Long term plans after leaving the Bay Area in the next few years- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Long term plans after leaving the Bay Area in the next few years

    Hello friends.

    Can't believe it's been almost 3 years since I posted this thread (lol) - https://forums.mtbr.com/california-n...o-1024360.html

    In that time I've met a lot of you guys, made friends, found a great riding crew, rode UC, Nisene, Demo countless times, visited Downieville, Northstar, South Lake, Pinecrest many times, and done lots of other fun things.

    But, a tiny speck of light at the end of the tunnel is beginning to appear. We will be ready to make our Bay Area exit, settle down, buy a house and start a family in less than 5 years. Hopefully closer to 3.

    While I have enjoyed my time here far more than I originally expected, it is time to start planning our next steps and I am excited to begin a new life phase.

    So...

    I have started compiling a "long list", which will probably be whittled down over time as we gather more information and vet some of these places in person. Without further ado:

    - Ashland/Medford OR
    - Bend OR
    - Arcata area CA
    - Reno/Carson City NV
    - Boise ID (where we lived before here)
    - Grand Junction area CO
    - Denver/Boulder area CO
    - Colorado Springs CO
    - Flagstaff AZ
    - Santa Fe NM
    - Salt Lake/Lehi/Park City UT
    - Wenatchee WA

    We will probably focus on the location first, and then figure out the job stuff once we've narrowed down the possibilities more. I'm an electrical engineer and my wife works at a hospital.

    So, those of you who know these places or may have other recommendations, please speak up! How is the riding and how are the towns? Good places to raise a family? Weather (we aren't big fans of gloominess of the PNW)? Access to good breweries, restaurants, backpacking, etc? Housing prices (budget is <450ish).

    Yes I know there is another thread floating around about leaving the Bay Area, but I felt like being a bit of a narcissist and focusing this on me specifically!

  2. #2
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    Maybe look at Western NC and Arkansas?

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    My family is looking at Vancouver, WA. There is no state income tax and if you drive across the border into Portland (quick drive across the bridge) there is no sales tax. Both of those items will put a ton of cash back into our pockets that CA currently steals and wastes. Homes are less expensive than the Bay Area and schools are way way better than CA. We are looking at a suburb called Camas, WA which has the best schools in Clark County. Camas is more expensive than other parts of Vancouver but if being in the best school district is important than I feel that this is the place to be. We have a 2yr old to think about so this looks like our best option. You can look at the school district next door to Camas called Evergreen and they are the 2nd best in the area. Another benefit to Vancouver is that you are -not- in Portland which I feel is suffering from the same extreme political climate that we have in CA with all the issues it brings (pick your topic). Portland definitely has more homeless, drugs, and crime. But, you can always go into Portland for great food, great beer, and more venues than in Vancouver then go home when you are done. Also, we both work for Silicon Valley tech companies and get to work remote. So moving out of the area has no impact on our jobs. If something happens, however, there is some tech in Vancouver and more in Portland. There, however, is way more tech from the major players in Seattle. $450K can definitely get you a nice home in the Vancouver area -- just depends on what you are looking for: schools, home size, lot size, and price.

    We looked at Boise and ruled it out as it just feels like a nice small town gone wild with un-checked growth and strip malls.

    I used to live in Prescott, AZ which is about 100mi to the SW of Flagstaff. There is a ton of MTB in both places but you need to get ready for cold winters. Prescott, at 5,000ft, would get occasional snow but it would usually melt off within days except for shady areas. I would assume that the snow would stick around in Flagstaff as it is at almost 7,000ft. Humidity is also really low which used to give me dry, itchy skin, and the static electricity can be interesting. I used to get good shocks getting out of my car or unlocking the front door to the house all the time.

    I can't speak to the other areas.....

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    Maybe look at Western NC and Arkansas?
    Going east past CO/NM is right out

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by spec306 View Post
    My family is looking at Vancouver, WA. There is no state income tax and if you drive across the border into Portland (quick drive across the bridge) there is no sales tax. Both of those items will put a ton of cash back into our pockets that CA currently steals and wastes. Homes are less expensive than the Bay Area and schools are way way better than CA. We are looking at a suburb called Camas, WA which has the best schools in Clark County. Camas is more expensive than other parts of Vancouver but if being in the best school district is important than I feel that this is the place to be. We have a 2yr old to think about so this looks like our best option. You can look at the school district next door to Camas called Evergreen and they are the 2nd best in the area. Another benefit to Vancouver is that you are -not- in Portland which I feel is suffering from the same extreme political climate that we have in CA with all the issues it brings (pick your topic). Portland definitely has more homeless, drugs, and crime. But, you can always go into Portland for great food, great beer, and more venues than in Vancouver then go home when you are done. Also, we both work for Silicon Valley tech companies and get to work remote. So moving out of the area has no impact on our jobs. If something happens, however, there is some tech in Vancouver and more in Portland. There, however, is way more tech from the major players in Seattle. $450K can definitely get you a nice home in the Vancouver area -- just depends on what you are looking for: schools, home size, lot size, and price.

    We looked at Boise and ruled it out as it just feels like a nice small town gone wild with un-checked growth and strip malls.

    I used to live in Prescott, AZ which is about 100mi to the SW of Flagstaff. There is a ton of MTB in both places but you need to get ready for cold winters. Prescott, at 5,000ft, would get occasional snow but it would usually melt off within days except for shady areas. I would assume that the snow would stick around in Flagstaff as it is at almost 7,000ft. Humidity is also really low which used to give me dry, itchy skin, and the static electricity can be interesting. I used to get good shocks getting out of my car or unlocking the front door to the house all the time.

    I can't speak to the other areas.....

    haha, my wife is from Vancouver actually and her parents are still there. It would be on the list but it seems like not good access to MTB? I don't want to drive an hour to Hood River to ride...

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    Jobs are hard to come by in Flagstaff. Your wife would fair well in Prescott. Lots of medical in town.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by griffsterb View Post
    Hello friends.
    Some nice options there. Some opinions based on some experiences I've had in some of them:

    - Reno/Carson City NV
    : We live part time in South Lake and will probably retire in the Carson Valley when the time comes when we can't deal with the snow any more. It's no longer much cheaper than California though. I recommend staying there for a week or so before making a decision. There are nuances to the place that you may or may not like.

    - Grand Junction area CO
    : You should seriously look into this one. Great climate with winters that aren't too harsh, yet easy access to higher elevations for recreation. Inexpensive real estate. Hot in the summer, but if you can live with that you have great access to Moab in spring and fall. This would be my #1 pick on your list.

    - Denver/Boulder area CO
    : I used to live there. OMFG the traffic drove me crazy. At least in the Bay Area there is a reason for it.

    - Colorado Springs CO
    : Conservative culture and politics for Colorado. More of a midwestern vibe. Beautiful place with lots to do nearby.

    - Flagstaff AZ
    : Similar to Santa Fe in some ways. Lots of interesting stuff to do around there. Skiing is meh. Unrelenting winds in the spring.

    - Santa Fe NM
    : I used to live there. Beautiful town, interesting culture, traffic, but spend some time there to get the nuances. People in New Mexico do things differently. You have to understand the culture first to see if you will be OK with it.

    - Salt Lake/Lehi/Park City UT
    : Park City = yes. Anything down in the valley = no for me. Winter smog is pretty bad. It's damn hot in the summer.

    - Wenatchee WA
    : Eastern Washington suffers from inversions in the winter where it is really cold at the surface and warm up above. This leads to ice storms, which I have personally experienced in Yakima. Maybe Wenatchee is different so get a local opinion on this, but that's a deal-breaker for me.

  8. #8
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    We'll be moving from Arcata to Knoxville, for a variety of reasons. We'll miss the hell out of our Humboldt MTB community, because these folks are amazing (and they better keep their spare rooms ready!), but Knoxville has its own thing going on...

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    I'm not exactly to the point of moving tomorrow but if I could find the right place for a young family 9-11 yo i.e. good schools, good outdoors with mtb trails, skiing, I'd consider seriously. From that list, maybe Bend OR and Park City UT fit some of my needs. Maybe something in BC too around Kamloops or Kelowna since I have a Canadian passport.

    Anyways, subscribed!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by adagioca View Post
    I'm not exactly to the point of moving tomorrow but if I could find the right place for a young family 9-11 yo i.e. good schools, good outdoors with mtb trails, skiing, I'd consider seriously. From that list, maybe Bend OR and Park City UT fit some of my needs. Maybe something in BC too around Kamloops or Kelowna since I have a Canadian passport.

    Anyways, subscribed!
    One of my good friends and fellow MTBer moved to Kelowna a few years ago. He loves it. Need to check in with him.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by griffsterb View Post
    haha, my wife is from Vancouver actually and her parents are still there. It would be on the list but it seems like not good access to MTB? I don't want to drive an hour to Hood River to ride...
    That is kinda what I am finding regarding the MTB scene in Vancouver as well. There are a few XC trails and a few trails that are rated Black Diamond nearby, per MTBproject and Singletracks, but for me at this stage in the game MTB is taking a back seat to other priorities.

    What does the wife and her family think about Vancouver? My biggest concern will be the adjustment to WA weather -- drizzly days and long gloomy winters. Every time I have been to the PNW, however, the weather has always been clear and warm so I have no personal experience with it. We do have a friend who is a Bay Area transplant to Vancouver (Felida) and he assures us that the grey gloomy weather is real and it took him a year or so to acclimate.

  12. #12
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    There’s no “quick drive across the bridge” from Vancouver into Portland....and it will be even less quick going back north. My daughter graduated college in 2014 in Portland and traffic sucked then, it’s even worse now.
    Carpe Diem!!

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    I'd second a look at Reno/Carson City area. My wife and I moved to Reno about 18 months ago from San Diego. We got tired of all of the traffic and increasing costs and wanted proximity to mountains for play. Housing costs have gone up in the last few years but you will be fine in that budget. We found a nice 3BR/2BA for $300k. You get a little of all 4 seasons which is nice, summer is warm 80s-90s but if it ever gets too hot you are only 40 mins from Tahoe which is always 10* cooler. Winters really aren't too bad as the mountains catch most of the storms, plus if you snowboard you are less than an hour from most Tahoe resorts. Riding wise Tahoe is 30 mins to an hour (depending where you live), Downieville is 90 mins, Mammoth is 3 hours, Ashland is only 5.5 hours, Park City 8 hours so tons of easy weekend trips. Reno really feels like the Biggest Little City since it has most everything you need and you can get corner to corner in the city in 20 mins. People who grew up here will say there is traffic, but there is no real traffic. Plus if you go to the mountains you are going reverse of all of the Bay Area people. Plus SF is an easy 4 hour drive for weekend getaways.

  14. #14
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    Stockton's not on the list?

    Huh.
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  15. #15
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    Have you ridden Ashland yet? Some really good trails, many more than are on the standard shuttle ride. And the town is full of super friendly active folks, seems extremely safe. It can get hot and/or smoky in the summer, but that seems like it's true for anywhere in the West now. Have fun choosing!
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  16. #16
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    Ashland has much better weather than most of Oregon too.

  17. #17
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    I highly suggest you read this thread https://forums.mtbr.com/fifty-years-...en-989104.html While many/most of them ate truly retired, it's still relevant and the exact same discussions have been had over there. There's good and bad wherever you decide to go, you just have to figure out what your true priorities are.
    Carpe Diem!!

  18. #18
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    "There’s no “quick drive across the bridge” from Vancouver into Portland....and it will be even less quick going back north. My daughter graduated college in 2014 in Portland and traffic sucked then, it’s even worse now."

    I guess I got lucky. I was just up there two weeks ago on a Thursday and Friday and flew into PDX. I managed a reverse commute out of PDX to Camas at 10:30am in about 20 minutes then Friday I managed downtown Vancouver to PDX at about 6:30pm on the 5 in about 15 minutes. The way I look at is any traffic is better than Bay Area traffic.

  19. #19
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    I absolutely love Colorado Springs. I can't attest for the mtbing since I was into road bikes at the time (which had great roads). The town, however, is excellent.

  20. #20
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    I would highly suggest staying in arcata for awhile before moving there. Humboldt, isn't for everyone and decent paying jobs are really tough to come by. Not to mention the cost of living and wages don't match very well. It does have a growing mtb community, but you will live 3 hours plus from other civilization. It's a great place, but very few who grow up there stay unless they have family money/ land/ businesses or grow.

  21. #21
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    Hailey, ID

    Since you've lived in Boise, you may be familiar with the Sun Valley area.

    Pros:

    Great MTBing (Riding season is usually starts in March and ends in November).
    Good to Great gravel biking.
    Great skiing (xc, alpine, backcountry, etc.).
    Well educated and progressive population.
    Very athletic population.
    Decent cultural stuff (bookstores, playhouses, restaurants, art festivals).

    Great weather (Subjective, I know, but summers are mostly 75-85 and sunny. Fall is cool and mostly sunny. Winter is snow, but not nearly as much as other ski resorts. Spring is a bit meh. It can be sunny and nice, but cold and drizzly too. In other words, high desert climate.)

    Decent schools.


    Cons:

    Cost of living is high, but as you move south in the valley, housing costs drop fairly dramatically.
    Lack of diversity.
    Few well paying jobs, but Power Engineers hires EE's, and St. Luke's is a fairly big hospital.
    Slim pickings if you're single and between 18-35.
    Not much road biking.

  22. #22
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    I will throw out a plug for Bend, Oregon. Before spending six years in the Bay Area, I lived in Sun Valley, Idaho, for over 20 years. I moved to Bend about the same time you moved to the Bay Area.

    The Bend job scene is growing as well as Central Oregon in general. Being at ~3800' the weather is relatively mild and being a high desert relatively dry. The community is fantastic, the beer scene is world-class, and you can participate in a ton of activities close to where you would live. Floating the river, mountain biking, golf, skiing and lift served mtb on Mt. Bachelor, amazing hikes to Broken Top and the Sisters, etc. The mountain biking in Bend is ok, with a lot of super-easy to access fun trails, although it isn't hard to find little gems that are more technical. I live near Sunriver Resort and ride Tyler's, Edison-Lava, Dinah Moe Hum and other stuff that is off the beaten path for most Bend locals. The best thing about Bend for riding is the proximity to amazing areas. Hood River is 2 hours away, McKenzie River Trail is an hour away, the Cascade Crest Trails are an hour and a half, Oakridge is an hour and half, etc. Heading east a short drive from Bend you have countless miles of singletrack in the BLM land that is riding pretty much year round. On a side note, there is very little traffic getting to these areas on scenic drives.

    Most of the places you listed could be good destinations, depending on your priorities. You have so many positive things to look forward to in your life. I am sure you will be happy wherever you land. With the current and anticipated continued growth in Central Oregon, Bend is a cool option if you are looking for that. Boise is undoubtedly in that category. The Ashland, Arcata, Grand Junction, Wenatchee, and Hailey options are going to be in the smaller town, less growth and diversity group, and SLC, Denver, etc. start to take on the characteristics of bigger cities and all of their pros/cons.

    Another thing to consider is elevation and climate. If you can't live in a Mediterranean climate like the Bay, a high desert climate like you experienced in Boise is hard to beat. As much as I loved living in Sun Valley, the winters at nearly 6000' are long. The geography makes for a world class playground, but the local economy, small town, and difficult access make it more of a vacation or retirement community.

    If you come to Bend, look me up. I would be happy to take you on a ride and show you around.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by spec306 View Post
    My family is looking at Vancouver, WA. There is no state income tax and if you drive across the border into Portland (quick drive across the bridge) there is no sales tax. Both of those items will put a ton of cash back into our pockets that CA currently steals and wastes. Homes are less expensive than the Bay Area and schools are way way better than CA. We are looking at a suburb called Camas, WA which has the best schools in Clark County. Camas is more expensive than other parts of Vancouver but if being in the best school district is important than I feel that this is the place to be. We have a 2yr old to think about so this looks like our best option. You can look at the school district next door to Camas called Evergreen and they are the 2nd best in the area. Another benefit to Vancouver is that you are -not- in Portland which I feel is suffering from the same extreme political climate that we have in CA with all the issues it brings (pick your topic). Portland definitely has more homeless, drugs, and crime. But, you can always go into Portland for great food, great beer, and more venues than in Vancouver then go home when you are done. Also, we both work for Silicon Valley tech companies and get to work remote. So moving out of the area has no impact on our jobs. If something happens, however, there is some tech in Vancouver and more in Portland. There, however, is way more tech from the major players in Seattle. $450K can definitely get you a nice home in the Vancouver area -- just depends on what you are looking for: schools, home size, lot size, and price.

    We looked at Boise and ruled it out as it just feels like a nice small town gone wild with un-checked growth and strip malls.

    I used to live in Prescott, AZ which is about 100mi to the SW of Flagstaff. There is a ton of MTB in both places but you need to get ready for cold winters. Prescott, at 5,000ft, would get occasional snow but it would usually melt off within days except for shady areas. I would assume that the snow would stick around in Flagstaff as it is at almost 7,000ft. Humidity is also really low which used to give me dry, itchy skin, and the static electricity can be interesting. I used to get good shocks getting out of my car or unlocking the front door to the house all the time.

    I can't speak to the other areas.....
    Camas, WA is GREAT (at least in the summer)! My company is one of the largest employers in Camas, and I'm there at least once a month. Cost of living is cheap, the people are nice, the summers are beautiful, the Portland scene is near.

    Plus, there is GREAT biking very close:

    https://www.trailforks.com/region/co...lon=-122.25863

    Major downside? It's cold and wet 8+ months of the year.

  24. #24
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    I would cross SLC/Lehi UT off your list. Having lived in both the Bay Area and Utah, I can say with certainty the traffic is as bad or worse in those areas than the Bay. Park City is much better, but much more expensive. The air pollution / winter inversion are also horrible along the Wasatch Front.

    I just came back from a trip to Grand Junction area, and was surprised at the amount of suburban sprawl. For what that's worth. Denver/Boulder feel really "midwesty" to me. It feels like quite a drive from Denver (flatland) to the mountains. Colorado Springs or the small towns to the west of it seem pretty nice, IMO.

    Good luck to you! I've visited many of the places on your list, and most are really great. My vote is for either Bend, OR or Colorado Springs.

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    The sense I get is that CO Springs doesn't have great trails close by. Is that true?

    Not a fan of suburban sprawl but supposedly Grand Junction has phenomenal trails and access.

    Also, I may have to add Prescott or Sedona and Durango CO to the list.

    Anyone know about any good trail networks in Montana? I think winters are pretty rough there though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by notb View Post

    - Denver/Boulder area CO
    : I used to live there. OMFG the traffic drove me crazy. At least in the Bay Area there is a reason for it.

    .
    I lived in Boulder for 4 years, and return there somewhat frequently because I deeply love there. While the traffic to-and-from Denver and the Airport is indeed awful, the traffic around Boulder itself isn't bad at all in my experience. And the riding is world class. Hall Ranch, Nederland, White Ranch, Golden--all less than an hour from DT Boulder. And of course you've got all the world class ski-resorts, which are closer to Boulder than Tahoe is to SF. Lots of tech/finance job opportunities in Boulder as well.

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    Prescott is cool, prefer the town over the valley. I was going to mention Durango, I wanted to move there pre kids. I have heard Farmington NM is actually nice and within striking distance to the San Juans, probably my favorite mountain range in the US. We were in Telluride last week, so awesome but I think you need a couple mil in the bank to set up shop there. Ridgeway is cool, not sure about Grand Junction, there is something I never really liked about that town. Maybe it has changed but maybe it is too beige w/ zero soul part that I don't like?

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    Quote Originally Posted by xtrwin View Post
    Major downside? It's cold and wet 8+ months of the year.
    This. You don't even see the sun from Oct - April.

    Sucked going to school there as a kid. If it was wet, we were stuck inside for recess. And it was wet every day for months on end.

    Summers are pretty awesome tho.
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    The BC Canada thing is beautiful. Have visited the Columbia Valley and the small towns just North (Revelstoke) and that place is awesome. Nelson, Fernie awesome too. But it can snow in Winter for sure. Summers in that area are insanely beautiful tho and the area is starting to really cater to mtn bikers in Summer. These are ski towns as you know.

    My Sister lives in Bend. She loves it but does tell me they don't ride in Winter as it's just too damn cold for that but they do a lot of other Winter activities.

    Weather is not as grey as Portland, etc but it still snows some and rains. It's Oregon. Ashland yeah it's better but it's consistently 10+ degrees colder in Winter than the Bay Area and a Friend told me it's pretty difficult for him to go out and ride for about 3-4 months of the year but there are some good sunny days in Winter close to 50 degrees and I'm told the town is nice. My Sister said they refer to Medford as Methford. Just an FTI. It might just be a Bend thing. LOL

    Have you looked into Auburn Ca or surrounding areas. Weather will be much better as Winter will be shorter and sunnier. Yeah hot in Summer but get a place w/ a pool. LOL

    Hope you find a nice place to live.

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    ^ I've heard Methford is a fairly accurate label, unfortunately. Talent is the next town up from Ashland and has some good riding of its own, and it's a lot cheaper.

    Quote Originally Posted by Trespinero View Post
    I have heard Farmington NM is actually nice...
    I don't think anybody has ever called Farmington nice! I lived there for 3 months. It's tolerable because it's cheap and has some cool places/trails pretty close by, like Durango and Cortez.
    Last edited by Callender; 08-07-2019 at 08:00 AM.
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    Right on buddy. You are a good man we are so stoked to hang out with you during your time here.
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    My wife and I are in the same position as you but are looking to move now. We don't need to live in the Bay Area for our jobs so why stay? I don't think I need to list the negatives of the BA. We also have a similar list of places although we've eliminated SLC and Denver/Boulder (too much big city), Arcata (weather, remoteness).

    If you are going to have kids, then I would look VERY closely at the schools in any place you are considering. It can be really hard to get a sense of that online but if you know anyone in these places then you can get some references.

    MTBing: consider what kind of riding you like to do and if it has those types of trails. Some people are okay with driving an hour to ride and consider that part of an area's trails. I do not and would prefer a place that has trails that I can ride to from my house. Also think about how much of the year is rideable based on trail conditions (clay mud?) and snow/rain/cold. What will you do during those times? Some places like Grand Junction have hot summers and a cold winter inversion layer and windy spring/fall.

    Housing costs are pretty easy to figure out on Zillow. I don't think you'll find the home prices you are looking for in SLC, Boulder or Santa Fe.

    What's the community like? Is it like Tahoe Donner where home are mostly occupied seasonally by tourists? Or long-term residents?

    Other stuff like decent restaurants and breweries and a bit of culture will be in all of the places you are looking at. It's the REALLY small towns or ones that are poor where you might find those things lacking. However, if you/your wife really want museums or a certain kind of shopping they might only be available in the bigger places like Boise or Boulder/Denver.

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    Really, its a simple question as to what you love to do, and what activities you would like to get into.

    Do you really like to ski/snowboard/fish/mountaineer or alpineer/sledneck/fourwheel/whitewater/golf etc? Whereever you move there WILL be an offseason for MTB, so it matters a lot what you like to do in that off season and/or what activities you think would be cool to do in that off season.

  34. #34
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    I've spent time (though not lived) in about 2/3s of those places. Bend would be top of the list for me.

    But see:
    https://www.outsideonline.com/239020...-mapping-study

    As for me, when we're looking at moving after the kids are out of high school, it'll probably be to somewhere like the Flathead Valley. Would love to do Canada, but I imagine it'd be tough to get a visa.

    Oh yeah, skiing is probably more important to me than biking. So that may not factor in as much for you, but still.

  35. #35
    Uncle
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    Quote Originally Posted by gordon View Post
    Hailey, ID

    Cons:

    Slim pickings if you're single and between 18-35.
    Oh boy does this bring back memories, lol (Auburn, CA late 90's). I used to joke:
    Single, female, has mostly a full set of teeth - Pick two.

  36. #36
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    Not really a fan of winter sports. I used to snowboard a lot, but I just prefer warm weather. But, it's not a deal breaker.

    Doing more research I have heard that Grand Junction has air quality problems during parts of the year due to wildfire smoke and farmers burning garbage (?) unrestricted.

    Incidentally, Prescott AZ is ranked as having some of the cleanest air in the country. I think it would be the best place to live in AZ.

    Also, Nevada and AZ have the best tax situations overall from the states I've included. Oregon is the worst, after ruling out living anywhere else in CA.

    SLC/Lehi off the list due to haze/inversion, Wenatchee I think is too small and not a good enough trail network even though it's somewhat close to family.

    Denver area is too big and congested. I heard Fort Collins has good trails. Maybe updated list something like:

    Ashland/Methford
    Bend
    Fort Collins
    Colorado Springs
    GJ/Fruita still maybe or other small CO towns
    Prescott
    Santa Fe
    Reno

    Thanks for all the input guys, very much appreciated. We definitely need to look into schools more. Santa Fe is close to being crossed off - apparently the trails are world class but the gentrification, and health care there is not good.

    Can anyone vouch for trail quality/access in Spokane or Coeur d'Alene ID?

    Or maybe even Driggs/Victor ID + Jackson WY?

  37. #37
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    New Mexico has bad schools generally, but private schools are cheaper than here. My friend loves Santa Fe, neighborhoods can be hit or miss. Colorado has oil and gas wells everywhere in ways that Texas even doesn't -- they can be right next to schools, parks and houses and people complain about the noise and fumes. The is becoming a big issue.

  38. #38
    wretch
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    She’s not your girlfriend it’s just your turn...

  39. #39
    wretch
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    I’d tend to disagree that Ft Collins has good trails - trips to Moab, Fruita, and other higher destinations but out of the door there’s more gravel...

  40. #40
    Moderator Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Entrenador View Post
    Oh boy does this bring back memories, lol (Auburn, CA late 90's). I used to joke:
    Single, female, has mostly a full set of teeth - Pick two.
    The odds are good, but the goods are odd.

  41. #41
    Moderator Moderator
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    I propose that every NorCal MTBR member buy a house in a strategic location and we can all crash at each other’s places around the world. What you guys think?

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