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  1. #1
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    Ripmo - too much bike for me?

    I'm 6'4" with 35" inseam, and ready to replace my 4-year old Niner Jet-9 frame (with older components -1x9 conversion -, Reba fork & Monarch shock). I'm turning 50 next month and the crappy fork beats the heck out of me where I ride at Annadel St. Park 3-days per week.

    I've demo'd the StumpJumper 29 Carbon, Pivot Trail 429 and Hightower LT (all XL). Pivot was too tight in the cockpit, Hightower was too light in the front end, and Stumpjumper felt all around decent climbing and descending. Interestingly, the Pivot was the best climbing (just felt too small for me), and the Hightower was the best descending (but I didn't like it climbing).

    I was advised by my shop to consider the Ripmo, but they only have a medium available to demo. I've left a message with Ibis to see if their demo van may be North of the Golden Gate, but that's doubtful in the next few weeks when I want to buy. I may also take a day trip to Santa Cruz for an Ibis demo day.

    My riding style is fast downhill singletrack, but I stay pretty close to the ground. When I infrequently ride Northstar, or other Tahoe trails, I'm not doing drops, big air or riding a lot of the ramps and manmade features. I like to climb. I'm a lot more cautious than I used to be, and the appeal to a longer travel bike is to smooth out the bumps and chatter, not to absorb big hits, which won't be happening anyway.

    I think if the Ripmo has the climbing ability of the Pivot 429, and descending prowess of the Hightower, it will be a sweetspot bike for me. If it's a lot tighter cockpit feel than the Stumpjumper (similar to the Pivot), then the Stumpy may be my bike.

    Does anyone of my height and inseam have experience with these two bikes, especially on the Nor Cal trails I ride?
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  2. #2
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    Based on what you are saying, I would point you more toward a Yeti SB 130, Transition Smuggler or the like. New geo mid travel 29ers. Insanely capable and will likely climb, spin and change direction a hair better.


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  3. #3
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    Check out the new Evil Offering, if you can. I think that's the perfect bike on the geo charts (for what that's worth), if I were looking for a new 29er right now. Or possibly the Yeti SB130... if that's not way outside of your budget.

  4. #4
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    The reach on the Ripmo is the largest out of all the bikes you listed. So it should not feel cramped at all.

    Also even though the numbers may suggest it is an Enduro shredder. It is a very ďtrailĒ feeling bike, which sounds like is exactly what you are looking for.

    Blame the slack STA on the Hightower for its poor climbing abilities.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the suggestions. Sounds like SB130 should be another on my short list - and Ripmo. I just called my LBS, and the SB130 XL would require ordering which right now would not arrive until November. No demos available at all. The Ibis is available in XL (flat black/ olive). Iím liking the blue/ orange, but that would be a special order, and not delivered until December.

    Unfortunately the Yeti would be pretty much be a sight unseen purchase. Ibis would require a trip to Santa Cruz, but I could swing a day or overnight trip if I canít convince myself riding around the Bike Peddler neighborhood.

    Evil Offering looks nice, but $700 more than the Ripmo, $300 More than the Stumpjumper Expert (all with GX), and no way to ride it first. After my Hightower ride, Iím definitely not comfortable making a decision based on geo specs alone without some kind of saddle time. I was close to pulling the trigger on the HTLT based on my parking lot ride at the LBS. So happy I demoíd That bike, and experienced itís slack STA Trail manners.

  6. #6
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    Iím in a pretty similar situation as you. Iím 6í4Ē, 35Ē inseam and 50 in November. I like hard core single track, like to get a little air. My last bike was an Ibis Ripley 1 and the cockpit was always too small so I had a 120 stem which threw off the geo.

    I demoíd the Ripmo at Ibis in SC and suggest you do the same. I couldnít believe how well the bike climbed especially having all of that travel. As soon as I pointed it down it just gobbles up all of the terrain. It is extremely stable in the harshest of conditions, likes to get into the air and holds its line very nicely. It comes stock with 2.5Ē Maxxis and that definitely helps - you can go 2.6Ē.

    I bought the bike within a few days of that from Trailhead off the showroom with their XO build, carbon logo wheels, factory fork and x2 rear shock. I canít tell you how much I love this bike after having it for a couple of weeks. It has taken me a while to get used to how much it gobbles up the terrain, how far you can push it and how much traction you get on corners.

    Yesterday I rode 21 miles with 4K vertical in Demo and Niscene and it seems like it pedals up just as well as the Ripley. The downhill ability of this bike will have you grinning cheek to cheek! I went down Braille and hit all of the jumps with total confidence

    The only con which is far outweighed by the pluses is that the BB height is lower and it takes getting used to so you donít hit too many things.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by isleblue65 View Post

    Unfortunately the Yeti would be pretty much be a sight unseen purchase. Ibis would require a trip to Santa Cruz, but I could swing a day or overnight trip if I canít convince myself riding around the Bike Peddler neighborhood.
    You can demo both the sb130 and the ripmo from trailhouse fyi.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by hillsandspills View Post
    Iím in a pretty similar situation as you. Iím 6í4Ē, 35Ē inseam and 50 in November. I like hard core single track, like to get a little air. My last bike was an Ibis Ripley 1 and the cockpit was always too small so I had a 120 stem which threw off the geo.

    I demoíd the Ripmo at Ibis in SC and suggest you do the same. I couldnít believe how well the bike climbed especially having all of that travel. As soon as I pointed it down it just gobbles up all of the terrain. It is extremely stable in the harshest of conditions, likes to get into the air and holds its line very nicely. It comes stock with 2.5Ē Maxxis and that definitely helps - you can go 2.6Ē.

    I bought the bike within a few days of that from Trailhead off the showroom with their XO build, carbon logo wheels, factory fork and x2 rear shock. I canít tell you how much I love this bike after having it for a couple of weeks. It has taken me a while to get used to how much it gobbles up the terrain, how far you can push it and how much traction you get on corners.

    Yesterday I rode 21 miles with 4K vertical in Demo and Niscene and it seems like it pedals up just as well as the Ripley. The downhill ability of this bike will have you grinning cheek to cheek! I went down Braille and hit all of the jumps with total confidence

    The only con which is far outweighed by the pluses is that the BB height is lower and it takes getting used to so you donít hit too many things.
    Great feedback, and now Iím excited to try out the Ripmo! How are those Shimano brakes? I read a review somewhere that said they werenít enough brake for the bike. The other thing is that I canít stand KS LEV posts (have had problems since day one with mine), but Peddler said they would swap in a Fox Transfer for a few $$s.

    I like a little air too, and a fast confident descender, so sounds like we are pretty similar riders.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jukas View Post
    You can demo both the sb130 and the ripmo from trailhouse fyi.
    When I called Trailhouse yesterday, they only had a medium Ripmo. Not sure if the large is down for repairs? I hadnít thought about the SB130, but the guy Iíve been working with at Peddler said they donít have the SB130 for demo at Trailhouse, and didnít know if or when they would get it in an XL.

  10. #10
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    I have had some issues with the lev but their customer service is good and they are light. I canít say enough great things about this bike but best of luck with your decision and have fun!

  11. #11
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    I almost forgot .. I put a 50mm stem and 2Ē Enve riser bar

  12. #12
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    It will be fine for you. It will keep you safe and give you a fair bit of room to progress on aggressive descending.

    Unless one is XC racing, I recommend to folks to have a little more bike, a little more tire, more knee pad than the razor's edge of XC/Trail.

    The downside is weight and climbing right? The RipMo does well in that department. It climbs like a champ! And the weight is not bad at 30 lbs for a medium. I tuned mine and got it down to 28 lbs and it was a flyer.

    What makes the RipMo great is it solved the frame real-estate puzzle. It does everything better than the competition when packaged up. DW suspension, light frame, short stays, 2.6 tires, big waterbottle, reservoir rear shock, long reach, 170mm dropper. It's all there.

    For your height, what you'll really appreciate is the steep seat angle. It's about 76 degrees so when you have a long post for your long legs, you're not hanging off the back by the rear tire. He Hightower is really a problem for very tall guys since the seat angle is slack at 72-73 i think.

    The weaknesses of the RipMo are availability, only 145mm rear travel and tight pivots. I think availability and tight pivots are now solved/addressed. The 145mm rear travel is not at the caliber of the very rowdy bikes like the Wreckoning or Capra but it can be purchased with a Fox X2 rear shock and that's like adding 5-10mm of travel.

    I say go for it. At least check it out.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    It will be fine for you. It will keep you safe and give you a fair bit of room to progress on aggressive descending.

    For your height, what you'll really appreciate is the steep seat angle. It's about 76 degrees so when you have a long post for your long legs, you're not hanging off the back by the rear tire. He Hightower is really a problem for very tall guys since the seat angle is slack at 72-73 i think.

    I say go for it. At least check it out.
    Thanks! I read your ride review on the Ripmo, which was great and helpful. I hadnít seen any YouTube or other reviews from anyone my height, and with the steep ST and a bit slack HT, I thought it may feel too tight. As was mentioned, thereís always a longer stem option.

    Bottom line is I need to get out and ride one. It certainly sounds like it will impress, if not blow away my expectations in multiple departments.

  14. #14
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    SportsBasement demos Ripmoís , I did it for my son this week.
    $100 a day. You pick it up before closing and return the next day prior to close.

    Plus you get to apply the demo price toward a bike purchase. You can demo up to 4 times and apply $400
    You can reserve on their website

    And yes itís my understanding they are not available till Nov. but it may take longer if you wait to order.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by MTB Dad View Post
    SportsBasement demos , I did it for my son this week.
    $100 a day. You pick it up before closing and return the next day prior to close.

    Plus you get to apply the demo price toward a bike purchase. You can demo up to 4 times and apply $400
    You can reserve on their website

    And yes itís my understanding they are not available till Nov. but it may take longer if you wait to order.
    Nice, I have never been in that store! The closest store that has the large (no XL in any Sports Basement stores for demo) is Novato, but thatís a lot better than driving all the way to Santa Cruz.

    Peddler said theyíd have the XL built up for me to spin around the neighborhood on Tuesday or Wednesday, and I already have a few demo credits to apply to a purchase there. Iíd just have to decide which demo credit Iím going to lose by where I buy the bike.

    Iím also not sure if riding a bike thatís too small for me is giving me enough to guess that the right size of the same bike will be the best overall bike for me. My only option to ride the right frame size on trails is to drive to Santa Cruz, or decide after testing the XL in the Peddler parking lot to take the plunge.

    These reviews and insight here give me a lot more confidence in potentially feeling comfortable making that decision.

  16. #16
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    Nothing really to add except I picked up my new Ripmo today, looking forward to getting the suspension dialed in tomorrow on its maiden voyage




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  17. #17
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    Just my .02 the newest Ripley sounds like the bike for you based on your ride likes. Having been on both bikes and now own the V3 Ripley and I ride basically the same as you. After several injuries and joint replacement Iím pretty cautious, Iím fast but avoid catching air unless on accident.
    The Ripley outclimbs the Ripmo but not by much. IMO the extra travel isnít needed for most which is why I bought a Ripley.

    I just rode 2 days this week in Truckee and my Ripley was fine. True if I rode Tahoe more Iíd have probably gone Ripmo.

    As you know Ibis the sizing is not as straight forward so if the XL Ripley doesnít work for you the Ripmo might as itís a bit more open cockpit. I donít think youíll be disappointed either way.

  18. #18
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    i have a medium ripmo Iíve taken to annadel once - it was great there as it is everywhere else I ride it (so far just a bunch of tamarancho and China camp). I havenít ridden new stump, liked 2018 (demoed at Annadel) but ripmo blows it away in every aspect in my opinion.
    Iíd just strongly recommend demoing the right size ripmo. And if stump is good for you for annadel then Iíd be shocked if you thought ripmo was too much bike there.
    Personally for annadel Iíd want my ripmo or a hardtail / xc bike for just totally different trails/style. Wouldnít want anything in between.
    Canít speak to the new yetis at all tho, and Iíve never had more fun on any bike on any trails than every time I ride ripmo

  19. #19
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    I think if I go with Ibis, Iíll go Ripmo based on everything Iíve read and seen. No significant long travel penalty for climbing, and more confident descending than the shorter travel Ibis bikes.

    I ride Downieville every once in a while, Northstar and other areas, and it sounds like a very capable bike to handle it all.

    Itís great to hear all of the excitement and great stuff people are saying about the Ripmo. Itís definitely on my short list.

  20. #20
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    Hi Everyone,
    I just joined on. I'm 6' 4", 36" inseam, older. I ride Annadel as my local and go up to Tahoe often, am looking forward to getting further afield. I am just getting to the point where I want to lift the bike some, took a lesson at Northstar, which I Highly recommend. Not getting big air but riding aggressively, working the corners harder as I get better. I'm coming form a Pivot SB that got killed 4/21 in a car accident.
    Ripmo, blk XL, XO, grips, saddle, Shwable HD 2.6 on front, Hayes Dominion's just put on.
    My 2 ct's, The Ripmo is not too much bike at all, it's very happy as a trail bike. It's way way better than the SB. My only hope might be that is came in XXL, it's still a little tight, better than the Pivot, I tried longer stems and that ruined the handling. Which would make the new Yeti line tempting, they don't have a sweet deal like the Rip NX, but if you have the money. My one big question would be the SA. The Ripmo is pretty steep and the new Yeti is more so, at least on paper. I have my seat all the way back and I wouldn't want to be much more forward. There is a limit to this steep seat tube thing I feel, there is a very important comfort issue in the 80% of your pedaling, there's a reason those roadies in the Tri position look so horribly unhappy.
    The Ripmo has been fantastic, I have almost 150 hours on it, many rides and it's still quiet, I'm not thrilled with the Fox 36 Factory, will try the PUSH conversion as soon as they are available, I'm down to 53 lbs pressure to get the fork somewhat sensitive. The Xt's did the variable bite point thing, same as they did on the SB, the newest gen XT is significantly flawed. The Hayes are only one ride but if they stay the this way they are 1000% better than anything I've tried.

  21. #21
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    Well, I pulled the trigger today on an XL Ripmo GX Build in black/ green! I took a test ride around the LBS neighborhood, hopped several curbs and played with the suspension settings. I don't think I got even close to a complete feel for the bike, but I could tell enough that I liked the way it felt under me, and I will get used to the differences between what I ride now and the Ibis. I'm a lot more stretched out on my Niner with a 100mm stem that compensates for far too tight a cockpit, and this bike feels like the Niner with a 30mm or 40mm stem, but much better seated posture, reach and body position.

    Thanks for all of the feedback on this thread, and it also helped to hear from folks of similar height, inseam and riding styles. This definitely played a large part in my confidence to buy this bike without a demo ride off-road.

    The shop agreed to swap out the KS Lev post with a Fox Transfer on my request, and because the Transfer has to be ordered, I won't pick up the bike until later in the week. I can't wait to get it on the trails this coming weekend at the latest!

    Ripmo - too much bike for me?-ripmo.jpg
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  22. #22
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    That is a sweet looking bike. I can't wait to demo one as well.

  23. #23
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    I LOVE mine

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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by isleblue65 View Post
    Well, I pulled the trigger today on an XL Ripmo GX Build in black/ green! I took a test ride around the LBS neighborhood, hopped several curbs and played with the suspension settings. I don't think I got even close to a complete feel for the bike, but I could tell enough that I liked the way it felt under me, and I will get used to the differences between what I ride now and the Ibis. I'm a lot more stretched out on my Niner with a 100mm stem that compensates for far too tight a cockpit, and this bike feels like the Niner with a 30mm or 40mm stem, but much better seated posture, reach and body position.

    Thanks for all of the feedback on this thread, and it also helped to hear from folks of similar height, inseam and riding styles. This definitely played a large part in my confidence to buy this bike without a demo ride off-road.

    The shop agreed to swap out the KS Lev post with a Fox Transfer on my request, and because the Transfer has to be ordered, I won't pick up the bike until later in the week. I can't wait to get it on the trails this coming weekend at the latest!

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Really awesome.

    Great choice on the Fox Transfer.

    30-40 stem is good and it really showcases our evolution from road bikes with big tires to mountain bikes more suitable for the task.

    Only thing is you're gonna have to venture out and find great terrain now.
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by isleblue65 View Post
    Well, I pulled the trigger today on an XL Ripmo GX Build in black/ green!
    Can you update as you ride more?

    Iím 6í4Ē with long arms. I stopped by the LBS to ask about the SB130....I told him I really appreciated the long reach and ďbignessĒ of the new geo bikes. He told that I should really try the Ripmo.

    When I said that I felt that 150/130 was pushing whatís needed; I also didnít get along with the Ripley LS, so I never even considered the Ripmo.

    He said that he thought the Ripmo is a much better bike than the Ripley and the, despite the suspension numbers, that itís climbing manners will surprise me.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by isleblue65 View Post
    Well, I pulled the trigger today on an XL Ripmo GX Build in black/ green! I took a test ride around the LBS neighborhood, hopped several curbs and played with the suspension settings. I don't think I got even close to a complete feel for the bike, but I could tell enough that I liked the way it felt under me, and I will get used to the differences between what I ride now and the Ibis. I'm a lot more stretched out on my Niner with a 100mm stem that compensates for far too tight a cockpit, and this bike feels like the Niner with a 30mm or 40mm stem, but much better seated posture, reach and body position.

    Thanks for all of the feedback on this thread, and it also helped to hear from folks of similar height, inseam and riding styles. This definitely played a large part in my confidence to buy this bike without a demo ride off-road.

    The shop agreed to swap out the KS Lev post with a Fox Transfer on my request, and because the Transfer has to be ordered, I won't pick up the bike until later in the week. I can't wait to get it on the trails this coming weekend at the latest!

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Congrats on your decision. That looks like a sweet ride for sure.

    PM me if you're ever in need of a local riding partner. I'm not available at 5:45 AM however. I do work early though and tend to be available to ride after 3:00-ish and on weekends.

    Chuck
    45=25

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    I have many miles in all kinds of terrain on a Ripmo, I'm 6'4". I would say you should rethink the whole thing of 'too much bike'. Demo the new Yeti and the Ripmo, I think you'll not even be thinking about it as you ride, if you have any interest in mountain terrain, unknown trails that can and do throw all manner of features and combinations, you'll come away with real love of the 'new' geo.(the euros laugh at that) New Yeti is case and point they've gone all in, it's very interesting to see they have so totally revamped their line, I'm going to keep a eye out for Demo's, love to try them, and the 150 looks especially interesting, they are expensive though, it goes unnoticed that Ibis makes the one quality level of Carbon unlike so many, making the NX Rip a real deal. The other little sleeper is Stumpjumper EVO, only available in two sizes and in alloy, clearly they are testing the waters, and that is going to be very interesting, it's going become a popular bike and then what? For us tall riders this change in geo is most welcome but they're still a little short of the mark, people at 6' are happy on XL's, up frame sizing is common, I hear that Transition is coming out with XXL, they are aware of this issue. The Ripmo in XL with a 50 is still tight for tall riders, the XL never feels too big.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wmmtn View Post
    I have many miles in all kinds of terrain on a Ripmo, I'm 6'4". I would say you should rethink the whole thing of 'too much bike'. Demo the new Yeti and the Ripmo, I think you'll not even be thinking about it as you ride, if you have any interest in mountain terrain, unknown trails that can and do throw all manner of features and combinations, you'll come away with real love of the 'new' geo.(the euros laugh at that) New Yeti is case and point they've gone all in, it's very interesting to see they have so totally revamped their line, I'm going to keep a eye out for Demo's, love to try them, and the 150 looks especially interesting, they are expensive though, it goes unnoticed that Ibis makes the one quality level of Carbon unlike so many, making the NX Rip a real deal. The other little sleeper is Stumpjumper EVO, only available in two sizes and in alloy, clearly they are testing the waters, and that is going to be very interesting, it's going become a popular bike and then what? For us tall riders this change in geo is most welcome but they're still a little short of the mark, people at 6' are happy on XL's, up frame sizing is common, I hear that Transition is coming out with XXL, they are aware of this issue. The Ripmo in XL with a 50 is still tight for tall riders, the XL never feels too big.
    My decision has been made, and I pulled the trigger on the Ripmo. I had enough confidence from a test ride at the shop in the feel and geometry to jump in. Trying to schedule a demo of an XL would have taken me weeks to months (trip to Santa Cruz), and frankly, I was ready to replace my bike 2 months ago. From what I'm reading and hearing, I won't be disappointed in my decision. I do think the bike is going to feel smaller to me than what I'm used to, but I also believe that the riding position I've become accustomed to over the last years has been all wrong. Too leaned forward and stretched out, and marginal handling on climbing (and worse on descending with my 100/120 suspension)

    Quote Originally Posted by chuckha62 View Post
    Congrats on your decision. That looks like a sweet ride for sure.

    PM me if you're ever in need of a local riding partner. I'm not available at 5:45 AM however. I do work early though and tend to be available to ride after 3:00-ish and on weekends.

    Chuck
    Sounds good Chuck. My weekend rides tend to be mornings, but not quite that early. Maybe 7am start. Will have to meet up one of these weekends.
    Craig

    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    That is a sweet looking bike. I can't wait to demo one as well.
    I'm no authority on it's trail handling skills, as I took a leap of faith based on reviews, feedback and a basic bike shop test ride. I don't pick up the bike for another day or two as the shop is waiting for a Fox Transfer post to come in to swap out with the KS Lev for me. If you can demo one, that's probably a smart thing to do!

    Quote Originally Posted by sbd View Post
    I LOVE mine

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  29. #29
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    I can confirm on the size feeling for the Ripmo, with the steep seat angle the seated position felt shorter than my last non-ibis (though roomier than my medium HD3). Once I got over it feeling different I found the front-back balance when climbing to be great, and when I stand up and ride downhill the long reach feels super roomy and stable.

    It's kinda nice to ride tech climbs without having to sit on the nose of my saddle.

  30. #30
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    I picked up my XL Ripmo yesterday and had my first ride. It was a much longer bike than I realized when I tried to strap it to my bike rack at the LBS, and the tires nearly fell off of the outside of the wheel trays on both sides! I actually had to drill new holes in the rack to move the trays outward so I could properly strap down the bike.

    The first thing I noticed is how much more confidently the bike climbs than my Jet 9. The rougher and more technical, the better the Ripmo handled it. It by no means felt 'light' - in fact my Jet 9 feels lighter - but the Ripmo just smoothed everything out and climbed up an over everything with ease. It's a long and big bike, but the cockpit feels pretty small to me. I moved the saddle back all the way on the rails. I think a lot of this is just getting used to a different riding position than what I've done for the past 20 years. My legs also felt like they were working different muscles because the pedals are right under the nose of the saddle compared to being more forward on my other bikes. I was tired and sore earlier in the ride because of this. I'll get used to it, it is part of the geometry and why it climbs so well.

    Descending, the Ripmo came alive. I found myself popping off rocks, roots and berms that I rarely if ever ride over on my Jet 9. The trail that has beaten me up for the last decade when I've pushed my speed beyond 60% was easily conquered at 75% yesterday, while springing off obstacles that I've always gone around. The way the bike felt on rocky and rooted sections above the obstacles made me completely comfortable that the bike would do just fine, and it did.

    Definitely not too much bike for Annadel or for me.

    Ripmo - too much bike for me?-ripmo.jpg
    Ripmo - too much bike for me?-ripmo-2.jpg
    Ripmo - too much bike for me?-ripmo-3.jpg
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  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by isleblue65 View Post
    I picked up my XL Ripmo yesterday and had my first ride. It was a much longer bike than I realized when I tried to strap it to my bike rack at the LBS, and the tires nearly fell off of the outside of the wheel trays on both sides! I actually had to drill new holes in the rack to move the trays outward so I could properly strap down the bike.

    The first thing I noticed is how much more confidently the bike climbs than my Jet 9. The rougher and more technical, the better the Ripmo handled it. It by no means felt 'light' - in fact my Jet 9 feels lighter - but the Ripmo just smoothed everything out and climbed up an over everything with ease. It's a long and big bike, but the cockpit feels pretty small to me. I moved the saddle back all the way on the rails. I think a lot of this is just getting used to a different riding position than what I've done for the past 20 years. My legs also felt like they were working different muscles because the pedals are right under the nose of the saddle compared to being more forward on my other bikes. I was tired and sore earlier in the ride because of this. I'll get used to it, it is part of the geometry and why it climbs so well.

    Descending, the Ripmo came alive. I found myself popping off rocks, roots and berms that I rarely if ever ride over on my Jet 9. The trail that has beaten me up for the last decade when I've pushed my speed beyond 60% was easily conquered at 75% yesterday, while springing off obstacles that I've always gone around. The way the bike felt on rocky and rooted sections above the obstacles made me completely comfortable that the bike would do just fine, and it did.

    Definitely not too much bike for Annadel or for me.

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    wowwwwwwww. So cool to hear.

    It's the latest evolution of the mountain bike and it works well.
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    Quote Originally Posted by isleblue65 View Post

    Descending, the Ripmo came alive. I found myself popping off rocks, roots and berms that I rarely if ever ride over on my Jet 9. The trail that has beaten me up for the last decade when I've pushed my speed beyond 60% was easily conquered at 75% yesterday, while springing off obstacles that I've always gone around. The way the bike felt on rocky and rooted sections above the obstacles made me completely comfortable that the bike would do just fine, and it did.

    Definitely not too much bike for Annadel or for me.
    Good feedback, Annadel is my home trail and the ripmo is on my shortlist of bikes to replace my Bronson v2 along with the v3 and the sb130.

    Iím curious which trail your referencing in the downhill and what your typical route is

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jukas View Post
    Good feedback, Annadel is my home trail and the ripmo is on my shortlist of bikes to replace my Bronson v2 along with the v3 and the sb130.

    Iím curious which trail your referencing in the downhill and what your typical route is
    Both the downhill section from the top of South Burma coming from Buick Meadow toward Richardson, and Spring Creek Trail from the lake down to Canyon. There are several rocks and dips on the fast sections that Iíve always (or usually) stayed pretty grounded going over, but this bike felt light and lively on the launch and landing.

    Iíll typically take Canyon to Marsh to South Burma - Richardson - Spring Creek and out during the week before work, and a longer ride on weekends.

    My sample of the park is small on this bike so far as I only had time for a short ride on Sunday after picking up the bike, but I was pretty impressed with it all around.

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    Congrats on your new bike. Sadly saw your post too late to advise against the Fox dropper and to suggest you instead get a 9point8 FallLine with offset head to help compensate for that super steep STA and also so you have a play free post.
    Yes you will be and are using different, less powerful muscles to climb than before and you aren't able to properly engaged those big muscles for power with that STA. I'm your height and I use a FallLIne with offset head to get me where I like to be to be able to properly put power down and my steepest STA is only 74.5*. That steep STA will help you on the seriously steep stuff though, so if that's the sort of area/trails you ride regularly, that's great, but if you have milder grade climbs, not so much.

    Quote Originally Posted by isleblue65 View Post
    .............The first thing I noticed is how much more confidently the bike climbs than my Jet 9. The rougher and more technical, the better the Ripmo handled it. It by no means felt 'light' - in fact my Jet 9 feels lighter - but the Ripmo just smoothed everything out and climbed up an over everything with ease. It's a long and big bike, but the cockpit feels pretty small to me. I moved the saddle back all the way on the rails. I think a lot of this is just getting used to a different riding position than what I've done for the past 20 years. My legs also felt like they were working different muscles because the pedals are right under the nose of the saddle compared to being more forward on my other bikes. I was tired and sore earlier in the ride because of this. I'll get used to it, it is part of the geometry and why it climbs so well.

    ......................Definitely not too much bike for Annadel or for me.
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  35. #35
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    My loop at Annadel is up Spring Creek, across the dam, up Canyon to Marsh, Marsh to Burma, Burma to Richardson and then down Rough Go.

    Zero complaints.

    BTW I LOVE the steep STA.

    Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk

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    If you find your ripmo is too much bike, you can try what I did - I have an extra set of wheels with Schwalbe G-Ones I use for pavement and occasional fire roads. They are super fast on the uphill, and make any downhill way more exciting!

    behold the roadmo!
    Ripmo - too much bike for me?-img_4086.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by isleblue65 View Post
    Both the downhill section from the top of South Burma coming from Buick Meadow toward Richardson, and Spring Creek Trail from the lake down to Canyon. There are several rocks and dips on the fast sections that Iíve always (or usually) stayed pretty grounded going over, but this bike felt light and lively on the launch and landing.

    Iíll typically take Canyon to Marsh to South Burma - Richardson - Spring Creek and out during the week before work, and a longer ride on weekends.

    My sample of the park is small on this bike so far as I only had time for a short ride on Sunday after picking up the bike, but I was pretty impressed with it all around.
    Good deal. Iím a creature of habit so I have two main routes

    1. Up Richardson - two quary - marsh - pig flat - ridge - marsh - south Burma - north Burma - live oak - rough go - orchard - cobblestone. That gets me right around 15mi and just under 2k climbing.

    2. Start at lawndale - up Schultz- ridge - marsh - out lawndale. Thatís around 14mi and something like 1700 footies.

    Iím really curious when I can ride again to demo and compare the ripmo and the sb130.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    Congrats on your new bike. Sadly saw your post too late to advise against the Fox dropper and to suggest you instead get a 9point8 FallLine with offset head to help compensate for that super steep STA and also so you have a play free post.
    Yes you will be and are using different, less powerful muscles to climb than before and you aren't able to properly engaged those big muscles for power with that STA. I'm your height and I use a FallLIne with offset head to get me where I like to be to be able to properly put power down and my steepest STA is only 74.5*. That steep STA will help you on the seriously steep stuff though, so if that's the sort of area/trails you ride regularly, that's great, but if you have milder grade climbs, not so much.
    I'm thinking/ hoping that I'll get used to the STA and pedal position and those muscles will get stronger and adapt to the change. I've already used the Fox Transfer on that first ride, and I also have the brand new KS LEV post (because the shop was only going to credit me $100 for the swap, and I can sell it for more than that). If I need more saddle rear offset, I'll look for a longer saddle or one with longer rails toward the front.

    Even though I felt more muscle fatigue on that first ride, which could also in part be due to a moderate case of bronchitis that I'm dealing with, the bike did everything better than my old geometry Niner, except feeling lighter.

    Quote Originally Posted by sbd View Post
    My loop at Annadel is up Spring Creek, across the dam, up Canyon to Marsh, Marsh to Burma, Burma to Richardson and then down Rough Go.

    Zero complaints.

    BTW I LOVE the steep STA.

    Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
    I avoided going up Spring Creek on my Niner. The suspension sucked! The Ripmo is a different animal. That's a good ride route, and one I'm going to try soon! Glad to hear you like the STA.

    Quote Originally Posted by brucero View Post
    If you find your ripmo is too much bike, you can try what I did - I have an extra set of wheels with Schwalbe G-Ones I use for pavement and occasional fire roads. They are super fast on the uphill, and make any downhill way more exciting!

    behold the roadmo!
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Those would definitely make downhills more exciting!
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  39. #39
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    I LOVE this bike! I was at Downieville this weekend, and put it through its paces. The bike inspires confidence downhill, and made me feel like a better rider. Itís very playful and easy to move around under you, or lift and pop over roots and rocks. It climbs like a dream both sitting and standing with very little pedal induced bob.

    Nothing could have wiped the ear to ear grin off my face.


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  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by isleblue65 View Post
    I LOVE this bike! I was at Downieville this weekend, and put it through its paces. The bike inspires confidence downhill, and made me feel like a better rider. Itís very playful and easy to move around under you, or lift and pop over roots and rocks. It climbs like a dream both sitting and standing with very little pedal induced bob.

    Nothing could have wiped the ear to ear grin off my face.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Great news! A great bike will grow with you. It'll make you a better and it will have your back when you're not dialed.

    It'll only get better!!
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  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by isleblue65 View Post
    I've already used the Fox Transfer on that first ride, and I also have the brand new KS LEV post (because the shop was only going to credit me $100 for the swap, and I can sell it for more than that). If I need more saddle rear offset,
    I'm in the exact same boat as you. I'm 6' 2" and have just bought a Ripmo size XL after demoing lots of bikes including the Hightower orig & LT, Rimo in both L & XL, all the evils, and the Yeti 130 & 150.

    If you can check out the new fox factory 175mm for your size.

    For anyone else looking for an aggressive trail bike which can go up or down mountain trails, which is fantastic on the descents, poppy fun, and agile in slow stuff, you're not going to go wrong between an SB130 or a Ripmo. Very much will be personal preference for fit so mega important to go and demo a bike properly.

    Also a big take away is for the Rimpo you must demo it on a trail, don't just try in a car park as feels very different when out on trail as brilliant control on tight fast and flowing twisty single track where it comes alive, vs a car park where it feels floppy. Also when a flow sections gives way to a very rocky sections it transitions super smooth! I ride very rocky trails in Wales Snowdonia, but often fast flowing track in forests before hand.

    Also the DPX2 vs the X2, if in doubt start with the DPX2 as you can always upgrade later. Everyone is different, I found DPX2 is way easier to set up, lighter and more supportive if you like popping off stuff and jibbing, vs the X2 which is great for very high speed descending or rounds of enduro series feels more stable but needs more time set up right. But if you're trail riding at lower speeds and like popping off stuff when out for trails for fun, and want something a straightforward that works - DPX2 all the way.

    Finally if you end up not liking the rimpo, you can buy an SB130 frame, and switch over the parts (minus the BB as Yeti is press fit vs Rimo which is threaded), and if you want you can change the air spring in the fork to drop it from 160mm travel to 150mm easy, then sell the rimpo frame .

    I might also buy an SB130 frame (or if Santa Cruz bring out a new Hightower frame later this year from reading the forums in here), then play and switch the kit around between the 2 bikes.

    Final point, I really did NOT like the KS dropper or remote - Transfer with wolf tooth remote all the way, and also XT brakes vs SRAM (but that's personal preference ).

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    I'm 6' 4" been on a Rip since 5/18, absolutely love it, I did change the shock to a Cane Creek DB CS and I like way way better than the DPX2, it's so much stronger and responsive, it is heavier though. I put a coil conversion in the Fox 36, which is nice too and lastly the big change, I went for Hayes Dominion A4's and I can't imagine going back to the clapping bricks on plates of Shimano. I think the too much bike thing is put to bed at this point, Enduro gave it top honors against a field of the best as Trail bike of the year, it was the bike Ibis sent to contend trail bike of the year not Enduro, that test comes out in a couple of weeks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wmmtn View Post
    I'm 6' 4" been on a Rip since 5/18, absolutely love it, I did change the shock to a Cane Creek DB CS and I like way way better than the DPX2, it's so much stronger and responsive, it is heavier though. I put a coil conversion in the Fox 36, which is nice too and lastly the big change, I went for Hayes Dominion A4's and I can't imagine going back to the clapping bricks on plates of Shimano. I think the too much bike thing is put to bed at this point, Enduro gave it top honors against a field of the best as Trail bike of the year, it was the bike Ibis sent to contend trail bike of the year not Enduro, that test comes out in a couple of weeks.
    Wow very cool set up. It just goes to show personal preference, and how cool it is can adjust a bike spec to feel at home.
    Every persons different, for example I really did not like the SRAM brakes speced on the builds I demoed, my personal preference is the Shimano XTs with 203 rotors. This is where the custom option suited me well as I loved the frame and the 942s, but wanted to change a lot of the base builds. In fact the shop I bought from gave me a brilliant advice which start with the NX build as this bought me time until the 175 transfer came out, plus I was able then to play with upgrading the bike to suite me. I got them to also upgrade the brakes to the XT's, drive trail to XO1. That worked out way, way lower cost than going for the stock XO1 Ibis build, plus I could sell the other parts I wanted to swap out too (such as bars, grips, saddle) or switch them to freshen up my other bike before I sell it.

  44. #44
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    Rekindled thread but anyone else wondering about this being "too much bike" that hasn't seen this review it may settle some of your concerns! This coming from owning an OG V1 Ripley owner that rides Annadel very regularly! 👍😀

    https://youtu.be/uJLE_mGNTTU
    Wait whuuut, who did he tell you that!?!?....

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrEndoBars View Post
    I'm in the exact same boat as you. I'm 6' 2" and have just bought a Ripmo size XL after demoing lots of bikes including the Hightower orig & LT, Rimo in both L & XL, all the evils, and the Yeti 130 & 150.

    If you can check out the new fox factory 175mm for your size.

    For anyone else looking for an aggressive trail bike which can go up or down mountain trails, which is fantastic on the descents, poppy fun, and agile in slow stuff, you're not going to go wrong between an SB130 or a Ripmo. Very much will be personal preference for fit so mega important to go and demo a bike properly.

    Also a big take away is for the Rimpo you must demo it on a trail, don't just try in a car park as feels very different when out on trail as brilliant control on tight fast and flowing twisty single track where it comes alive, vs a car park where it feels floppy. Also when a flow sections gives way to a very rocky sections it transitions super smooth! I ride very rocky trails in Wales Snowdonia, but often fast flowing track in forests before hand.

    Also the DPX2 vs the X2, if in doubt start with the DPX2 as you can always upgrade later. Everyone is different, I found DPX2 is way easier to set up, lighter and more supportive if you like popping off stuff and jibbing, vs the X2 which is great for very high speed descending or rounds of enduro series feels more stable but needs more time set up right. But if you're trail riding at lower speeds and like popping off stuff when out for trails for fun, and want something a straightforward that works - DPX2 all the way.

    Finally if you end up not liking the rimpo, you can buy an SB130 frame, and switch over the parts (minus the BB as Yeti is press fit vs Rimo which is threaded), and if you want you can change the air spring in the fork to drop it from 160mm travel to 150mm easy, then sell the rimpo frame .

    I might also buy an SB130 frame (or if Santa Cruz bring out a new Hightower frame later this year from reading the forums in here), then play and switch the kit around between the 2 bikes.

    Final point, I really did NOT like the KS dropper or remote - Transfer with wolf tooth remote all the way, and also XT brakes vs SRAM (but that's personal preference ).
    Now that Iíve had the Ripmo for a while, I think I have a more balanced/ unbiased opinion of the bike.

    All of the positive points have been stated several times here and in online reviews and videos. It is NOT too much bike. In fact itís the perfect amount of bike for where I ride, and versatile enough to perform well on a variety of different terrains.

    Where I believe the Ripmo falls short - or took the new geometry too far was in the steep (76 degree) seat tube angle. On flat or rolling terrain, my weight is noticeably heavy on my hands and wrists while riding, my feet are further back under the saddle, and I have not found a solution to the discomfort this causes. Most newer geometry bikes have between 72 and 74 degree ST angles. 74 or 75 would be ideal for this bike.

    While descending, even moderate grades, it feels like the seat post has to be dropped to get behind the forward-leaning saddle. This is Ok, because thatís why the dropper is there. Saddle positioning for climbing seems to be in the sweet spot for this bike. It stays planted sitting or standing. When the terrain levels out, thatís where the geometry is a compromise.

    The second area that the Ripmo falls short is in the stock/ recommended DPX2 pressure settings. I found that I needed to exceed the recommended PSI for my weight by close to 100psi to achieve recommended sag. Even with this, it bottomed out on large hits.

    Secondly, I Initially blamed a low bottom bracket for pedal strikes, but this had more to do with a shock that is not optimally tuned out of the box for an XL bike and rider. A volume spacer resolved the issues above, and also allowed me to set the shock to recommended pressure for my weight to achieve proper sag.

    Tires: The Minion DHF and Aggressor DHR 2.5 are great tires, and well suited to the 34mm ID Ibis 938 wheels (GX build). They shine with between 15 and 18psi for me, and I weigh 205 pounds. Climbing and descending traction are their sole purpose. However, they are incredibly slow tires. Too slow for a bike that feels like a downhill capable XC rig. I think a faster rolling, less aggressive tire would turn this bike into a rocket ship, and it would still be an amazing climber and descender because of geometry.

    The Ripmo isnít perfect, but itís darned close. Itís lively and fun, and has made me a faster, better rider!



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    Quote Originally Posted by isleblue65 View Post
    The Ripmo isnít perfect, but itís darned close. Itís lively and fun, and has made me a faster, better rider!
    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Nice post, I totally agree. Every rider is different so key is selecting the components you feel comfortable with. I personally felt the tyres and 938 rims were a little too heavy for me personally (brilliant tyres on descents, but on longer trails and transitions they were very noticeable).
    I've gone for the 942s carbon rims with ibis hubs (as if I don't like I can switch the hubs to DT Swiss, but they are really good!), and switched the tyres to Magic Mary soft up front and Hands Damp speed grip on the rear both on 2.35 (which was the tyres I ran on my other FS 29er Bike) and the difference is very noticeable on longer day out trails where there's lots of peddeling or transitions with climbs between descents. The bike is also it's a lot more lively / lighter and easier to jib now too I find, but it's all personal so would be different for another person.

    The pressure in the shock is a good point, I made the same mistake with a too low pressure on my other bike and was horrible! The Ripmo has a very slightly higher BB at 431mm than a lot of other bikes (my other FS 29er BB is 335), so I tend to get less strikes or hang-ups in water rutted sections. It seems to be in the sweet spot of BB height for aggressive trail riding as it's also slightly less so than the bigger endure 29er bikes like the evil wreckoning or intense carbine.

  47. #47
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    Very interesting thread...For those still considering I thought I'd post my experience. I had a chance to demo a large Ripmo at Demo a few months back...My main bike is an HDR (set up still in 26" setup). Overall I liked the Ripmo but found I was not having as much fun as on my HDR. First on the good.

    + The bike makes you feel super confident on descents. It just plows over stuff that requires skill and technique on my current bike. As a result you can go faster, with less angst and take the middle line
    + The Ripmo climbs surprisingly well. Once again small rock gardens just disappear...just pedal and the bike conquers most chop

    BUT

    - No real room for finesse...If you stall this bike on a technical feature it's pretty damn hard to get it moving again, flick it over rocks etc.
    - As someone said above you need to get that seatpost DOWN...Without it down you're in the wrong position for descents
    - You have to move your body WAY more to get that center of gravity far back enough to unweight the front wheel
    - Bigger, heavier makes it tougher to flick...less lively

    Overall I ended up passing and just doing a complete revamp of my HDR. Riding the Ripmo helped me figure out what I like and don't like...I like to think about my line, I like the challenge of conquering a technical section, where and when to move my body, flicking the bike up and over etc. The Ripmo would be a great second bike, it'd be amazing in a place like Bend or if I was to do a lot of downhill but around the Bay Area I just think I'd miss the fun of the HDR.

    That said a lot of the above was just not being used to the bike. The more I rode it the more I built new muscle memory...it did get more fun and lively as I got used to it's geometry and weight so my guess is that I'd have gotten used to it.

    I should also note the Ripmo was a burlier build than my bike, with heavier tires/wheels and fork.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by isleblue65 View Post

    Tires: The Minion DHF and Aggressor DHR 2.5 are great tires

    They shine with between 15 and 18psi for me, and I weigh 205 pounds.

    However, they are incredibly slow tires. Too slow for a bike that feels like a downhill capable XC rig.



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    Um yeah. Pretty much anything is gonna be slow rolling when its half flatted like you have them setup.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Californiagrown View Post
    Um yeah. Pretty much anything is gonna be slow rolling when its half flatted like you have them setup.
    Yeah, youíd think Iíd be getting rim strikes constantly, but Iíve done the Downieville downhill twice with 17psi, and ride a psi higher on my very rocky local trails. I havenít once bottomed out. Traction is greatly improved, and thereís no sidewall roll with the beefy Minion/ Aggressor. Compare this to 25psi, which beats the heck out of you, chatters over chunk and slides over gravel like ball bearings instead of conforming over it and gripping. Iíve tried this. Not going back.

    I wouldnít have believed it until my LBS set it up this way initially and said ďtry it!Ē I was running close to 30psi in my previous tires with Stanís ZTR Flow rims on my Niner, and anything less than 24psi resulted in rim strikes, sealant burping and squishy cornering.


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  50. #50
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    Not all air pressure gauges are created equal. I have one that reads 20 and another that says 25. My longacre racing tire pressure gauge has been my baseline gauge for 15 years.
    Making shit harder than it needs to be isn't awesome, it's just...harder.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by isleblue65 View Post
    Now that Iíve had the Ripmo for a while, I think I have a more balanced/ unbiased opinion of the bike.

    All of the positive points have been stated several times here and in online reviews and videos. It is NOT too much bike. In fact itís the perfect amount of bike for where I ride, and versatile enough to perform well on a variety of different terrains.

    Where I believe the Ripmo falls short - or took the new geometry too far was in the steep (76 degree) seat tube angle. On flat or rolling terrain, my weight is noticeably heavy on my hands and wrists while riding, my feet are further back under the saddle, and I have not found a solution to the discomfort this causes. Most newer geometry bikes have between 72 and 74 degree ST angles. 74 or 75 would be ideal for this bike.

    While descending, even moderate grades, it feels like the seat post has to be dropped to get behind the forward-leaning saddle. This is Ok, because thatís why the dropper is there. Saddle positioning for climbing seems to be in the sweet spot for this bike. It stays planted sitting or standing. When the terrain levels out, thatís where the geometry is a compromise.

    The second area that the Ripmo falls short is in the stock/ recommended DPX2 pressure settings. I found that I needed to exceed the recommended PSI for my weight by close to 100psi to achieve recommended sag. Even with this, it bottomed out on large hits.

    Secondly, I Initially blamed a low bottom bracket for pedal strikes, but this had more to do with a shock that is not optimally tuned out of the box for an XL bike and rider. A volume spacer resolved the issues above, and also allowed me to set the shock to recommended pressure for my weight to achieve proper sag.

    Tires: The Minion DHF and Aggressor DHR 2.5 are great tires, and well suited to the 34mm ID Ibis 938 wheels (GX build). They shine with between 15 and 18psi for me, and I weigh 205 pounds. Climbing and descending traction are their sole purpose. However, they are incredibly slow tires. Too slow for a bike that feels like a downhill capable XC rig. I think a faster rolling, less aggressive tire would turn this bike into a rocket ship, and it would still be an amazing climber and descender because of geometry.

    The Ripmo isnít perfect, but itís darned close. Itís lively and fun, and has made me a faster, better rider!



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    Iíd agree with most of this review, except I love the seat angle. If you have too much weight on the hands you can go to a shorter stem and a higher rise bar: which is what I did. Iím 6í1Ē with a reach of someone 6í4Ē and I run a 35 stem with a 40mm rise Renthal bar. To me the advantage of the steep SA is that you can keep the front end down while climbing with such a short stem yet have all the DH benefits of the short stem.
    I feel like the Ripmo is more of a big trail bike that can race enduro (witnessed by Wallner on the EWS) vs an enduro bike that can sort of work as a trail bike, if that makes sense. Iíve had fun days at the bike park with it and I have done 6k vert trail rides with it. I do a lot of smooth xc rides with my Ripmo and just throw the lever in the middle position and it responds more like a Ripley than such a big bike, but then has the more fun geometry for railing turns and hitting jumps. My XC bike saw very little trail days last year because I find the Ripmo just more fun even on smoother trail days.


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  52. #52
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    I demo'd a Ripmo on the Flow Trail in SC and fell in love. Incredible climbing, luscious descending. I sold my two bikes to make room/cash for it! It should arrive in 2-3 weeks...


  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by isleblue65 View Post
    On flat or rolling terrain, my weight is noticeably heavy on my hands and wrists while riding,
    Tell us more about this so-called flat to rolling terrain you ride. Are you in Norcal?

  54. #54
    Rollin 29s
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    Ripmo - too much bike for me?

    Quote Originally Posted by Callender View Post
    Tell us more about this so-called flat to rolling terrain you ride. Are you in Norcal?
    Yes Nor Cal. At Annadel St Park for example (if youíre familiar with it), an example would be from Buick Meadow on Marsh trail to the other side of Ledson Marsh where Ridge begins. Or from about 1 mile down Marsh Trail to S. Burma through Buick Meadow to the left turn where the climb begins. These are generally rolling to flat-rolling sections.

    My weight is much more centered on my saddle on my Niner because the bottom bracket on that bike is positioned forward of the saddle, and frankly itís much more comfortable to ride in this kind of terrain.

    Iíve tried shorter, steeper stems, spacers, and 7 degree backsweep risers and 12 degree backsweep risers, and saddle fore and aft, and tilted up vs flat, and had the free fitting done at my LBS (that was done first).

    I think my three choices are down to:

    1. Living with it, combined with core strengthening and wrist/ hand strengthening exercises to support and lift my weight off my hands.
    2. Get another fitting done - professional fitting, not free LBS fitting you get when you buy the bike.
    3. Demo something else and sell the Ripmo.

    #3 isnít really on my radar yet, because I havenít really exhausted the options outlined in #s 1 and 2.

    Also, the overall ride, handling and feel of this bike is so much better than the Niner or anything else Iíve ever ridden, that this probably outweighs most of the downfalls for me. If the hand pressure was not comfort related, it probably wouldnít be an issue at all given all of the other ways that the bike shines.


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  55. #55
    Rollin 29s
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    Ripmo - too much bike for me?

    Delete duplicate
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  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by isleblue65 View Post
    Where I believe the Ripmo falls short - or took the new geometry too far was in the steep (76 degree) seat tube angle. On flat or rolling terrain, my weight is noticeably heavy on my hands and wrists while riding, my feet are further back under the saddle, and I have not found a solution to the discomfort this causes. Most newer geometry bikes have between 72 and 74 degree ST angles. 74 or 75 would be ideal for this bike.
    I'm a shorty, but you might be onto something here for tall folks, with a steeper STA, even with the same inseam, the vertical height of you hips is going to be higher, therefore your saddle to handlebar drop (I assume drop and not rise, since you are tall) will be greater as well. The only way to compensate for that is larger stack height. It doesn't look like the Ripmo has very high stack height for L and XL frame. Compare to the extreme Pole machine the stack height is 28mm (1.1") higher in XL. I assume you have maxed out your spacers and handlebar height already?

    Tires: The Minion DHF and Aggressor DHR 2.5 are great tires, and well suited to the 34mm ID Ibis 938 wheels (GX build). They shine with between 15 and 18psi for me, and I weigh 205 pounds. Climbing and descending traction are their sole purpose. However, they are incredibly slow tires. Too slow for a bike that feels like a downhill capable XC rig. I think a faster rolling, less aggressive tire would turn this bike into a rocket ship, and it would still be an amazing climber and descender because of geometry.
    Wow, I run the same pressure on those tires but I weight 150#. That sounds low and slow rolling at that pressure to me. But I agree these are slower/heavy tires to start with and I will be swapping for light ones, once the rain/mud clears up.

  57. #57
    sbd
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    I'm right around 200.

    I run the rear at 20. The front at around 18. Don't feel overly sluggish and grip like mad.

    Lighter tires sound interesting but not as interesting as traction


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