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  1. #1
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    Noob looking for practice trails near Oakland

    I just bought a FS mountain bike. I'm new to the sport and got into it as a means to lose weight (Currently 6'6" 300lbs).

    What I'm looking for are some good trails in or around the East Bay that will help me build up my hill climbing skills. I've gone to Joaquin Miller a few times and went to China Camp the first weekend I had my bike. I had a good time at both trails but I spent a lot of time walking up the hills.

    I'd like to find a trial or two with more gradual climbs that will help me build my strength.

    Any help out there?

    FYI - My bike is a 2018 Santa Cruz Tallboy C 27.5+ XE Build

  2. #2
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    Sounds like you're going to the right places. In and around Oakland, Joaquin Miller and Redwood parks are your best bet. You could also check out Lake Chabot (but I've haven't ridden out there).

    Don't worry about walking -- it's part of the training. Keep going, and you'll walk less going forward.
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  3. #3
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    Coyote Hills in Fremont has a decent amount of flat bike paths, levees, and some trails. You can also take the pedestrian bridge over to Don Edwards National Refuge to get a few more miles.
    The broken are the more evolved. Rejoice.

  4. #4
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    Hopefully this isn't out of line but really if you're just looking for some exercise what about doing some hill repeats somewhere locally on the road? Then mix it up with JMP to maximize your fun.

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    If you don't like walking your bike so much you could try a smaller chainring. That would give you lower gears, easier to pedal up hill.

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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harry Mackenzie View Post
    Hopefully this isn't out of line but really if you're just looking for some exercise what about doing some hill repeats somewhere locally on the road? Then mix it up with JMP to maximize your fun.
    Not out of line at all. I'm all for doing what it takes to get in shape!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtvert View Post
    Coyote Hills in Fremont has a decent amount of flat bike paths, levees, and some trails. You can also take the pedestrian bridge over to Don Edwards National Refuge to get a few more miles.
    Coyote Hills is a good idea. I didn't even think about that. Thanks.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by andytiedye View Post
    If you don't like walking your bike so much you could try a smaller chainring. That would give you lower gears, easier to pedal up hill.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
    How small would you recommend?

  9. #9
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    Maybe try Line Ridge in Walnut Creek. Itís definitely not flat there, but the one time Iíve been I donít remember it being too steep like a lot of other easy bay parks.

  10. #10
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    In the winter when the trails are sloppy I like to ride up the road on Mt. Diablo. It's a long grind but not steep. You just ride as far up as you can and try to increasing the distance each time out, I find it a good workout on my mtb.

  11. #11
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    This loop is pretty flat https://www.mtbproject.com/trail/701...spiration-loop . I would try to graduate from that to JMP quickly as it's so much more fun. You'll get your fitness up in no time if you keep at it, and know there's no shame in walking -- if you get up the hill you win, doesn't matter how.

  12. #12
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    Keep at it OP. Just push a little farther each time on the trails that are most convenient to you. It won't be long until you're making non-stop forays into places you've never been before.
    You're entitled to your own opinion, but you're not entitled to your own facts.

  13. #13
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    Hey, man. Iím in Oakland, too.

    Like others said, thereís no shame in walking your bike. We all do it sometimes. (And itís good exercise!)

    Just keep hitting those climbs at JMP and Redwood over and over, and youíll be breezing through them before you know it!

    Also, check out Butters Dr on a map. Itís a mellow/leisurely paved climb to get you from the bottom of JMP back up the hill a bit.


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    Some great suggestions and encouragement here. Thanks! I'll keep at it for sure.

    One other question, what do mountain bikers do when the days get shorter? So far it's been fun riding after work. But in the fall/winter do folks ride after dark as well?

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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post
    One other question, what do mountain bikers do when the days get shorter? So far it's been fun riding after work. But in the fall/winter do folks ride after dark as well?
    Depends on where you ride, my understanding is it's not legal to ride after dark pretty much anywhere in the East Bay, definitely not in East Bay Parks. Walnut Creek Parks (Lime Ridge) might be different, I've never ridden there day or night. Last I heard JMP is a grey area, but most people would discourage night-riding there as the allowed status of bikes on singletrack is tenous even without that.

    I night ride in GGNRA in the Marin Headlands, that's 100% legal.

  16. #16
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    Night riding is legal at Lake Chabot. I want to say 10:00 curfew, we used to do it once a week depending on weather but it's been a while now.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post
    Some great suggestions and encouragement here. Thanks! I'll keep at it for sure.

    One other question, what do mountain bikers do when the days get shorter? So far it's been fun riding after work. But in the fall/winter do folks ride after dark as well?
    Hate life pretty much.

    On weeknights I'll night ride when not lazy. It just seems like more of a hassle for me personally to night right so typically I lift weights or run.

  18. #18
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    If you live in Oakland, I wouldn't bother coming out to Concord/WC for Lime Ridge - JMP, Redwood, and Tilden have better trails and aren't any steeper than Lime Ridge. JMP/Redwood is about as good as East Bay trails get, in terms of fun. There are a few pretty mild loops you can make in JMP/Redwood also, that only have a few short, punchy climbs. As long as you aren't bombing to the bottom of the ridge, you shouldn't have too much climbing there. You can loop Sequoia-Bayview to the horse arena, then Castle trail to the Skyline Connector trail, then West Ridge over to Big Trees Trail, back down to Sequoia. It takes me about 35-40 minutes, and is a fun loop to do repeats on. Nothing technical or super steep, a good beginner loop.

    As a few others mentioned, you can mix in road rides to help build fitness - there are some pretty excellent road rides in this area. If you only have the FS bike, you will probably get a bit bored though, and you will probably scrub off your knobbies fairly quickly if you ride on the road often. Butters Dr. is one of my favorite Oakland rides, as someone above mentioned - great views, not terribly steep, and an easy access point to the lower part of JMP. You can hop on bottom of Butters from the intersection of JMP Blvd and Mountain (I think), right by the Hwy 13 on/off ramps. Tunnel Road is also a popular way up to the top of the ridge, less steep than Butters, but less natural break points - it is a pretty constant 6% or so grade the whole way up.

    In addition to road riding, you can also work on squats and deadlifts - squats build your quads and deadlifts build your butt - both obviously important for cycling. You don't really even need a gym for this - you can do unweighted air squats and lunges to start, and incorporate jumps or weights later. When you are ready to add weights, you can start with water jugs - they are cheap and can simulate kettle bells pretty well if you aren't swinging them around too vigorously - for lunges or squats, they work fine. As you build power, it will improve your endurance, because the stronger you are, the less exertion you will need to carry yourself up a hill, using less of your overall energy reserve.

    Riding with friends is also a lot of fun - and can be a big motivator for pushing yourself. There are a lot of riding groups in the area, and for sure you probably already know at least a couple people who ride here. They can also help show you around the local trails too - and help you build rides for your skill and fitness level.

    The key to the whole thing is to remember to have fun - after I started riding more and more, I found myself tailoring a lot of my lifestyle to fit into riding, like my workout habits and diet choices, so that I could go faster on the trails and maximize my fun. I also commute by bike a few day a week when I am home, to get some base miles in. It is a pretty incredible feeling when you clean a climb that you used to have to walk up, or when you realize that your normal rides are taking a lot less time than they used to.

    Go ride and have fun!

  19. #19
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    Outside of a couple of sections, the climbing at either China Camp or Joaquin Miller is relatively "easy". I say build up your endurance by riding your bike lots on whatever terrain is easiest for you to access. This will help build your base fitness which you can then improve by taking on hills.

    I remember Grizzly peak having some fun fireroad and "singletrack" and "doubletrack" that I would hit when I went to Cal and it was a great way to get miles in until I could go to the more fun mtb areas.

  20. #20
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    Route choice makes a big difference in how steep the hills are that you climb. A ride I've done starting at Skyline gate in Redwood going south on west ridge has mild climbs until I think moon gate ,go out to Skyline rd,cross over to Castle park in JM (there is a short steep climb on this trail) get to the paved road ,connect to Big Trees ,BT to Sequoia Bayview, BV around back to the paved road ,cross Skyline to Metro Horseman's parking lot ,though the lot to West ridge ,left on WR, follow WR back to Skyline gate. Around 7 miles . Another easier ride is Nimitz way in Tilden out and back from Inspiration Pt. Around 8 miles. A couple of short steep hills. You could join the Bicycle Trail Council for one their rides , they have rides for all fitness and skills. You can find them on Meetup,com. As far as I know all East Bay park district parks have a 10 o'clock curfew. Lights for fall winter rides,helmet and bars. Talk to the shop where you bought the bike for gearing advice.

  21. #21
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    JMP Sequoia Bayview > Big Trees loop is probably one of the easiest/most accessible dirt routes around.
    East Bay Parks AKA East Bay Cattle Ranches

  22. #22
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    Some good advice above. Climbing is part of the deal for mountain biking, especially around here. All the real riding areas are in the hills. The most amazing (and wonderful) thing about it is that if you keep at it you will actually come to love climbing and become reasonably OK at it. Eventually you will find yourself seeking out the steeper and tougher ways to climb.

    I started at this about 7 years ago, when I was about 45 pounds heavier than I am now. I hated the climbing, the pain, the inability to catch my breath. That faded in less than a year of occasional riding and then went away completely as I rode more. Now I'm actually a halfway decent climber, I race, and I love climbing.

    More suggestions for local easy rides: In Tilden, climb Meadows Canyon Trail to Inspiration Point, then descend Curran to Wildcat Gorge trail and back to the start. That's 3 miles and about 5% grade on the climb. It's great for beginners, and the descent and return on Wildcat Gorge are fun and have a few spots that will challenge beginners (they are very short root/rock sections, easily walked). When you get stronger, start extending it by going up Quarry after the top of Meadows Canyon. Then when you are stronger still, go all the way up Seaview to the Steam Trains, then back down South Park to Vollmer Peak to Quarry to Curran/Wildcat.

    In Crockett Hills, the initial climb is probably a bit daunting but it isn't long and once you go up the front (the easiest way is actually up the steep fire road, which is uglier but quicker, has no traffic and fewer grade changes than the pretty way up Edwards), there are several routes on the top and on the back side that have mild climbs.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by J-Flo View Post
    The most amazing (and wonderful) thing about it is that if you keep at it you will actually come to love climbing and become reasonably OK at it. Eventually you will find yourself seeking out the steeper and tougher ways to climb.
    Ummm, not true for everyone. I enjoy a good 5kí elevation ride, but only because I get to descend 5kí. Still dislike climbing just as much as always. I can just do it faster/easier now that I ride multiple times per week.

  24. #24
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    I think Lake Chabot is good for training rides and the climb up from the golf course is pretty gradual.

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    Some really awesome tips! Thanks so much. Keep 'em coming.

    I got off work early today so I went over to JM and did Sequoia > Big Trees loop twice. This was the first time I started from Skyline. I usually start on Sunset Trail which is a little much for me.

    About two weeks ago I did the Redwood Park loop starting on the East Ridge Trail from Redwood Road. That was brutal!

    The Chabot options sound perfect as that is close to where I live.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by rangeriderdave View Post
    Route choice makes a big difference in how steep the hills are that you climb. A ride I've done starting at Skyline gate in Redwood going south on west ridge has mild climbs until I think moon gate ,go out to Skyline rd,cross over to Castle park in JM (there is a short steep climb on this trail) get to the paved road ,connect to Big Trees ,BT to Sequoia Bayview, BV around back to the paved road ,cross Skyline to Metro Horseman's parking lot ,though the lot to West ridge ,left on WR, follow WR back to Skyline gate. Around 7 miles . Another easier ride is Nimitz way in Tilden out and back from Inspiration Pt. Around 8 miles. A couple of short steep hills. You could join the Bicycle Trail Council for one their rides , they have rides for all fitness and skills. You can find them on Meetup,com. As far as I know all East Bay park district parks have a 10 o'clock curfew. Lights for fall winter rides,helmet and bars. Talk to the shop where you bought the bike for gearing advice.

    These both sound right up my alley. Thanks!

  27. #27
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    Agree, start with Lake Chabot and get that one mastered. Make Haywardís Garin Park and Fremont Mission Peak your fitness and skills objectives.


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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post
    How small would you recommend?
    Your bike probably came with a 32, you could go down to 30, at least.
    28 or 26 could be an option (check with the manufacturer).

    What are you running now? (I couldn't find an "XE" build on SC web site)


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    Quote Originally Posted by andytiedye View Post
    Your bike probably came with a 32, you could go down to 30, at least.
    28 or 26 could be an option (check with the manufacturer).

    What are you running now? (I couldn't find an "XE" build on SC web site)


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    Mine has a 30. The 2019s no longer have the XE build. My bike is a 2018.

    Here are the specs:
    https://www.backcountry.com/santa-cr...tain-bike-2018

    Mine is an XXL

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by rafekett View Post
    Depends on where you ride, my understanding is it's not legal to ride after dark pretty much anywhere in the East Bay, definitely not in East Bay Parks. Walnut Creek Parks (Lime Ridge) might be different, I've never ridden there day or night. Last I heard JMP is a grey area, but most people would discourage night-riding there as the allowed status of bikes on singletrack is tenous even without that.

    I night ride in GGNRA in the Marin Headlands, that's 100% legal.
    Many of the East Bay Parks are open until 10 PM year-round. Tilden, Del Valle, and Redwood are some examples. Others do close around sunset (with hours adjusted by month).

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    Come join us at Lake Chabot on Saturday mornings. We meet and park at the Ranger station at around 7:30-8am. We hit 10 hills then climb the golf course like a few here already suggested. From there, there are some options. Good beginner trails.

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    Quote Originally Posted by frankieuc View Post
    Come join us at Lake Chabot on Saturday mornings. We meet and park at the Ranger station at around 7:30-8am. We hit 10 hills then climb the golf course like a few here already suggested. From there, there are some options. Good beginner trails.
    I might take you up on that!

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by rafekett View Post
    This loop is pretty flat https://www.mtbproject.com/trail/701...spiration-loop . no shame in walking...
    I race for team NSIW, and I never but always win.

    I 2nd this route option - plenty of gradual work along this route.

    Also, consider joining the BTCEB. They run monthly gala rides with multiple skill/fitness levels at each ride. Great way to meet like-minded folks and see some of the types of riding you're seeking.

  34. #34
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    I used to live near Hank & Frank on College Ave in Oakland, and would ride my knobbies up Old Tunnel Rd to Skyline Rd before either a) dipping into Sibley Volcanic Preserve, or b) riding Skyline over to JMP/Redwood area - depending on how much time & energy I had.

    The climb up to Sibley was anywhere from 35-50min of contstant and gradual climb - depending on what kind of shape I was in or what bike I rode that day. Round trip to Sibley only included a few miles of dirt but the steady climb up on the pavement (or shoulder in some spots) on Skyline provided some great aerobic work without the gut-busting punchy sections you get at JMP. I eventually found a great groove doing this ride on a single-speed; the grade was perfect 95% of the time. For folks trying to build up their lungs and legs simultaneously, there might not be a better stretch to ride with limited time available.

    Getting this in at least once per week really helped me get the most out of longer weekend jaunts to more interesting spots like Skeggs, Annadel, Demo, etc.

    I moved to Castro Valley a few years ago and get into Chabot at least once per week. It's a fairly bland park for cycling if you stick to the rules, but for training purposes is pretty ideal. The Brandon climb (starts next the golf course) is probably close to 800' of elevation, and none of it is really steep. I'd recommend hitting Brandon once from the golf course parking lot, just to get familiar with it. If you find you still have some good gas at the top, there's more climbing ahead that includes actual singletrack (yes!). If you can put more in after that trip, then try starting on Lake Chabot Rd and ride over Ten Hills to/up Brandon; with that done you'll have put in plenty of work already. Getting back to LC Road will require a bit of work from there too.

    If riding out your door is an option, I'd recommend that, as there's something uniquely satisfying about planning your route and knocking it out without use of a vehicle. Feel free to PM me for more ideas about your locale and local mellow routes.
    Last edited by Entrenador; 09-13-2018 at 08:52 PM.

  35. #35
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    Haven't been to China Camp in ages, but if you're willing to drive that far, give Tamarancho a shot for something different on a weekend.

    Less climbing than China Camp (depending on route) and definitely more fun.

    Super easy to navigate, go clockwise or counterclockwise with an option of a flow trail.

    https://bayarearides.com/rides/tamarancho/

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by rafekett View Post
    This loop is pretty flat https://www.mtbproject.com/trail/701...spiration-loop . I would try to graduate from that to JMP quickly as it's so much more fun. You'll get your fitness up in no time if you keep at it, and know there's no shame in walking -- if you get up the hill you win, doesn't matter how.
    Tilden is my local ride out my door. I donít know who makes these loops. Why anyone would want to descend Conlon (a steep fire road) rather than Havey Canyon (more varied, narrow, under trees, super fun for a new rider). I do like climbing up Curran rather than Meadows Canyon but that conflicts with the OPs desire to avoid steeper climbs.

    But nothing in Tilden is better than JMP. If JMP and Chabot are close for you then thatís where you should ride. Big Trees loop is one to be repeated endlessly, and can be mixed up with Westridge to Dunn in Redwood (just donít go all the way down Westridge).

  37. #37
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    2nd Tilden..but

    like doing it from the wildcat canyon side so that you combine both parks. plenty of punchy and sustained climbing but nice views and some goodies thrown in there as well.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post
    Mine has a 30. The 2019s no longer have the XE build. My bike is a 2018.

    Here are the specs:
    https://www.backcountry.com/santa-cr...tain-bike-2018

    Definitely go down to a 28, maybe a 26 (not sure if they go down to 26). No reason to run a 30 right now, or ever maybe with a 9t in the rear.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini2k05 View Post
    Definitely go down to a 28, maybe a 26 (not sure if they go down to 26). No reason to run a 30 right now, or ever maybe with a 9t in the rear.
    9t is a no-go for me right now. I'm having my e13 cassette swapped out for a shimano because of issues with the 9t.

    I'll give a smaller chainring some thought.

  40. #40
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    Noob looking for practice trails near Oakland

    (Personally) I would steer clear of swapping out components to make climbing easier. If itís semi-doable with the equipment you have (albeit challenging), and youíre having fun, Iíd stick with what youíve got. If you stick with it and keep putting in the miles, youíll come to appreciate the gearing that came with your bike. It was chosen for a reason.

    As an example... I was a pretty avid mountain biker about 8-10 years ago, riding a typical 27 speed trail bike from the early 2000ís. After a long hiatus, I returned to MTB and bought myself a bike with a 1x11 SRAM drivetrain. For the first month or so, I was spending a lot of time in the granny gear, and often wishing I had even lower gear options like I used to with my 27 sp.. I started researching granny rings, smaller chainrings, oval chainrings, etc, etc, etc. Fast forward a few months and Iím really glad I didnít spend any money tweaking my drivetrain. I only use the granny occasionally now, either on very steep punchy sections, or when I need to take a breather but donít want to stop moving. I donít find myself wanting/needing lower gearing like I originally thought i did.

    Just keep at it, and youíre grow into the gear youíve got!




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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post
    9t is a no-go for me right now. I'm having my e13 cassette swapped out for a shimano because of issues with the 9t.

    I'll give a smaller chainring some thought.
    What's your biggest (aka easiest) ring on the cassette? 40? 42? 46? Should be 46t.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexB_510 View Post
    (Personally) I would steer clear of swapping out components to make climbing easier. If itís semi-doable with the equipment you have (albeit challenging), and youíre having fun, Iíd stick with what youíve got.
    False. Big guys struggling up steep climbs at super low cadence is not only not helpful, it can very quickly and easily cause back/knee issues. I'm 6'7" and understand the OP's pain.

    How tall/big are you AlexB? When you're above 6'2" to 6'4" or so climbing is a totally different game. Geometry and power to weight ratio is totally different which make you way more susceptible to issues (in addition to infinitely more challenging). Especially if you on the heavy side. It's like a 6'7" guy telling a 5'6" guy to just practice jumping a little more and he'll be able to dunk a basketball.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexB_510 View Post
    Also, check out Butters Dr on a map. Itís a mellow/leisurely paved climb to get you from the bottom of JMP back up the hill a bit.
    And also the secret bike path that connects Joaquin Miller Road to Burdeck/Butters, right next to the freeway offramp
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini2k05 View Post
    False. Big guys struggling up steep climbs at super low cadence is not only not helpful, it can very quickly and easily cause back/knee issues. I'm 6'7" and understand the OP's pain.

    How tall/big are you AlexB? When you're above 6'2" to 6'4" or so climbing is a totally different game. Geometry and power to weight ratio is totally different which make you way more susceptible to issues (in addition to infinitely more challenging). Especially if you on the heavy side. It's like a 6'7" guy telling a 5'6" guy to just practice jumping a little more and he'll be able to dunk a basketball.
    Iím 6í3Ē. I was in no way implying that he should struggle at a super low cadence. If it gets to that point, itís definitely time to hop off the bike and walk to avoid injuries.

    What I was implying is just that the OP probably doesnít need to spend money on his bike to get in shape if he doesnít want to. A combo of riding the bike heís got and walking it when itís too tough (cadence too low) will work wonders on his physical fitness, and (I believe) before too long heíll be happy with what heís got.


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  45. #45
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    Yep, 46t.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexB_510 View Post
    Iím 6í3Ē. I was in no way implying that he should struggle at a super low cadence. If it gets to that point, itís definitely time to hop off the bike and walk to avoid injuries.

    What I was implying is just that the OP probably doesnít need to spend money on his bike to get in shape if he doesnít want to. A combo of riding the bike heís got and walking it when itís too tough (cadence too low) will work wonders on his physical fitness, and (I believe) before too long heíll be happy with what heís got.


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    I tend to lean more towards using what I have and growing into it.

    Unless something on the bike (or me) starts to break then I'll think about investing more $$$.

    That's not to say a 28 chainring is out of the question. But I'll just see how I do for now with the 30t.

  47. #47
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    A lot of it is just time on the bike. Bike 2 times a week and your fitness will improve. 6 weeks ago I couldn't pedal up a steep fire road near me without stopping 3 times. The other day I did it no problem (slow - but no problem).

    Consistently bike and your fitness will develop.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post
    I might take you up on that!
    I'm in Oakland as well. If you want to practice climbing, Chabot Regional Park and Redwood Regional Park are the closest options and bests ways to go. Chabot is easier and has multiple loop options, short and long.

    Download maps and detailed ride descriptions here: https://bayarearides.com/eastbay.shtml

    Chabot usually has an early group ride or two every Saturday morning. Look for a bunch of Filipino dudes. Those guys are chill and know how to have fun, and they're not Stravatites, so don't worry about holding them up!

    Your current 30x46 gearing is more than enough for these hills. Name of the game is not fast, but rather fun. 8-speed was plenty for me when I first started out. You'll even see many one-speeds on the Saturday morning group rides. You'll get faster in no time.

    Have fun!
    Solo & Ala Carte ~ that's how I like my bikes.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by TeeKay View Post
    I'm in Oakland as well. If you want to practice climbing, Chabot Regional Park and Redwood Regional Park are the closest options and bests ways to go. Chabot is easier and has multiple loop options, short and long.

    Download maps and detailed ride descriptions here: https://bayarearides.com/eastbay.shtml

    Chabot usually has an early group ride or two every Saturday morning. Look for a bunch of Filipino dudes. Those guys are chill and know how to have fun, and they're not Stravatites, so don't worry about holding them up!

    Your current 30x46 gearing is more than enough for these hills. Name of the game is not fast, but rather fun. 8-speed was plenty for me when I first started out. You'll even see many one-speeds on the Saturday morning group rides. You'll get faster in no time.

    Have fun!
    This thread has me really pumped! Thanks for all the motivation.

  50. #50
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    East Bay riding is all about boring fire trails with dumb climbs! There is definitely no shortage of trails for you to work on the cardio. One fun local loop with a mellow climb to start is to climb up to Sibley Regional from Old tunnel Rd. Theres a bit of singletrack in there, and once up top you can have a fun descent down Round Top Loop to Skyline and back to your car.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by J-Flo View Post
    Why anyone would want to descend Conlon (a steep fire road) rather than Havey Canyon (more varied, narrow, under trees, super fun for a new rider).
    Ah I missed that part - thought that map showed the Havey descent. Agree with J-Flo on this. Coming down Havey is almost like real mountain biking

  52. #52
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    Update: I went out to Chabot twice this weekend and did the Redwood-Towhee loop.

    Saturday morning I missed a turn and ended up following two guys back to the LC lot so not the proper loop.

    But yesterday I did the entire thing. I was able to figure out a good cadence that allowed me to stay on the bike a lot more than I usually do. I only got off to walk a handful of times.

    So thanks again for all the suggestions.

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    Nice work! Keep it up!


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