Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: fondoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    250

    clipless pedals?

    okay, its time to invest in clipless pedals. which one do you guys recommend from shimano or from crank brothers??
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    2013 Cannonale Jekyll 3 M

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: StumpyElite2010's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    513
    Eggbeaters...light, durable, no adjustments needed.
    I have it on all my bikes - never had a problem.
    S.C. TB2
    Flash29C2
    Niner One9 SingleSpeed RDO fork
    Supersix Evo 1 Hi Mod D/A

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: fondoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    250
    is it easier to pull out than shimanos SPDs?
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    2013 Cannonale Jekyll 3 M

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: StumpyElite2010's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    513
    Cant; compare to the Shimano, but it's very easy to pull out.
    Once it gets a bit worn, after a few rides, you just need to think about un-clipping and it will do it for you...
    S.C. TB2
    Flash29C2
    Niner One9 SingleSpeed RDO fork
    Supersix Evo 1 Hi Mod D/A

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: limba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,938
    Quote Originally Posted by fondoo View Post
    is it easier to pull out than shimanos SPDs?
    NO. It's slightly harder. You may not even notice the difference but Eggs/Time pedals require a greater foot twist angle to release than Shimano/Ritchey. I've owned all of these pedals for years and still can't get used to Eggs/Times. I prefer SPD's release point.
    Eggs are notorious for breaking. I tore the body right off of the spindle. Lots of people have. Pretty much everyone has broken their Eggs within a few years. The good news is Crankbrothers are awesome for warranties and replacing/rebuilding stuff
    .
    Cheap Shimano pedals are heavy but bombproof. The new XTR pedals seem to be hit or miss for durability.
    If you ride in mud/snow get Eggs/Times. Eggs if you want light weight, Time if you want durability.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: StumpyElite2010's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    513
    I believe that most EB reliability issues were fixed with the 2011 models (released in 2010).
    BTW, I am riding in dry conditions (SoCal) so it may be easier on my pedals..
    S.C. TB2
    Flash29C2
    Niner One9 SingleSpeed RDO fork
    Supersix Evo 1 Hi Mod D/A

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    825
    I have made the switch once and for all after 20+ years on flats. I have tried them all and failed miserably in the past. Someone talked me into trying the Shimanos again. The new Shimanos are by far the best, for me anyway... they are fully adjustable, they have a small platform, and are relatively inexpensive (although they are a little heavier). My son ran Crankbrothers and always had problems with them. He has also switched to the Shimanos and loves them...

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: fondoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    250
    i picked up a pair of shimano mo77 tonight from REI. i've decided to go shimano spd

    i am considering the following:
    PD-M980
    PD-M985
    PD-A530 so i could flip between flat and clipless.

    which one do you guys recommend?
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    2013 Cannonale Jekyll 3 M

  9. #9
    LA CHÈVRE
    Reputation: Dan Gerous's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    9,429
    Quote Originally Posted by StumpyElite2010 View Post
    I believe that most EB reliability issues were fixed with the 2011 models (released in 2010).
    BTW, I am riding in dry conditions (SoCal) so it may be easier on my pedals..
    No they didn't really. The bushing wearing through the axles is fixed on the Eggbeaters 3 and 11 as they now use needle bearings where the bushings used to be... but the bearing seals are still weak (they need frequent rebuild) and the springs and body can still break quite easily.

    Here's my take after years on SPD's and years on Eggbeaters:

    Shimano are the king of durabilty. Even if you never touch them, they will last years, I think after the end of the world, all the Shimano SPD pedals will still work. Bearings are durable without much attention. They do weigh a lot though but they're mostly made of metal (which probably helps make them last so long). They also hate mud and snow. They pack up easily and it gets harder to clip in. What I hated the most though is that, no matter how I adjusted the cleat position or the tension, they were never consistent. It's very hard to set them so they clip in and out easily while still holding the cleat well. They need a lot of spring tension so the foot doesn't pull out. I like some float so I could never find the sweet spot of having a little bit of rotational looseness while still holding the cleats tightly, I often pulled out of them while pedaling hard, a combination of the small release angle and the spring tension adjustement I prefered. And perhaps because of their sensitivity to mud, dirt and air molecules, they can sometimes be hard to voluntarily clip in and out while sometimes they go in and out like butter. I was never happy with any SPD, Shimano, Ritchey, VP...

    Eggbeaters are the lightest, they work very well even in mud and snow and they are, I think, much easier to clip-in and out of. The effort to get in and out is easy and always exactly the same unlike SPD. They also provide a little more float (in my case, the bigger release angle is a plus). Their design though is a mirror so the underside of the pedal is connected to the top that holds your cleat. It happens that you hit a rock with the underside and that opens the mechanism and your foot pull out... I can probably count on one hand the times it happened to me in... 7-8 years of use I'd say so it's not a deal breaker IMO. The big negative to Crank Brothers pedals is that they are not very durable. I needed to rebuild mine very often otherwise they seize. I had a pair of Eggbeaters 11 completely seize where I couldn't even turn them after a single cyclocross race this year. Same thing happened with some Eggbeaters 3 last year. They're also the most fragile pedals, even the new ones. I had at least 1 pedal failure per season, one year I snapped 4 Eggbeaters. It's not always immediatly after an impact so they give no warning. I had a pair on a road bike once, I felt a looseness all of a sudden and a spring had just snapped in two. I don't know where Crank Brothers source their metal from but it's just so brittle. It's like their mini-tools, the hex wrenches are made of metal so soft, if you over-tighten a plastic bolt, it's not the bolt that will strip, it's the tool! It's too bad, I like the Eggbeater's design, it's well thought of and when they work, they're my favorite pedals, they feel good, they're light, they perform the same no matter the condition so I endured the multiple failures over the years but the execution is quite poor. Looking at everything the company makes, they seem to put most of the focus on the designs, sometimes over-designing things, make things pretty but don't build quality products. At least, the company still stand behind their product so even when out of warranty, they'll fix pedals for not much. But I got tired to walk back home after a failure so....

    I now switched to Time pedals. They're heavier than the Eggbeaters but, much more reliable and they don't need much maintenance, the bearings are well sealed. The float is similar to the Eggbeaters as is their consistency of clipping in and out and they also work quite well even when it's muddy. I've just been on them this season but so far so good. And Time has just announced the replacements for the ATAX XS line, the new ATAC CX are pretty much the same but they lost something like 40 grams.

    Personally, a bigger or smaller platform or no platform at all is a non factor. I never ride unclipped, Eggbeaters and Times are so easy to clip into that you can clip right into them as soon as you put your foot on them so I don't see the point of riding unclipped. And the old idea that bigger platforms transfer power better is just true if you have crappy shoes with a flexy sole.

    DAN.GEROUS.NET : MOUNTAIN BIKING : CYCLOCROSS : ROAD :

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Schott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    586
    I don't like the flat/clipless combo option for a Mtb, especially if you haven't been using them for a while. Having to worry about the pedal being on the correct side when trying to remount your bike in a tricky section, just another thing to worry about. I have a pair on my commuter and like them ok, but they are heavy too.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: StumpyElite2010's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    513
    Dan,
    All my CB pedals are from the 2011 1 series - i.e bushings, so maybe that's explains it's durability

    I have 4 of those on all my bikes, with over 2k miles per year for the last 2 years or so an no real issues.
    I didn't even replace the cleats yet. I rotated it 180 degrees when one of them became too loose.
    The great thing is that I use the same shoe (Sidi)) for all my bikes (including road)
    Couldn't get used to the stupid road cleats and the 1-way entry Shimano road pedal...

    In any case, EB really works for me, I don't have any complaints.
    S.C. TB2
    Flash29C2
    Niner One9 SingleSpeed RDO fork
    Supersix Evo 1 Hi Mod D/A

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    244
    XT pedals with multidirectional release cleats. Easier to release than Crank Bros and Times in my experience. Crank Bros were a bit easier to clip back in, but I prefer getting unclipped faster and easier.

  13. #13
    LA CHÈVRE
    Reputation: Dan Gerous's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    9,429
    Quote Originally Posted by StumpyElite2010 View Post
    Dan,
    All my CB pedals are from the 2011 1 series - i.e bushings, so maybe that's explains it's durability

    I have 4 of those on all my bikes, with over 2k miles per year for the last 2 years or so an no real issues.
    I didn't even replace the cleats yet. I rotated it 180 degrees when one of them became too loose.
    The great thing is that I use the same shoe (Sidi)) for all my bikes (including road)
    Couldn't get used to the stupid road cleats and the 1-way entry Shimano road pedal...

    In any case, EB really works for me, I don't have any complaints.
    Perhaps... I think the needle bearings might push the grease out of the pedal quicker than a bushing or cartridge bearings, same thing happens to me with Speedplay road pedals, I love those (the more free float the better for me) but they need new grease after each wet ride, but crappy seals on road pedals isn't as much of a big deal as pedals that should handle mud, water, dust, dirt... But maybe I ride in crappier conditions (I ride rain or shine, in the summer heat or the snowed, cold winter)... And I put more milage on mine...

    My post above is my personal opinion, preference and experience, not the absolute truth... Take it for what it is.

    DAN.GEROUS.NET : MOUNTAIN BIKING : CYCLOCROSS : ROAD :

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: limba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,938
    I can't stand the float on Eggs and Time. It feels like I'm on ice. It drives me insane. I like my junk Ritcheys better than my 4ti. Eggs.

    You really have to try them for yourself to figure out what works for you. Dan loves the float, I hate it, some people don't even notice it's there.

  15. #15
    LA CHÈVRE
    Reputation: Dan Gerous's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    9,429
    Quote Originally Posted by limba View Post
    I can't stand the float on Eggs and Time. It feels like I'm on ice. It drives me insane. I like my junk Ritcheys better than my 4ti. Eggs.

    You really have to try them for yourself to figure out what works for you. Dan loves the float, I hate it, some people don't even notice it's there.
    Yup, there is not one product that's perfect for all. But limba, wanna trade your 4ti Eggs for my old Ritcheys?

    DAN.GEROUS.NET : MOUNTAIN BIKING : CYCLOCROSS : ROAD :

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: limba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,938
    Uh no, I think I'll pass on that.

    Edit: I did a (unintentional) muddy ride today with my new XT pedals. I did the same thing a few months in the exact same area and tore off my rear derailleur because it was so muddy. The pedals sucked. I could jam my foot into them but it was tough to get out. I also noticed I can't clip out at the top of my pedal stroke. I think I can clip out of my other pedals anywhere in the circumference.
    I can even twist my foot to the inside and clip out of some pedals. I couldn't do that on my new XT's.
    Last edited by limba; 12-04-2012 at 09:37 AM. Reason: Adding info.

  17. #17
    Helmetless Crasher
    Reputation: Stumpjumpy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,071
    the eggs are great in terms of performancw and light weight - but require frequent re-greasing and eventual replacement of the needle-bearings (like 2x a year).
    '95 M2 StumpJumper FS
    '11 Cannondale RZ 120-two

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: fondoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    250
    thanks for everyones advice. i've decided to go with the shimano PD-M985 and SH56 cleats
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    2013 Cannonale Jekyll 3 M

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    1,253
    Quote Originally Posted by fondoo View Post
    thanks for everyones advice. i've decided to go with the shimano PD-M985 and SH56 cleats
    When I was deciding on which SPD pedals to use, I chose the XT version of the trail platform pedal, the PD-M785 over the PD-M985. There are only a few grams (10g according to Shimano web site) difference in mass but many, many $$$$ difference. Competitive Cyclist has the XTR PD-M985 pedals for $243 and the XT PD-M785 for $135.

    There really isn't much meaningful difference between them as far as I could discern.

    I can't say anything about the multi-directional release cleats, the SH56, but I have never had a problem with the standard SH51 cleats either that I could discern would have helped me avoid injury. I would rather be clipped to the pedal securely and by now, it is an unconscious movement to release. My guess is that you will quickly decide the same after releasing from the pedal at the most inopportune time, when you don't think you should.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: fondoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    250
    i couldnt justify paying $290-$300 on the M985 pedals from all the LBS. so i decided to pick them up at amazon.com for $150.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    2013 Cannonale Jekyll 3 M

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    1,253
    Quote Originally Posted by fondoo View Post
    i couldnt justify paying $290-$300 on the M985 pedals from all the LBS. so i decided to pick them up at amazon.com for $150.
    $150 for the XTR pedals is a pretty good price. Good score! Of course, on Amazon, I see the XT pedals for ~$80. That $80 is about what I paid at Performance Bike for one set of my XT pedals.

  22. #22
    Music & Bikes
    Reputation: fokof's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,404
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Gerous View Post
    , I think after the end of the world, all the Shimano SPD pedals will still work.
    Good to know that they'll still work in January !


    Pedal wise , I'm a big fan of Speedplays , road and MTB.
    Lots and lots of float , easy In/Out , good with sow/mud.

    Their only drawback is that you need shoes with very high rubber to fit the cleat.
    "There is a big difference between kneeling down and bending over" -FZ

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.