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  1. #1

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    overnight biking trail?

    My buddies and I are looking to do an overnight biking trip somewhere in California -- optimally, the trail would be moderate in aerobic intensity/technical difficulty and would have great views. Any suggestions?

  2. #2
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    There is not that many single track in California long enough to put together on overnight trip.

    If you are willing to include forest roads and 4wd roads, the possibilities are endless.

  3. #3
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    A few years back I took the bus from San Anselmo and took it to Point Reyes Light House. I started there (road) and pointed the bike to wards San Francisco. My route was around 60 miles total, about 25 miles of it was road. It was a blast!

    There is a 45ish mile loop in Oroville all dirt. I am sure that would be a fun trip!

    Good luck, and have fun!
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by hamachi
    My buddies and I are looking to do an overnight biking trip somewhere in California -- optimally, the trail would be moderate in aerobic intensity/technical difficulty and would have great views. Any suggestions?
    Look at Henry Coe in Gilroy, 40 minutes south of San Jose in the mountains of central CA - one of the biggest parks in CA outside Yosemite, yet is so hard to access that it gets only a few visitors. (See official Henry Coe web site here.) I camped overnight on a bike trip there last year in a two day trip that was one of my most delightful epics ever. Super views and spring is great for wild flowers. See my trip report and pictures here.

    Lots of delightful singletrack and even a lot of the "road" looks like singletrack with decades of neglect. Camping overnight is legal almost anywhere. Not much population. Very steep hills, but many bikers take BOB trailers and they're fine on the singletrack. Lots of stream crossings, and sometimes the trail is the stream, but a lot of that starts drying up by mid summer. Lots of lakes to refill water bottles with a filter. Some say the fish jump onto the hook out there. The views are spectacular (see some in above link).

    The far eastern ends of the park, around JackRabbit Lake, are 30 miles from the entrances at Headquartes and Hunting Hollow in the west off of Hwy 101. One day trips with 35 miles and 7500' of climb can get very good riders 2/3 of the way into places such as Mississippi Lake or Orestimba Corral and some rides in that area. The distance north/south is as big as east/west, so if you want you can do anywhere from 25 to 50 miles on each of two days and still only barely skirt around the desolate park. The Orestimba Wilderness section in the northeast is off limits to bikes, even walking with it. But you can stash the bike and hike it if desired.

    The park is a dangerous desolate place. There's not any people around to help you, the hills are brutal, there's no cell phone reception past the first couple hill tops, and it's easy to get lost. Be prepared. You want one of the super maps that are sold by the rangers. You can get one by mail if you don't want to drive to the ranger station. (See here.)

    There may be some other places near Tahoe if the snow has melted. But I'm not as familiar with them.
    Last edited by BigLarry; 05-10-2006 at 09:14 PM.
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  5. #5
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    How many miles do you want to do?

    You might consider Salmon Falls/Sweetwater, etc., starting at Dyke 8 (Folsom). There's a campsite at the end (Peninsula Campground, on the east side of the lake, 10 mi. from Pilot Hill, Hwy. 49, at the end of Rattlesnake Bar Road). - wake up in the a.m. and ride back the way you came.

    That sounds like fun, altho the views aren't much to write home about. I'd be up for it, if you wanted some company. I guess BOB trailers would be helpful, eh?

    fp
    "합니다 행사에서 디비 판매 합니다 관련해" Lesleybien

    Hogan Lake blog. A section of Hogan Lake trails here.

  6. #6
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    I've posted something about this before, also. I plan on riding from my house in San Jose to the beach and back. This would entail some road, some fireroad and some singletrack. It can be done in two BIG days.

    That said, I've spent 3 days riding solo on the Tahoe Rim Trail. I started in Tahoe City, wearing an adventure racing type of pack and rode the 21 miles of TRT to King's Beach, crashing in a motel as opposed to camping. I then rode from there to Marlette Peak and camped overnight. Then I rode the rest of it to Kingsbury Grade, then took the road to our cabin off Pioneer Trail. It was super fun, but very tiring carrying 30 lbs. over technical trails. The views are unreal though. The scenery made it completely worthwhile. If I did it again, though, it'd be even better. I'd skip the Tahoe City-King's beach portion and start in Incline Village. From there, I'd climb the sandy fireroad (forget the name) up to the TRT and ride to Spooner campground, where someone (a wife or girlfriend) has gone and already set up camp with all the amenities. This way, you don't have to carry a bunch of crap, like I did, you just enjoy the ride and show up at camp! Eat well, have a beer or four, and then wake up the next day for another fat ride, the Spooner to Kingsbury section. If you're feeling up for it, you could even continue on to Armstrong Pass, but that would be an epic of epics ride.

    Now that I mention this, I'm getting all excited. I may just have to plan it. Only thing is, the snow needs to melt up to the 9,000 foot level beforehand, although the east mountain do melt first. Could be done in July.

  7. #7
    just another bleepin SSer
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    Quote Originally Posted by hamachi
    My buddies and I are looking to do an overnight biking trip somewhere in California -- optimally, the trail would be moderate in aerobic intensity/technical difficulty and would have great views. Any suggestions?
    As mentioned before, Coe is a good choice. http://www.coepark.org/

    Big Basin State Park has campsites that you could presumably ride to (though most people drive in). http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=540

    The Blackpacker's Camp on Montibello Open Space Preserve could be done. http://www.openspace.org/

    Most any place that is National Forest is open camping (unless otherwise posted). So you could do this up in the Sierras in many different places.
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  8. #8
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    South Yuba or Hunter's trail

    South Yuba
    Start in Nevada City ... ride to the SYuba trailhead. Ride a far as you want (30mi+)... mostly singletrack, great views, camp along the river and then ride back.

    Hunter's Trail
    Start at trailhead ... ride to the Hell Hole Resevoir (10 tough mi). Camp at the campground. Come back the way you came. 100% singletrack, very similar to SYuba (great views) but way more remote! Lots of Bears!

    I would also be interested in a trip like this.

  9. #9
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    did a nice ride from Sunnyvale to Half Moon Bay SP and back...

    Sunnyvale to Stevens Canyon. Up Stevens Canyon to Skyline. Skyline to Skeggs. Through Skeggs to Tunitas Creek Rd. Tunitas Creed Rd. to Purisima Creek Redwoods Open Space. Through the Purisima Creek Redwoods to Higgins Canyon Rd to Half Moon Bay State Park.

    Camped the night next to the beach in the Hiker/Biker site for $3.

    Next day road down Highway 1 to Gazos Creed Rd. Up Gazos Creed Rd and Gazos Creek Trail to Big Basin SP headquarters. Then 236 and 9 back to Sunnyvale.

    You can do a lot of cool weekend trips by using the state park's hiker/biker camp sites. $3 and no reservations required. Some of my favorites are Pfeiffer Big Sur SP, Memorial Park in Monterey, New Brighton State Beach near Capitola, Half Moon Bay SP, and Bodega Dunes Sp.

    Lately I've been getting into lightweight weekend road touring. Bike + seatpost rack + thermorest + goretex bivy tent + down bag =25 lbs.
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  10. #10
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    Yeah, South Yuba

    I've been planning to do this as a 2-day, 40+ mile ride.

    It's now possible to connect Grouse Ridge > Spaulding Lake > Pioneer Trail > Town of Washington > South Yuba Trail to Purdon Crossing

    The South Yuba trail alone to Purdon is appx 25 miles of excellent singletrack along the South Yuba river. Ogre and others have a bunch of pics from a week or two ago.
    Live to Ride, Ride to Live

  11. #11
    OOOOOOOh Gee Are Eee
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    Somebody was talking about that...

    Quote Originally Posted by Brah
    I've been planning to do this as a 2-day, 40+ mile ride.

    It's now possible to connect Grouse Ridge > Spaulding Lake > Pioneer Trail > Town of Washington > South Yuba Trail to Purdon Crossing

    The South Yuba trail alone to Purdon is appx 25 miles of excellent singletrack along the South Yuba river. Ogre and others have a bunch of pics from a week or two ago.
    That sounds like an awesome ride. The Washington->Purdon Crossing ride is absolutely incredible. I think I would want to do this as a supported ride, with some sort of support rather than hauling all of the gear though. I guess over the summer it might be warm enough that we could get away without tents. Bob's would be nearly impossible on this route though.

    As far as the original poster goes there are tons of trails in norcal with camping. The big limiter is how far do you want to go? Some of the guys here mentioned some great ones, and the one Brah mentioned is probably some of the best rideable before the snow melts. After the melt... Tahoe Rim Trail. There are also a lot of places where you could drive, set up camp, ride 25-35 miles, camp at HQ then ride another 25-30 different miles the next day. I could easily see a 2-3 day adventure like this at Silver Lake.

    I guess it comes back to what type of riding do you want to do?
    Last edited by Ogre; 05-11-2006 at 02:43 PM.

  12. #12
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    No support needed!

    Quote Originally Posted by 0gre
    I think I would want to do this as a supported ride, with some sort of support rather than hauling all of the gear though.
    I was thinking of staying at the Washington Hotel
    Live to Ride, Ride to Live

  13. #13
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    If you are looking for specific routes...

    Go pedal around a volcano... A 130 mile 3 day loop circumnavigating Lassen Volcanic NP. You do not enter the Park, but ride around the perimeter. Mostly forest road. Some single track, and a few short stretches of unavoidable pavement. A couple of designated campgrounds along the route, but you can camp almost anywhere along the route. A support rig can follow you about 85% of the ride (it's tough driving a van on singletrack.) Elevation ranges from 4500 to almost 7,000 feet, so it's a nice place to be when it hits a hundred in the Valley. Lakes, streams, fascinating geology.

    Three Rivers Bike trail by Lake Shasta. 70 miles. Forest roads and 4wd roads. Haven't ridden this trail, it's on my short list.

    Bizz Johnson Trail, Susanville -- 26 miles of Rails-to-Trail. A campground halfway. Stay at the campground, and pedal up and back one half of the trail, then the other half the next day. Springtime flowers, Fall colors.

    Peligreen Jeep Trail by the Ishi Wilderness (not in the Wilderness -- skirts the edge). Depending on the specific route you chose you can ride from 15 to 40+ miles, mostly downhill. This is a spring and early summer ride. Not summer (too hot, no water). Wildlife, flowers in Spring. Rocky and technical in places. No support rig.

    I am also researching the old Lassen Emigrant Trail ( 1840's wagon route into northern California) to assess its possibility as an epic ride.

    You can also just use any forest visitor map and start stringing dirt roads together to make a ride of any length.

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