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  1. #101
    fc
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    Quote Originally Posted by isleblue65 View Post
    Im 64 210 geared up. 35 inseam. Average shoulder width and reach for my height.

    Now I have 30-ish rides on this bike, and Im trying to love the bar width. Im honestly not seeing a whole lot of advantages. Slightly more stability with the wider stance, and maybe less twitchy in rock gardens.

    ...
    It is not easy to tell you outright the advantages of wide bars. It is something that is felt and learned. The more someone has weighting and cornering background, the easier it is to understand.

    It took me 20 years. And I'm just starting to see the light. Cornering is the greatest pursuit of all since it is very easy to do but impossible to master.

    But essentially, it is give you more control, more leverage, weighting, precision with your bars and bike. Downhillers do it well. Enduro riders understand to but EWS riders have to trim their bars since many of the courses don't let them fit through the fresh cut trails, traveling at 30+ mph.

    Here is one of the best riders today illustrating how it's done.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vbzC...youtu.be&t=372
    IPA will save America

  2. #102
    I dig trails!
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    I popped myself off the South Yuba trail doing the same thing the OP did. I cheated too far to the inside, hit the handlebars on the inside cut cliff, and it popped me off the outside of the trail with me jumping off on a near cliff.

    Lucky for me the DG was soft and deep as I sunk my feet up to my ankles but was able to stick the landing. Otherwise it would have been a couple hundred foot tumble down to the river.

    I was riding a friends bike for the first time and it had wide handlebars.

    I ride 800s now, and am more conscious of the bar ends, but will still occasionally tag a tree. Some armor on the outer fingers is definately a friend.

    Rode up in Bend Oregon last week and there were tree gaps I had to stop and walk through. Yeow!

    The used to be one spot after a switchback on Butcher in Downieville, where a large embedded boulder would try to grab the bars, but thankfully we widened the trail a bit, so the risk is much less. There are still plenty of bar marks on the rock.

    P

  3. #103
    I dig trails!
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    Regarding SBTS, part of our mandate is to improve local economies, and help to preserve the mountain way of life. Part of that includes having houses available to live in the communities.

    That has lead us to The Lure... more on that later and in a separate thread.

    Good things coming!

    P

  4. #104
    wretch
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.P View Post
    Regarding SBTS, part of our mandate is to improve local economies, and help to preserve the mountain way of life. Part of that includes having houses available to live in the communities.

    That has lead us to The Lure... more on that later and in a separate thread.

    Good things coming!

    P
    Just heard about that - congrats!

  5. #105
    Rollin 29s
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    CUT IT!!!!

    If you have many trail situations where the bars barely fit, it's just not going to work.
    Actually not a whole lot of situations, but I think enough to tip the balance. Considering I've had to modify my riding style, I've hurt myself twice, and of course the most harrowing close call I've had in 20+ years of riding at Downieville - the disadvantages after 30 rides outweigh the benefits. I'm going to start with 5mm off each end of the bar to go to 170mm and see if I want to go further.

    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    It is not easy to tell you outright the advantages of wide bars. It is something that is felt and learned. The more someone has weighting and cornering background, the easier it is to understand.

    It took me 20 years. And I'm just starting to see the light. Cornering is the greatest pursuit of all since it is very easy to do but impossible to master.

    But essentially, it is give you more control, more leverage, weighting, precision with your bars and bike. Downhillers do it well. Enduro riders understand to but EWS riders have to trim their bars since many of the courses don't let them fit through the fresh cut trails, traveling at 30+ mph.

    Here is one of the best riders today illustrating how it's done.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vbzC...youtu.be&t=372
    Nice video! I've been watching quite a few videos lately on cornering, weight leveraging and bike setup. I don't think 160mm or 150mm bars are going to hinder my ability to properly handle the bike - even as I improve to the point I can handle corners half as well as the pros, and the upside is that I will be able to enjoy my rides more without worrying about fitting through things or fracturing my fingers.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.P View Post
    I popped myself off the South Yuba trail doing the same thing the OP did. I cheated too far to the inside, hit the handlebars on the inside cut cliff, and it popped me off the outside of the trail with me jumping off on a near cliff.

    Lucky for me the DG was soft and deep as I sunk my feet up to my ankles but was able to stick the landing. Otherwise it would have been a couple hundred foot tumble down to the river.

    I was riding a friends bike for the first time and it had wide handlebars.

    I ride 800s now, and am more conscious of the bar ends, but will still occasionally tag a tree. Some armor on the outer fingers is definately a friend.

    Rode up in Bend Oregon last week and there were tree gaps I had to stop and walk through. Yeow!

    The used to be one spot after a switchback on Butcher in Downieville, where a large embedded boulder would try to grab the bars, but thankfully we widened the trail a bit, so the risk is much less. There are still plenty of bar marks on the rock.

    P
    Scary - I know the feeling!


    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.P View Post
    Regarding SBTS, part of our mandate is to improve local economies, and help to preserve the mountain way of life. Part of that includes having houses available to live in the communities.

    That has lead us to The Lure... more on that later and in a separate thread.

    Good things coming!

    P
    Nice! Congrats. DVille is an awesome place, not just because it's a mountain biking mecca. Important to keep it from being carried away by tourist vacation home dollars. A similar situation impacted Montana where I lived near Flathead Lake. Skyrocketing home values (mostly Californian's vacation homes) priced locals out. The government grant situation wasn't as much of a factor in MT.

    Quote Originally Posted by benja55 View Post
    As for the town, there is magic in that place.
    I agree! I've always loved small mountain towns, but DVille is the only place in California I've been that strikes a cord with me. Every time I go, I feel like I'm home.
    Whoever invented the bicycle deserves the thanks of humanity.
    - Lord Charles Beresford

  6. #106
    fc
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    Quote Originally Posted by isleblue65 View Post
    Im 64 210 geared up. 35 inseam. Average shoulder width and reach for my height.

    Now I have 30-ish rides on this bike, and Im trying to love the bar width. Im honestly not seeing a whole lot of advantages. Slightly more stability with the wider stance, and maybe less twitchy in rock gardens.

    ....


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    30 rides????????

    That's pretty good. Very good!!
    IPA will save America

  7. #107
    Rollin 29s
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    30 rides????????

    That's pretty good. Very good!!
    More than normal! 2 riding camping trips happened during that time with more than one ride each day, and then my normal 3 to 4 rides per week. High 20s at least.


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    Whoever invented the bicycle deserves the thanks of humanity.
    - Lord Charles Beresford

  8. #108
    Rollin 29s
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    760 = so far so good. Less twitchy and less steering input on climbs for some reason. Wider bars give a better solid base feeling going downhill, and cornering but by minuscule amounts, and not outweighed by the disadvantages (for me). My shoulder width is about 21.5. 760cm is 30. This feels a lot more natural, wrists are more aligned in a straight line from my elbows through middle knuckle rather than my wrist angled outward in natural riding position.





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    Whoever invented the bicycle deserves the thanks of humanity.
    - Lord Charles Beresford

  9. #109
    fc
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    I have these cool bars that let you change your mind

    Ibis
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