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  1. #1
    Obi
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    Well look who got caught! (Again)

    PD did a bait bike sting this week and they caught Powell. Most of us in the local industry are very familiar with his face. He's a career bike thief. How many times will he be released just to steal again before people wake up and find a way to keep him in jail?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Well look who got caught! (Again)-michaelpowell.jpg  


  2. #2
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    How frustrating.

    Dude needs a hand lopped off.
    I wouldn't even get my hair cut except it's near the liquor store and it seems like my eyebrows need trimming now and then.

  3. #3
    J-Flo
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    Maybe someone should tell the Saudis hes been spreading fake news about MBS.


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  4. #4
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    Next time they setup a bait bike, they should put a small needle coated in the poison from a puffer fish to quickly "disable" the perps and aid in apprehension, with antidote on hand of course and if this guy (or any like him) takes the bait, just take a little longer to administer the antidote - people trip, bottles/syringes gets broken
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  5. #5
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    I guess 3 Strikes doesn't apply in this situation.
    Hunt Hard, Kill Swiftly, Waste Nothing, Offer No Apologies...

  6. #6
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    It's seriously time for new thinking on crime. We've been doing the same damn thing for centuries with nothing to show for it except that we incarcerate more people, both gross and per capita, than any nation on earth.

    Because this guy apparently is semi-famous, what's his deal? Is he an addict?

  7. #7
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwiceHorn View Post
    It's seriously time for new thinking on crime. We've been doing the same damn thing for centuries with nothing to show for it except that we incarcerate more people, both gross and per capita, than any nation on earth.

    Because this guy apparently is semi-famous, what's his deal? Is he an addict?
    We always want to apply our own standards and mindset to these situations, figuring the other person is as rational as we are and that with knowledge of consequences, they wouldn't do bad things. That's great for us, but for these people that do irrational things, it wouldn't matter if there was a death penalty, the first time they got away with it they'd become "normalized" and they'd continue to do it until caught. There has to be a systematic approach to it and there needs to be punishment (for some reason whenever we start talking reform people that support just doing what we've always done start screaming that the other side wants no consequences), but there also needs to be reform to prevent recidivism and to ensure that police and detectives have the resources they need. In my city, they are too busy with stabbings and shootings to do anything in this regard. Sad, but what are you going to do with limited resources? And then just like you said, you just build more and more prisons and don't seem to actually make any dent.

    One thing is sure, never ever leave your bike unattended out of your control.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  8. #8
    Mr. Buck E. Fikes
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    He will NEVER serve his due because Californians continue to elect politicians that are soft on crime, over and over again. Criminals of this nature get a free pass and there is NOTHING you can do about it.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    He will NEVER serve his due because Californians continue to elect politicians that are soft on crime, over and over again. Criminals of this nature get a free pass and there is NOTHING you can do about it.
    So true. Illegal trail poachers should all have their bikes confiscated.

  10. #10
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    Well look who got caught! (Again)

    Quote Originally Posted by ohmygato View Post
    So true. Illegal trail poachers should all have their bikes confiscated.
    Every person at some point in their lives is Jean Valjean, they have to decide what they will do with the silverware.

    But in the case of poaching trails on public land, the local government has become more like Javert.

    This is a story that has been written about and debated millions and millions of times. Best explained by Victor Hugo.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    He will NEVER serve his due because Californians continue to elect politicians that are soft on crime, over and over again. Criminals of this nature get a free pass and there is NOTHING you can do about it.
    What do you propose to do with this guy? Execute him? Life in prison at $20k/year? He's 40, so that's a solid $500k to spend, conservatively.

    News reports indicate he's a meth addict and homeless, which may also indicate a fairly serious mental illness, e.g. schizophrenia.

    In the grand scheme, a bike thief, even if he manages to get an S-works or equivalent every six months, is a petty thief.

    "Tough on crime" is a moronic and thoughtless stance on real problems that deserve real solutions.

  12. #12
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    I really don't understand why we don't use the imprisoned more as a work force. Not the old chain gangs of old, but it seems like they could be utilized in ways that would benefit all parties; society gets work done and they gain some work skills that could benefit them when they are released. I will admit, I know very little of what I am taking about.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Remember, there's always quilting and knitting if pedalling becomes too tough.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finch Platte View Post
    How frustrating.

    Dude needs a hand lopped off.
    He would just turn to stealing unicycles.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwiceHorn View Post

    "Tough on crime" is a moronic and thoughtless stance on real problems that deserve real solutions.
    I have a friend who spent 9 years in Folsom. Now, one of the greatest guys youd ever meet. He opened my eyes on just how tough we actually are on certain kinds of crime.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    I have a friend who spent 9 years in Folsom. Now, one of the greatest guys youd ever meet. He opened my eyes on just how tough we actually are on certain kinds of crime.
    Yeah, there's a real social cost to our current criminal justice system in addition to the vast sums we flush down the toilet incarcerating people. Part of the problem is that we as a country abandoned any semblance of public mental health services a while back.

    I don't know what the exact solutions are, but I guarantee that doing what we've been doing (Tough on crime!) ain't it.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by the_kman View Post
    He would just turn to stealing unicycles.
    Maybe looping off one foot is a better solution?

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwiceHorn View Post
    What do you propose to do with this guy? Execute him? Life in prison at $20k/year? He's 40, so that's a solid $500k to spend, conservatively.
    I propose we cut his balls off and get him hired at the local boys choir. Then we should go rampage through all the homeless camps in Pogonip and let them feel the wrath of our studded tires in their butt cracks because they lit all this shit on fire and we as mountain bikers are God's gift to Santa Cruz.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ohmygato View Post
    I propose we cut his balls off and get him hired at the local boys choir. Then we should go rampage through all the homeless camps in Pogonip and let them feel the wrath of our studded tires in their butt cracks because they lit all this shit on fire and we as mountain bikers are God's gift to Santa Cruz.
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    I really don't understand why we don't use the imprisoned more as a work force. Not the old chain gangs of old, but it seems like they could be utilized in ways that would benefit all parties; society gets work done and they gain some work skills that could benefit them when they are released. I will admit, I know very little of what I am taking about.
    I had some court appointed work days to do back in the late 90's. It was in Sonoma County. I would meet at the county work yard, the same place the inmates would meet, we would grab a bunch of tools, rain gear, what ever we needed and pile into a van. Sonoma had a contract with Marin County at the time, we worked in China Camp, Samuel P Taylor and a couple other parks down here. We did a bunch of clean up after the Russian River flooded too. I only had to do 20 days but there were people that had to do up to 120 days on these crews. It was way better than serving time in county jail and we actually got a lot done.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    I really don't understand why we don't use the imprisoned more as a work force. Not the old chain gangs of old, but it seems like they could be utilized in ways that would benefit all parties; society gets work done and they gain some work skills that could benefit them when they are released. I will admit, I know very little of what I am taking about.
    So because they are incarcerated they should be allowed to be exploited by industry as a cheap/free workforce? No easy answers my friend. If it was easy it would be fixed by now.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jetta2010 View Post
    So because they are incarcerated they should be allowed to be exploited by industry as a cheap/free workforce? No easy answers my friend. If it was easy it would be fixed by now.
    Its the taxpayers who are currently being exploited.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    Its the taxpayers who are currently being exploited.
    Yup - no reason they shouldn't pitch in to help earn their keep if able.
    Probably a lesson many should've learned earlier.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jetta2010 View Post
    So because they are incarcerated they should be allowed to be exploited by industry as a cheap/free workforce? No easy answers my friend. If it was easy it would be fixed by now.
    No, I don't think they should be "rented out" to a commercial enterprise. I was thinking more public service. I *think* the guys that work at the dump (which I rarely visit) are from the nearby prison. It would be difficult to find appropriate work, you'd also not want to cause problems of them competing with regular workers. But more along the lines of what sfgiantsfan mentioned.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Remember, there's always quilting and knitting if pedalling becomes too tough.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by the_kman View Post
    He would just turn to stealing unicycles.
    Comedy gold. Thanks!

    Which city nabbed Mr. Powell (this time)?
    The broken are the more evolved. Rejoice.

  25. #25
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    Ever had a bike stolen? As a city bike commuter, I've had four stolen in four years.

    I'm beyond tired - I'm DISGuSTeD with cops who show up and say, "get over it. It's petty crime. Call your insurance company."

    No. It's a fcuking felony to steal thousands of dollars. The cops just dont care that my bike wasn't an $89 Huffy. In fact, they think I'm an idiot for spending more than $89 at Walmart.

    Do they say that to people who had their cars stolen? "You should have bought a Yugo?"

    I would struggle with NOT shooting this guy...

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  26. #26
    J-Flo
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwiceHorn View Post
    What do you propose to do with this guy? Execute him? Life in prison at $20k/year? He's 40, so that's a solid $500k to spend, conservatively.

    News reports indicate he's a meth addict and homeless, which may also indicate a fairly serious mental illness, e.g. schizophrenia.

    In the grand scheme, a bike thief, even if he manages to get an S-works or equivalent every six months, is a petty thief.

    "Tough on crime" is a moronic and thoughtless stance on real problems that deserve real solutions.
    The smart approach would be to use this guy to get his fence. Then lock that fukker up good. The people who pay cash to tweakers for stolen bikes make the real profit from the theft, and their existence encourages and enables the theft. If it werent so easy for a tweaker to convert a stolen $5000 bike into $500 cash, it would happen less.

  27. #27
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    I have not seen mentioned in this thread anything about how this theft/crime issue being discussed has been compounded by the change in laws voted in by the citizens of our fine State of California. The laws that reduced previous felonies to misdemeanors, the laws that released from incarceration felons who were facing many years in prison who suddenly had their sentences reduced, the laws that reduce the punishments given out by the courts when convicting criminals.

    The voters made this happen...

    As far as the cop who doesn't want to spend any time on your reported bike theft, he has that attitude because your case will only result in the bad-guy getting punished on the level of a parking ticket...not worth the little time each beat cop has to spend on the thousand calls they have to respond to every day.

    As far as this Powell dirtbag not getting the punishment many here have voiced they desire...the voters made sure his type will never have to spend time incarcerated. The punishment for his kind of criminal has been reduced to nothing...as has the person who breaks into your vehicle to steal whatever is there, or the person who breaks into your house and burglarizes the place, or the person who steals from a business, etc. Criminals are emboldened, they KNOW they will no longer get punished, they know law enforcement will not follow up, they know YOU can do nothing about it.

    Doesn't matter what kind of politicians are sitting in the State Capitol building (aka "The F*ckup Factory")...they may not be tough on crime, but that is immaterial when the citizens decide to vote in a law or change in law. The politicians are not responsible here....the citizens are.

    Reminds me of something V said in V for Vendetta:

    "if you're looking for the guilty, you need only look into a mirror."
    "You're messing with my zen thing, man!"

  28. #28
    Mr. Buck E. Fikes
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    He will NEVER serve his due because Californians continue to elect politicians that are soft on crime, over and over again. Criminals of this nature get a free pass and there is NOTHING you can do about it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bokchoicowboy View Post
    I have not seen mentioned in this thread anything about how this theft/crime issue being discussed has been compounded by the change in laws voted in by the citizens of our fine State of California. The laws that reduced previous felonies to misdemeanors, the laws that released from incarceration felons who were facing many years in prison who suddenly had their sentences reduced, the laws that reduce the punishments given out by the courts when convicting criminals.

    The voters made this happen...
    Well, that was really where I was going with that first statement. Prop 47 came to mind and I forgot the other. But, yes....you are spot on and I'm glad you weighed in as I expected this might be your response. I have numerous very close friends, CHP, SO, PD as well as 5 immediate neighbors that are LEO and Correctional Officers. They were all vehemently against those props because they had a solid understanding of the faces that would end up back on our streets...and they were ALL correct. We're at the tip of the iceberg, nowhere close to seeing the ultimate end result of these actions.

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