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  1. #1
    Trail Gnome
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    Letís hear from the NorCal old farts...


  2. #2
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    ^^buncha older kids in their 40's, 50's posted in that thread. Old fart starts in the 70's, no?

  3. #3
    NedwannaB
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    Turne 60 this year 40,50 and 70 was mentioned so I guess that leaves me out.😊
    Wait whuuut, who did he tell you that!?!?....

  4. #4
    Paper or plastic?
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    Started riding when my older son was an infant. He's now 19 and I'll turn 50 this year. I was slow then, I'm slow now. Still riding though.
    Faster is not always better, but it's always more fun

  5. #5
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    JC, you are not an old fart. I am an old fart. I've always been slow, but I think the difference now is that i go on fewer really big rides than I did. Now a four hour ride is long for me, but several years ago I was doing the occasional 35 miler. I think I could still do them, I just don't enjoy them as much. On the upside, I'm probably riding a bit more frequently now since I have more time as I don't work full time any more. So more frequent, shorter rides are probably my thing now. I might be a touch more cautious (ie, even slower) on more technical terrain, but I'll still try to get up and down a lot of things.

  6. #6
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    Iím still trying to figure out what people consider old. I started riding at 40. Iím 47 now but I feel better now than when I was 30.


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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by NotQuiteClimbing View Post
    Iím still trying to figure out what people consider old. I started riding at 40. Iím 47 now but I feel better now than when I was 30.


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    Old is when you quit trying.

  8. #8
    Trail Gnome
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    Old is when you quit trying.
    I quit trying years ago, 35 was probably my peak...Iím just riding for fun now.

  9. #9
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    Age 61, been riding mt. bikes since age...48 or so. Raced the Sea otter in 2016, third in the cat 3, 60 and over. More cautious, slower, but still love it.
    Cannot wait to retire next year, moving up to Humboldt, will ride Paradise Royal, Arcata Redwood Forest, everywhere up there. Also ride my road bike, feel safer on the mt. bike.
    Great way to keep fit, cardiovascular strong for free diving....beer and women still taste and look great...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    Old is when you quit trying.
    Great quote. Gonna make it my motto.

  11. #11
    Hella Olde
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    56 and still 'racing' DH and Enduro. I'll probably die riding.

  12. #12
    fc
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    I had a late start in biking, about 30 years old. So every year, I just wanted to get better than the year before. It was pretty easy for about 15 years since I was so engaged. Pretty much, getting better meant I was getting faster at climbing. My descending was pretty much the same after year 2.


    And then at around 45 years, I couldn't beat my uphill records anymore. Singlespeeding and roadbiking helped break the plateaus for a bit.

    So then around 47/48 I started to improve and get faster at descending to 'get better every year'. I then realized tha I didn't know that much about descending or cornering and it was cool to learn and improve again.

    These last couple of years, I improve descending not by getting faster but having more control and being more active and playful. It's cool. Safer and more fun.

    As far as the extra stuff. I'm riding more bike now... around 150mm travel since they are sooooo awesome at around 28 lbs, provide a safety margin for getting rad and preserving the creaky bones.

    I stretch a lot more know and have improved my diet. Yoga when I can, massage and accupuncture. I went Vegan for three months but am now at pescatarian. (seafood allowed).

    Also spend a lot of time with kids since they are about to leave the house. Ciao!


    Here's 1996 and 2018. Turning 53 this year.
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    IPA will save America

  13. #13
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    52, strong as I've ever been.

    Haven't noticed any physical issues due to age, but my thinking has changed a bit.

    I tend to be much more conservative when riding solo or when in the backcountry (less air, less big chunk). Maybe that's just riding smarter, I don't know. The hardest part at this age is finding friends who have available time to ride.

    I road bike a lot more now, but I'd like to think that it's because I don't have close access to any great trails (I live in the east bay) and not moral decrepitude.
    Live to Ride, Ride to Live

  14. #14
    sbd
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    BMX in the 80s, MTBs since 91.

    Still suck, but still love it @ 53.

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  15. #15
    Paper or plastic?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brah View Post
    52, strong as I've ever been.

    Haven't noticed any physical issues due to age, but my thinking has changed a bit.

    I tend to be much more conservative when riding solo or when in the backcountry (less air, less big chunk). Maybe that's just riding smarter, I don't know. The hardest part at this age is finding friends who have available time to ride.

    I road bike a lot more now, but I'd like to think that it's because I don't have close access to any great trails (I live in the east bay) and not moral decrepitude.
    Got a road bike 5-6 years ago when I realized that I had no time to ride off road during the week. Works out pretty well when trails are sloppy too like yesterday.

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    Faster is not always better, but it's always more fun

  16. #16
    Ride On!
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    Started down this road at age 52, where the north side of 50 came from. Now 56 and am riding strong looking forward to the upcoming season. Every season so far I have found that I can climb better, do better on the downhills according to Strava. What has changed this last year is I am trending towards to sustainability vs going all out.

    I realize that I don't bounce as good, have to keep my goals reasonable to continue to enjoy this kicka#$ adventure. I'm another one that riding keeps me young, enthused and allows me get the razor edge experiences I crave

  17. #17
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by NorthSideOf50 View Post
    Started down this road at age 52, where the north side of 50 came from.
    Ha! I always thought it had to do with where you live/ride - which would be a cool name too.

  18. #18
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    Turn 48 in August, been riding mtn bikes since 20. First 20 years I was a slow climber, but had decent skills descending so I was always in the pack of folks I rode with. Last five years I've gotten way faster climbing and probably descending, although this last year I realized I lost some reaction time. I'm still hitting jumps I never would have five years ago. I think they're respectable height/width/length jumps too for 47. Most of this is due to riding with new peeps. Glad it happened because I would hate to be still doing mundane xc and some all mtn.

    Main things i've noticed change, i increased my overall strength in order to keep riding so that's the positive. On the negatives, my eyesight and reaction decreased to where its affected cornering and nimbleness. South side of 50 but approaching fast! I'm having the most fun these last three years than I can recall.

  19. #19
    Yeti SB95c
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    Age 66.

    I've met many guys on trails all over the western US who are in their 40's and say they are getting old and may not MTB much longer. They seem shocked that I'm still riding in my 60's. I'm not any stronger now of course and too much wine doesn't help, but wife and I are both riding far more technical than before. That is mostly due to great bikes and components though.

    My goal this year is to ride most of Flying Monkey (Virgin, UT) and most of the drop-in to Horsethief Bench (Fruita, CO). Also all of Ahab in Moab. These are famous big-gnar trails, check them out on YouTube. The waterfall on Toads is not for me but rode the rest of it.

    I don't give up easy. Never broke a bone doing MTB since 1957. It helps to grow up in the mountains riding bikes.
    MTB blog for US West trails: http://jimprestonmtb.com. Trail analysis videos, bike and component reviews, other stuff.

  20. #20
    Ride On!
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    Quote Originally Posted by dchester View Post
    Ha! I always thought it had to do with where you live/ride - which would be a cool name too.
    Had occurred to me too, I live in El Dorado Hills north of hwy 50

  21. #21
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    I rode Levi's Gran Fondo this past October at age 47 just to prove I'm not old. (48 now as of January) I tied my time from 2007. Pretty happy about that. 3 weeks later, I got a severely herniated L5S1 disc that left me incapacitated. Not so happy about that. It's nearly all healed now, but I lost all of my strength and endurance so I'll be starting over this year. Happy to feel like I could ride again though. I miss the MTB...

    I haven't ridden the MTB on a trail for prolly 6 months since I was doing so many road rides training for the century. then the injury/PT and recovery.

    I fee like I could now, but it's wet and cold and I'm not looking forward to realizing how out of shape I am. Anyone want to help get me out of this funk and pop my MTB cherry? - that didn't come out right :-)

    The biggest factor that age brings for me is additional responsibility. I have a 6 yo and a fixer-upper house. plenty to compete for my time.

  22. #22
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    47. Started riding mtb in high school, but stopped for 10 years. Started up again at 32 and been riding a lot since then. My goals for riding have changed last few years. Before it was all about being competitive and fast. Now, I ride more for keeping healthy and really think exploration with the bike is the next level. Still like to push myself at times though.

    Feel like I am a stronger rider in terms of riding longer and bigger rides and better rider with technique (new bike technology has helped) However, recovery takes longer, uphills get tougher and nagging injuries have crept in. Been taking less chances with jumping and drop-offs last few years. Still competitive on downhills via Strava on my local rides with some of youngsters. Haha. Uphills not so much.

  23. #23
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    I'm not quite an old fart yet, but I do keep a pair of these cheap ultra compact reading glasses in all my packs. My far vision is still 20/20 but my close vision has gotten worse over the last few years. When you need to read a map, work on a small part, etc. these are really very handy. $5 off Amazon.

    -img_7683.jpg

  24. #24
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    And this banner ad just popped up......

    -screen-shot-2018-03-19-11.41.37-pm.jpg

  25. #25
    Life's a Garden, dig it!
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    And this banner ad just popped up......

    Click image for larger version. 

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    F-ing Ads!
    Why Johnny Ringo, you look like someone just walked over your grave.

  26. #26
    Life's a Garden, dig it!
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    56 here and still riding exclusively SS. So far, so good. One of these days I may have to add gears, but I don't see it happening for awhile.
    Why Johnny Ringo, you look like someone just walked over your grave.

  27. #27
    Formerly dvo
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    I'm not quite an old fart yet, but I do keep a pair of these cheap ultra compact reading glasses in all my packs. My far vision is still 20/20 but my close vision has gotten worse over the last few years. When you need to read a map, work on a small part, etc. these are really very handy. $5 off Amazon.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    THIS....I carry all I need to fix my bike but without these I am useless.
    Anyone else dealing with the joys of severe arthritis? Absolutely no cartilage left in my left wrist and my last cortisone shot did nothing to help. My doc is recommending schaphoid excision and 4 corner fusion to get back to pain free riding. Currently I ride with a brace and pop Advil like M and M's.
    I'm the problem....

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbrdan View Post
    THIS....I carry all I need to fix my bike but without these I am useless.
    Anyone else dealing with the joys of severe arthritis? Absolutely no cartilage left in my left wrist and my last cortisone shot did nothing to help. My doc is recommending schaphoid excision and 4 corner fusion to get back to pain free riding. Currently I ride with a brace and pop Advil like M and M's.
    Yup, glasses are my best tool.
    As far as the arthritis, 50 here, cervical(neck) osteo arthritis is constant for me. Comes with a bonus headache most of the time. It bothers me least when riding, but I pay big after. Doc says I have the neck of an 80 year old man. 20 years in a tow truck? Still skateboarding? Sworn to the hardtail? Who knows why.

    I broke my scaphoid skateboarding at around 40. Bone graft didn't take and scaphoid is now in 2 pieces connected by a pin, looks like a barbell. I can definitely relate to that one. Told fusion was all they could do at this point, so I'm just living with it for now. I don't take pills, but edibles help a bit.
    It's better to ride and hurt than to have never ridden at all...

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbrdan View Post
    THIS....I carry all I need to fix my bike but without these I am useless
    This occurred to me one day when I was in the backcountry and couldn't read my GPS! All the fancy equipment will not help you if you can't see it!!

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    This occurred to me one day when I was in the backcountry and couldn't read my GPS! All the fancy equipment will not help you if you can't see it!!
    Chain repair by Braille is so much fun!

  31. #31
    Ride On!
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    And this banner ad just popped up......

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Started getting those types of ads via Snail Mail...,they need to start coming out with more mountain biker and extreme sport targeted ads for our generation

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    This kinda thing would get me to click or open the envelope and check it out

  32. #32
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    71 and still charging...

    Quote Originally Posted by bob-o View Post
    ^^buncha older kids in their 40's, 50's posted in that thread. Old fart starts in the 70's, no?
    I'm an old(er) fart that still feels young. Young with the experience of the years of wisdom while being present.

    I started MTB biking to get through a nasty divorce in 1986. It worked!
    That Cannondale was my rocket ship to freedom. I've stayed with riding ever since. I tried racing in 1993 at the Norba Championships in PC, but that was way too frenetic for me. It was more where the bike could take me: high up into the mountains of Utah (Wasatch Crest Trail) that mattered most. Now, my only regret is I didn't retire 5 years earlier as I'm so loving riding three to four days a week for the last 11 years. Settling into the Mendocino coastal area is the best thing I've ever done after leaving Bend OR (3 year hiatus) via Salt Lake City (20 year stint).

    Living here has afforded me year round opportunities to ride as much as I care to get in. Most of us are older with the oldest and still charging hard is Jack (my co-author of the guidebook) at 78! So, that brings me to my perspective on why we ride: It's about the comradery of good friends. We support one another regardless of who is last to the top of the climbs. There is always someone who is faster (BigBike Nick-who'll be turning 60 in May!) but it isn't a race, but an opportunity to be a kid, each time we ride. Riding is similar to ski racing: it's about challenging yourself, no one else. If you compare yourself to others you lose the essence of why one is riding in the first place. My only goal in riding is the number of miles I accumulate in a year (3000+). No Strava. No Personal "Best Awards". Just the "Ride"! Beside being in good shape, I can eat all the pizza I care to devour. I use to be a bike guide (Mendocino Bike Sprites) until the JDSF threatened us with citations. The beauty of guiding was meeting so many great folks who had similar desires: to experience new trails without the fear of getting lost. To be able to commune with each other in a friendly, unthreatened manner leaving any macho at the door. Macho rides alone!

    I love what aging has taught me: It is the opportunity to be gentler, more aware, and more forgiving. With each ride comes harmony and endorphins and lots of smiling. I hope to carry this forward through the years ahead. What comes will be a great mystery, but also the opportunity to enjoy all there is on my Ripley "Believe of not"!. Then, it's time for another pint of IPA and a second slice of life!

    -8.jpg

  33. #33
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    Yea sound the same , upper back , neck , shoulders, even the headaches ,from years of physical labor and some bad genetics I guess. I take an injection of Enbrel every couple of weeks, has changed my life. Rotator cuff surgery 2 weeks ago with no success, just have to live with not being able to lift my arm above my head. I will turn 64 in May, been riding road bikes all my life. Raced biathalons and triathlons for a few years, so I put in a lot of miles. Rode dirt bikes (motorcycles ) in my teens and 20s. Took up mountain bikes 4 years ago because I heard so much about how great it was in Nor Cal, absolutely true. I find mountain biking very similar to dirt bikes. I ride with caution but I'm not giving up yet.

  34. #34
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    I am seeing the worth in e-bikes as the joints start to get a little dodgy when getting older. E-bikes will just extend the riding career. When given a choice between sitting on the couch or riding an e-bike, there is no question. The e-bike.

  35. #35
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    I need these glasses. After having great vision all my life, my reading vision went to sh--t within a two year period. Now I have to carry glasses everywhere. Fortunately, I don't need them when I ride...
    Live to Ride, Ride to Live

  36. #36
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    48, grew up right outside Anadel, rode every bike I have ever owned up there. BMX, 10spd even took my moms 3 speed step through up there a bunch of time. Off the bike in my mid 20's to mid 30's and played tons of golf. Ruined my back and was on pain pills for a long time. Took my bike down the road to get my mail one day, felt good, rode in to town, felt great. Off the norcs and riding and snow boarding ever since. At 40, crashed a quad up in Tahoe National Forest. I was paralyzed for about 45min. Herniated my C4-C5. All my muscle memory was erased, it was like I had never ridden a bike or a snowboard my entire life. Took a year or so before I felt comfortable riding off road.

    Now I have to hit something about 10 times before I am comfortable. I come to obstacles and think of 5 ways to crash instead of how to succeed. Tried to board a few times and it was really depressing.

    I still ride at least 2x/week and it keeps me normal. I do get upset at myself frequently but it is way better than the alternative.
    I'm sick of all the Irish stereotypes, as soon as I finish this beer I"m punching someone

  37. #37
    Unstoppable
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    Will be 59 in July. Aging affect: I can afford better bikes now. I have more time to ride now (not coaching daughters basketball and soccer teams, not going to swim meets). Moved from foothills into Sacramento which is good and bad. Good: house needs less upkeep which equates to more riding. Bad: not much dirt to ride in and no hills. Other than that, health is still okay and I enjoy riding now as much as I ever have. Most rides are in Granite Bay, Browns Ravine, Salmon Falls (Darrington), Auburn (Divide, Connector, Hidden Falls). Hope to be at Sea Otter in April just to ride the course and enjoy the races as a spectator. Will do Wente 8 hour in June. Hope to get to China City and Santa Cruz this summer. I've been riding since about early 90's, but did not upgrade to big wheels (29er's) until 2016. Splitting riding time on FS-I Carbon 2 and Tallboy 3 and some CX/gravel rides when trails are too wet.
    "The most important thing about this instrument is the way the air smells when it comes out of these holes" ~Frank Zappa

  38. #38
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    yea..i'm 50. i dont think i'm old..but i do recall when i was 30, i thought 50 was old.

    i do love how i didnt have to buy my bike on credit. and i also love how in my wisdom i dont feel the need to immediately buy a new bike or modify mine. i am moving back to focusing on the trip and not the tools for the trip. kinda like how i approached my bike as a kid. it was just all an adventure.

    no ego either. well, i dont let it dominate me like i did as a kid.
    Santa Cruz 5010 C
    Surly Crosscheck.

  39. #39
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    You know that people messaging on here are old because they put their actual age down, giving hackers one less attribute to guess. Mid-40s and started late, but seeing the progression on trails and jump parks is great (although not growing up on bikes made me realize my jumping technique was full of bad technique). But I'm definitely the fastest I've been, so that's a cool feeling. However, coming off a broken leg last year, the dh bike hasn't seen dirt since. Oddly at the time of injury I said 'never again'...but as time goes on...

  40. #40
    ol'guy who says hi &waves
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    65, and would rather ride about than write about.
    .

    I may not have the best of everything, but I have the best everything that matters.

  41. #41
    Air Pirate
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    It's not the age, it's the mileage.....













    Bonus points if you can say who that is quoted from....
    "You're messing with my zen thing, man!"

  42. #42
    190lbs of climber
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    You guys are going to laugh, but I feel like I can throw in my two cents since I've been on here since 2004. Aging happens from 15 to almost 30, also...

    I've ridden a LOT since I met FC at his 40th bday ride at UCSC. For a solid eight years, all I really did was bike, no real cross training, and at around 26 it started catching up with me in the form of increasingly frequent episodes of severe upper and lower back pain. Every major joint and muscular injury I've sustained since 18yo is still with me in some small way: a creaky wrist, weakened shoulders, a calcified broken finger that aches in the cold, etc.

    This past November, after a bad four-day episode where my back was so locked up that I couldn't walk, I vowed to change things. I finally listened to my wife and started going to pilates with her, put on a few pounds of upper body muscle, and feel better already. It's also helping build stability muscles in my hips and core that I didn't even know I was lacking! I'm a little slower in hill climbs due to the extra weight, but it sure beats spending a few wretched days on the couch every month or two.

    All you guys and gals charging into your sixties and seventies have motivated me to put in the time now to strengthen more than just the handful of muscles primarily used for pedaling.

    In addition to listing aches and pains, please share what you've done to remain an active rider. I and the other young(er-than-me) guns can hopefully pick up a thing or two. Ride on!
    ye' old trailblog: www.most-excellent-adventures.com THE BAY AREA... WHERE IF IT'S FUN, IT'S ILLEGAL

  43. #43
    Yeti SB95c
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    @Menso, you do have courage. You followed your wife's advice. :-)

    Since I do software development until I die and I work at home I don't get much exercise except for MTB and workouts with weights and ski machine at home. I've lost interest in the trails around Silicon Valley, not technical and varied enough, so I'm spending 3 months in Utah, Colorado, and a little in other western states at times. (Leave this Thursday for a month.) Since I can work anywhere this kind of schedule works out.

    For me the big issue is if I'm excited about riding. If so I'll ride every day. Therefore the trips. Those trails and views kick ass!! Enthusiasm and excitement really help with motivation. I hope to be riding into my 80's, slowly and carefully. I currently meet many riders in their 70's and hear rumors of those in their 80's occasionally.

    For any of you in Santa Clara our senior center has a free well equipped gym and you can get in starting at age 50. I hate spending time driving half a mile...
    MTB blog for US West trails: http://jimprestonmtb.com. Trail analysis videos, bike and component reviews, other stuff.

  44. #44
    NedwannaB
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    Quote Originally Posted by fred-da-trog View Post
    65, and would rather ride about than write about.
    Still young at heart Fred. Hope to catch back up to you on a ride someday young man!😎👍
    Wait whuuut, who did he tell you that!?!?....

  45. #45
    YOUREGO ISNOT YOURAMIGO
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    Your only as old as the women you feel up.

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    I'm 49 but that is the new 39 so it's all good. Not really. I've been doing sports since pee wee soccer and haven't stopped yet. Been mountain biking since 1988, rode motocross hard for 6 years, kitesurfed hard for 8 years and I've been pretty lucky that other than a back injury when I was 34, I haven't been injured that bad over the years. But to maintain the active lifestyle takes more work now. I go to the gym 2 days a week at least to keep my core strong and work on my shoulders which have taken a beating. So keep the body strong and do the work and enjoy the fruits, riding, oh and beer!

  47. #47
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    2018 is my 31st year riding mountain bikes (BMX and Moto prior to that). Started racing XC in '94, and I will ride my 21st or 22nd (can't remember) Sea Otter next month as a 57 year old Cat 2 Clydesdale. Never very competitive, do it for fun, and have finished every race. In '92, a friend invited me to ride with her in Utah at Sundance, and we've now been married for 23 years. Our 3 kids were dragged to races all over NoCal since birth, and not one of them ever got into mountain biking. I experienced a 1-month solo mountain biking adventure in the jungles of Northern Thailand in '91, several festivals in Moab, Fruita, and Sedona with my wife over the years. I raced Xterra Triathlons for a couple years. In 2015, I raced (more like rode) the BC Bike Race (I'll never do that again). I cracked my clavicle on Day 1 in Cumberland hitting a tree.
    I remember meeting Greg Williams and Henry O'Donnell (must have been 10 years old) at Coyote Adventures on my first trip to Downieville around '95. It was so cool to see Henry many years latter master the Downieville DH. I bought a Santa Cruz Blur frame from Menso when he was still in high school. It's been awesome to see him turn pro and compete over the years. At 210-220 lbs and 6'4", my body has held up pretty well over the years. I broke my little finger going OTB on Butcher many years ago, concussed once, but have cracked my helmet 3 times. Last year I went OTB, onto my head and chipped 10, yes 10 teeth, and some nerve damage in my chest. For the past two years, I've done 3 HIIT classes per week at the gym as a hopeful remedy to back issues I started having a few years ago. It's really helped my core strength, and I've not had any back issues since. The past year or so, I've determined that my body simply doesn't heal after a fall like it used to. For years I've thought I could race and ride into my early 70s, but now I'm going to take it day by day, year by year. While I lurk more than I post, MTBR and the NoCal forum has been a real treasure over the past couple decades. Thank you all, and I wish you all the health you need to keep it going!
    Every day above ground is a great day!

  48. #48
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    I am only 64. I'll let you know when I become an old fart. I am not even grown up yet.



    That is not completely true. I skipped puberty and went straight into adultery.
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  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Menso View Post
    In addition to listing aches and pains, please share what you've done to remain an active rider. I and the other young(er-than-me) guns can hopefully pick up a thing or two. Ride on!
    Live below your means. What I see happen to people, and especially type-A athletic over-achiever types, is they have early success and they begin to adjust their lifestyle upwards. This is only natural, if you make money you want to enjoy it. Then, they become dissatisfied with their career and want to make a change, this happens to everyone. But, they can't because of their obligations. That's when the stress starts and the riding stops, usually in the mid 30s. What people don't realize in their 20s/30s, life will change, your perspective will change, and the most valuable asset is time, not material obligations.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by bradmtb View Post
    2018 is my 31st year riding mountain bikes (BMX and Moto prior to that). Started racing XC in '94, and I will ride my 21st or 22nd (can't remember) Sea Otter next month as a 57 year old Cat 2 Clydesdale. Never very competitive, do it for fun, and have finished every race. In '92, a friend invited me to ride with her in Utah at Sundance, and we've now been married for 23 years. Our 3 kids were dragged to races all over NoCal since birth, and not one of them ever got into mountain biking. I experienced a 1-month solo mountain biking adventure in the jungles of Northern Thailand in '91, several festivals in Moab, Fruita, and Sedona with my wife over the years. I raced Xterra Triathlons for a couple years. In 2015, I raced (more like rode) the BC Bike Race (I'll never do that again). I cracked my clavicle on Day 1 in Cumberland hitting a tree.
    I remember meeting Greg Williams and Henry O'Donnell (must have been 10 years old) at Coyote Adventures on my first trip to Downieville around '95. It was so cool to see Henry many years latter master the Downieville DH. I bought a Santa Cruz Blur frame from Menso when he was still in high school. It's been awesome to see him turn pro and compete over the years. At 210-220 lbs and 6'4", my body has held up pretty well over the years. I broke my little finger going OTB on Butcher many years ago, concussed once, but have cracked my helmet 3 times. Last year I went OTB, onto my head and chipped 10, yes 10 teeth, and some nerve damage in my chest. For the past two years, I've done 3 HIIT classes per week at the gym as a hopeful remedy to back issues I started having a few years ago. It's really helped my core strength, and I've not had any back issues since. The past year or so, I've determined that my body simply doesn't heal after a fall like it used to. For years I've thought I could race and ride into my early 70s, but now I'm going to take it day by day, year by year. While I lurk more than I post, MTBR and the NoCal forum has been a real treasure over the past couple decades. Thank you all, and I wish you all the health you need to keep it going!
    This is a nice share. Thank you.
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  51. #51
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    57 retired and ride 6 days a week if I'm not skiing. Slower than I used to be and plenty of aches and pains but feel my riding downhill is still progressing party cause the new bikes these days are amazing! More important is to keep moving as I get older, fitness drops off really quickly without getting out. I do shorter rides for the most part these days but still knock out the occasional Epic, Lots of trail variety keeps things interesting.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by kuuk View Post
    I'm 49 but that is the new 39 so it's all good. Not really. I've been doing sports since pee wee soccer and haven't stopped yet. Been mountain biking since 1988, rode motocross hard for 6 years, kitesurfed hard for 8 years and I've been pretty lucky that other than a back injury when I was 34, I haven't been injured that bad over the years. But to maintain the active lifestyle takes more work now. I go to the gym 2 days a week at least to keep my core strong and work on my shoulders which have taken a beating. So keep the body strong and do the work and enjoy the fruits, riding, oh and beer!
    Kuuk is a good friend and is legit. 5 years ago, he said he would never soar on the bike again after doing Carlmont doubles many years ago.

    Now he is jumping like a BOSSSSSS! Riding so well too.
    IPA will save America

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Menso View Post
    You guys are going to laugh, but I feel like I can throw in my two cents since I've been on here since 2004. Aging happens from 15 to almost 30, also...

    I've ridden a LOT since I met FC at his 40th bday ride at UCSC. For a solid eight years, all I really did was bike, no real cross training, and at around 26 it started catching up with me in the form of increasingly frequent episodes of severe upper and lower back pain. Every major joint and muscular injury I've sustained since 18yo is still with me in some small way: a creaky wrist, weakened shoulders, a calcified broken finger that aches in the cold, etc.

    This past November, after a bad four-day episode where my back was so locked up that I couldn't walk, I vowed to change things. I finally listened to my wife and started going to pilates with her, put on a few pounds of upper body muscle, and feel better already. It's also helping build stability muscles in my hips and core that I didn't even know I was lacking! I'm a little slower in hill climbs due to the extra weight, but it sure beats spending a few wretched days on the couch every month or two.

    All you guys and gals charging into your sixties and seventies have motivated me to put in the time now to strengthen more than just the handful of muscles primarily used for pedaling.

    In addition to listing aches and pains, please share what you've done to remain an active rider. I and the other young(er-than-me) guns can hopefully pick up a thing or two. Ride on!
    Ha, ha... good impostor post.

    Menso is wise and eloquent well beyond his years. And he's been here on this board longer than most.

    And he LOVESSSSSSSS norcal.
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  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Menso View Post

    This past November, after a bad four-day episode where my back was so locked up that I couldn't walk, I vowed to change things. I finally listened to my wife and started going to pilates with her, put on a few pounds of upper body muscle, and feel better already.

    Stretching does help a lot especially the older you get. Helps for aches and pains, but also for joint pain as it can take stress off joints. Also, I rarely have back pain after implementing daily stretching of hamstrings, calves, and back. If I slack off stretching, my body feels it.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    Live below your means. What I see happen to people, and especially type-A athletic over-achiever types, is they have early success and they begin to adjust their lifestyle upwards. This is only natural, if you make money you want to enjoy it. Then, they become dissatisfied with their career and want to make a change, this happens to everyone. But, they can't because of their obligations. That's when the stress starts and the riding stops, usually in the mid 30s. What people don't realize in their 20s/30s, life will change, your perspective will change, and the most valuable asset is time, not material obligations.
    I needed this as I am struggling with retiring early (guilt about not working when I'm still able). My wife said "do it, own a crappier bike and less new gear but use it more ".

  56. #56
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    50 here but feeling much healthier than when i wast at 30. i gave up smoking and been sober for almost two years. been riding strictly mtb. started with a motiv mountain bike bought from costco and had beaten the hell out of it riding skeggs in the early 90ís
    aside from cycling, iím also an OCR addict

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by TahoeBC View Post
    57 retired and ride 6 days a week if I'm not skiing. Slower than I used to be and plenty of aches and pains but feel my riding downhill is still progressing party cause the new bikes these days are amazing! More important is to keep moving as I get older, fitness drops off really quickly without getting out. I do shorter rides for the most part these days but still knock out the occasional Epic, Lots of trail variety keeps things interesting.
    I rode SLT with you last Summer...you seem to be in fine shape

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by dave54 View Post
    I am only 64. I'll let you know when I become an old fart. I am not even grown up yet.



    That is not completely true. I skipped puberty and went straight into adultery.
    Finally, someone I can relate to....

    If you haven't grown up by age 50, you don't have to.
    .

    I may not have the best of everything, but I have the best everything that matters.

  59. #59
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    I consider Moab to be the fountain of youth. Lots of older folks from around the world riding there and most are in better shape than I am. Encountering 70 year olds that look 55 is common. I'm spending a couple months a year riding there now. Only a 15 hour drive from San Jose :-)

    I don't have anything to do with my brother who is 7 years younger than me so I don't know what he looks like now. He's a golfer. Anyway, I hang out at a restaurant bar in Los Gatos, Steamers, and some of the older guys there thought I'm the younger brother. They said I look younger.

    That would make me look 14 years or so younger than 66. Again, Moab. Maybe its the beer or maybe a lot of MTB. It can't be the extra sun.
    MTB blog for US West trails: http://jimprestonmtb.com. Trail analysis videos, bike and component reviews, other stuff.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Menso View Post
    This past November, after a bad four-day episode where my back was so locked up that I couldn't walk, I vowed to change things. I finally listened to my wife and started going to pilates with her, put on a few pounds of upper body muscle, and feel better already. It's also helping build stability muscles in my hips and core that I didn't even know I was lacking! I'm a little slower in hill climbs due to the extra weight, but it sure beats spending a few wretched days on the couch every month or two.
    I am young too, but this is sage advice at any age. Flexibility, core strength, and upper body strength are key to injury prevention. My typical routine for last two years is to do spin class 2x a week, yoga 2x a week, Monday off, ride Saturday/Sunday. During the summer I'll often skip spin and ride instead, though I lose some fitness as a result (the fitness is for riding anyway!).

    I used to think spin was the can't-skip workout, since why do I work out all if not to ride? But it's actually yoga (you get very similar benefits from pilates, pick whichever you prefer). Both from a mental health and physical perspective, yoga has done wonders for my life and my riding. Doubling down on it (and really focusing on proper form) has virtually eliminated some of the common issues I had -- back/shoulder pain from riding, knee pain. It's also helped my riding quite a bit -- I have noticed I am much faster on descents. That could just be more practice, but it does seem sensible that more core strength and flexibility would help you be loose on the bike and ride smooth downhill.

    In addition to listing aches and pains, please share what you've done to remain an active rider. I and the other young(er-than-me) guns can hopefully pick up a thing or two. Ride on!
    Yes! This thread is full of golden advice, really appreciate the sharing.

  61. #61
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    69, almost 70. Still have my first mtb - a mountain trek from the early 90's. Still ride, ski, hike, and paddle. But, not so far. I push up hill a lot more but I can still push the bike up the hill pretty quick. I'm a lot more conservative about what I ride and what I walk because I don't want anymore damage to my body than I already have.

    But, I generally ride alone these days. I'm slow and most people as slow as me aren't riding anymore. I ride into the wilderness on much less used trails and old vanishing roads because I've always skied, hiked, paddled, and biked as much as possible in remote places. I can ride when I want to because I'm retired and I have a 4 wheel poptop camper and I can go on weekdays.

    Pretty much the only thing about getting older that is any good, other than perhaps some wisdom, is retirement - the best job ever.
    My mantra: Hike, Bike, Paddle, Ski

  62. #62
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    I'm 63 this year, and fortunately still feeling better than ever. When younger, I thought I'd be using a walker by now. So I find it odd to not yet be feeling old age.

    My speed mostly increased as I got older, partly from more riding and also from loosing weight and better bikes. It helped that I wasn't fast to begin with. My heart rate isn't nearly as high but I can still put out a lot of power at the lower HR. I was too fat and developed diabetes 3 years ago, which oddly was the best thing for me as it was a wake up call. I got a better bike and starting riding over an hour every day. Lost weight, got better fitness, and reversed my diabetes. I still ride every day for at least an hour. With the cold and snow in CT where I spend half my time consulting, I bought a nice NordicTrack Grand Tour, where I can virtually mountain bike around the world whenever the weather's too bad to ride the local wild woods.

    I had some bike injuries over the years: a bad spinal compression that hurt like hell for 3 months, a concussion and torn rotator cuff that took a year to heal. And from work I got a bad stiff neck and shoulders from too much time at the computer. Each time, I thought this was it, now I'm old! But interestingly, all these injuries went away with physical therapy and time. I'm now completely pain free and injury free, as much as when I was 18 years old.

    I've now come to realize that old age is not a major detriment, just a slow decline in one's baseline. Factors like training and weight matter a lot more. Someday my health might get hit by something big. That can come at any age, but more likely as you get older. So I count my blessings and still enjoy riding for the fun of being outdoors and challenge of the trails.
    It's not slow, it's doing more MTB time.

  63. #63
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    ^^^Thatís great to hear that youíve been able to deal with diabetes...Iím pre-diabetic, and have it under control at the moment.

  64. #64
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    Turning 46 this year and really fell back in love with trail riding late last year. I started mountain biking in the 8th grade and have been riding pretty much ever since. When I entered my 20's & 30's I really shifted my focus to dirt jumping while still trail riding here and there. I felt it had a better bang for your buck since I never liked climbing. When my kids were born I found myself racing BMX as my boys loved it and it was a great way to share our love for 2 wheels. After 6 years of racing my boys are now focused on DH & moved away from the same old BMX races. This was a big moment for me but the two other big changes were I found Strava (I love racing against the clock on the DH) and I discovered UC. I used to drive to SC to hit multiple jump spots and now I find I'm driving to hit laps on UC while sometimes hitting Harvey since those jumps are easy on my LT. The thing that keeps me going is getting PR's on my DH & climbing. I know I'm not as fast as I was but it's cool to be still relevant and not that far off the pace plus I'll still send it - had a great session at Carlmont. Still have a lot of good years ahead!

  65. #65
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    You've looked worse

    Quote Originally Posted by Menso View Post
    In addition to listing aches and pains, please share what you've done to remain an active rider. I and the other young(er-than-me) guns can hopefully pick up a thing or two. Ride on!
    Drama Queen. You've looked worse: Face down in the grass, post Twelve Hours of Weaverville 2007, and I quote, "I'm so dead"


    I'm 60 now. YIKES! Haven't had the time or interest to do as many big rides or races as in years past. I still get ten to twelve hours of saddle time a week in, riding something, somewhere. I'm toying with the idea of doing another endurance race or two [my last Cascade Cream Puff hundred miler was 2012 -22nd OA at age 56], probably a 50 miler or gravel grinder.

    Aside from a touch of arthritis in my hands from swinging a hammer for forty years, [which acupuncture has relieved], I've been fortunate, I'm still framing houses, and I've got no real chronic aches, pains, or physical deficits to speak of. Core exercises three to four times a week, staying away from too much alcohol, soft drinks, NSAID's, and extra sugar have kept my weight down. Everybody is different, pay attention to what works for "you" as an individual.

    Advice? Ride for fun, when you feel like it. Spend as much time as possible daily on your feet - evolution built us that way. And find something that makes you laugh or smile daily. The rest is just genetics and happenstance.
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  66. #66
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    I needz dis. I can't read anything with that microfont size.
    Don't harsh my mello

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by wg View Post
    I needz dis. I can't read anything with that microfont size.
    Any thread that references old farts should use the appropriate font size!

  68. #68
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    I'm somewhat younger than some of you here(53) but my lifestyle is likely a bit different as well. I've been a contractor my whole life and that has certainly begun to catch up to me. I raced BMX professionally in the early 80's and was nearly always on two wheels from the age of 4 or so(father was a professional motorcycle racer). I broke both my legs in a motorcycle accident when I was 21 and was told I might have to have my right leg amputated and that I'd never ride a bike again. I proved those suckers wrong!

    I took a solid 5 years off and rediscovered my joy of cycling in my mid 20's. I've done just about everything I wanted to do on two wheels outside of riding across the US and Tour Divide. Lots of racing along the way and lots of crashing have left me a bit beat up. My next shoulder surgery will be my 7th and both knee's have had some work done to them.

    I don't ride as dangerously as I used to, though I pride myself on being able to ride just about everything out there that's reasonably safe. I'm off to Moab next month and I'll be riding all the pro-line stuff in addition to doing the White Rim in a day, so I consider myself a general all arounder and I hope to be able to continue that for at least a few more years. I can still bang out back to back to back 100 mile bikepacking trips, it just hurts a lot more....oh to be 35 again....

    I was diagnosed as diabetic about 10 years ago as a 140 pound 24 hour racer, so bad genetics were my undoing, not my lifestyle. I've adjusted nearly everything in my life to be drug free and now just consider myself to be pre-diabetic, though my A1C disagrees sometimes. Eating relatively healthy and being in constant motion for work and play can be both a positive and a negative. I don't go to a gym, but my body also doesn't get a whole lot of recovery time, something we need much more of as we get older.

    I am really looking forward to getting older. My perspective on time and energy is much different than it has been at any point in my life. Riding has taken on a different purpose for me as I've gotten older. It has at times been an escape from life and its trappings which is not always healthy, especially if moderation is not in the equation. It now serves as calming and purposeful aspect of my life, something I bet a fair amount of us are hoping/looking to find.

  69. #69
    jms
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean Allan View Post
    I am really looking forward to getting older.
    I'm looking forward to you getting older too! Maybe I'll be able to keep up for a minute or two longer.......... wait, crap, okay that's not going to work
    My Favorite Peeps:

  70. #70
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    These posts are very motivating to read and the common theme seems to be to never stop and keep charging as best you can. Years ago I was snowboarding at Kirkwood and my buddy and I met a 77 year old skier from Austria that did two big hikes with us to get some powder. I told him how impressed I was at his fitness and he said the key is just never stop, workout everyday.

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by kuuk View Post
    ... he said the key is just never stop, workout everyday.

    What he said!!!

    64 in July. 2-wheeled speed & endorphin junkie since 6yo. Still have 1st Mtb ('96 Spec Hard Rock Sport), but must have good suspension now for back, wrists, knees, & hands.

    As testosterone dropped (50-60yo for me), natural-for-me muscle tone subsided. Full-body workouts become required to keep fitness. More aging problems than you wanna hear about, but keeping ACTIVE helps me deal better with all of 'em. :-)

    Beyond 60, any stop in being active is rewarded with atrophy. "Use it or lose it" becomes true!

    Stop chasing more money. The stress is probably killing you too. Ride or exercise EVERY day!


    Catfish ...

  72. #72
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    47, and looking forward to that free Santa Clara senior center in 3 yrs...

    Enjoyed road riding since I was a kid.
    Discovered mtn biking in '96 and have been splitting time between road and mountain ever since. Mtn biking is preferred but getting in a quick ride is easier when you dont live next to a trail. Riding was an occasional thing when my kids were young, but picked up once kids started school, and the elementary school dads started meeting every Saturday at 6:30am for road rides. Dads ride early because there's usually something going on at 9-10am, but on open days we squeeze in a mtn bike ride. That was 9 years ago, and we're still riding together. Last summer we did a bunch of bike packing practice rides going up and down hills around Montebello, and ended the summer doing the Durango to Moab Hut to Hut ride.
    Twice a week HIIT type classes, twice a week yoga, a run or two per week are part of the lifestyle now if I want to keep being active. Back pain and hip stiffnees/soreness have been constant for a long time. A bit of compressed spine two years ago was causing my legs to go numb alot. So the chiropractor is in the mix, as well as extra stretching morning and evening.
    Still riding my 2003 Sycip.... I might get something new one day...

  73. #73
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    Yeah, 72 y.o. and lifetime cyclist.

    Now I go on these lecture tours. When you write a book about bicycles you better be ready to ride one. Everybody else on the ride is 40 years younger and races bicycles.

    It's becoming a problem.

  74. #74
    Life's a Garden, dig it!
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    Never stop never stopping, CK!
    Why Johnny Ringo, you look like someone just walked over your grave.

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by dchester View Post
    Ha! I always thought it had to do with where you live/ride - which would be a cool name too.
    Friend of mine was in a band named "North of 50" was in reference to most of the band members age as well as their location in the Coloma River Valley area which happens to be North of Hwy50.

  76. #76
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    North of 50 has a better ring to it than east of 880.

    Sent from my LG-H872 using Tapatalk
    Faster is not always better, but it's always more fun

  77. #77
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    I think what im most impressed with is that there are over 50 yr olds in an online chat forum holding it together. No acronyms. Well done guys lol. Whoops.

  78. #78
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    48yo started riding around 40yo. Started doing crossfit at 44 and in better shape than in my 20s

    Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk

  79. #79
    SOG
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    Quote Originally Posted by yeti575inCA View Post
    48yo started riding around 40yo. Started doing crossfit at 44 and in better shape than in my 20s

    Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk
    Love to see this and congrats. I've dropped 30lbs over the last 6 months and feel so much better and riding has become more fun with less pain.

  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by SOG View Post
    Love to see this and congrats. I've dropped 30lbs over the last 6 months and feel so much better and riding has become more fun with less pain.
    Congrats !

    Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk

  81. #81
    fc
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    popped up in my FB today. Riding keeps us young. Kids remind us of passing time

    couple years ago
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    now'ish, the kid is harder to carry
    -img_0821.jpg
    IPA will save America

  82. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    popped up in my FB today. Riding keeps us young. Kids remind us of passing time

    couple years ago
    Name:  DSCN0012.jpg
Views: 959
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    now'ish, the kid is harder to carry
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Is that Vanilla Ice?

  83. #83
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    If you need a great GPS watch that you can actually read in the sun without reading glasses, the Garmin Fenix 5x is killer. Basically a fully functioning GPS on your wrist.


    -img_7691.jpg

    -img_7689.jpg

    -img_7690.jpg

  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    If you need a great GPS watch that you can actually read in the sun without reading glasses, the Garmin Fenix 5x is killer. Basically a fully functioning GPS on your wrist.


    Click image for larger version. 

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    Click image for larger version. 

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    Where did you get the watch...from Flavor Flav? That thing is massive

  85. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by griz View Post
    Where did you get the watch...from Flavor Flav? That thing is massive
    Yeaaaaaahhhh Boyeeeeeeee.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jmpreston View Post
    ... doing MTB since 1957. It helps to grow up in the mountains riding bikes.
    I'd like to hear more about MTB in the 1950s and '60s. I don't think I've read much about MTB before the '80s or maybe '70s.

    You all have inspired me to look forward to more decades of riding than I have so far experienced, thanks. Plus, there are 80s rap references so the babies in the thread like me can feel included 

  88. #88
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    [QUOTE=5k bike 50cent legs;13595369]If you need a great GPS watch that you can actually read in the sun without reading glasses, the Garmin Fenix 5x is killer. Basically a fully functioning GPS on your wrist.

    SOO Flow ride yesterday as per the watch?? How was it?

  89. #89
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    [QUOTE=dp400;13596689]
    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    If you need a great GPS watch that you can actually read in the sun without reading glasses, the Garmin Fenix 5x is killer. Basically a fully functioning GPS on your wrist.

    SOO Flow ride yesterday as per the watch?? How was it?
    No, I just downloaded the map! Going to hit it Wednesday and/or Thursday. Will update conditions.

  90. #90
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    [QUOTE=5k bike 50cent legs;13596714]
    Quote Originally Posted by dp400 View Post

    No, I just downloaded the map! Going to hit it Wednesday and/or Thursday. Will update conditions.

    OK thanks. Figured it would be a slip n slide....

  91. #91
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    Like fc, i was slow and am still slow...but I am the fastest I've ever been, now at 52. Difference is recovery time from just a good hammer fest and definitely from injuries.

    I find it funny to see young people trying to interact in forums, dude get with it.."forums" are ancient.....like us.

  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmpreston View Post
    ... doing MTB since 1957. It helps to grow up in the mountains riding bikes.
    You should write a book about that.

  93. #93
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    I'm only 42 or 43, I forget. But cancer has put me into an older age class. I basically lost my 30s so I didn't get to experience the slower transition from superman 20s to more relaxed 40s. Hence, my theme song.


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    I've ridden with Roo Harris. He is a force of nature. He was our guide, and even the young warriors couldn't stay on his heels. Roo is also one of the best people you will ever meet. He loves the bike life, and enjoys giving tours of his home turf. He's one of the few riders I have been on the trail with that's even older than me! (wish I could catch him)
    Stay swift Roo!

    I'm over 60 now, and I'll say this: Geezers! Treat yourself to a new steed. I scored a magnificent 29er with big fat tires last year. It rolls over ANYTHING. I no longer impress anyone with my climbing speed, but the new steed crushes the descents. The plus tires and relaxed geometry keep my old bones from gravity fails. The big wheels also make mince meat of long rides, as it truly takes less energy to keep 'em rolling. I ride some trails better now than I did in my 30's. So here's to over thirty years of up & down!
    I like to bike.

  95. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by yeti575inCA View Post
    48yo started riding around 40yo. Started doing crossfit at 44 and in better shape than in my 20s

    Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk
    Well done, brother! I like to poke fun at Cross Fit, but I am not poking fun at you (at least not to your face).
    The broken are the more evolved. Rejoice.

  96. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtvert View Post
    Well done, brother! I like to poke fun at Cross Fit, but I am not poking fun at you (at least not to your face).
    Lol thanks..

    Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk

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    I am 'young' for this thread, but interesting story - prediabetic 2.5 yrs ago, 6.6 A1C, 260lbs, 6'0", model sedentary lifestyle at 51.

    Stopped eating junk, got a mountain bike, daily rides. Lost 90lbs in 4 months (would be 3 but there was thanksgiving and christmas in between - couldn't starve through them).

    A1C consistently 4.7 now, glucose 82 (from 200s), no medication. Every drug ad (aren't there too many?) says "bullshenda works best with diet and exercise" - guess what? Diet and exercise alone work just fine in most cases.

    Mountain biking for me is the PERFECT exercise - the type you want to do more, not less. Instead of that gym feeling of punishment or a prison sentence, the kid like feeling of liberty, plain and simple happiness. I went to a gym once in my life, I have preferred instead to ride at 10F, snowstorm, rain, whatever. Once you figure how to keep your toes from frostbite, all is bliss.

    I am 54 now, while writing this, but can't wait to be 7 again tomorrow on the trails.

  98. #98
    fc
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    Quote Originally Posted by zecamara View Post
    I am 'young' for this thread, but interesting story - prediabetic 2.5 yrs ago, 6.6 A1C, 260lbs, 6'0", model sedentary lifestyle at 51.

    Stopped eating junk, got a mountain bike, daily rides. Lost 90lbs in 4 months (would be 3 but there was thanksgiving and christmas in between - couldn't starve through them).

    A1C consistently 4.7 now, glucose 82 (from 200s), no medication. Every drug ad (aren't there too many?) says "bullshenda works best with diet and exercise" - guess what? Diet and exercise alone work just fine in most cases.

    Mountain biking for me is the PERFECT exercise - the type you want to do more, not less. Instead of that gym feeling of punishment or a prison sentence, the kid like feeling of liberty, plain and simple happiness. I went to a gym once in my life, I have preferred instead to ride at 10F, snowstorm, rain, whatever. Once you figure how to keep your toes from frostbite, all is bliss.

    I am 54 now, while writing this, but can't wait to be 7 again tomorrow on the trails.
    I can't wait to be seven again.
    IPA will save America

  99. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by zecamara View Post
    Mountain biking for me is the PERFECT exercise - the type you want to do more, not less. Instead of that gym feeling of punishment or a prison sentence, the kid like feeling of liberty, plain and simple happiness. I went to a gym once in my life, I have preferred instead to ride at 10F, snowstorm, rain, whatever. Once you figure how to keep your toes from frostbite, all is bliss.
    Isn't it cool how riding a bike adds years to your life and life to your years? Congratulations on taking your life back.
    My Favorite Peeps:

  100. #100
    fc
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    Quote Originally Posted by jms View Post
    Isn't it cool how riding a bike adds years to your life and life to your years? Congratulations on taking your life back.
    "adds years to your life and life to your years"


    Maaaan, you guys have some keepers here!!
    IPA will save America

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