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  1. #1
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    Chuck,

    A birdie told me that you run a 1x9 setup? Mind if I ask your ratio? Have you experienced any chain suck since your conversion?

    I've been hit hard with chain suck. I've gone through three XT chains in the last two weeks, the last one only lasted 7 miles. (yep the entire drive train is new and I was getting chain suck in the middle ring as well.) I am thinking of changing to SRAM and running a 1x9 32 teeth in the front, and a 34 rear. I just want to ride the thing and not push it.

    I'll take ANY advice.

    Thanks,
    -Larry
    You only live once, but if you work it right, once is enough.

    -Joe Louis

  2. #2
    VTT
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    Larry, sorry to hear that you still have a lot of problems with your drivetrain. You know my advice : switch to Blackspire rings and a new chain. Their rings are a little pricey but they are really well built. Since swithching to them I don't experience anymore the problems I had with chainsucks.
    Maybe take your bike to Becky's brother (Mike's bike on Contra Costa Blvd- Pleasant Hill) for another opinion and have Pete look at it. I was very happy with the job on my Burner..
    Or buy my Burner frame and built a new bike

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by LJ0913
    Chuck,

    A birdie told me that you run a 1x9 setup? Mind if I ask your ratio? Have you experienced any chain suck since your conversion?

    I've been hit hard with chain suck. I've gone through three XT chains in the last two weeks, the last one only lasted 7 miles. (yep the entire drive train is new and I was getting chain suck in the middle ring as well.) I am thinking of changing to SRAM and running a 1x9 32 teeth in the front, and a 34 rear. I just want to ride the thing and not push it.

    I'll take ANY advice.

    Thanks,
    -Larry
    Hey Larry,

    Sorry - no 1x9 here - well except for maybe my M1 - I can't remember if it's an 8 or 9 speed - but no front derr on that bike - fo sho.

    Nope - My Foes FXR has a 22/32 front - 12/32 rear - 2x8.

    My Tracer runs 21/32/44 front - 12/32 rear - 3x8.

    I run Sram derrailleurs, Grip Shift, Solid housing on both derrailleurs - 1.1mil cables and 8 speed on all bikes - I just can't remember right now what the DH bike has on it for a cassette...

    I don't have shifting problems or chain suck issues.

    With this weather you have to run heavy - wet lube. White Lightning and things of the sort don't work in the mud. Carry a bottle with you and lube during the ride, if need be.

    You might consider 8 speed as an option.

    Shifters and derrailleurs can be had on ebay fairly easily. Cassettes on cambria - cheap.

    Good luck.

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    Quote Originally Posted by VTT
    Larry, sorry to hear that you still have a lot of problems with your drivetrain. You know my advice : switch to Blackspire rings and a new chain. Their rings are a little pricey but they are really well built. Since swithching to them I don't experience anymore the problems I had with chainsucks.
    Maybe take your bike to Becky's brother (Mike's bike on Contra Costa Blvd- Pleasant Hill) for another opinion and have Pete look at it. I was very happy with the job on my Burner..
    Or buy my Burner frame and built a new bike
    I think I'll do that......Head to Mike's Bike for a third opinion as I am getting no where with this. Hey they are open until 7, which works even better for me!

    You know I'd LOVE to buy your Burner, but........
    You only live once, but if you work it right, once is enough.

    -Joe Louis

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by imridingmybike
    Hey Larry,

    Sorry - no 1x9 here - well except for maybe my M1 - I can't remember if it's an 8 or 9 speed - but no front derr on that bike - fo sho.

    Nope - My Foes FXR has a 22/32 front - 12/32 rear - 2x8.

    My Tracer runs 21/32/44 front - 12/32 rear - 3x8.

    I run Sram derrailleurs, Grip Shift, Solid housing on both derrailleurs - 1.1mil cables and 8 speed on all bikes - I just can't remember right now what the DH bike has on it for a cassette...

    I don't have shifting problems or chain suck issues.

    With this weather you have to run heavy - wet lube. White Lightning and things of the sort don't work in the mud. Carry a bottle with you and lube during the ride, if need be.

    You might consider 8 speed as an option.

    Shifters and derrailleurs can be had on ebay fairly easily. Cassettes on cambria - cheap.

    Good luck.
    Thanks for the info. I've done it all. Waterbottles, tons of lube everything. Rode yesterday in completely dry trails not one spec of mud to be found, climbing up Pleasanton Ridge and almost went down sideways. Stopped me dead in my tracks! It's beyond frustration right now.

    Thanks for the post!
    You only live once, but if you work it right, once is enough.

    -Joe Louis

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    Quote Originally Posted by LJ0913
    Thanks for the info. I've done it all. Waterbottles, tons of lube everything. Rode yesterday in completely dry trails not one spec of mud to be found, climbing up Pleasanton Ridge and almost went down sideways. Stopped me dead in my tracks! It's beyond frustration right now.

    Thanks for the post!

    What's the build? (cranks, rings, chain, cassette)?

    How old is everything? Have you been riding the same parts all winter? (I just had to replace the whole drive train on the foes - this winter's been rough on bikes!)

    What's the chain line look like? (put chain in middle ring in front and 3 gears down in the back - chain shoud be parralel with frame and perpendicular to bb spindle/hub axle - if not, then it could be an issue)

    I'll take a look at it if you like - cost = 1 beer.

    (edit) - and by chance have you checked the rings closely for bends and burs?
    Last edited by imridingmybike; 04-24-2006 at 03:44 PM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by imridingmybike
    What's the build? (cranks, rings, chain, cassette)?

    How old is everything? Have you been riding the same parts all winter? (I just had to replace the whole drive train on the foes - this winter's been rough on bikes!)

    What's the chain line look like? (put chain in middle ring in front and 3 gears down in the back - chain shoud be parralel with frame and perpendicular to bb spindle/hub axle - if not, then it could be an issue)

    I'll take a look at it if you like - cost = 1 beer.
    Let's see I've gone through some much lately:

    Chain=4 days old need a new one, bent three links. Shimano xt chain. Third chain in two weeks.

    Entire drivechain is less than two months old. Last Annadel group ride I broke a few teeth pushed most of the way back. New raceface chain-rings, 9 speed shimano xt cassette. I'll have to check the chain alignment tonight.

    Thanks for the offer, but I don't want to burden you with my bike issues. It's all F'd up!

    VTT's Burner is looking better, and better...
    You only live once, but if you work it right, once is enough.

    -Joe Louis

  8. #8
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    After my chain suck yesterday I broke two teeth in the middle ring. I do weigh 250 pounds. Perhaps a beefier chain rings?
    You only live once, but if you work it right, once is enough.

    -Joe Louis

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by LJ0913
    After my chain suck yesterday I broke two teeth in the middle ring. I do weigh 250 pounds. Perhaps a beefier chain rings?

    250#'s all on one pedal at one time is a lot of load. I hate to tell you to spend more money but you might try "migrating" toward to following:

    Full size Chain Rings (110x74 bolt pattern, 24/24/46 tooth gear combo) Larger Chain rings mean less load per tooth = slower wear and better load distribution. Buy a steel granny gear, too - nothing smaller than a 24 tooth.

    Beefier cranks and BB - you weigh enough that you may be flexing your cranks far enough to affect a really bad chain line under torque. Raceface Atlas come to mind - but something relatively heavy. Old Raceface Turbines - old skool XTR etc... easy to find online and such

    8 Speed - less problematic. Each cog is a little farther apart than a comparable 9 speed which means it can handle more grit and grime before shifting is effected.

    High-end chains - I like SRAM over Shimano but what ever brand you go with - buy the top end model chain. The higher end chains have less slop between links - they flex less = quicker shifting - and run much smoother than their cheaper counterparts.

    Wet lube in wet conditions, dry lube in dry conditions. Carry it with you and lube up as soon as you hear or feel grittyness in the drive train.

    Solid housing from shifter to derrailleur = sealed system - works much better on a MTB than using the stops...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by imridingmybike
    250#'s all on one pedal at one time is a lot of load. I hate to tell you to spend more money but you might try "migrating" toward to following:

    Full size Chain Rings (110x74 bolt pattern, 24/24/46 tooth gear combo) Larger Chain rings mean less load per tooth = slower wear and better load distribution. Buy a steel granny gear, too - nothing smaller than a 24 tooth.

    Beefier cranks and BB - you weigh enough that you may be flexing your cranks far enough to affect a really bad chain line under torque. Raceface Atlas come to mind - but something relatively heavy. Old Raceface Turbines - old skool XTR etc... easy to find online and such

    8 Speed - less problematic. Each cog is a little farther apart than a comparable 9 speed which means it can handle more grit and grime before shifting is effected.

    High-end chains - I like SRAM over Shimano but what ever brand you go with - buy the top end model chain. The higher end chains have less slop between links - they flex less = quicker shifting - and run much smoother than their cheaper counterparts.

    Wet lube in wet conditions, dry lube in dry conditions. Carry it with you and lube up as soon as you hear or feel grittyness in the drive train.

    Solid housing from shifter to derrailleur = sealed system - works much better on a MTB than using the stops...
    Thanks for all the info. What's your beer preference?

    I think you're on to something with the flex. I am rough on bikes. I do pedal hard. I was just reading this: http://www.mrpbike.com/product-system3.php I think it's a bit of an overkill for my needs, but...?

    As for replacing the drive train. Currently I am on shimano, but will be ordering SRAM shifters, cables, cassette and chain. 8 speed eh? I can dig it! I like your point about the spacing of 8 speed and 9 speed.

    (I was hesitant on posting this, glad I did!)
    You only live once, but if you work it right, once is enough.

    -Joe Louis

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    Quote Originally Posted by LJ0913
    Thanks for all the info. What's your beer preference?

    I think you're on to something with the flex. I am rough on bikes. I do pedal hard. I was just reading this: http://www.mrpbike.com/product-system3.php I think it's a bit of an overkill for my needs, but...?

    As for replacing the drive train. Currently I am on shimano, but will be ordering SRAM shifters, cables, cassette and chain. 8 speed eh? I can dig it! I like your point about the spacing of 8 speed and 9 speed.

    (I was hesitant on posting this, glad I did!)
    IPA

    I have a pair of beefy 110/74 cranks you can use to test the theory - just upgraded from Turbines to Next LP's. A shimano XT BB will cost you $20 at the lbs.

    If you're going 8 speed - you prolly want an old XTR cassette

    And I doubt you'll find 8 speed SRAM shifters, unless you're ok with grip shift... they don't make 8 speed thumbies, far as I know. Ebay is a great source for all things 8 speed.

    Let me know if you want to pick up the cranks and give em a try...

  12. #12
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    This would work better for a 2 x 9

    Quote Originally Posted by LJ0913
    Thanks for all the info. What's your beer preference?

    I think you're on to something with the flex. I am rough on bikes. I do pedal hard. I was just reading this: http://www.mrpbike.com/product-system3.php I think it's a bit of an overkill for my needs, but...?

    As for replacing the drive train. Currently I am on shimano, but will be ordering SRAM shifters, cables, cassette and chain. 8 speed eh? I can dig it! I like your point about the spacing of 8 speed and 9 speed.

    (I was hesitant on posting this, glad I did!)
    I think this may help you more if you wanna keep your granny. I want one too.

    http://www.mrpbike.com/product-lrp.php

  13. #13
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    SRAM makes

    Quote Originally Posted by imridingmybike
    IPA

    I have a pair of beefy 110/74 cranks you can use to test the theory - just upgraded from Turbines to Next LP's. A shimano XT BB will cost you $20 at the lbs.

    If you're going 8 speed - you prolly want an old XTR cassette

    And I doubt you'll find 8 speed SRAM shifters, unless you're ok with grip shift... they don't make 8 speed thumbies, far as I know. Ebay is a great source for all things 8 speed.

    Let me know if you want to pick up the cranks and give em a try...
    8 spd shifters compatible w/Shimano rear derailleurs. Speedgoat also has older Shimano 8 speed XT shifters on their website.

  14. #14
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    Sallen runs a 1x9 (or is that 1x8?) with no issues that I know of. You could get his thoughts on it.


    -eric-

    http://www.rumpfy.com
    Wanted: NDS Suntour XC Pro Microdrive 175mm Crank Arm.

  15. #15
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    Just another opinion on Chain Suck

    I had chain suck like crazy - within a few minutes of riding in the mud at my large size (used to be above 270, under 225 now). I'd get nasty chain suck even with a new drive train (chain, cassette, chain ring). Here's what worked for me and completely eliminated chain suck: After fixing or getting a new drive train, use White Lightning - in both dry and wet mud conditions.

    I had this nightmare when starting MTB in the NJ mud, sand, snow, etc..I was replacing the drive train every few months only to have chain suck come back after a few minutes in the mud and destroy my chains, cassettes, chain stay, etc.... I tried many wet and dry lubes with no help. But after going to White Lightning, I never got chain suck again. My drive train lasted for many years.

    Soon after getting to California a few years ago and breaking my frame again, I got a new Trek Fuel in January in the middle of all the muck. I decided to try the standard lube on the chain to see if White Lightning really helped. No chain suck for a few days until I hit a muddy day. I again quickly got very nasty chain suck and it just about ripped my new bike apart. In one ride, I twice had to pull the chain out that was jammed between the chain ring and nasty dent it made in the chain stay. I tried again another couple times with no improvement in horrible chain suck. I then swapped out to White Lightning and never got chain suck again. So this simple lube worked for me twice now with very clear and stunning results.

    It should be noted other guys much smaller than me (or you) don't get chain suck, even riding right beside me on the same trails, and do fine with other lubes, wet or whatever. Maybe they don't wear out the drive as bad, or put as much pressure or chain stretch. I don't know why. But for whatever reason, WL solved my problems. Vice-versa, I suspect if you got a bad drive train, you can get chain suck no matter what your size, and no lube will help. But my problem wasn't a bad drive train.

    Some claim WL leaves a wax residue, but it's not happening on my bike. However, I only apply WL when I hear or feel a little squeak so I know it needs it. I lube about every 3 to 20 rides, depending on the muck, but typically about 3-4 weeks (over 150 miles of rides). I put two drops, one on each side of the roller, on each link. I never get a buildup of wax (or dirt) on my drive train, and only wash my bike once or twice a year (if you don't count the stream crossings).

    Also let WL sit a couple hours so it drys out, and it will not only shed dirt, but also mud, sand and all other nasty trail goop. You'll always have a clean chain and no drive train issues. It's very easy to try. The first time, you just need to use a spray degreaser and apply it and remove it two or three times, which I've done with the chain still on the bike. It takes all of 30 minutes and $2 to try.

    As for cranks, I use Saint cranks because the LX cranks on my Fuel were bending quite a bit under my load, and I was worried about breaking or inefficiency. But WL worked to solve the chain suck with all three cranks I've used on different bikes.
    Last edited by BigLarry; 04-24-2006 at 06:59 PM.
    It's not slow, it's doing more MTB time.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rumpfy
    Sallen runs a 1x9 (or is that 1x8?) with no issues that I know of. You could get his thoughts on it.


    So what's the deal with running a 1x(#) without a chain guide? It seems that on a really bumpy downhill, for instance, it would be very easy to throw the chain... No?

    (edit) very pretty bike btw - and judging by mech and brakes, it's prolly running 8 speed

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by nativeson
    I think this may help you more if you wanna keep your granny. I want one too.

    http://www.mrpbike.com/product-lrp.php
    If you don't have ISCG mounts, you can use the Heim 3guide http://www.montaramtb.com/Products/3Guide/3Guide.html

    I'm pretty happy with mine, but then again I never had chain suck with my bike either. I also clean my chain pretty regularly (dip in gasoline + relube).
    Faster is not always better, but it's always more fun

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigLarry
    I had chain suck like crazy - within a few minutes of riding in the mud at my large size (used to be above 270, under 225 now). I'd get nasty chain suck even with a new drive train (chain, cassette, chain ring). Here's what worked for me and completely eliminated chain suck: After fixing or getting a new drive train, use White Lightning - in both dry and wet mud conditions.

    I had this nightmare when starting MTB in the NJ mud, sand, snow, etc..I was replacing the drive train every few months only to have chain suck come back after a few minutes in the mud and destroy my chains, cassettes, chain stay, etc.... I tried many wet and dry lubes with no help. But after going to White Lightning, I never got chain suck again. My drive train lasted for many years.

    Soon after getting to California a few years ago and breaking my frame again, I got a new Trek Fuel in January in the middle of all the muck. I decided to try the standard lube on the chain to see if White Lightning really helped. No chain suck for a few days until I hit a muddy day. I again quickly got very nasty chain suck and it just about ripped my new bike apart. In one ride, I twice had to pull the chain out that was jammed between the chain ring and nasty dent it made in the chain stay. I tried again another couple times with no improvement in horrible chain suck. I then swapped out to White Lightning and never got chain suck again. So this simple lube worked for me twice now with very clear and stunning results.

    It should be noted other guys much smaller than me (or you) don't get chain suck, even riding right beside me on the same trails, and do fine with other lubes, wet or whatever. Maybe they don't wear out the drive as bad, or put as much pressure or chain stretch. I don't know why. But for whatever reason, WL solved my problems. Vice-versa, I suspect if you got a bad drive train, you can get chain suck no matter what your size, and no lube will help. But my problem wasn't a bad drive train.

    Some claim WL leaves a wax residue, but it's not happening on my bike. However, I only apply WL when I hear or feel a little squeak so I know it needs it. I lube about every 3 to 20 rides, depending on the muck, but typically about 3-4 weeks (over 150 miles of rides). I put two drops, one on each side of the roller, on each link. I never get a buildup of wax (or dirt) on my drive train, and only wash my bike once or twice a year (if you don't count the stream crossings).

    Also let WL sit a couple hours so it drys out, and it will not only shed dirt, but also mud, sand and all other nasty trail goop. You'll always have a clean chain and no drive train issues. It's very easy to try. The first time, you just need to use a spray degreaser and apply it and remove it two or three times, which I've done with the chain still on the bike. It takes all of 30 minutes and $2 to try.

    As for cranks, I use Saint cranks because the LX cranks on my Fuel were bending quite a bit under my load, and I was worried about breaking or inefficiency. But WL worked to solve the chain suck with all three cranks I've used on different bikes.
    Hey Larry,

    (Boy that's still strange to say)

    (I started riding when I weighed 299 pounds. I vowed that I'd never be 300 pounds, and I am happy to say that never happened. I am down to 251 pounds with a goal weight of 230 pounds.)

    Thanks for info. However I've gone through two bottles of WL Epic, and two tall bottles of the regular WL. I am a WL fan, but it's just not working. I am leaning to wards Chuck's idea of weak, or wore-out cranks/BB. The cranks and BB are original (over 4,000 miles) on them. I am going tomorrow night to have Black Spider chain rings put on, with all new SRAM Components. I am going to go with nativeson's suggestion of LONG RANGE PATROL it looks much better than the cumbersome thing I posted earlier.

    nativeson-Thanks for that link. I think you're right, that does seem like a better fit. It's going in the shop tomorrow and I hope I can get her back by this weekend for a test run on Diablo.

    That's a cool setup/bike. I am just not there yet, I've got about thirty pounds to go and some more, NO A LOT more uphill to do before I get into that conversion.

    Thanks again everyone for your posts!

    -Larry
    You only live once, but if you work it right, once is enough.

    -Joe Louis

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by LJ0913
    (I started riding when I weighed 299 pounds. I vowed that I'd never be 300 pounds, and I am happy to say that never happened. I am down to 251 pounds with a goal weight of 230 pounds.) ...

    Thanks for info. However I've gone through two bottles of WL Epic, and two tall bottles of the regular WL. I am a WL fan, but it's just not working. I am leaning to wards Chuck's idea of weak, or wore-out cranks/BB. The cranks and BB are original (over 4,000 miles) on them....

    Yea, if you've got a bad drive train, it will cause problems no matter what rider or lube or conditions. WL only helps with bad trail conditions if everything else is working first.

    Sounds like you could take over my user name, that I'll have to surrender when I get under 200 lbs. Just pass it on to someone else who can use it when you're done.
    It's not slow, it's doing more MTB time.

  20. #20
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    Good job!

    Congratulations to both Larry for losing so much weight and getting fit.

  21. #21
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    A little more info...

    Quote Originally Posted by imridingmybike

    8 Speed - less problematic. Each cog is a little farther apart than a comparable 9 speed which means it can handle more grit and grime before shifting is effected....
    So here's the deal with 8 VS 9 Speed and why the former provides more fault tolerance in gritty conditions.

    Grit - IE dirt, grime, sand etc... when introduced into the cable housing of a bike, between the inner liner of the cable housing and the shift cable - acts as something of a damper - that is the grit works to slow the movement of the cable within the housing by way of friction.

    Let's say that a given amount of grit - X - provides for a given amount of friction - Y - that is to say that there is a somewhat linear relationship between the amount of grit in the cable housing and the friction induced, which slows - or even stops - the movement of the cable and subsequently, the derrailleur.

    If we know that X amount of grit equals Y amount of friction, and that Y amount of friction when extrapolated to a 2 meter cable and housing running to the rear derrailleur of a bicycles effectively halts the movement of the cable my .2~millimeters per shift - we can begin to quantifiy the effects of grit and friction on shifting in bicycles with derrailleurs.

    In cassettes & free hub bodies, we are given a fixed amount of space to house our rear clusters. If memory serves - in standard 135mil rear hubs - 32 millimeters is allocated to the rear cluster. It is obvious then, that the more gears forced to fit within those constraints, the closer those gears will be to each other.

    Because the 9 speed cassette fits within the same 32 millimeter freehub that its 8 speed counter part does - each cog is accordingly closer to its neighber than its 8 speed counter part. The amount of movement required of the shifter and derrailleur cable to actuate a single cog shift is therefore lessened in 9 speed systems, when compared to the 8 speed system.

    Understanding now that a 9 speed cassette requires less movement of the shifter and cable within the housing - and that friction directly equates to lessened movement of the derrailleur cable - it is easy to see why for any amount of friction - a 9 speed drivetrain will be affected to a greater degree than its 8 speed brethren.

    A corrolary to this is that an 8 speed system will be able to withstand more contaminants before shifting is negatively effected - when compared to a 9 speed system.

    Hope that makes sense... I need to work on an easier to understand explanation...

  22. #22
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    My questions are...

    ...how available is the 8-speed stuff? Is Shimano still making it, or are there a finite number of parts left?

    If so, I am positive that as soon as I'd buy an 8-speed gruppo, the last available part would be sold on eBay and I'd be stuck once again.

    I'm still getting a rough feeling in my drivetrain (in middle ring only), and it was mis-shifting all over the place on our Yuba ride. I've replaced all of the drivetrain fairly recently, installed full-length der. housing, filed the burrs off the cassette/middle ring, and lubed lubed lubed. It's something I've had with this Enduro for-focking-ever, and I'm getting sick of having to ride the SS because the FS isn't working properly.

    On my commutes, I look down & watch the shadow of the chain. If I'm in granny or the big ring, the chain remains calm. If I'm in the middle ring, the chain is bouncing all over the place. Weird.

    fp
    "합니다 행사에서 디비 판매 합니다 관련해" Lesleybien

    Hogan Lake blog. A section of Hogan Lake trails here.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finch Platte
    ...how available is the 8-speed stuff? Is Shimano still making it, or are there a finite number of parts left?

    If so, I am positive that as soon as I'd buy an 8-speed gruppo, the last available part would be sold on eBay and I'd be stuck once again.

    I'm still getting a rough feeling in my drivetrain (in middle ring only), and it was mis-shifting all over the place on our Yuba ride. I've replaced all of the drivetrain fairly recently, installed full-length der. housing, filed the burrs off the cassette/middle ring, and lubed lubed lubed. It's something I've had with this Enduro for-focking-ever, and I'm getting sick of having to ride the SS because the FS isn't working properly.

    On my commutes, I look down & watch the shadow of the chain. If I'm in granny or the big ring, the chain remains calm. If I'm in the middle ring, the chain is bouncing all over the place. Weird.

    fp
    sram still makes 8 speed shifters and cassettes. You can still find shimano cassettes online. 8speed grip shift are fairly easy to find too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Finch Platte

    I'm still getting a rough feeling in my drivetrain (in middle ring only), and it was mis-shifting all over the place on our Yuba ride. I've replaced all of the drivetrain fairly recently, installed full-length der. housing, filed the burrs off the cassette/middle ring, and lubed lubed lubed. It's something I've had with this Enduro for-focking-ever, and I'm getting sick of having to ride the SS because the FS isn't working properly.

    On my commutes, I look down & watch the shadow of the chain. If I'm in granny or the big ring, the chain remains calm. If I'm in the middle ring, the chain is bouncing all over the place. Weird.
    I'm beginning to wonder if there is an underground contingent of closet drivetrain afflicted hypochondriacs! Sheesh.

    The deal with your front chain ring is one of those that will require a fine tooth comb and a magnifying glass - most likely. You just have to go over it and over it until you find the bent chain link, or chain ring tooth, or burr or whatever it is that's causing the problem.

    What cranks and BB do you use? in cases like this, it's effective to swap one part at a time until you isolate the culprit. This is not always the easiest or cheapest route though, if you don't have tons of parts lying around...

    I'm happy to take a look on our next ride...

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