Walk of shame...the unfixable walk home.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Walk of shame...the unfixable walk home.

    I made the long walk of shame today.

    The ride was intended to be an exploration of the wild string of hidden fire roads I recently discovered in my extended backyard and an easy run home. What turned into a jungle romp from hell, found myself a good 10 miles from ground zero, deep in the woods, with a snapped derailleur hanger high up in the LG hills. A failed attempt at turning my bike into a single speed (apparently I don't know the secrets of the trade well enough to MacGyver my way out of that fix), I started my long, sad trek home. Half way up, my wheel just decided to come off, nice. 2 miles of pushing the rig, rat bastard face bugs who know when you are slogging, and a darkening sky, I finally crested and was able to coast a good portion down with some finely placed skate board-esk foot pushes. Then I hit Downtown where it was mostly taking that long walk of shame. "Look at that loser" faces said as I hung my head and pushed on; cleats uncomfortably clacking along as blisters formed. The walk of shame.

    Finally made it home and needed a beer at the local 7-11. On my way, spotted another rider making the walk of shame with a flat tire and no fix on hand. Did the right thing and gave him a ride home that would have equalled my miserable trek.

    Walk of shame...what's your story?
    I'm not sure how this works.

  2. #2
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    Never had a problem I couldn't fix, my walk of shame was not eating enough/drinking enough water, so that when I was a block from home I had to start walking/laying out on people's front lawns.

    Then I got inside my house and puked.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by FatCloud View Post
    Never had a problem I couldn't fix, my walk of shame was not eating enough/drinking enough water, so that when I was a block from home I had to start walking/laying out on people's front lawns.

    Then I got inside my house and puked.
    Dig it...Funny shit man. Curious though...how do you deal with a snapped hanger? I tried to position the chain in different configs but it just failed every time. Opted to walk as the bugs were swarming like mad!
    I'm not sure how this works.

  4. #4
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    On one of my very few trips to Demo, my dropout bolt (1st gen Blur LT) snapped. At the top of the hill. After all of that stinking climbing. I was about 3 minutes into the descent when my rear end started wallowing. Stopped to find the 8mm bolt that screws into the end of the chainstay snapped. I did manage to ride reeeaallly smoothly down part of Sulphur Springs road and found that I could climb the fire road very carefully if I maintained steady pressure on the chain.

    And I have broken 3 pedal axles way out in the woods. Scootered home as much as I could with one pedal.

    Also broke the lower shock pivot pin.

    On my old Fisher CR-7, I snapped the bottom bracket spindle on my way home from work. Had to ride the remaining 7 miles with one foot.

    I guess I usually find a way to roll most of the time, even if I can't pedal.

  5. #5
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    My bike has horizontal drops, I've also never run into that problem! Sorry! I've heard you can use zip ties to hold the derauiller in line and just have to replace the zip ties when they snap (which can be frustrating but it will get you home).

    Quick google search came up with this: In Race Fixes - Broken Rear Derailleur

  6. #6
    rox
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    I deal with it by always carrying a spare hanger. sometimes the derailleur itself doesnt survive and thats when you walk

  7. #7
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    Unfixable, Bonehead Walk...

    Done it before too; Four of us shuttled my vehicle at the top and had a splendid DH ride, though 7 miles of buff, forest singletrack. Once at the bottom - my buddy realized he left his keys AND cellphone to his bottom shuttle car, INSIDE my summit vehicle.

    The other two watched all our bikes, as my blundering buddy and I slog up a steep, 7-mile horse trail...by foot, on cleated, MTB shoes, back to my car at the top. Two hours later- both of our shoes ate holes through both socks, gnawing massive heel and instep blisters.

    We must have burned about 3000 calories each that day...and used just about every known swear word in the planet!
    "This is a male-dominated forum... there will be lots of Testosterone sword-shaming here" ~ Kenfucius

  8. #8
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    My first long walk back to the car was at Saratoga Gap. I stood up to knock out one of the rollers on Long Ridge and the chainstay snapped in half.



    The second long walk back to the car, I'd made about half of the climb from the car to the top of Demo where the bike kept making a rubbing noise. Turns out the tire was leaning 10-15 degrees to one side and rubbing on the seat stay, because the chain stay was cracked. Attempted riding it back to the car, but it split in half in a spectacular fashion and forced me to walk back after about five feet.

    SIDIs make for crap hiking shoes.


  9. #9
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    I do have to mention my most epic walk of shame. The VERY TOP OF KENNEDY, I flatted (about 5 years ago). The spare I had broke as I pulled the pump out, bringing the nub. Stuck, I thought to fill the tire with grass...but that sucked up a storm. Ended up walking home from the very top of Kennedy down Dogmeat (my house is at the bottom of ST. Joes). Only one rider asked if I was ok...offered his spare tube...then renigged and said he might need it. Everyone else ignored me. Ahhhh, LG.

    JDub...you are a (bike) wrecking machine.

    Edit. There was one horrible walk of shame I made in Chico...but that was due to an overstay at the Bear, a beer google, and an escape that left me with one missing limb.
    Last edited by squashyo; 08-08-2013 at 09:56 PM. Reason: word
    I'm not sure how this works.

  10. #10
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    Yeah. We learned the lesson years ago: Don't stuff your tire with anything but an inflated tube. Anything else is a waste of time and will result in a damaged tire on a good day and a wrecked rim on a bad day.

  11. #11
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    I normally carry a spare hanger on me, because trying to rig a single speed on full squish is almost impossible. If you don't have a spare hanger, tying the derailler to your chainstay is the next best thing. It at least keeps it from going into your spokes and allows you to coast. Just be glad that it happened in your backyard. This happened to me about a month ago and I had driven about two hours from home. Talk about a buzzkill.

  12. #12
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    Got a goathead (tribulus terrestris) thorn induced flat at the Santa Teresa County Park trailhead (must have picked them up between my house and the trailhead) roughly eight (8) miles of riding from my house. No problem, I always carry a spare tube, pump, and a patch kitÖ well, sort of a problem, as like a total moron idiot, I forgot to check the inside of the tire for residual prickly bits stuck in the tire before putting the replacement tube in. Ok, out with the now punctured tube, and opening up the patch kit, yeah, no problem, the little toothpaste tube thingy of rubber cement is dried up. Oh, but thatís no problem, Iíll just walk home eight miles in the least comfortable shoes. Lesson learned. Now I fill each of my tubes up with 4oz Stanís No-Flat liquid, and I carry a spare tube and the adhesive-backed patch kits in addition to a traditional one.
    Donít frail and blow if youíre going to Braille and Flow.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by squashyo View Post
    Dig it...Funny shit man. Curious though...how do you deal with a snapped hanger? I tried to position the chain in different configs but it just failed every time. Opted to walk as the bugs were swarming like mad!
    2 ways,
    Carry a spare in the pack. They are so lite and you probably have the tool in your multi to do it.

    Or,

    you can get an emergency hanger thing that fits most bikes. your hanger bolts into this slot. It looked like it would work, but not that great. You might as well get an extra one specific to your bike. $20 piece of mind.

    Walking out sucks.

    the only bragging rights you have to walking out is if you broke your frame landing a jump, not casing a jump, landing it............and there has to be video or you cased it
    Crusin' on a fake duck with a Sharks jersey on and a pig's tail in my fork

  14. #14
    M8 M12 M15 deez nuts
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    After having bent two derailleur hangers on rides this year (bad luck, eh?) I started carrying one of those Problem Solvers spare derailleur hangers in my kit-o-save-my-ass in my underseat bike bag. I hope I will never need to use it.
    Donít frail and blow if youíre going to Braille and Flow.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker View Post
    Got a goathead (tribulus terrestris) thorn induced flat at the Santa Teresa County Park trailhead (must have picked them up between my house and the trailhead) roughly eight (8) miles of riding from my house. No problem, I always carry a spare tube, pump, and a patch kitÖ well, sort of a problem, as like a total moron idiot, I forgot to check the inside of the tire for residual prickly bits stuck in the tire before putting the replacement tube in. Ok, out with the now punctured tube, and opening up the patch kit, yeah, no problem, the little toothpaste tube thingy of rubber cement is dried up. Oh, but thatís no problem, Iíll just walk home eight miles in the least comfortable shoes. Lesson learned. Now I fill each of my tubes up with 4oz Stanís No-Flat liquid, and I carry a spare tube and the adhesive-backed patch kits in addition to a traditional one.
    Almost identical to my conversion to tubeless. The only exception was that I was able to get about 2 miles before the spare tube went flat. Only 4 miles of a walk home. Never again!

  16. #16
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    I made the short ( 1.5 hours) walk of shame last night as the result of 3 flats and two co2 cartridges. And of course I got to ride the uphill and carry/push the downhill. This was my first and last ride sans pump.

  17. #17
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    The bottom pulley on my rear DR fell out somewhere on an extended downhill and I didn't notice until the trail started to climb and I tried to shift. I was able to convert my bike into a singlespeed using the lone pulley and that worked for a couple miles until the derailleur hanger snapped off, leaving me 5 or 6 miles from my car. Bad times.

    That's why I carry a spare pulley and a derailleur hanger in my camelback.

    The next time I was riding at that same park, my chainstay broke at the pivot. That time I was only a little over a mile from the parking lot and my friend shuttled a beer to me for the last bit. I still don't carry a spare chainstay.

  18. #18
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    Binary answer. Small ring in the front, 4-5 gears up on the casette and keep the chain nice and strait. A little slack in the chain is ideal to accomodate the suspension.

    We were in Ashland a few months ago and one in the group broke the hanger off the stay. I did what I always do when someone breaks stuff, stood there and waited for them to fix it, kind f like Caltrans, and space out on, like, flowers and sh*t. About 30 minutes later I realized we weren't moving and all 5 guys, huddling over this one bike trying to figure out wtf was going on, were still at a loss. Cutting chains, linking it back together.. Now, I'm not a real smart man by any stretch, or I'd have been a doctor, or a card shark, or something, but I have been called an idiot-savant before when it comes to bikes. I told all 5 of those engineer, doctor, mathmatician types I ride with to btfu, and did exactly what I typed above. Litte of this, little of that, boom-pow, were riding back to the car. End

    Don't feel bad homie, sometimes even 3 engineers, a doctor and a lawyer cannot go SS after a chain breaks. You may have made a withdrawl and bank-of-karma, but fixing that guy's bike was a nice payback.

    Good Post Squash.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by twowheelmotion View Post
    sometimes even 3 engineers, a doctor and a lawyer cannot go SS after a chain breaks.
    What a surprise!

  20. #20
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    I know that is the makings for some kind of golf course, golfing joke, where a ball is shanked into the woods after the punchline is delivered, but I'm not sure.

  21. #21
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    Has anyone made the walk due to tubeless failure? I'm new to tubeless and want to make sure I'm a prepared as I should be. I only carry a pump, which I haven't had to use.

  22. #22
    M8 M12 M15 deez nuts
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    Quote Originally Posted by hairylegs View Post
    I still don't carry a spare chainstay.
    Whaaat??? You havenít learned your lesson???
    Donít frail and blow if youíre going to Braille and Flow.

  23. #23
    M8 M12 M15 deez nuts
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    Quote Originally Posted by zott View Post
    Has anyone made the walk due to tubeless failure? I'm new to tubeless and want to make sure I'm a prepared as I should be. I only carry a pump, which I haven't had to use.
    Not yet. But Iíd advise you bring a spare tube just in case, as tubeless still can fail (and make a big-ass mess of latex liquid all over the place when it does fail) if a big enough puncture occurs.
    Donít frail and blow if youíre going to Braille and Flow.

  24. #24
    rho
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    in my epic bag of crap that lives in my hydration pack:
    -multi tool with chain tool
    -spoke wrench
    -deraileur hangers(one for my bike and a "common one*
    -two chainring bolts
    -shifter cable
    -1 20$ bill and a couple singles for use as tire boots
    -duct tape
    -zip ties
    -glue patch kit and two self stickie patch kits
    -2x m3, m4, m5 and m6 bolts
    -two cleat bolts
    -shimano link pin
    -2x 9sp quick links
    -toooobe(s)
    -a stainless steel hose clamp

    Even so, with all that crap, I've had few cases where I've taken long walks home. One was when I broke a stem another I broke a chainstay on one of my old hardtails and finally I've blown up a shimano freehub body...

  25. #25
    rho
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker View Post
    Not yet. But Iíd advise you bring a spare tube just in case, as tubeless still can fail (and make a big-ass mess of latex liquid all over the place when it does fail) if a big enough puncture occurs.
    Twice! both involved putting big holes in the tread of tires. One of those times I didn't have a tube or pump with me. I had a nice three mile run in Santa Teresa with moments of very gentle bits of coasting down hills while putting all my weight on the front tire

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker View Post
    After having bent two derailleur hangers on rides this year (bad luck, eh?) I started carrying one of those Problem Solvers spare derailleur hangers in my kit-o-save-my-ass in my underseat bike bag. I hope I will never need to use it.
    That ProbSolver solution looks better than the thing I saw. Nice find.

    It won't work for TA or Chris King Fun Bolts, but will get you home if you have a QR.

    One might go years without busting a hanger, but it sucks big time when you do and you are "out there"
    Crusin' on a fake duck with a Sharks jersey on and a pig's tail in my fork

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by rho View Post
    Twice! both involved putting big holes in the tread of tires. One of those times I didn't have a tube or pump with me. I had a nice three mile run in Santa Teresa with moments of very gentle bits of coasting down hills while putting all my weight on the front tire
    Humm, my last flat was at ST with the same thing, tread puncture. Stans failed to seal it also. I had the tube and pump with me.

    Maybe there's a pissed off gophers that bites the tread of mtb tires as we ride over their hole.
    Crusin' on a fake duck with a Sharks jersey on and a pig's tail in my fork

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by rho View Post
    in my epic bag of crap that lives in my hydration pack:
    -multi tool with chain tool
    -spoke wrench
    -deraileur hangers(one for my bike and a "common one*
    -two chainring bolts
    -shifter cable
    -1 20$ bill and a couple singles for use as tire boots
    -duct tape
    -zip ties
    -glue patch kit and two self stickie patch kits
    -2x m3, m4, m5 and m6 bolts
    -two cleat bolts
    -shimano link pin
    -2x 9sp quick links
    -toooobe(s)
    -a stainless steel hose clamp

    Even so, with all that crap, I've had few cases where I've taken long walks home. One was when I broke a stem another I broke a chainstay on one of my old hardtails and finally I've blown up a shimano freehub body...
    I think you need a spare wheel too. Maybe you can figure a way to integrate the wheel on top of your helmet.
    Crusin' on a fake duck with a Sharks jersey on and a pig's tail in my fork

  29. #29
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    My longest walks are more because of broken people.

    I broke my collarbone during a night ride in SLO, by myself. I clipped a pedal going down shooters. Landed on my collarbone. I sat up after catching my breath. I could tell my collarbone was broken because it was poking me. I knew I had to get moving quickly before the pain really set in. This was in the 90's before everyone had cell phones.

    Hiked down the hill through Stenner canyon, a couple miles, over a few fences to the ranch house at the end of stenner canyon. Their light was on, I knocked on the door. I was worried about getting shot, but they were friendly, let me use the phone to call a buddy.

  30. #30
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    snapped a cone on rear wheel that wound down onto my hub crushing my bearings and seizing the wheel.

    not only did I half to walk (wearing lycra)...I had to carry the damn bike.

    I caught some heckling that day as a rigid SS is not supposed to 'break'...ugh
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  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by rho View Post
    in my epic bag of crap that lives in my hydration pack:
    -multi tool with chain tool
    -spoke wrench
    -deraileur hangers(one for my bike and a "common one*
    -two chainring bolts
    -shifter cable
    -1 20$ bill and a couple singles for use as tire boots
    -duct tape
    -zip ties
    -glue patch kit and two self stickie patch kits
    -2x m3, m4, m5 and m6 bolts
    -two cleat bolts
    -shimano link pin
    -2x 9sp quick links
    -toooobe(s)
    -a stainless steel hose clamp

    Even so, with all that crap, I've had few cases where I've taken long walks home. One was when I broke a stem another I broke a chainstay on one of my old hardtails and finally I've blown up a shimano freehub body...
    Awww man! That is awesome, well not the walk home part. But you are definitely the guy to be riding with way back in Coe where nobody can hear you scream.

    Can I borrow $20? Sale on Pliny down the street.. You know..!

    lol

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by rho View Post
    in my epic bag of crap that lives in my hydration pack:
    -multi tool with chain tool
    -spoke wrench
    -deraileur hangers(one for my bike and a "common one*
    -two chainring bolts
    -shifter cable
    -1 20$ bill and a couple singles for use as tire boots
    -duct tape
    -zip ties
    -glue patch kit and two self stickie patch kits
    -2x m3, m4, m5 and m6 bolts
    -two cleat bolts
    -shimano link pin
    -2x 9sp quick links
    -toooobe(s)
    -a stainless steel hose clamp

    Even so, with all that crap, I've had few cases where I've taken long walks home. One was when I broke a stem another I broke a chainstay on one of my old hardtails and finally I've blown up a shimano freehub body...
    I would recommend adding a derailleur cable. Very light weight and handy as shit. Pinecrest last weekend, scrapped a rock and sheared my cable at the derailleur...was back on bike in 5 minutes thanks to that carry on.

    I also ordered and carry some quick chain links (you know, those pinch-on links used to set it the first time?)...makes fixing a chain break super easy and much faster. AND finally, pump with air cartridges. I've never gone back...nothing sweeter than a non jack-off tire fill.
    I'm not sure how this works.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by CHUM View Post
    I caught some heckling that day as a rigid SS is not supposed to 'break'...ugh
    Actually rigid SS's are designed to break....................












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  34. #34
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    Re: Walk of shame...the unfixable walk home.

    Quote Originally Posted by jdubsl2 View Post
    My first long walk back to the car was at Saratoga Gap. I stood up to knock out one of the rollers on Long Ridge and the chainstay snapped in half.



    The second long walk back to the car, I'd made about half of the climb from the car to the top of Demo where the bike kept making a rubbing noise. Turns out the tire was leaning 10-15 degrees to one side and rubbing on the seat stay, because the chain stay was cracked. Attempted riding it back to the car, but it split in half in a spectacular fashion and forced me to walk back after about five feet.

    SIDIs make for crap hiking shoes.

    This is why i always carry an extra chain stay

    Edit: damn someone beat me to it

  35. #35
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    Rigging a full-sus to run singlespeed can be next to impossible if the suspension design is such that there is a lot of chain growth. If the chain is loose enough to allow full suspension travel, there can be so much slack in some positions that the chain will want to fall off. If chain is tight enough to not fall off, the suspension movement can stretch it to the point of breaking. In this case, try to limit the rear suspension movement as much as possible (pump up the shock bunch).

    One time I took a friend to Downieville for his b-day, and rented him a nice Nomad since his bike was pretty old. On the climb before 3rd Divide he cross-geared under load, and the rear derailleur just completely blew up. Managed to rig a workable singlespeed but only after using the CO2 pump to crank the pressure in the shock (be careful doing that...). He was able to limp it back the rest of the ride. The mechanic at Yuba was pretty impressed we actually made that work. Only had to pay for a cheap replacement rear derailleur.

  36. #36
    jrm
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    I was in a fast right hand corner descending Emerald Canyon when the front end of the bike goes away sending me augering into the ground. After inspecting the bike it turns out the crown on my RS judy "long travel" cracked. The timing sucked b/c i was about to double back towards El Moro and ultimately Corona Del Mar where the car was parked. There was no way i could ride back the way i'd come I was where i wasn't supposed to be so i figured it was best to hike out to Laguna Canyon Rd. After some backyard bushwhacking i made it and tired to ride the bike but it soon turned out to be too dangerous b/c i couldn't control it so i started walking. After walking awhile i came opon a bus stop and got the idea that maybe i can beg my way into a bus ride back up the coast to the car. heck it was worth a try. So I begged and begged all time promising the driver that i'd pay for the free ride at a later date. The driver said i was holding up his bus and motioned for me to get on the bus. So i racked my broken bike and got on the bus. Made it back to my car and thanked the bus driver a couple too many times as i got off the bus and retrieved my bike from the rack. As i drove home i was laughing about my little adventure. Once i got home i got on the computer and shared my adventure with the fine folks on Passion who got a good laugh.

  37. #37
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    So I decided to do a morning ride to Muir beach from the inner Richmond. I made it to muir beach ok but then I made a wrong turn coming back and ended up in a housing development east of Tennessee Valley. The pavement was really steep and really grippy so consequently when I applied my brakes both inner tubes simultaneously blew out at the stems. As I only had one spare tube and was carrying no money, I had no choice but to start the long trudge back home.

    When I was half way across the golden gate bridge (on the east side facing traffic), some clown with great aim in a passing car nailed me with a full on water bottle squirt right in the face. Oh the indignity. Then, in the presidio, a passing mtber stopped and asked me if I wanted to purchase his spare tube. He looked at me like I was a moron when I said I had no cash. But then, just a bit farther, a pick-up truck passes me, then slows down and pulls over. As I straggle up, a friendly gal asks me if I want a ride. She says that I just looked so tired that she thought I needed help. So I toss my bike in the back and get in the truck. Her boyfriend was driving and was not quite as friendly. He rolled his eyes at me, I mean, who goes for a bike ride and can't make it home? At that point I didn't care what he thought, was just happy to get a ride for the final 10 blocks to home and an end to the indignity. At least it was a good workout.

  38. #38
    rho
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    Quote Originally Posted by squashyo View Post
    I would recommend adding a derailleur cable. Very light weight and handy as shit. Pinecrest last weekend, scrapped a rock and sheared my cable at the derailleur...was back on bike in 5 minutes thanks to that carry on.

    I also ordered and carry some quick chain links (you know, those pinch-on links used to set it the first time?)...makes fixing a chain break super easy and much faster. AND finally, pump with air cartridges. I've never gone back...nothing sweeter than a non jack-off tire fill.
    Derailleur cable is on that list... last year i was doing the tour de cure and my rear shifter cable failed... Lots of zip ties later and adjusting the rear, I had a two speed bike in Pescadero...

  39. #39
    MarkyMark
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    I've been having a rash of rear wheel problems lately.

    I flatted on White Oak (smooth as can be), replaced the tube, and found out that that the brand new tube had a hole. I tried patching it, but it didn't hold so I pulled out my heavy emergency slime spare. I'm glad I brought two extras, but that's unusual for me. No walk of shame, but it was soooo close and I was pretty far from where we parked.

    I was descending Ridge @ Demo and hit a rock with my tubeless rear. I felt it hit the rim, but I was hopeful and kept on going. It got squirmy and I heard air leaking out at the top of the intersection with Corral. I put my spare in there and we continued down Ridge. I felt the tire get soft again after the (drop, jump, log, log) sequence at the intersection with Tractor. I was out of spares so I booked it down Tractor, and walked up Hihns to the parking lot.

    The latest incident was a UC. I broke a drive-side spoke and it got caught in my cassette. It made a lot of noise and wouldn't freewheel. Then my tubeless setup gave out. The tape was leaking and my rear tire was completely flat before I had time to react. I passed a bunch of riders and probably could have bummed a tube, but I figure I deserved to walk for not bringing a tube. I made the best of it and decided to take the railroad tracks (never been) instead of Emma McCrary.

    Lessons learned:
    - No more pretending to have style off of jumps (fake whips=broken spokes).
    - No more jumps on the spare tube. Drop into survival mode and baby that home.
    - Bring lots of spare tubes.

  40. #40
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    I've done the walk of shame. I was on the Almaden side of STCP down by road on the entrance to stiles when my shimano chain snapped. Didn't have the chain tool with me so I began the walk, up Fortini and then to use my bike as a 'push bike' (sit on the seat and push with your feet) along the road, down Bernal and along side streets/sidewalks the remaining 4 miles to my house.


    Side question: How do roadies do this? Those guys ride 50-75miles with what appears to be nothing more than a bottle of water and some gel/gu/energy bars? No backpacks full of tubes, tools and such..

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by sjhiker View Post
    Side question: How do roadies do this? Those guys ride 50-75miles with what appears to be nothing more than a bottle of water and some gel/gu/energy bars? No backpacks full of tubes, tools and such..
    Some people are really reckless about this I think. They say they're shaving grams, but I suspect it's because saddlebags are ugly. Cell phones have made people much more brazen about this. I always take enough to recover from a flat but that's about it. If you take good care of your bike, it's pretty unusual to have other mechanicals on a road bike (unless you crash and then all bets are off).

  42. #42
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    Weight Weenie roadies only bring enough to handle ONE FLAT(tube, C02, levers, cellphone)....anything after that - then they are at the mercy of any available family/friends/SOs, etc). Ever been called by a roadie friend, stranded 50 miles out, on a weekend? Buzzkill....

    Great thing about MTB - we learn the art of self-reliance!
    "This is a male-dominated forum... there will be lots of Testosterone sword-shaming here" ~ Kenfucius

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by sjhiker View Post
    I've done the walk of shame. I was on the Almaden side of STCP down by road on the entrance to stiles when my shimano chain snapped. Didn't have the chain tool with me so I began the walk, up Fortini and then to use my bike as a 'push bike' (sit on the seat and push with your feet) along the road, down Bernal and along side streets/sidewalks the remaining 4 miles to my house.


    Side question: How do roadies do this? Those guys ride 50-75miles with what appears to be nothing more than a bottle of water and some gel/gu/energy bars? No backpacks full of tubes, tools and such..
    Usually they can use their iPhone to call in a helicopter.
    At least that's what I think most roadies do? If they can spend $500 on lycra kit, they must be able to afford helicopter rescues!

    I mostly road ride and I carry one tube, patch kit, multi tool, and a C-wrench. Hell, when I go off-roading that's what I bring, but I have yet to do an epic ride where I couldn't huff it 3-5 miles to the nearest bus stop (the joys of living in a strangely urban area with MTB trails)

  44. #44
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    My most memorable failure was at Demo Forrest, not because of the failure or my inability to fix it, but how I got back to the car. Mind you, this was back in 2007 or 2008 where you had to park before the slide (road closed), walk through the closed slide section and then roll down 1-2 miles to the Demo parking lot to start the ride. This was a big group ride organized by Charles at Passion Trail Bikes. During that time my bike was in his shop for some repair and he loaned me one of his shop bikes. Anyway, mid-ride I was kind of at the very end of the pack huffing and puffing up Tractor when I managed to snap off the derailleur hanger at what must have been like 2 miles/h going uphill (WTF, how did this branch manage to end up in my drive train at this speed??? ). I tried to fix it, a few others tried to fix it, but no luck. So I tell them to go ahead and finish the ride and I'll just walk back (I had come in my own car that day). Took the chain off, rolled Tractor back down to Hinh's Mill and then started trotting back scooter style, when to my amazement somewhere shortly after the bottom of Braille I see someone riding back towards me (his first name was Tom, but don't recall his last name anymore) , who was one of the faster riders in the group that day. Someone had told him about my mishap and he decided to ride all the way back on Hinh's Mill to try and help me. What a guy...but it gets better. Tom tries to fix it, but nope, the bike refuses to cooperate in any fashion. Silence....Tom looks up and asks me to jump back on my bike and hold on to him and he is gonna hitch me out. I start laughing about the joke until it dawns on me he is dead serious. Next thing you know, that's exactly what we do. I hold on to his shoulder with my left arm, steer my bike with the right and Tom is hitching me hardly breaking a sweat. Awkward, but it works and after a few minutes we are perfecting the technique by using the belly straps on his Camelbak as the tow line, which I hold on to with one arm, so he doesn't have to deal with me leaning against him while he is hitching us back. And he did it, he hitched me all the way back to the slide area INCLUDING the 1-2 miles uphill stretch on Highland Way. Mind you, that day he was riding a heavy freeride type bike. What an animal (and I truly mean this in the most respectful way). There were still a few riders at the slide when we got there, clapping and cheering at the final stretch when they saw the stunning feat. I will never forget it, best memory ever!!

  45. #45
    Beaubien
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    Quote Originally Posted by hairylegs View Post
    Some people are really reckless about this I think. They say they're shaving grams, but I suspect it's because saddlebags are ugly. Cell phones have made people much more brazen about this. I always take enough to recover from a flat but that's about it. If you take good care of your bike, it's pretty unusual to have other mechanicals on a road bike (unless you crash and then all bets are off).
    I broke my D hanger on my Intense Mt Bike while in Tahoe. It took a while to get one from the factory. So I decided I would ride my road bike while waiting. Days later I break my D hanger on the road bike. I was 25 miles from home on a quiet road. I attempted to make it a fixie but it just messed up the chain and cassette. A much more expensive fix than new Look cleats.
    Will Beaubien
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  46. #46
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    Hah hah fizzywater, awesome! My brother snapped his derailleur in half in the middle of nowhere (along Desert Creek in the middle of the Sweetwaters - some mountains east of the Sierra). We had a chain tool and we tried every combo of gears - but we couldn't get a single speed. After he did some hiking along the "singletrack" (cow trails) while I biked, we got to a jeep road, and he grabbed my shoulder and we managed to bike up a few hills that way (way more awkward than most people would guess!).

    I've done the walk plenty of times...the worst were a couple times in the White Mountains near Bishop. One of those was the classic flat-but-don't-check-the-inside-of-the-tire, then the thorns still embedded in the tire punctured the new tube (dumb...). The other was from hitting a sharp-edged limestone rock too fast, just ripped a huge hole through the center of the tire. Both were long hikes out...but at least they were downhill hikes!

  47. #47
    Slowest Rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdubsl2 View Post
    My first long walk back to the car was at Saratoga Gap. I stood up to knock out one of the rollers on Long Ridge and the chainstay snapped in half.
    Not sure, but I may have captured leading causes for the above malfunction in a low flight:


    And another


    Unfortunately, I missed capturing his big 8' drop later that day...

    In this neighborhood Spring 2008:


    Isn't this the same bike?

    If bikes could talk, they'd scream when they see jdubsl2 coming towards them, at his tall size and big jumps.

    [EDIT: For the record, I've also broken my Trek Fuel many times myself (due to my size, not jumps). Treks are built to be light, not take abuse. My Heckler is built like a tank, and only cracked a chain stay once, but not critically and it was found by the bike shop.]
    Last edited by BigLarry; 08-12-2013 at 08:19 PM.
    It's not slow, it's doing more MTB time.

  48. #48
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    I've snapped a der. hanger and bent a couple but had a spare each time. I have had to do the walk of shame a couple times though.

    1) Tubeless failure on a solo night ride. Spare had a hole in it and didn't I have a patch kit. Walked down a trail to the nearest road and had a buddy pick me up.

    2) Knuckle spring popped out of deraileur and wouldn't hold tension. Bailed out onto the pavement, then peddled in granny gear, 22-34, on pavement to a buddies house and borrowed his bike to ride home.

    3) Knuckle spring popped out again a year later. Knew how to fix it this time, but it was mostly downhill to the car so took off the chain and figured I'd coast down. Told my buddy I'd meet him at the bottom. 5 seconds after he took off I had a tubeless failure. Went to put in a spare - opened my pack and found 2 bottle openers but no spare tube. Started a 1000 ft walk down through poison oak, but halfway down my buddy came pushing back up with a spare tube. Put the tube in and started the coasting thing on the way out. Along the way I went to wheelie to pull my tire back on the trail which didn't work so well without a chain and went over the bars. Fun day.

    4) Not a walk of shame but just as bad. Last week I rode 9 miles to a kind of secret descent that I had never done and was really psyched for. Just before starting down I let all of the air out of my fork. Had to bail out to a nearby road and ride pavement home.

    To the person who asked about tubeless failures, I've had about 10 over the past 3 years. Mostly torn sidewalls but a couple small holes that just didn't seal. Carry a spare!

    -slide

  49. #49
    Slowest Rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker View Post
    Got a goathead (tribulus terrestris) thorn induced flat at the Santa Teresa County Park trailhead (must have picked them up between my house and the trailhead) roughly eight (8) miles of riding from my house.
    In my first encounter with Santa Teresa mud, I got to carry my 100 lb bike back home to chisel off the mud that wrapped around the fork and chain stays and froze solid.

    I got eight (yes 8!) goat head flats the day I rode Guadalupe Creek all the way from Santa Teresa to the bay for 28 miles - right in the creek going under all the roads. Unfortunately I only had six patches. I made the last stretch by pumping my tires every 5-10 minutes.

    As for walk of shame, I got to carry my Trek Fuel a couple miles on Auburn trail above the American River. It just cracked in half underneath me, JRA on a cliff side trail:
    It's not slow, it's doing more MTB time.

  50. #50
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    Just blew apart my 2nd free hub in 30 years of riding. Got lucky and was able to baby it back to the car. Too much pedal pressure and the hub would spin, but it was also locked up and wouldn't freewheel.

    I've only had to walk twice - snapped the swing arm on my 1st gen FSR-XC 4 miles from the car. Long walk on a cold December evening. I also managed to snap a fork on a road bike coming down Monitor Pass, training for the Death Ride. Walked 2 miles down before I finally managed to hitch a ride from a local.

  51. #51
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    Good job!

    In 1993 in the Downieville area, an overnighter by bike (loaded lite for camping), another dude and I rode up Galloway Rd (dirt) to head towards Jackson Res or Wild Plum (or anywhere on deer hunting season opening day no less), and somewhere along the way I lost a pulley bolt to a Suntour XC-pro rear derailleur (edit...lost the pulley and bushings too...found all of the pieces in the forest). We spent at least an hour backtracking to look for it...and I found it! That was the longest walk I ever avoided.

    Oh yeah, must have been 10 years ago now, my rigid steel fork on an old blue Ross mountain bike I used to ride all over the place, broke on a summer after work ride on Russian Ridge (the wheel came off with the fork legs). I was lucky not to have been severely hurt. I was not injured at all, and did a few rolls. I was completely hauling ass. I had rode from home in Cupertino. I stashed the bike in the broom behind the white fence on the top of Page Mill Road and hot footed it to the top of Montebello Road. I found some friends partying on the road side pullout on the bend by the big rock in the flat section of Montebello and bummed a ride (and a beer!). That would have been a longer walk.

  52. #52
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    been riding road and MTB for over 40 yrs. Sometimes 9k miles a year. NEVER had to walk yet. Experience must be the best teacher.

  53. #53
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    Mine all involve breaking myself - the Nomad is apparently more durable than I am. I did break the chain on my SS near the top of Ridge at Demo once and had to ride chainless all the way down Corral and then kick-push it out.
    I've seen a lot of guys making looong walks out of Downieville - that place seems to invite the walk of shame.
    "You are by far the most interesting single-serving friend I have ever met."

  54. #54
    I just wanna go fast!
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    Had a good one this weekend. Busting out my regular close to home 10 mile loop so I didn't bring anything but a water bottle. Snapped my chain on a steep climb (didn't even nut myself, bonus!) and had to coast back down to Toro park. From there my wife towed me back to the car.

    Not really a walk of shame but I probably looked like the ultimate lazy dude forcing his wife to pull him back to the car.

  55. #55
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    Walk of shame...the unfixable walk home.

    Quote Originally Posted by bdamschen View Post
    ....
    Not really a walk of shame but I probably looked like the ultimate lazy dude forcing his wife to pull him back to the car.
    Or a boss.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigLarry View Post
    In my first encounter with Santa Teresa mud, I got to carry my 100 lb bike back home to chisel off the mud that wrapped around the fork and chain stays and froze solid.

    I got eight (yes 8!) goat head flats the day I rode Guadalupe Creek all the way from Santa Teresa to the bay for 28 miles - right in the creek going under all the roads. Unfortunately I only had six patches. I made the last stretch by pumping my tires every 5-10 minutes.

    As for walk of shame, I got to carry my Trek Fuel a couple miles on Auburn trail above the American River. It just cracked in half underneath me, JRA on a cliff side trail:
    You cased a jump on with that Trek didn't you?
    Crusin' on a fake duck with a Sharks jersey on and a pig's tail in my fork

  57. #57
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    I broke the dropout on the drive side of the rear swingarm just as I hit the singletrack. When it broke I was already close to the high point of the ride and if I turned around I could coast most of the way into town, so I said goodbye to my friends and bailed on the ride.

    The only way to keep the tire from rubbing was to tip the bike far to one side and stand on one pedal, hard to do on singletrack but I was close to a fire road where I could coast freely, even though awkwardly.

    As I rolled down the hill I passed a few riders on their way up, who no doubt wondered why anyone would abuse his bike the way I seemed to be doing.

  58. #58
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    My walk of shame turned into a cab ride of shame after the fixing nut/bolt/screw thing on the non-drive side of my XX crank sheered leaving me with half a crank clipped into each shoe and 10 miles from home.
    If I had a black light this place would look like a Jackson Pollock painting.

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by ziscwg View Post
    You cased a jump on with that Trek didn't you?
    Damm, you were there!!! Glad you didn't get pics to embarrass me. My bad, casing the landing on my biggest jump ever, just over 0.5 inches.

    And this is why I carry a spare cross tube, seat tube, and arc welder.
    It's not slow, it's doing more MTB time.

  60. #60
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    Sunday morning, the mrs was competing in the duathalon in Santa Cruz so I dropped her off at 7 ish and headed over to the local hills to ride. Get ready to hit the trail and see I forgot my pack. No big deal, it was kind of cold out so I can ride for two hours without water. Last downhill (and most fun) pinch flat! Funny thing is I stopped like I was going to pull a patch out of pack. Arghhh, walking stinks. That's what I get for still running tubes.

  61. #61
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    Haha, where to start. The saves are more interesting. Back in the rim brake days blew a 2 foot section of rim sidewall off miles from nowhere. Taped the sharp stuff and tied my tire on with a dozen strips cut from the blown tube. Pumped to 10 pounds in a fresh tube and rode out...Blew a freehub more than several miles in and converted to fixie with zipties and other crap...carried my friends bike out from the Colorado trail after he shattered himself by dividing up the bike and strapping to a few Camelbacks...have towed or been towed multiple times by pals on bikes like when my friends lame proprietary Specialized BB self destructed and I towed him back to Graeagle...broke a BB spindle on Tam back in the day and coasted home (except for the parts I skateboarded)...shattered myself on the TRT near Toads and stumbled out on a walk of shame with my broken bike somehow (ain't gonna leave it!)...broke my frame a couple times but just kept riding it for a few weeks until I got around to replacing it...rode the infamous forty miler when a friend broke his (lame) Maverick, some knucklehead on the ride had a piece of bar stock (!) and we splinted it and ditched him...multiple times pounded a taco'd wheel against a tree, only to ride it for another month or 2 before replacing...lost count of shredded derail hangers (always had a spare) and exploded derailleurs...shattered a front v brake link and found out how hard it is to ride loose tech with just a rear brake, so skidded like a teenager but didn't walk, including the stupid tech parts...had a White Brothers BB come apart on Round Lake Trail (haha baaaaaaack in the day) but found a tool to fix it via a square nail at a mine site...snapped my dropper seatpost in half on top of Elwell and stood the whole way down, a crushing defeat after that brutal slog...watched my good pal Vernonator shred a few bones apart on a looong Preferred ride and filled him with vicodin and good tidings and watched him ride out a dozen miles, to this day a shocking feat...watched my good pal Vernonator shatter himself right next to his privates at Oathill and there followed another amazing self recovery and some gruesome/amusing photos...there are many more. Walk of shame? Sure, here and there, but some proud recoveries too! Fun times...

    Great thread! I love my bike.

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrWheels View Post
    Mine all involve breaking myself - the Nomad is apparently more durable than I am. I did break the chain on my SS near the top of Ridge at Demo once and had to ride chainless all the way down Corral and then kick-push it out.
    I've seen a lot of guys making looong walks out of Downieville - that place seems to invite the walk of shame.
    YO...when we riding again...you back in action yet???
    I'm not sure how this works.

  63. #63
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    Was doing an Urban Assault ride in Sacramento my buddy worked out that went down by the river and through different urban areas. At one point there was this single track that weaved through newly planted trees that had this chicken wire around them. Me being a cocky bomber, I asked to go ahead of everyone and started whipping through them, popped a left to avoid one tree so that my back wheel hopped up and swung to my right. The chicken wire snagged my rear derailleur and sent me flying. Tried shortening the chain but that broke on the next hill. Walked 2 miles along an aqueduct in the baking sun.

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