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  1. #1
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    First Aid Kit Essentials

    Unfortunately had to use this on a buddy today. Great for cleaning out wounds, road rash, etc. What do you carry in your kit?

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    ouch..had a nurse use something similar recently.

    she was turbo jetting out rocks and grit. it felt AWESOME (sarcasm here). it was a squeeze bottle. and it flooded the room with bloody water. good times!!

    "clean up, ER room 6!" it looked like crime scene.

    i need to put a kit together. stat!
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    Yeah, hopefully they didn't need to get in there with the scrub brush to get the gravel and dirt out... that is an odd feeling, even with the local anesthetic. good times!

    I keep a kit in the car, and I've read a few threads here on kits, and was debating over riding with an H bandage, but I might just pack some gauze and duct tape: http://forums.mtbr.com/general-discu...l#post13739880

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    depends on how far off the beaten track I go. prefacing with the fact that I am an EMT and i carry a few extras to deal with nasty stuff. REI Hiker First aid kit (I like the bag}. tossed the manuals added some pain meds (for me) roll gauze, mini pads (sterile and they absorb blood) Sam Split, combat tourniquet, quick clot gauze, CPR Mask , tape, ABD Pads.
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  5. #5
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    These 3M SteriStrips are also a good addition to a first aid kit. Basically work like stitches for closing wounds. Used today on buddy after crash.

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    I actually have a snake bike kit from the days i used to ride arastradero alot

  8. #8
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    Vitamin B (Benadryl). Turns out I am becoming more sensitive to stings and bites.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boomchakabowwow View Post
    ouch..had a nurse use something similar recently.

    she was turbo jetting out rocks and grit. it felt AWESOME (sarcasm here). it was a squeeze bottle. and it flooded the room with bloody water. good times!!

    "clean up, ER room 6!" it looked like crime scene.

    i need to put a kit together. stat!
    When I went through wilderness first aid, it was reinforced many times that this is the most effective way to clean wounds, then bandage them. Don't use superglue and seal up the bacteria in there, hydrogen peroxide doesn't kill stuff, just good ole saline solution with slight hint of iodine and irrigation, irrigation, irrigation (to the point of being painful).

    Anyway, the class focused a lot of on triage and the fact that you aren't going to do a lot for someone in the wilderness except try to make them comfortable and recognize what kinds of injuries are critical and which ones are just "very uncomfortable". A few bandages can be decent, but after that, you are better off with more food, water, a filter!?, some duct tape, and other stuff that will help you survive WHEN you get injured.

    A guy broke his femur today at the bike park, had to be evacuated off the mountain, which first had the bike-patrol on ATV on scene, then they had to get him on a jeep, using some kind of inflatable stabilizing air-bag, then had to be transferred down the mountain, which took what seemed like at least 30 min, to an ambulance, and then to the hospital.

    Think if that happened in the backcountry away from all of this stuff...
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    ^^ This is probably my most important first aid piece: Garmin InReach Explorer. Satellite based texts, GPS, and location tracking.

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    I've found a small plastic syringe to be helpful for power washing dirt. Garmin also has a new inreach mini that's a little more pocketable:
    buzzes like a fridge

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    Quote Originally Posted by PerfectZero View Post
    I've found a small plastic syringe to be helpful for power washing dirt. Garmin also has a new inreach mini that's a little more pocketable:
    Can you type messages on the device or do you have to use a phone?

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    Donít forget to get your calstar insurance

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    Quote Originally Posted by EDRN911 View Post
    Donít forget to get your calstar insurance
    I'm going to do this tonight. What plan do you recommend for NorCal?

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    Quote Originally Posted by PerfectZero View Post
    I've found a small plastic syringe to be helpful for power washing dirt. Garmin also has a new inreach mini that's a little more pocketable:
    I have this one, it's a little bit different philosophy, you only use it when self-rescue is out of the question. It's 5 watts, vs. in-reach's 1.4 or SPOT's .4, it goes directly to the NOAA SarSAT, which goes directly to the Regional search and rescue Coordination Center (RCC). Works nearly everywhere in the world too, since 406mhz is the international standard, each device is registered, so they know who you are. No third parties, commercial services (the other two use iridium sat-phone satellites) and while it sends your GPS coords to the sat, it also has a 121.5 beacon to assist with terminal search-and-rescue. All that said, being able to track or send messages is also a nice function and a lot of people like to use the SPOTs in races, so choose accordingly.

    First Aid Kit Essentials-01d3bdfbff9e8a9721a6929cb27c9baef2a3e38f72.jpg
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    Everybody gets to exercise the hobby in the way the suits their desires, but good lord...humping massive FAKs and satellite locators out onto the trails seems like a lot of trouble to go to. We are fortunate that we don't have to make that effort. Locally, we have 30-40 miles of really excellent, well-designed single track and I don't think there's any point on the trail that's more than 10 miles from the local hospital with its ALS ambulance service. The trails themselves have multiple evacuation points and the ambulance service has equipment specific to recovering people on mountain bike trails. I've never had to avail myself of the service, but less fortunate folks are brought into the ED at least a couple of times a week in the summer with a variety of mountain bike injuries. I've never seen one yet that needed anything more than some 4x4's and a roll of gauze for that short trip.
    Last edited by Cuyuna; 08-26-2018 at 04:53 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cuyuna View Post
    Everybody gets to exercise the hobby in the way the suits their desires, but good lord...humping massive FAKs and satellite locators out onto the trails seems like a lot of trouble to go to. We are fortunate that we don't have to make that effort. Locally, we have 30-40 miles of really excellent, well-designed single track and I don't think there's any point on the trail that's more than 10 miles from the local hospital with its ALS ambulance service. The trails themselves have multiple evacuation points and the ambulance service has equipment specific to recovering people on mountain bike trails. I've never had to avail myself of the service, but less fortunate folks are brought into the ED at least a couple of times a week in the summer with a variety of mountain bike injuries. I've never seen one yet that needed anything more than some 4x4's and a roll of gauze for that short trip.
    You obviously don't ride anywhere that has a semblance of "backcountry" then. Sure, frontcountry needs are generally pretty light, but venture into real backcountry where it becomes a whole lot more difficult and time consuming to get out/get help if you get yourself hurt. Time is of the essence. More FAK supplies to hold down the fort and better comms for getting help faster. Further, the hurts have a tendency to get worse the bigger the terrain gets.

    Cause, you know, bigger rocks, taller cliffs, faster water, etc.

    Plus, less reliable cell reception. Where I ride, cell signal is good in town, but there are no trails in town. Go where the trails are, and reception takes a huge dump. Need to call for an ambulance because a MAML had a heart attack on the trail or because your buddy went big and ate $hit in that rock garden and flayed himself open (see rider down forum for an example)? Someone has to haul ass for quite awhile to get somewhere with a signal unless you have a PLB or satellite messenger. Could make a big difference for someone.

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  18. #18
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    ^^ This. Lots of lives could be saved if people carried a simple GPS with locator in the backcountry. These things are no bigger than a cell phone, and far more useful. Even frontside trails can be dangerous. Crash at Demo on an afterwork weekday ride and you could be spending the night there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    You obviously don't ride anywhere that has a semblance of "backcountry" then.
    Obviously . Which is why I said:

    We are fortunate that we don't have to make that effort. Locally, we have 30-40 miles of really excellent, well-designed single track and I don't think there's any point on the trail that's more than 10 miles from the local hospital with its ALS ambulance service.


    Cause, you know...not everyone lives and rides in the "backcountry".

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cuyuna View Post
    Obviously . Which is why I said:



    Cause, you know...not everyone lives and rides in the "backcountry".
    But, as you said, it's so much trouble to take extra steps to address higher levels of risk. SO MUCH TROUBLE to potentially save a life or just save someone an extra couple hours of pain before getting medical help.

    You know, thinking about a first aid kit and stocking it with helpful supplies. Or setting aside a little money so you can buy a satellite messenger/plb device. What trouble.

    So much trouble that I carry the same first aid kit on every ride. So much trouble to carry a little device the size of a cell phone. So much trouble to get wfa/wfr training.

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    My wife is a nurse and the best thing you can put on a wound is good old iodine. Itís been around for years and although it doesnít get marketed, itís the first thing applied at surgery and still effective against almost all bacteriaís.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    Can you type messages on the device or do you have to use a phone?
    i think you can theoretically type out messages on the device, but apparently it's rather agonizing. Pairing with a phone works well though and you can store a bunch of pre-typed messages/addresses.

    Honestly I think the best first aid "essential" is to take a wilderness first aid class.
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    Quote Originally Posted by PerfectZero View Post
    Honestly I think the best first aid "essential" is to take a wilderness first aid class.
    That is 100% correct. My wife is an ER doc. It's interesting to verify things I read with her.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    But, as you said, it's so much trouble to take extra steps to address higher levels of risk. SO MUCH TROUBLE to potentially save a life or just save someone an extra couple hours of pain before getting medical help.

    You know, thinking about a first aid kit and stocking it with helpful supplies. Or setting aside a little money so you can buy a satellite messenger/plb device. What trouble.

    So much trouble that I carry the same first aid kit on every ride. So much trouble to carry a little device the size of a cell phone. So much trouble to get wfa/wfr training.
    I'm in favor of being prepared to address the levels of risk one takes in their daily life. Personally, I have no desire whatsoever to ride a bicycle in the "backcountry" and prepare myself to do so safely. Juice is just not worth the squeeze to me. I couldn't possibly care less where you ride or how you prepare, but I'm glad you have a hobby that you enjoy.

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    where i ride, i get full service on my cell phone.

    however, i will put together a small kit. i use to have these tiny vials full of iodine. you break the vial and the juice will flow into a cotton swab stuck in the end. you can clean some pretty good sized wounds.

    now we switched to moist towelettes full of iodine. half i opened have been dry.

    i love iodine. i used the generic..betadine? exclusively for my recent road rash..scrubbed with it, when the pain allowed it.
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    It was years ago that I read the study, but using tap water to irrigate wounds had equivalently low rates of infection vs sterile normal saline.

    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    Unfortunately had to use this on a buddy today. Great for cleaning out wounds, road rash, etc. What do you carry in your kit?

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Only thing I almost always bring (unless I'm on a <1h ride in the neighborhood) is a small zip lock bag with 5 ibuprofen, 2 benadryl. Benefits of benadryl have already been covered here. I keep the ibuprofen because, in my experience it works a lot better as far as relieving swelling the sooner after an injury you take it. If I go down hard on my hip/knee/etc I'll pop 3 ibuprofen right away, which 1) will cover the pain until I'm done with my ride and 2) prevent a good amount of swelling/bruising. I keep 2 extra ibuprofen in case I have a long drive home or if I have to walk out.

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    Common stuff I've seen as a nurse vs what I carry a long ways out. Stabilizing wounds is better than treating them unless you're days from help. So I'd never bring things like steristrips or glue.

    Road rash: antiseptic wound wipes, gauze and ace wrap

    Large laceration: wipes, Quickclot, gauze, ace wrap

    Broken ribs (hemo/pneumothorax): Nothing, evac fast!

    Clavicle: sling

    Open chest wound: Vaseline gauze and sticky compression tape, evac

    Broken arm or wrist: Sammy splint, ace wrap, sling

    Broken ankle, busted knee: Sammy splint, ace wrap

    Broken femur: Tourniquet (training), traction?, evac

    Head injury: Nothing, evac

    Neck injury: Could bring a hard collar, probably just hold c-spine manually while someone gets help.

    Thus my kit includes a sammy splint, ace wrap, gauze, quickclot, splint, tourniquet, vaseline gauze, sticky compression tape, scissors, wound wipes, bandaids.

  29. #29
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    Nice list, couldn't agree more (work in the ER as a PA).

    Quote Originally Posted by RoscoP View Post
    Common stuff I've seen as a nurse vs what I carry a long ways out. Stabilizing wounds is better than treating them unless you're days from help. So I'd never bring things like steristrips or glue.

    Road rash: antiseptic wound wipes, gauze and ace wrap

    Large laceration: wipes, Quickclot, gauze, ace wrap

    Broken ribs (hemo/pneumothorax): Nothing, evac fast!

    Clavicle: sling

    Open chest wound: Vaseline gauze and sticky compression tape, evac

    Broken arm or wrist: Sammy splint, ace wrap, sling

    Broken ankle, busted knee: Sammy splint, ace wrap

    Broken femur: Tourniquet (training), traction?, evac

    Head injury: Nothing, evac

    Neck injury: Could bring a hard collar, probably just hold c-spine manually while someone gets help.

    Thus my kit includes a sammy splint, ace wrap, gauze, quickclot, splint, tourniquet, vaseline gauze, sticky compression tape, scissors, wound wipes, bandaids.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RoscoP View Post
    Common stuff I've seen as a nurse vs what I carry a long ways out. Stabilizing wounds is better than treating them unless you're days from help. So I'd never bring things like steristrips or glue.

    Road rash: antiseptic wound wipes, gauze and ace wrap

    Large laceration: wipes, Quickclot, gauze, ace wrap

    Broken ribs (hemo/pneumothorax): Nothing, evac fast!

    Clavicle: sling

    Open chest wound: Vaseline gauze and sticky compression tape, evac

    Broken arm or wrist: Sammy splint, ace wrap, sling

    Broken ankle, busted knee: Sammy splint, ace wrap

    Broken femur: Tourniquet (training), traction?, evac

    Head injury: Nothing, evac

    Neck injury: Could bring a hard collar, probably just hold c-spine manually while someone gets help.

    Thus my kit includes a sammy splint, ace wrap, gauze, quickclot, splint, tourniquet, vaseline gauze, sticky compression tape, scissors, wound wipes, bandaids.
    my friend broke his clavicle on one of the best trails of my life. Gilberts trail near el paso tex....my friend was still laying there when a bunch of EMT guys rode up. they made a great sling with a bike tube. it was a great teachable moment for the rest of us.
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    Quote Originally Posted by PerfectZero View Post
    ...
    Honestly I think the best first aid "essential" is to take a wilderness first aid class.
    Absolutely. And retrain every 2 years for updates (& certs if required).

    Certified since 1978, and I carry one of these in my camelbak;
    (https://www.rei.com/product/132220/h...-first-aid-kit)

    And duct tape. :-)


    Catfish ...

  32. #32
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    Quikclot bleed stopping pads.
    Satellite PLB.
    Standard first aid kit
    Glock 29

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axe View Post
    Glock 29
    Is that a preventative measure?

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    Quote Originally Posted by sparkie View Post
    My wife is a nurse and the best thing you can put on a wound is good old iodine. Itís been around for years and although it doesnít get marketed, itís the first thing applied at surgery and still effective against almost all bacteriaís.
    The main problem is cleaning the wound, and an iodine solution doesnít get in all the cracks and crevacis that may be present, thatís why vigorous irrigation is the key. Iodine is good if you can have it, but vigorous irrigation and cleaning is supposed to be the best, having saline solution and iodine is even better, but often unlikely or impractical.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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    ^^ This is what my wife says as well. I'm going to keep this small wire brush for wound cleaning. Think it will do the job?

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    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    ^^ This is what my wife says as well. I'm going to keep this small wire brush for wound cleaning. Think it will do the job?

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    If you've ever had bad road rash cleaned, that's about how it feels. I've made people pass out from the pain, which is why I try to have heavy sedatives on hand now when I do the job.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    The main problem is cleaning the wound, and an iodine solution doesnít get in all the cracks and crevacis that may be present, thatís why vigorous irrigation is the key. Iodine is good if you can have it, but vigorous irrigation and cleaning is supposed to be the best, having saline solution and iodine is even better, but often unlikely or impractical.
    I agree but I thought the topic was first aid kit essentials. I was merely suggesting something to add.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    Is that a preventative measure?
    Euthanasia

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    Quote Originally Posted by Axe View Post
    Euthanasia
    LOL! That made me think of this scene from Snatch....


  40. #40
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    Didn't read the thread, since I never crash*, but I saw this today: https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/med...cid=spartandhp




























































































































































































































































































































































































































    *Can't crash if you don't ride, amirite?
    What's wrong with him??

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    The main problem is cleaning the wound, and an iodine solution doesnít get in all the cracks and crevacis that may be present, thatís why vigorous irrigation is the key. Iodine is good if you can have it, but vigorous irrigation and cleaning is supposed to be the best, having saline solution and iodine is even better, but often unlikely or impractical.
    Fill a Ziploc bag with water and a small hole in the corner. You can create a nice controllable jet for irrigation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RoscoP View Post
    Common stuff I've seen as a nurse vs what I carry a long ways out. Stabilizing wounds is better than treating them unless you're days from help. So I'd never bring things like steristrips or glue.

    Road rash: antiseptic wound wipes, gauze and ace wrap

    Large laceration: wipes, Quickclot, gauze, ace wrap

    Broken ribs (hemo/pneumothorax): Nothing, evac fast!

    Clavicle: sling

    Open chest wound: Vaseline gauze and sticky compression tape, evac

    Broken arm or wrist: Sammy splint, ace wrap, sling

    Broken ankle, busted knee: Sammy splint, ace wrap

    Broken femur: Tourniquet (training), traction?, evac

    Head injury: Nothing, evac

    Neck injury: Could bring a hard collar, probably just hold c-spine manually while someone gets help.

    Thus my kit includes a sammy splint, ace wrap, gauze, quickclot, splint, tourniquet, vaseline gauze, sticky compression tape, scissors, wound wipes, bandaids.
    Yep. I carry nitrile gloves as well. Chemical ice pack too. While not first aid per se, being prepared for an unplanned night out is good. Light shell jacket or large trash bag (a hole in the top and pull over your head= instant poncho). Hypothermia is a real issue depending on conditions or injury. Emergency services may take a while to reach you and get you, or someone else, out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnrsq View Post
    Light shell jacket or large trash bag (a hole in the top and pull over your head= instant poncho).
    This is super important IME, I started carrying small packable jackets a few yeas back. Sometimes I carry two, or I switch it out for a waterproof one or just a light one. Some of them pack down real small, but they are so nice to have on when it gets a little chilly and it's not full-on cold season.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    I'm going to do this tonight. What plan do you recommend for NorCal?
    I didn't see that anyone answered you, so I'll pipe up. I have AirMedCare which contracts with several carriers. It costs me about $65/year and covers everyone in my home.
    Why Johnny Ringo, you look like someone just walked over your grave.

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    ^^ You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to chuckha62 again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckha62 View Post
    I didn't see that anyone answered you, so I'll pipe up. I have AirMedCare which contracts with several carriers. It costs me about $65/year and covers everyone in my home.
    Quite topical timing. I crashed hard on lawndale yesterday and ended up hiking out to the trailhead with a broken hand where another rider was kind enough to drive me back to my truck so I could self drive to the er.

    I remember as I was lying on the trail assessing my injuries debating weather to try and walk out vs call for rescue.

  47. #47
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    I ride Solo often
    Bring a beacon...what ever brand so long as it is connected to a satellite
    Mine leaves a trail of bread crumbs...good if you end up unconscious
    Bring something to clean the clean the wound
    Bring something to close the wound(tape of some sort)
    Butterfly band aids are the thing Ive had to restock the most

    And oh that first shower.....scrub till you scream...and continue.

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  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    Used to be that helicopters weren't dispatched to the scene. Then...they were, but only when requested by the on-ground EMS crew that had seen and evaluated the patient. Then, the helicopters started getting dispatched directly by cops on the scene. Then, (and now), many or most of the medical helicopters will self-launch on the basis of their interpretation of monitored radio calls from police bands. Theoretically, if called, they can be waved off, with no charge to the patient but that often doesn't happen...especially if the ground ambulance crew is part of the same service that owns the helicopter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cuyuna View Post
    Used to be that helicopters weren't dispatched to the scene. Then...they were, but only when requested by the on-ground EMS crew that had seen and evaluated the patient. Then, the helicopters started getting dispatched directly by cops on the scene. Then, (and now), many or most of the medical helicopters will self-launch on the basis of their interpretation of monitored radio calls from police bands. Theoretically, if called, they can be waved off, with no charge to the patient but that often doesn't happen...especially if the ground ambulance crew is part of the same service that owns the helicopter.
    I wonder how it goes over if the patient refuses air transport or signs out AMA. Burning blade time on a non-transport can't go over well...

    Balance billing patients is such a BS move IMHO.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cuyuna View Post
    Used to be that helicopters weren't dispatched to the scene. Then...they were, but only when requested by the on-ground EMS crew that had seen and evaluated the patient. Then, the helicopters started getting dispatched directly by cops on the scene. Then, (and now), many or most of the medical helicopters will self-launch on the basis of their interpretation of monitored radio calls from police bands. Theoretically, if called, they can be waved off, with no charge to the patient but that often doesn't happen...especially if the ground ambulance crew is part of the same service that owns the helicopter.
    This is spot on.

    It's crazy how out of control the costs have gotten, IMO, everyone needs to send their bills to 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., but what you posted is exactly what we were briefed on in wilderness first aid/survival.

    Some other tidbits is that most state search and rescue helicopters have no significant air-ambulance capability, if they pluck you and there is any medical condition, they'll often make a switch with an actual HEMS provider at some location. The same is true for some of the military helicopters that are employed here, although the Coast Guard has some pretty highly equipped stuff.

    The fact that any medical procedure or cost can be many times what you make in a year is mind blowing. In some cases, more than a person would ever make in their lifetime or could ever reasonably pay back.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    This is spot on.

    It's crazy how out of control the costs have gotten, IMO, everyone needs to send their bills to 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., but what you posted is exactly what we were briefed on in wilderness first aid/survival.

    Some other tidbits is that most state search and rescue helicopters have no significant air-ambulance capability, if they pluck you and there is any medical condition, they'll often make a switch with an actual HEMS provider at some location. The same is true for some of the military helicopters that are employed here, although the Coast Guard has some pretty highly equipped stuff.

    The fact that any medical procedure or cost can be many times what you make in a year is mind blowing. In some cases, more than a person would ever make in their lifetime or could ever reasonably pay back.
    There is definitely a lot of variation across jurisdictions and agencies. In CA, many of the hoist equipped 'copters (like the CHP B3s) that can support a complex backcountry extraction may have limited capacity to support patients requiring more than basic life support care. Hence the transfer to an helo EMS provider although transfer to a ground EMS ambulance is probably just as likely - depending on the nature of the injuries. Agencies like LA County Fire and LA Sheriff Dept operate paramedic staffed ALS capable aircraft and will do direct transports to the hospital. An emergency call to a remote location will often have a rescue capable helicopter assigned on the ticket at dispatch. Rescue flights aren't billed like an air ambulance flight in these instances.

    Life Flight in UT is the only civilian air ambulance/HEMS provider that I know of approved for external hoist operations. It would be very unusual to see an air ambulance landing on some tiny dirt patch on a ridge to load and go either.

    Can someone comment on the Coast Guard providing ALS care on their 'copters? I thought they were BLS only.

    Given the time from accident, notifying emergency services, to getting first responders on scene, to stabilizing and transporting to the hospital, many (most?) patients are outside the "golden hour". Truly life threatening injuries in remote locations don't usually bode well for the patient.

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    Our instructors told us the coast guard here (in Alaska) was so equipped, at the least in between EMS and basic rescue/extraction, but fairly well equipped, which makes sense with their missions that often require life support to victims in extremely remote locations or at sea. Not sure if thatís the case everywhere.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnrsq View Post
    I wonder how it goes over if the patient refuses air transport or signs out AMA. Burning blade time on a non-transport can't go over well...

    Balance billing patients is such a BS move IMHO.
    Probably varies from service to service, but around here they can only bill if they actually transport.

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    These things are miraculous! My wife bring them home from work. You can get them in different widths and they're also antimicrobial. They dry rigid and put a really nice cap on your wound. I'll put them on a cut and leave them on until it heals. They come off and I'm all good to go underneath.
    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    These 3M SteriStrips are also a good addition to a first aid kit. Basically work like stitches for closing wounds. Used today on buddy after crash.

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    Thanks for the reminders of how important first aid preparedness is, and the insight into important elements of a kit

    Is there a good kit to start with? Or what is a shop for piecing one together from these recommendations?

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    Quote Originally Posted by king_dave72 View Post
    It was years ago that I read the study, but using tap water to irrigate wounds had equivalently low rates of infection vs sterile normal saline.
    When surgeons scrub for surgery, they use tap water.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnrsq View Post
    Can someone comment on the Coast Guard providing ALS care on their 'copters? I thought they were BLS only.

    Given the time from accident, notifying emergency services, to getting first responders on scene, to stabilizing and transporting to the hospital, many (most?) patients are outside the "golden hour". Truly life threatening injuries in remote locations don't usually bode well for the patient.
    I have been in the Coast Guard for 12 years, 10 here in the Bay Area, and about 5 of those spent as a Search and Rescue Controller (mission planner). Typically our helos get airborne with two pilots, a flight mech, and an EMT. In some cases, a flight surgeon will get airborne to help facilitate patient care, but this is fairly rare. There are a few factors involved, but typically this would only happen in cases that require special care, such as a MEDEVAC of a patient with complicated medical issues.


    Because our primary tasking is federal maritime response, the CG doesn't do inland rescues very often - only when specifically requested by a state/local agency, usually due to a lack of local resources. In the Bay Area and Southern California, this is almost never an issue because of the availability of local enforcement/rescue resources and commercial air medical transport. This is a good thing, because this indicates that local agencies can handle their own case loads under normal circumstances, and the CG is always ready and willing to help out in surge operations, like major natural disasters or incidents.

    Alaska, and parts of the Northwest are a bit different - often the USCG is the only resource available for medical transport, and the crews there have more capable aircraft to meet the unique challenges of that operating area. Aircraft are seasonally staged in strategic places to be readily available for fishing seasons, when there is a greatly increased likelihood of requiring MEDEVAC at sea. CG C-130s also fly regularly to several of the Aleutian Islands to help transport sick/injured patients to higher level care in Anchorage.

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    Oh, and I ride with this in my pack:
    https://www.rei.com/product/800721/a...-3-medical-kit

    Not the most complete kit, but I don't ride very far off the beaten path right now. I would definitely carry a more complete kit if I was going further out into the wilds.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    I have this one, it's a little bit different philosophy, you only use it when self-rescue is out of the question. It's 5 watts, vs. in-reach's 1.4 or SPOT's .4, it goes directly to the NOAA SarSAT, which goes directly to the Regional search and rescue Coordination Center (RCC). Works nearly everywhere in the world too, since 406mhz is the international standard, each device is registered, so they know who you are. No third parties, commercial services (the other two use iridium sat-phone satellites) and while it sends your GPS coords to the sat, it also has a 121.5 beacon to assist with terminal search-and-rescue. All that said, being able to track or send messages is also a nice function and a lot of people like to use the SPOTs in races, so choose accordingly.

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    These are fantastic devices if you go out into the great beyond - I spent a fair amount of my time as a SAR Controller looking at these alerts, and I will vouch for their accuracy. Real incident, the applicable agency gets a ping every hour or so, as the satellites pass over it. Sometimes the first alert isn't a perfect position, because it needs 3 satellite passes to correlate the position, but once it gets those passes the resolution is usually pretty good. The 121.5 homing is also nice - the CG can use direction finding equipment on that signal with most boats and aircraft.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SpeedyStein View Post
    These are fantastic devices if you go out into the great beyond - I spent a fair amount of my time as a SAR Controller looking at these alerts, and I will vouch for their accuracy. Real incident, the applicable agency gets a ping every hour or so, as the satellites pass over it. Sometimes the first alert isn't a perfect position, because it needs 3 satellite passes to correlate the position, but once it gets those passes the resolution is usually pretty good. The 121.5 homing is also nice - the CG can use direction finding equipment on that signal with most boats and aircraft.
    Many ground SAR teams have the ability to use their radio direction finding equipment on 121.5 MHz as well. We carry handheld units in our rescue trucks. Bikers donít tend to be off trail in crazy locations, unlike hikers or downed aircraft. The beacons are nice but arenít magic bullets. It can be surprisingly difficult to pinpoint a location in complex mountain terrain.

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