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Thread: Tune-Up Time!

  1. #1
    bike buster
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    Tune-Up Time!

    Well, I've had my Stumpjumper FSR for just under a year now. My last couple of rides were not as smooth/trouble-free as I had become so accustomed to. I took a look at my chain, which seemed to be causing most of the problem, and found it had stretched 1/8". Some of the chainrings looked kind of beat up, but still usable. I put a new chain on and then...

    I finally broke down and thoroughly cleaned the bike and took it to Trailhead for a handlebar to cassette inspection. So, after hovering over the counter watching Jack inspect my bike for almost an hour, here's what my rig needed:

    • New cassette (so-so, but I don't like to wait until things become unusable to fix them)
    • New big and middle chainrings (described as "completely toasted")
    • New front derailleur cable/housing (dirty inside the housing, requiring more effort on the dual control lever... which I DEFINITELY don't want to break)
    • New rear shock bushing (causing a pop/click noise if you bounce the bike about 1" off the ground)
    • Both hubs sound unlubricated and rough, so they're being torn down and rebuilt (gnarly sounding!)
    • Wheels slightly out of true (corrected w/ hubs)
    • Loose headset


    So, it made me wonder... hey, the weather is getting nice. I wonder what everyone else's bike needs/is having done to prepare for the (hopefully) upcoming nice weather.

    All I know is, I can't wait to get my newly tuned and ready to ride bike back on Wed. This is the first time I've anything but clean this bike off. Well, I bent a rotor once... and am on a second set of tires! :-D I am surprised at how well it has stood up to the abuse I put it through. Hopefully, it will continue to provide this kind of reliability in the seasons to come. Specialized makes one hell of a bike.


    Justin

  2. #2
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    I just finished tearing down my '04 FSR XC comp today. I should have it reassembled tomorrow evening, with freshly overhauled hubs, cleaned & slick-honeyed cables, cleaned & lubed shocks, readjusted calipers, and a fresh chain. It's been good to me so far and I'd like to get as much life out of it as possible.

  3. #3
    bike buster
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    Quote Originally Posted by SPDu4ea
    It's been good to me so far and I'd like to get as much life out of it as possible.
    That's my line of thinking, too. So far, I've only had wear and tear issues and am hoping to keep it that way.

    Sounds like you'll be running smooth when it's all done. I'd love to work on my own bike. However, a lack of tools, a place to do it and the fact that it'd take me 3x as long as a shop keep me in line as a paying customer. I make up for it by fixing my own car. :-)


    Justin

  4. #4
    aka dan51
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdubsl2
    I'd love to work on my own bike. However, a lack of tools, a place to do it and the fact that it'd take me 3x as long as a shop keep me in line as a paying customer. I make up for it by fixing my own car. :-)


    Justin
    So..... where do you work on your car? You should just bring your bike to work and do it there. All the things listed you can do on your own fairly easily. Part of the enjoyment of mountain biking is GETTING to work on your bike. And we all love tools, and there is no better reason to work on your bike than to get more tools.

    -Dan

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by dan51
    So..... where do you work on your car? You should just bring your bike to work and do it there. All the things listed you can do on your own fairly easily. Part of the enjoyment of mountain biking is GETTING to work on your bike. And we all love tools, and there is no better reason to work on your bike than to get more tools.

    -Dan

    I like to leave things I'm not 100% confident in doing to professionals. Observing what happens when people try to fix their own cars, sometimes it is better that way. I could've done the cassette, chainrings and cable, but wheel building is nothing but experience and skill, both of which I have none in that area. I don't want my wheels to fall apart halfway down Saw Pit because I wanted to save $30 in labor. From my eye, the bike didn't need half of the things it turned out needing... so I will be riding a much healthier machine after the work is done and know it's in great condition.


    Justin

  6. #6
    aka dan51
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdubsl2
    I like to leave things I'm not 100% confident in doing to professionals.
    Understandable, but there is only one way to get confident.

    Quote Originally Posted by jdubsl2
    I don't want my wheels to fall apart halfway down Saw Pit because I wanted to save $30 in labor.
    If they got you as far as Saw Pit you should be happy

    Quote Originally Posted by jdubsl2
    From my eye, the bike didn't need half of the things it turned out needing... so I will be riding a much healthier machine after the work is done and know it's in great condition.
    Justin
    Your eye might be right, since seeing things can make others money...

    I've brought my bikes to shops twice, both for 30 day "tune-ups". Nothing was wrong with either bike, but this was recommended by the shop. After getting them back, neither bike shifted well. On one visit, I had just got my TALAS back from Fox, and it was perfect. I told them not to touch it. When I picked up my bike, I saw Slick Honey all over the stanchions, apparently they didn't listen. Then I was stuck disassembing the fork to wipe all that crap off. That's when I became a home mechanic.

    Hope your experience is better than mine were.

    -Dan

  7. #7
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    I started out using a bicycling magazine self-help manual and then kindly asking my lbs to check my work. After a few tries, you figure out the feel of a nicely adjusted hub etc. Plus you develop a good relationship with your bike shop (I ended up working there for a couple years while in school). And it's also nice to be able to help your friends out if/when they breakdown on the trail...

    On a related note, what is everyone's tool collection like? Aside from basic hand & allen tools, I only have a cone wrench set. I'd really like to get a chain whip and cassette remover though. The LBS doesn't charge me to remove or reinstall the cassette, but its a pain in the rear to bring the wheel in...

  8. #8
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    Almost ready for new season.

    One new full squish, One new SS and a new road bike on the way. I'm almost ready for the nice weather.

    I'll be eating Top Ramen for the next four months

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