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  1. #1
    josephr
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    Transporting the Lefty?

    Looks like I'm picking up my RZ120.3 next weekend from my LBS. My problem now is how do I get the thing home? I'd like to ride it home, but thats not really gonna be practical.
    I have a Yakima roof rack with the copperhead fork-mount system. I've looked at the Yakima site and there's a Lefty adapter that they sell for $69 but it looks sort of cumbersome. Also, given this my first Lefty --- is it going to be a pain in the rear removing and replacing the front wheel, installing the adapter for the roof rack, etc?

    I'm a low-hassle sort of a guy. Just thinking that if I'm gonna spend $69 on an adapter, I might be better off switching to an upright type rack mount?

    Suggestions?????????
    Thanks!
    Joe

  2. #2
    NEPMCPMBA President
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    It's a pain to remove the wheel and replace everytime you drive somewhere to ride... get a different rack.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by RoyDean
    It's a pain to remove the wheel and replace everytime you drive somewhere to ride... get a different rack.
    Seconded. Plus, I don't think it's really good for the bearings to be pressing them (which is essentially what you're doing when you put the Lefty hub on the fork) everytime you go for a ride. You've gotta get a new tray, like a Raptor, Cobra or High Roller, all Yakima trays.
    "An intelligent man is sometimes forced to be drunk to spend time with his fools. -Ernest Hemingway

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by RoyDean
    It's a pain to remove the wheel and replace everytime you drive somewhere to ride... get a different rack.
    Agreed. I would get a different rack like the Thule T2 as seen here:

    '15 Niner RLT 9
    '13 Pugsley Necromancer
    '13 Bad Boy 5
    '09 F29 2
    '08 Rush SL 5Z (650b)
    '00 F2000SL

  5. #5
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    saris thelma

  6. #6
    Mr. Knowitall
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    Thule Proride is a good one.

  7. #7
    Keep it Simple Stupid!!!
    Reputation: Steel Freak's Avatar
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    Hope I ride to the Trail Head and have a truck with 8ft bed but

    Id get one of the Racks Pictured Above. Taking that wheel on and off would get old really quick. I did it once to transport the Caffeine in my GF's car.
    Who cares how much gas you save, ride your bike to work because it's fun!!!!!!!

  8. #8
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    I use the Thule Criterium now and it is the best way by far to carry a bike. I have used the Sportworks Bob for years in the past (which is exactly the rack that thule markets now as posted above) and the criterium is a step above with regard to ease of loading and security of the bike. No doubt get the criterium, you will not be sorry.

    The bob is fine but it is bulky and more cumbersome to load the bike, the front tire must be fully inflated or it's not secure and after a couple years the huge arm would bang a little on my roof when going over bumps and such which is just annoying.

    Case closed no need for more posts, get the criterium!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctorsti
    I use the Thule Criterium now and it is the best way by far to carry a bike. I have used the Sportworks Bob for years in the past (which is exactly the rack that thule markets now as posted above) and the criterium is a step above with regard to ease of loading and security of the bike. No doubt get the criterium, you will not be sorry.

    The bob is fine but it is bulky and more cumbersome to load the bike, the front tire must be fully inflated or it's not secure and after a couple years the huge arm would bang a little on my roof when going over bumps and such which is just annoying.

    Case closed no need for more posts, get the criterium!
    Get a Honda Element, you can push your bike straight in and bungee it up and you are done , 30 secs each end. Done it with a Bad Boy , Rize 3 and with a bit more time ,several small Yamahas.

  10. #10
    josephr
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    Thanks guys! Exactly what I needed to know plus a lot more! The deal here is the best way is working with the Lefty. Probably gonna stick with the roof rack mount system for now and get an upright tray for the Yakima. Maybe in the future can move to a trailer-hitch mount.

  11. #11
    Vermonter to the Core
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    I have the same bike an I love it!! I use a upright yakama roof mount and on my wife Jeep it has one that goes through the frame...
    JEM
    09 Marlin Disc
    2010 Cannondale RZ 120....
    2011 Trek XO Crossbike
    .......... __o
    ......... -\<
    ........(_)/(_)

  12. #12
    josephr
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    new king cobra on amazon.com for $120...included shipping....not bad!

  13. #13
    Scalpel Fan
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    I have a Thule Bigmouth for my roof. It is fine except that it grips the downtube. The sidearm is a better choice. I'm picking up the 916XT for my 4Runner hitch ASAP. Roof racks are for the birds.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
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    Anyone have issues with transporting a Lefty, with a fork-up adapter, on a fork-mount rack? Maybe it's just me, but my rebuild and bearing migration schedules seem shortened by having the fork mounted to the roof rack.

  15. #15
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    I travel a lot for work and I would like to take me new RZ120-3 with me. I drive a 07 Toyota Tacoma with a topper. I know that a hitch mount rack would be the easiest to use, but I'm not sure that I want to subject my bike to three thousand miles a month on the back of my truck. I think that I would like to put the bike inside my truck, but to do this I would need to remove the front wheel. Would I have to worry about the hub or spindle getting damaged while in transport??

  16. #16
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    I can't see how either would get damaged. After borrowing a friend's bike with a Lefty for a week I found it to actually be *easier* than using a standard quick release.

    With a quick release you're dealing with unscrewing anyway to get around the lawyer lips. You're consistently adjusting it to get it tight.

    The caliper is easy. Loosen the lower bolt a few turns, loosen the upper enough that it rotates up and away from the rotor and then just snug the bolt down so the caliper stays in place.

    With an allen key I thought it was easier than a quick release.

    -Steve

  17. #17
    mtbr member
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    We use the Yakima upright racks and they work fine, very easy, easier than quick releases etc., grab the bike and ride, then throw it up on the roof, crank and strap and move on to beer time

  18. #18
    josephr
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    Quote Originally Posted by River19
    We use the Yakima upright racks and they work fine, very easy, easier than quick releases etc., grab the bike and ride, then throw it up on the roof, crank and strap and move on to beer time


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