy slow stuff with. I use one on my bars to go to the store at night on my bike.

    Funny, my old Halogen NR light ramps up, but it cycles low, med, hi and back to low. I used to run a modified Gee Whiz Ultra Death Ray light I installed Light Brain controller in there. It had the best interface. Two halogen lamps. tap to turn on, tap for each of 5 steps of brightness up, hold the button to turn it down. Once on the lowest setting, hold the button for 3 seconds to turn off. Hold then tap would get into flashing mode and SOS mode. That was the best, but the original light it was built into was failing. The frame was cracking through, been fixed once, still about to break. I had to retire it before it broke off on me and ended up in my spokes. If somebody had the same interface on good LEDs and lightweight run forever LiIon batteries, I'd be all over it (if I had the dough, which I don't).

    I'm with you. I passed on the whole HID thing. Way too exensive, way too much light for much of the time, and most HIDs don't have a way to dim them down. The ones that dim down, don't dim much. When the bulbs fail, they cost like $90 to fix. Halogens are cheap to fix, as long as you don't buy the bulbs from Night Rider. LEDs never burn out, and are super cheap to build in the first place compared to HIDs.

    For bike camping, I don't really think I'll be night riding so I won't be bringing the full bike light setup. Too heavy. The setup I bring will be mostly an emergency measure. Like if I get hung up and don't make camp before sundown. I think LED flashlights will be good enough if I can strap one or two to my lid.
    Last edited by pimpbot; 06-15-2008 at 11:33 PM.

  174. #174
    Ride 2 Work, Work 2 Ride!
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    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    whoa! tools, handyman work, 4spd coaster... and maybe a ladder... wow... thats great!
    whats not to love about a useful bike?
    its pure genius...
    Yep. i have covered as much as 15 miles. Since I have seen this your packing I have been able to get more into less space too. Thanks. Tate
    "Don't give up, Never give up!"

  175. #175
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    Devo, have you ever thought about using a dynamo hub?

    From what I've read, modern dyanmo hubs are pretty efficient, and don't have much drag as opposed to older models.

  176. #176
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    Quote Originally Posted by croscoe
    Devo, have you ever thought about using a dynamo hub?

    From what I've read, modern dyanmo hubs are pretty efficient, and don't have much drag as opposed to older models.
    I had thought about a dynamo hub, and one of my friends had one on her bike, as she was very much into doing Brevets, but ultimately she opted for LED lights.

    i think the dynamo hub thing is a great idea. the hub she has is a German product, it seemed to work fine, but ultimately, for what ever her reasons, she has quit using it.

    at the moment I am using a Princeton Tec Corona for the bike.
    http://www.princetontec.com/products...6&type=0&use=4
    the beauty of this light is that it cycles from strobe, dim, bright, from 1 led all the way up to 8 LEDs.

    AND...

    it can also operate on only 4 AA's so you dont have to load it up with all 8 AA's that the carrier can handle. I also have a headband for it, so i use it for tasking too.
    the single LED gets the most use, as i'm mostly just rummaging around camp doing little things.

    the 8 LED strobe mode is pretty bright.

    the last LA trip, i used the light in transit from Union Station to my siblings house, and again in Ventura. however in Ventura the fog had rolled in, and it was not quite dark yet, so i had my lights on strobe mode, for safety precautions.

    i think its an awesome light, with the exception, that when you turn it on, it starts out in the brightest mode, so you have to push the buttons down to the low mode.

    i suppose if i get startled while alone and camping, the brightest setting is psychologically comforting, from the start, but really its over kill. i wish it cycled from the bottom up, cuz really all i seem to need is the single LED.

    thats my rant about lights for today...

    peace...d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  177. #177
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    For touring, I think I'll make an LED light powered by a dynamo hub. http://www.pilom.com/BicycleElectron...moCircuits.htm
    No need to recharge it then

  178. #178
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schmucker
    For touring, I think I'll make an LED light powered by a dynamo hub. http://www.pilom.com/BicycleElectron...moCircuits.htm
    No need to recharge it then
    you ROCK!

    that is exactly the kind of stuff that needs to be developed.
    it would be OFF THE HOOK! if charging things could be achieved. like... AA's for digi cam, handheld GPS (i think i may be buying one), iPod...

    dynamo, generator... not sure what the differences are...

    i definitely like the idea of being able to generate electricity... it could potentially keep me "off the Grid", only to pirate an open WiFi source, for my dot com addiction.

    i think all of this stuff is awesome, and i think its a New Wave in the future of cycling.
    potentially anyways...
    i also like the solar roll stuff.
    I've heard rumors that things are being worked on for the military, like backpacks with solar panels to help keep a power sourced charged.

    i could see some kind of crazy bike set up with all the gadgets...iBIKE or whatever. it begs for it. as it is... you see all sorts of people with a million things on their handlebars. and plus there is large movement in the e-assist bike world. i guess StokeMonkeys are on backorder/not available, and i think i heard the same of BionX.

    there is so much of this stuff out there. the world of R/C has better and better brushless motors, and battery technology is getting better. but i often wonder of the environmental impact of old batteries.

    i think the idea of generating electricity is probably the best way... a generator hub, dynamo, or whatever...

    i bet with a Cargo Bike the small amount of drag from a generator or dynamo would be so little that you'd probably not even notice it, compared to wind, hills, or a cargo load.

    thats crazy style points.
    imagine a bike, complete in design, with something like this.
    like... if it had nice lights, LED's seem to be super versatile. I keep thinking of a light setup that would fit the curve of the flat section on a handle bar... basically incorporated.
    if the bike could generate and store electricity for things like lights, iPod, Cell Phone charge, etc...
    and with a light sentinel turning your lights off and on, when needed... maybe with a mode switch... like "automatic", hi, lo, strobe, off...

    i think in the world of cars, motorbikes, and bikes... i think that if a vehicle has lights, its that much more accepted on the road, and socially, as a vehicle.

    too much coffee...
    lates...d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  179. #179
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    coffee's not done yet

    http://www.pilom.com/BicycleElectronics/Battery.htm
    while i scrolling around thru this stuff... i found this pic

    and it makes me think... wow!?

    energy bank
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  180. #180
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    DUnno if you check out the light forum...

    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    http://www.pilom.com/BicycleElectronics/Battery.htm
    while i scrolling around thru this stuff... i found this pic

    and it makes me think... wow!?

    energy bank
    .. but there is lots of good info about lights, batteries and management systems.

    Problem with solar right now is that it takes such a large area to make enough energy to be useful. Large at least, from a backpacker's perspective. As you pointed out ealier, printed flexible roll-up solar panels are going to help change some of that. I don't think there is enough energy there to run your laptop until the end of time in a small enough package to take with you camping. Letting a solar panel bake all day long to charge up your laptop battery for an half an hour to an hour's use is doable.

    I recently took down a small 18"x36" solar panel from one of our sirens that was no longer being used. I rigged up a small marine battery and inverter to run my laptop in the truck all day long (so I don't kill the truck battery) at work. My boss got me a laptop with a tiny battery that only runs for an hour or so to write work orders and stuff for the jobs I'm on. To make it more of a hassle, it runs Vista which takes for frickin ever to start up, even from hibernation. The 300 watt inverter drew like 3 or 4 amps at 12 volts from the battery to run my little laptop, but next to nothing when it wasn't running, so the inverter itself wasn't wasting much energy. The solar panel would only supply 1.5 amps in full sun at 12 volts. It was a loosing game in the sense that it wouldn't sustain itself if I left the laptop on all the time, which I really wanted to do because startup and shutdown took too long. I ended up just charging the marine battery from the wall at night when I pulled the truck back in.

    I like the dyno hub idea too. I hear Shimano has a 3 watt 6 volt hub that has a disc brake mount for commuter bikes in Europe. heck, do they make a rear? Have it charge the battery all the time, and the battery should be enough to run lights and other handheld electronics. Probably not a laptop, tho. Laptops generally take around 30-50 watts to run. Somebody oughta tie in the disc brake to the dyno hub so when you apply the brake it goes into an overcharge mode, kinda like the Prius does. Sap some of that momentum and convert it to energy for the battery to store. THink about how much energy it takes you to push you, the bike, and all that cargo up a hill, then just waste it by rolling back down the other side. Waste it in the sense that it just becomes either heat in your brakes, heat in the friction of your bearings and tires, and friction form pushing the wind around. At least it would be easy to recover the energy lost in the brakes, since you are willingly wasting that to keep you from crashing into stuff, or going off the road.

  181. #181
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    Thanks Devo and others!

    I've been really enjoying the conversation in this thread recently. I'm in workaholic mode these days, but I'm self-employed and love what i do (www.energysmiths.com). But I've done some bike camp/touring and a lot of backpacking. A few years ago I gave up carrying a stove and fuel and pots completely for 3 season backpacking (I'm in NH, so my idea of cold may be different than someone in CA :-). I like the freedom of not carrying the fossil fuel. It leaves more time to just hang out and look at what's happening around me when I'm out. I was surprised to see that on a trip of 5-6 days my kit was lighter without the stove pots and fuel (tho' to be fair I never carried freeze-dried food, more like instant bean soups and pasta).

    The bit about tomatoes a short while back makes me think about the different things you get and give up by being more settled. We've got a big garden in this year, and need to be around to watch and tend. But I hope this year to perhaps get my sweetie on a bike with me for a short tour.

    And yeah, less stuff, more time to enjoy being alive! May it happen to all of us.

  182. #182
    Devo
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    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    .. but there is lots of good info about lights, batteries and management systems.

    Problem with solar right now is that it takes such a large area to make enough energy to be useful. Large at least, from a backpacker's perspective. As you pointed out ealier, printed flexible roll-up solar panels are going to help change some of that. I don't think there is enough energy there to run your laptop until the end of time in a small enough package to take with you camping. Letting a solar panel bake all day long to charge up your laptop battery for an half an hour to an hour's use is doable.

    I recently took down a small 18"x36" solar panel from one of our sirens that was no longer being used. I rigged up a small marine battery and inverter to run my laptop in the truck all day long (so I don't kill the truck battery) at work. My boss got me a laptop with a tiny battery that only runs for an hour or so to write work orders and stuff for the jobs I'm on. To make it more of a hassle, it runs Vista which takes for frickin ever to start up, even from hibernation. The 300 watt inverter drew like 3 or 4 amps at 12 volts from the battery to run my little laptop, but next to nothing when it wasn't running, so the inverter itself wasn't wasting much energy. The solar panel would only supply 1.5 amps in full sun at 12 volts. It was a loosing game in the sense that it wouldn't sustain itself if I left the laptop on all the time, which I really wanted to do because startup and shutdown took too long. I ended up just charging the marine battery from the wall at night when I pulled the truck back in.

    I like the dyno hub idea too. I hear Shimano has a 3 watt 6 volt hub that has a disc brake mount for commuter bikes in Europe. heck, do they make a rear? Have it charge the battery all the time, and the battery should be enough to run lights and other handheld electronics. Probably not a laptop, tho. Laptops generally take around 30-50 watts to run. Somebody oughta tie in the disc brake to the dyno hub so when you apply the brake it goes into an overcharge mode, kinda like the Prius does. Sap some of that momentum and convert it to energy for the battery to store. THink about how much energy it takes you to push you, the bike, and all that cargo up a hill, then just waste it by rolling back down the other side. Waste it in the sense that it just becomes either heat in your brakes, heat in the friction of your bearings and tires, and friction form pushing the wind around. At least it would be easy to recover the energy lost in the brakes, since you are willingly wasting that to keep you from crashing into stuff, or going off the road.
    there is definitely a lot of refinement that can go into the brakes of a cargo bike.
    its one of my pet peeves. it seems to me that the brakes are somewhat problematic, and they are such a critical part of the overall equation. a way to brake/generate electricity would be awesome! and i think the entire rear section of a Cargo Bike begs to have a solar roll or maybe several, draped over the cargo, or simply the length of the SnapDeck. seems to me something that could fold out to various shapes would be best. but the idea being to keep some solar exposed as much as possible.

    the laptop gig... ya... i know its a huge draw. I think i read that my MacBook draws 50-85 watts.

    all this chit chat about electronics, sparks a bug in me to learn this stuff. when i was a younger man, i had taken various Automotive Electronic classes, but these days, i can even remember things like ohms law, or P,E,I... divided, by ? maybe i'd like to check this stuff out at a JC once i figure out where i want to live... Arcata?

    back on track...
    the whole of the wheel/generator/battery charger... etc...
    i think its such a large endeavor, that a whole new product would come to be... it would come to be a complete wheelset, i suppose.

    and of course there is the weight. how much energy produced/stored vs the weight.

    i wonder if there is some kind of crazy magnet tech out there...
    i.e. i guess like a MagTrainer, where they dont touch but come close to each other, enough to drive a shaft? in a generator? i have no idea.
    maybe all in an ultra all weather sealed hub? i guess front hub... since there are another million options when it comes to drivetrains.

    or maybe some kind of awesome brake caliper?

    its way too much... i think... but a an awesome dream, no doubt.

    d-
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    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  183. #183
    Devo
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    Quote Originally Posted by NHpug
    I've been really enjoying the conversation in this thread recently. I'm in workaholic mode these days, but I'm self-employed and love what i do (www.energysmiths.com). But I've done some bike camp/touring and a lot of backpacking. A few years ago I gave up carrying a stove and fuel and pots completely for 3 season backpacking (I'm in NH, so my idea of cold may be different than someone in CA :-). I like the freedom of not carrying the fossil fuel. It leaves more time to just hang out and look at what's happening around me when I'm out. I was surprised to see that on a trip of 5-6 days my kit was lighter without the stove pots and fuel (tho' to be fair I never carried freeze-dried food, more like instant bean soups and pasta).

    The bit about tomatoes a short while back makes me think about the different things you get and give up by being more settled. We've got a big garden in this year, and need to be around to watch and tend. But I hope this year to perhaps get my sweetie on a bike with me for a short tour.

    And yeah, less stuff, more time to enjoy being alive! May it happen to all of us.
    the tomato gig blew my mind, and me further, by actually buying them...
    now it seems that I'm fighting a cold... gee... like i need that? oh well... more adjusting.. right?

    settled life, at the moment has me at standstill, with a house sitting gig for friends while they are out of town, and still more yet parts on the way, like a new wheelset for the BD.

    I'm anxious to try out my new Kifaru Para Tarp and the tiny wood burning stove. I'm sure that will blow my mind.

    of late Monterey County is on fire, specifically the area known as Indians, of which was my next objective, to hike to the top of Junipero Serra Peak.

    as it turns out, i read that Cone Peak is the highest Coastal Range peak in the lower 48. I had my eyes set on a double summit trip, solo, unsupported, with The Dummy.
    i guess that notion has gone up in smoke...

    so i may as well, get with the gettin... and get to Arcata, check things out.
    maybe Washington? the San Juans?

    what i need is a beautiful place to live where i can hang out for awhile, find a job, maybe go to school, and i guess, ultimately, probably spend 20yrs, cuz it seems that 20yrs goes by real fast. it happened here in Monterey.

    here i am... lookin.

    anyone out there have any Arcata contacts? a place i can rent on the cheap, hang out, and check out the town, jobs, etc...

    peace...d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  184. #184
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    Oh, I forgot...

    Sheldon Brown (God rest his soul... good man, we miss him) has a good write up on lights and generators.

    https://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/...g/shimano.html

    *edit*

    Wups! Use this link:

    https://sheldonbrown.com/dynohubs.html



    Again, 3 watts is not a lot of energy, but it can do something. It seems to me that it would be easy enough to rig it to charge batteries, and then hit a kill switch so there is no drag when pedaling up the hills, against the wind, whenever you want best pedaling efficiency. Since there are is no mechanical contact in the generator, no-load drag should be the same as a traditional hub. Basically, there are pemenant magnets around the hub shell, and the coils are around the inner axle part. As long as you aren't drawing current, they two shoudln't care about each other.

    Only real problem is that IIRC, it's 6 volts. USB power bus is 12 volts. You need to regulate it anyway, or you burn stuff up. IIRC, you can get a buck/boost circuit in there to make it 12 volts pretty easily.

    I hear you about the 'time goes by' issue. The other day I was in a pizza place, and the sign on the wall said something about 'you must have been born on this day in this year to buy alcohol'... and the year was the year I graduated high school. Dang, I don't feel 'half way through my life progress bar' but the numbers say I am. You don't pay attention, you miss your life as it goes by.
    Last edited by pimpbot; 06-16-2008 at 12:31 PM.

  185. #185
    Devo
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    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    Sheldon Brown (God rest his soul... good man, we miss him) has a good write up on lights and generators.

    https://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/...g/shimano.html

    wow! that thing rocks! now it needs to be able to charge a small bank of batteries, with a USB plug to charge an iPod. if it could charge AA's... it would probably be pretty awesome.
    then i could carry less batteries.
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  186. #186

  187. #187
    @adelorenzo
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    When it comes to charging gadgets, I saw this cool little wind-powered generator in a copy of Wired recently:



    $50 plus a few more bucks for the handlebar mount. Charges DC and USB stuff. When you're not charging, shove it in a bag to reduce the wind drag.

  188. #188
    Devo
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    Quote Originally Posted by anthony.delorenzo
    When it comes to charging gadgets, I saw this cool little wind-powered generator in a copy of Wired recently:



    $50 plus a few more bucks for the handlebar mount. Charges DC and USB stuff. When you're not charging, shove it in a bag to reduce the wind drag.
    i think thats the slam dunk right there.
    charges everything but a laptop. right?
    holy smokes... it rocks!
    that would be enough to charge, cell phone, iPod, and some AA's?
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  189. #189
    Devo
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    zoning out

    on another note, it seems like I may be getting sick...
    i think it was Saturday i woke up from a nap, sneezing
    so i'm drinking green tea, eating vitamins, and just zoning out...
    hoping to not get sick...

    so i start rummaging around thru my stuff, thinking maybe this wednesday i might go camp at the local campground here in Monterey, Veteran's Memorial Park... just up the street.

    wed, some friends are riding south, to Cambria, while i get to keep an eye on their house for the week they are going to be gone. so Wednesday am, they are riding south, a few of us might ride with them down to Big Sur, and then come Friday, i have a house sitting gig.

    wednesday i could camp get back thursday... friday check on the house.

    by the way i'm feeling, maybe i'll relax.

    but i think i could manage to camp wed and set up the new tarp and stove.

    i started zoning out, digging thru my stuff, and couldn't resist so i put the stove together, played with the tarp, etc...

    the tarp is a trip. its own stuff sack, is sewn in, placed to double as a storage pouch when the tarp is pitched.

    the stove is really nice. I'm totally stoked, and anxious to try it out.
    my cookset is exactly what I've been wanting for some time now...
    now i just need to get to the Filipinas Market to score some more udon style noodle...
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  190. #190
    ballbuster
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    Heh...

    Quote Originally Posted by anthony.delorenzo
    When it comes to charging gadgets, I saw this cool little wind-powered generator in a copy of Wired recently:



    $50 plus a few more bucks for the handlebar mount. Charges DC and USB stuff. When you're not charging, shove it in a bag to reduce the wind drag.
    0.065 amps at 5 volts.... that's what... 1/3 of a watt? Not sure that is enough to actually be useful. That would be a lot of pedaling to just keeep the phone on. I don't think that is much more than the phone consumes on standby.

    Sounds like one dyno hub will do the work of 10 of those, for twice as much money (not including a wheel build).

    In the last few months, I've been thinking about energy a lot. It's amazing how the universe works. There was this huge explosion that created the universe, and after that, there has been no energy created and none taken away. We have the same finite (however mind bogglingly huge) amount of energy today as we had 13.75 billion years ago (or so) when this whole thing started. Some of that energy condensed into matter.

    Point is, there is no such thing as creating energy. It's all just converted form one form into another.

    Bike rolls down hill. How did it get up the hill in the first place? What happens when you use the brakes to come to a stop? Your leg energy got the bike up, then it was all turned into heat in your brakes... and your brakes disipated that heat into the air. Photons form the sun rained down on a plant, it made sugars, starches and protiens... We consumed them, created gluten stores in our muscles, push pedals, pedals push bike against wind, tire friction, bearing friction, up a hill. At least the hill is storing that energy and can be released later. So we are basically burning previously stored sunlight. That is the thing with burning carbon. Dino juice and coal are all basically stored sunlight from the past hundreds of millions of years, all cooked down with pressure in the earth. Now, we are releasing all of that stored energy all at once, as if there were a giant worldwide forrest fire.

    It just reminds me that everything comes form somewhere, and has to go somewhere.
    Last edited by pimpbot; 06-16-2008 at 05:12 PM.

  191. #191
    Devo
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    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    i think thats the slam dunk right there.
    charges everything but a laptop. right?
    holy smokes... it rocks!
    that would be enough to charge, cell phone, iPod, and some AA's?
    looking at the website better...

    holy smokes! for $100 you'd get 3 solar panels, and the windmill thing.
    ???!!! plus it has a little built in battery 1200mAh? thats little.. right, cuz i have AAA's that are 900mAh, and some AA's 2500 and 2600mAh. so how do i use this 3 solar panel, windmill deal, to charge a bank of AA's, AAA's and my old Motorola Rokr cell phone?

    that would be a HUGE accomplishment for me. it would very much change an aspect of my life, and view of where i can go.

    that and the 4 man tipi, plus groceries? thats off the hook!
    next, if i could actually find a river that has fish... license, pole, and go!
    Arcata?

    $100? is it worth it?
    charge cell phone, iPod, and maybe AA's?
    then buy handheld GPS... i can use the GPS to simply double check myself on a map, right? plus GPS in the city, would be handy huh? like touring?
    maybe San Juans, Seattle, Portland... etc...

    cuz maybe i could move all my stuff to Arcata, find a room to rent, maybe its secure enough to have my stuff there? or maybe i end up keeping things in storage?

    things i think about... you know... here i am... 24" iMac... all the bikes... tools.... camping gear... etc... plus i want to get out and spend days on end camping... maybe be gone for a few weeks at a time? i wonder how the security of things would pan out...

    Monterey is nice and all, but I've been here for 20yrs, and it looks to me that I basically have the South Coast to ride. that is... the southern section off of the top of Nacimiento Ferguson Rd. and thats 60 miles south.

    maybe i should make the jump to Arcata. it seems to me that there is more Wilderness there and closer by too.

    the whole laptop thing... its too much, i often think. its a brick and it eats energy. but it touches the internet. I suppose with a GPS i could just use Flash memory... right... more cards... i use them for the digi cams anyways. so on flash drive cards, you store things like maps, right? and the thing to do is to what?

    download everything to the MacBook... plus i have a 150GB EHD that powers off of the FireWire...
    and administer a hand held GPS

    so i've been thinking of this one by Garmin https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?cID=145&pID=309#
    and they have a handlebar mount available too
    https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?pID=1004

    it runs on AA's of which i have probably 20 of! its crazy. all NiMh.. i just need a way to keep that battery bank charged.
    4 for the digi cam
    4 to 8 for the Princeton Tec Corona bike/head lamp
    plus a GPS uses 2 AA's
    that about 14 AA's right off
    i have a rear LED that uses 2 AA's thats 16 AA's!

    i have 7 extras sitting here on the table.. if i could keep all that charged, plus an iPod and Cell Phone... damn... that sounds pretty much like over the top luxury... huh?
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  192. #192
    ballbuster
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    Did you see....

    .. there are rumors of a new iPod or iPhone having a solar panel LCD screen? I think Apple got a patent on it or something. It would probably work well on a laptop as well... bigger panel!

    How's that for convinient? Just leave it out in the sun to recharge.

    Dig it:

    http://www.forbes.com/2008/05/26/app...markets14.html

    also, if you are looking to lighten up (your wallet too) the iPhone can do internet tasks. If you don't want to pony up $70 a month for the phone bill, the iTouch does it all except the phone and GPS funcitons. That is, its a mini web surfing comptuer if you can find a WiFI connection, plus plays music and movies.

    I have a monster brick Nextel phone that loses signal at the same time you lose line of sight to a Starbucks. I'm going to propose to my boss a deal if I pay for the iPhone, he can get the service. The service is about the same price as my Nextel plan. GPS, internet, text messaging... it would all be way useful to my work.

  193. #193
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    Check out making your own bike-powered generator:

    http://www.scienceshareware.com/peda...d-your-own.htm

    Also, interesting thing, amazon's e-book-reader thingy also includes free cellular internet, so if you get to the web browser, you can be off and running (though w/ a clunky interface):

    http://www.showmycoverage.com/mycoverage.jsp?id=A921ZON

  194. #194
    Devo
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    i'm all racked up...
    sneezing has turned south, something somewhat in my lungs... i'm tired, lazy, all i want is tea, a sweater, etc...

    so i get this email today.

    $179K for a house in Seaside
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  195. #195
    Devo
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    Quote Originally Posted by HardyWeinberg
    Check out making your own bike-powered generator:

    http://www.scienceshareware.com/peda...d-your-own.htm

    Also, interesting thing, amazon's e-book-reader thingy also includes free cellular internet, so if you get to the web browser, you can be off and running (though w/ a clunky interface):

    http://www.showmycoverage.com/mycoverage.jsp?id=A921ZON
    i'm amazed with all the new tech thats out there.
    currently i use an old Motorola Rokr cell phone, and i'm on "pay as you go"...
    so in the last 10 months, i've use about $140 of Cell Phone. and that I'd really like to reduce too.

    as to GPS in a Cell Phone device... is that really GPS? or is it using Cell Phone transmitters to locate with. if so... does that mean they dont work where there is no Cell Phone coverage?

    laptop web browser stuff, that stuff amazes me too. I keep wondering when the heck are they gonna make laptops that just get any kind of web access, wether it be WiFi or some kind of funky Cell Phone network... i dont know...
    i heard there was talk of something called XFi

    the way things are going with Apple, it will be just a matter of a few years before all this is figured out.

    i wont go into a big apple rant here.

    i use a MacBook and an iMac... i like Apple.

    in my minds eye... some kind of Fashion debut/American Paradigm shift...
    if i had a suggestion for Apple...
    that would be to create the iBike, complete with iRack(s)

    with all the Segway advancements, etc... the tech is there.
    with the Long Tail Cargo Bike... i think the bicycle platform is there.
    it just needs to have it all in a Smart Green Package

    once upon a time... in 96' i guess... i bought my first and only Colnago... a BiTitan at that.
    2 sets of wheels, and around $4k later... my 82' Subaru wagon, i had for some years, and i probably had 4 bikes at the time.

    i significantly remember a morning ride thru Pebble Beach on road bikes, with my buddies, and saying, "I'd much rather spend $4K on an awesome road bike, than buy a worn out car."

    i think there are a lot of people out there that would love to get rid of their car related expenses.
    something big long, stable, like a Long Tail Cargo Bike... combined with some kind of electronics, cell phone holder, GPS, iPod, maybe even electric assist (on demand, smart, etc)

    i think people would ride them. its all dependent upon being able to integrate them into the National Transportation System. Trains, busses, work place, etc... and i guess electrical outlets, to charge if needed.

    i can see people spending $4k on somekind of smart iBike, and maybe even make payments on it.
    monthly passes for trains, etc.. all in all people of course would save money. the Bicycle Industry would boom that much more, infrastructure would change... creating jobs...and maybe this would help out with our current issues.

    somehow, it seems like this stuff is naturally attracted each other.

    peace...d
    www.AsanaCycles.com
    "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

  196. #196
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    score!

    a big ol "SCORE"!
    just got a call... looks like i got some per diem bike wrenchin gig!
    coolio!

    its perfect, cuz... at Winning Wheels the Chavez family, has been like a 2nd family to me. a long standing relationship...
    Hector... the dad, we've done a ton of road riding together... i used to simply mimic his form. when he shifts i'd do the same.
    eric... his son, we are the same age, and have ridden MTB's together in the past, even went to Mammoth in 94' for the Grundig Cup. back in the day we were checking out Griffins, Salsa, Ibis, TNT, Cook bros, in the day when Bob Roll was on a Pro-Flex... when Halson forks where around, an elastomer inverted fork from Oregon... as i remember.
    Ophie... the mom, the shop manager as i know... hector and eric wrenches,
    Amy used to be around, eric's sister, she used to tend the clothing, accessories, etc... now days she's in the Seattle area...
    and Kevin... a new wrench that has been on the books for a year or so, i think...
    Kevin came in and helped fill the slot that Todd of BlackCat Cycles...left open when he left to pursue some frame building path in Watsonville.

    i would not be surprised to learn that the dropouts on my new Hunter were made by Todd.

    summer is upon us... and i guess the shop has enough business that comes in surges, to offer me a little on call work.

    i like that.
    like i was telling Ophie... its perfect, I'll ride over, show up with a king sized Snicker bar, a liter of Coke, and wrench away. just like old times. and I'd get paid for this?

    this is exactly where i want to be going in my life... wrenching on bikes...

    you know its a whole lot different... i mean... in my world... that is The Devo World... i have my own bikes, and thats pretty much all i work on. I pick the parts, build them up, ride them, etc... you know... its mine... so working on my own bikes, is a whole lot different from working on anything that rolls in the door. its been some time since I've done that kind of wrenching, that ought to be interesting...
    good stuff to put in my data bank of experience(s)
    just cuz all my bikes are put together with proper specs, etc...
    doesn't mean thats the absolute thru out the universe
    and...
    there are people who ride those bikes!

    the house sitting gig i got coming up, is only blocks away from the shop, and in fact...
    one of my duties is to go to the mail box and pick up the club mail
    VCM (Velo Cub Monterey)
    laffs huh... i think its funny
    i mean... the keychain for the VCM mailbox is an old plastic glow in the dark #1, with the shop's old address printed on it. you know... from back in the day... when people had funky keychains... i guess now days... the car alarm remote has replaced that for most people.

    so there it is... a little side cash...

    not so bad for a day of sitting around being sick-ish

    peace...d
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  197. #197
    ppp
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    Congratulations !

  198. #198
    ballbuster
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    Haught!

    Quote Originally Posted by SelfPropelledDevo
    *buncha stuff about new bike shop job*
    That rules, Devo! Like some wise man said (and I'm too lazy to look up the quote), 'do what you love and you never have to work a day in your life'.

  199. #199
    Devo
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    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    That rules, Devo! Like some wise man said (and I'm too lazy to look up the quote), 'do what you love and you never have to work a day in your life'.
    GENUIS!
    maybe thats why i can ride a bike for hours on end, and never feel like it was work...
    well... we'll see how much time on the books i actually log in... lol!
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  200. #200
    Devo
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    $54... collect

    this really sucks...

    i made a $50 collect phone call! what?
    yup
    called from the pay phone in Big Sur to Monterey for 30 minutes, and it cost $54 when all said and done.

    so there i am all braggin about $3/night bike camping, living on the cheap...

    i blow it on a crazy expensive collect call. holy smokes!

    i guess I'm lookin for a calling card... gee... do you think?

    $54! thats just pathetic! and to think that i actually did the dialing and the yapping!

    dooh!

    so i'm looking at
    http://www.callingcards.com/shopping...estination=USA
    1 cent/min...

    so be careful out there... for all of us on the cheap... beware the Public Phone Collect call trap....
    Last edited by SelfPropelledDevo; 06-17-2008 at 07:32 PM.
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