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  1. #101
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    Cool-blue Rhythm Sad news indeed!

    Quote Originally Posted by f0nz0 View Post
    man, so freeride legend Kelly Mcgarry passed away, reports are coming back... cardiac arrest, dude was only 33 years old!

    Kelly McGarry Has Passed Away in New Zealand - Mountain Bikes News Stories - Vital MTB
    It is always sad news to lose a fellow riding soul. RIP Kelly...

  2. #102
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    regular doc checkups.

    that's all i can do. i do think exercising and diet are worth the risk..for SURE, if i sat still trying to preserve my "heart-miles" i would die for sure.

    the chitty thing..that type of death is drawn out and full of pain/suffering. my heart red-lining and blowing a gasket..fast and efficient. i'd take that route. anyday.
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  3. #103
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    If it turns out it was a heart issue I hope more folks take it seriously and have theirs check out like f0nz0 did. Dying while riding sounds like an ideal way to go but not dying is even better.

  4. #104
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    I get an EKG for my FAA medical. I highly recommend that everyone do the same. It is cheap and I know about a half dozen fit pilots that had to take a time out and get their heart fixed. These guys were fit and healthy and if they hadn't done the EKG for work they probably would have had heart problems on the trail.

  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davey Simon View Post
    I get an EKG for my FAA medical. I highly recommend that everyone do the same. It is cheap and I know about a half dozen fit pilots that had to take a time out and get their heart fixed. These guys were fit and healthy and if they hadn't done the EKG for work they probably would have had heart problems on the trail.
    Right. I did get an ekg for work. Mine found a blip and I had to go to my doc. She redid the test since she said the first machine was archaic. All clear. So far


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  6. #106
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    According to this:
    Kiwi mountain biker Kelly McGarry dies after collapsing on Queenstown bike trail | Stuff.co.nz

    "The 33-year-old, from Nelson, was biking on the Fernhill Loop Track when he suffered from a cardiac arrest while riding uphill at 4.14pm."
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  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by zephxiii View Post
    According to this:
    Kiwi mountain biker Kelly McGarry dies after collapsing on Queenstown bike trail | Stuff.co.nz

    "The 33-year-old, from Nelson, was biking on the Fernhill Loop Track when he suffered from a cardiac arrest while riding uphill at 4.14pm."
    There's no official word yet but it's always a heart attack. It is the silent killer masked by our fitness but often left uncured. Some get a warning while many do not. Older folks are definitely at more risk but young ones can be taken too.

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  8. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    Older folks are definitely at more risk but young ones can be taken too. fc
    Just got to keep the wheels rolling as long as you can!
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  9. #109
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    Wow,, decided to read this thread 9 months after Roo's first post because guess what,, I was diagnosed with A fib a few months ago. Denial was huge for me, I figured it was a temporary fluke. Doesn't seem to be, the "fluttering" while at rest chilling on the couch, or while driving down the road seemed to get more frequent.
    So now I have cut out caffeine, cut way back on training, and probably won't race any more. Now my rides are "leisure" rides where I keep the ticker under 140 and take frequent breaks. It's too soon to tell if this new normal will reduce the episodes but I want to give it a try before drugs or surgery.
    Now I think I will go for an slow old man's ride.

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  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by zon View Post
    Wow,, decided to read this thread 9 months after Roo's first post because guess what,, I was diagnosed with A fib a few months ago. Denial was huge for me, I figured it was a temporary fluke. Doesn't seem to be, the "fluttering" while at rest chilling on the couch, or while driving down the road seemed to get more frequent.
    So now I have cut out caffeine, cut way back on training, and probably won't race any more. Now my rides are "leisure" rides where I keep the ticker under 140 and take frequent breaks. It's too soon to tell if this new normal will reduce the episodes but I want to give it a try before drugs or surgery.
    Now I think I will go for an slow old man's ride.

    .
    Sorry to hear that. Be very aware of your activities at high elevations too. After my lung removal I didn't really notice afib until I did a work retreat in Tahoe. Just sitting still my heart beat was very irregular. Back home at nearly sea level it was mainly noticeable during physical activity but nothing like it was at 7,000'+ ASL.

  11. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by zon View Post
    Wow,, decided to read this thread 9 months after Roo's first post because guess what,, I was diagnosed with A fib a few months ago. Denial was huge for me, I figured it was a temporary fluke. Doesn't seem to be, the "fluttering" while at rest chilling on the couch, or while driving down the road seemed to get more frequent.
    So now I have cut out caffeine, cut way back on training, and probably won't race any more. Now my rides are "leisure" rides where I keep the ticker under 140 and take frequent breaks. It's too soon to tell if this new normal will reduce the episodes but I want to give it a try before drugs or surgery.
    Now I think I will go for an slow old man's ride.

    .
    Damn brother man. You're a hammer too.

    Maybe get it fixed. Burn those bad circuits. Velonews and Lennard Zinn have a lot of writings on this issue and the medical procedure to fix.
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  12. #112
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    Magnesium...

    Quote Originally Posted by zon View Post
    Wow,, decided to read this thread 9 months after Roo's first post because guess what,, I was diagnosed with A fib a few months ago. Denial was huge for me, I figured it was a temporary fluke. Doesn't seem to be, the "fluttering" while at rest chilling on the couch, or while driving down the road seemed to get more frequent.
    So now I have cut out caffeine, cut way back on training, and probably won't race any more. Now my rides are "leisure" rides where I keep the ticker under 140 and take frequent breaks. It's too soon to tell if this new normal will reduce the episodes but I want to give it a try before drugs or surgery.
    Now I think I will go for an slow old man's ride.

    .
    Sorry to hear about this recent discovery. Talk with your doctor about upping your magnesium intake. It is a good regulator of the heart. A good friend here was able to manage his arrhythmia for a number of years before he had to finally get an ablation. Again, I urge you to seeks medical advice for anything that will help.

  13. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by zon View Post
    Wow,, decided to read this thread 9 months after Roo's first post because guess what,, I was diagnosed with A fib a few months ago. Denial was huge for me, I figured it was a temporary fluke. Doesn't seem to be, the "fluttering" while at rest chilling on the couch, or while driving down the road seemed to get more frequent.
    So now I have cut out caffeine, cut way back on training, and probably won't race any more. Now my rides are "leisure" rides where I keep the ticker under 140 and take frequent breaks. It's too soon to tell if this new normal will reduce the episodes but I want to give it a try before drugs or surgery.
    Now I think I will go for an slow old man's ride.

    .
    that sucks to hear and hopefully you'll be able to get through it some how.

    Also I will be curious on if cutting back caffeine helps in anyway.



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  14. #114
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    I wonder how Greg Minnaar is doing...

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  15. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by zephxiii View Post
    :
    Also I will be curious on if cutting back caffeine helps in anyway.
    Definitely did help. Attacks are not as intense or a frequent..


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  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by zon View Post
    Definitely did help. Attacks are not as intense or a frequent..
    According to this study: Caffeine and arrhythmia there was no effect. "Frost and Vestergaard describe the association of caffeine intake with the subsequent incidence of atrial fibrillation or flutter in almost 48 000 participants in the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study. Or rather, they describe the lack of such an association, because the incidence of atrial fibrillation was unrelated to caffeine intake."

    This one found inverse relation: Coffee, Caffeine, and Risk of Hospitalization for Arrhythmias

    "Conclusion: The inverse relations of coffee and caffeine intake to hospitalization for arrhythmias make it unlikely that moderate caffeine intake increases arrhythmia risk."

    More recent studies found no link either: Consumption of Caffeinated Products and Cardiac Ectopy "Conclusions: In the largest study to evaluate dietary patterns and quantify cardiac ectopy using 24‐hour Holter monitoring, we found no relationship between chronic consumption of caffeinated products and ectopy."

    Every time I read something about coffee, it is either good, or no effect. So I keep drinking it.

  17. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axe View Post
    ...

    More recent studies found no link either: Consumption of Caffeinated Products and Cardiac Ectopy "Conclusions: In the largest study to evaluate dietary patterns and quantify cardiac ectopy using 24‐hour Holter monitoring, we found no relationship between chronic consumption of caffeinated products and ectopy."
    ....
    Hmmm ,, maybe that's the issue,, I need to switch from mild consumption to chronic consumption.

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  18. #118
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    Zon, I've found alcohol to be a much more reliable trigger for afib than caffeine. The others; poor sleep, colds, stress, dehydration, the period of rest immediately after endurance rides, or longer stops during endurance rides, full belly.

    The key for me seems to be something to do with the vagal response; the nervous system's mechanism for bringing the heart rate and related systems back down. For some reason, when this response is in charge, the beat goes off. I learned this from talking with an electrophysiologist and triathlete at Kaiser Santa Clara, Taylor Liu.

    I still ride fairly hard, but don't really race. I have had two ablations, and I'm thinking about seeing a new electrophysiologist, now that I'm on different insurance. I've found that regular riding helps keep afib at bay. It's when I'm off the bike for more than a few days that it is more prevalent. I did four days on the Colorado Trail, bikepacking, riding all day at 12,000' last summer. Only on the fourth day, with a long stop for lunch did it kick in, after resuming riding. Amazingly, after feeling like I was on the the cross for a few hours, I went back into sinus rhythm. It feels really good when it snaps back in, but it also leaves me feeling just beat down; normal heart beat, but tired like I did a 100-mile mtb race. Still, sinus + tired beats the hell out of afib.

    It helps to talk about this stuff. There are a lot of us out there, but it's a painful and embarrassing subject, so people don't. And I think a lot stop riding. Don't do that. Shredding with Father Time and The Gerries | Singletracks Mountain Bike News

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  19. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by morganfletcher View Post
    Zon, I've found alcohol to be a much more reliable trigger for afib than caffeine. The others; poor sleep, colds, stress, dehydration, the period of rest immediately after endurance rides, or longer stops during endurance rides, full belly.

    The key for me seems to be something to do with the vagal response; the nervous system's mechanism for bringing the heart rate and related systems back down. For some reason, when this response is in charge, the beat goes off. I learned this from talking with an electrophysiologist and triathlete at Kaiser Santa Clara, Taylor Liu.

    I still ride fairly hard, but don't really race. I have had two ablations, and I'm thinking about seeing a new electrophysiologist, now that I'm on different insurance. I've found that regular riding helps keep afib at bay. It's when I'm off the bike for more than a few days that it is more prevalent. I did four days on the Colorado Trail, bikepacking, riding all day at 12,000' last summer. Only on the fourth day, with a long stop for lunch did it kick in, after resuming riding. Amazingly, after feeling like I was on the the cross for a few hours, I went back into sinus rhythm. It feels really good when it snaps back in, but it also leaves me feeling just beat down; normal heart beat, but tired like I did a 100-mile mtb race. Still, sinus + tired beats the hell out of afib.

    It helps to talk about this stuff. There are a lot of us out there, but it's a painful and embarrassing subject, so people don't. And I think a lot stop riding. Don't do that. Shredding with Father Time and The Gerries | Singletracks Mountain Bike News

    Morgan
    Good info Morgan. The alcohol component is definitely a trigger. I notice the "flutter" soon after a glass of wine with dinner. Bummer,, cause I really like my glass of red with dinner.
    I don't plan of quitting riding,, just racing where I push myself to red line. I may casually race just to be out there with my homies.
    Tough getting old.

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  20. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by morganfletcher View Post
    It helps to talk about this stuff. There are a lot of us out there, but it's a painful and embarrassing subject, so people don't. And I think a lot stop riding. Don't do that. Shredding with Father Time and The Gerries | Singletracks Mountain Bike News

    Morgan
    Morgan,

    Thanks for the link. Such inspiration! Love to get these guys up here. Our own Godfather of Single track - Jack at 76 is almost recovered from hip surgery with three screws after falling in December. He was on his trainer 3 days after surgery and now is up to 15 miles with long climbs thrown in. Most of us are in our late 50's to mid 70's and will ride three days a week. I'm looking into motor doping if Medicare will pay for it just so I can keep up with our resident whipper snapper Nick Taylor at 58. BTW: Jack has had 4 ablations and one 5 box surgery for his arrhythmia. He has had no issues with a-fib now for several years.

  21. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by zon View Post
    Tough getting old.
    "Beats the alternative."

    Many of us get old without getting wise. Stuff like this teaches humility, and mortality. I'm maybe a little wiser for it. Still a jerk tho.

    Morgan

  22. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by RooHarris View Post
    Morgan,

    Thanks for the link. Such inspiration! Love to get these guys up here. Our own Godfather of Single track - Jack at 76 is almost recovered from hip surgery with three screws after falling in December. He was on his trainer 3 days after surgery and now is up to 15 miles with long climbs thrown in. Most of us are in our late 50's to mid 70's and will ride three days a week. I'm looking into motor doping if Medicare will pay for it just so I can keep up with our resident whipper snapper Nick Taylor at 58. BTW: Jack has had 4 ablations and one 5 box surgery for his arrhythmia. He has had no issues with a-fib now for several years.
    Roo, I've ridden with you, and was inspired. I'm 1.5 years in from a broken hip. PITA.

    Morgan

  23. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by morganfletcher View Post
    Roo, I've ridden with you, and was inspired. I'm 1.5 years in from a broken hip. PITA.

    Morgan
    BTW, if you all need a room to discuss this, shrinkage, getting shorter, dating younger women and other issues, I made a forum for you guys here:


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  24. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axe View Post
    According to this study: Caffeine and arrhythmia there was no effect. "Frost and Vestergaard describe the association of caffeine intake with the subsequent incidence of atrial fibrillation or flutter in almost 48 000 participants in the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study. Or rather, they describe the lack of such an association, because the incidence of atrial fibrillation was unrelated to caffeine intake."

    This one found inverse relation: Coffee, Caffeine, and Risk of Hospitalization for Arrhythmias

    "Conclusion: The inverse relations of coffee and caffeine intake to hospitalization for arrhythmias make it unlikely that moderate caffeine intake increases arrhythmia risk."

    More recent studies found no link either: Consumption of Caffeinated Products and Cardiac Ectopy "Conclusions: In the largest study to evaluate dietary patterns and quantify cardiac ectopy using 24‐hour Holter monitoring, we found no relationship between chronic consumption of caffeinated products and ectopy."

    Every time I read something about coffee, it is either good, or no effect. So I keep drinking it.
    Coffee raises my BP significantly and this seems to be consistent over at least the past 5 years (didn't monitor before that). I keep trying coffee again periodically in the hope that there's some other diet/exercise/lifestyle factor at work but the number of data points I've collected overwhelmingly point to caffeine as the culprit.

    I take 100 mg Losartan daily, and in the absence of caffeine, this helps me maintain an average of 115/75. Even half a cup of regular coffee bumps that up to 145/90 or higher and it takes 4-5 hours to return. Other CNS stimulants have a similar effect. Taking pseudoephedrine for nasal congestion sends my BP into the 170/110 range.
    The glass is twice as large as it needs to be

  25. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    BTW, if you all need a room to discuss this, shrinkage, getting shorter, dating younger women and other issues, I made a forum for you guys here:


    Fifty+ Years Old - Mtbr.com
    What,, you saying your tired of us old farts complaining about aches and pains on NorCal and want in the rest home "Fifty+ Years Old" .


    Actually it is a really good idea. If I may suggest a name change to "The Rest Home - Fifty + ".
    We wont need a moderator, we are old enough to know better.
    You could move this thread there as the kick starter.


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  26. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by zon View Post
    Wow,, decided to read this thread 9 months after Roo's first post because guess what,, I was diagnosed with A fib a few months ago. Denial was huge for me, I figured it was a temporary fluke. Doesn't seem to be, the "fluttering" while at rest chilling on the couch, or while driving down the road seemed to get more frequent.
    So now I have cut out caffeine, cut way back on training, and probably won't race any more. Now my rides are "leisure" rides where I keep the ticker under 140 and take frequent breaks. It's too soon to tell if this new normal will reduce the episodes but I want to give it a try before drugs or surgery.
    Now I think I will go for an slow old man's ride.

    .
    I hope that gets better. I started to get the same thing, beat.beat.beatbeatbeatbeat..................beat.b eat.beat etc. It was mostly when chilling and definitely while horizontal. Of course it couldn't be reproduced for the ekg machine. And the doctor pretty much said for minor cases there's not much to be done. I poked around the net and found magnesium might help, and it clicked in my head that i had abandoned eating my regular helpings of dark green vegetables and nuts. . After a few weeks it cleared up or i guess more realistically it's in remission.

    The Best AFib Health Blogs of 2015

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    Itís a particularly cruel double blow for ex-NBA athletes; not only is atrial fibrillation a condition more likely to appear in older men, a 2006 study showed merely being tall is also an independent risk factor in contracting the disorder.
    ďPatients in the tallest quartile group had an atrial fibrillation prevalence that was 32 per cent higher than those in the shortest quartile,Ē the study states.
    Heavy hearts: The NBA’s silent killer | The Roar

    Morgan, 6'2"

  28. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by morganfletcher View Post
    Ditto,, 6 2


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  29. #129
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    I just wanted to keep this thread going as there is important information for us older farts in it.
    Riding within your limits and enjoying the experience without feeling the challenge is compromised. I think at my tender age I have to be cognizant of what and how much to push on each ride. Slowly I'm getting back into shape even though I rode all winter. Find those hills to climb. Kind of like life, it will make you stronger...

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    Quote Originally Posted by RooHarris View Post
    I just wanted to keep this thread going as there is important information for us older farts in it.
    Riding within your limits and enjoying the experience without feeling the challenge is compromised. I think at my tender age I have to be cognizant of what and how much to push on each ride. Slowly I'm getting back into shape even though I rode all winter. Find those hills to climb. Kind of like life, it will make you stronger...
    +1 plus don't trust devices that may give faulty heart rates ... perhaps too low during your exercises. That being said I will be heading out for a ride with a 15 dollar wrist stop/watch and a fitbit. One of those is a "brass liar" term for watches in the old days!
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    So I'm only 42. Used to race a lot. Nordic skiing, mtb and road. (I am a NeverWas though as opposed to a HasBeen) Now I'm a fat out of shape 3X a week exerciser. I get weird random beats some times. Here's the thing. I only ever paid it any heed after I read that Velo Snooze article. Can't tell if I've always had it or it is a new thing. Seems stress related, as far as I see. Maybe a dehydration thing? Also anxiety- the what the f is going on seems to lead to it going on more often.

    What are you guys that have this a-fib hearing from your doctors as far as exercise? That Velo Snooze article was detailed on specific people but really vague in general as far as what to do/what to expect. The plan has always been to get less fat the way I always have- race. Sounds like that might not be the best idea...

    Also I guarantee it won't replicate at the Doctors. The guys that have gone in at the doctors, what was the trigger- was it happening daily, weekly, hourly, once a month?
    Thanks
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  32. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Svahn View Post
    So I'm only 42. Used to race a lot. Nordic skiing, mtb and road. (I am a NeverWas though as opposed to a HasBeen) Now I'm a fat out of shape 3X a week exerciser. I get weird random beats some times. Here's the thing. I only ever paid it any heed after I read that Velo Snooze article. Can't tell if I've always had it or it is a new thing. Seems stress related, as far as I see. Maybe a dehydration thing? Also anxiety- the what the f is going on seems to lead to it going on more often.

    What are you guys that have this a-fib hearing from your doctors as far as exercise? That Velo Snooze article was detailed on specific people but really vague in general as far as what to do/what to expect. The plan has always been to get less fat the way I always have- race. Sounds like that might not be the best idea...

    Also I guarantee it won't replicate at the Doctors. The guys that have gone in at the doctors, what was the trigger- was it happening daily, weekly, hourly, once a month?
    Thanks
    PS 6'2"
    I get afib about once or twice a week, but it only lasts for 4 or 5 minutes. Haven't figured out the trigger, but it only happens (or I only notice it) when I'm resting at home, usually in the evening. My doc said that as long as it wasn't happening while biking, I can continue to do that. I've got an 8-hour race coming up in a couple weeks, so we'll see how that goes.
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  33. #133
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    6' 1 7/8", so a little better off than several of you ;-)

    FWIW, just over 6 years ago at almost 44 years old I had my first cardiac episode. I thought it was a-fib for years but finally had it diagnosed as PVCs, pre-ventricular contractions. Having an occasional PVC is no big deal but having several in immediate succession knocks me on my @ss. Last fall in Moab it happened and after the ride I was taking my pulse and notice my heart was skipping every 7th beat or so so I walked over to the ER. They hooked me up to a machine and diagnosed the PVCs. I went back and talked to my cardiologist and he gave me the ok to ride, saying that basically it is an annoyance, not particularly dangerous. I could take beta-blockers to reduce it but... no thanks.

    Things that trigger it for me are

    caffeine
    dehydration
    drinking a lot the night before
    weight
    stress/adrenaline
    heat

    In Moab it was all of the above and my heart was out of whack for 2 weeks.

    I gave up coffee and soda that day. I dialed it back to "fun" on descents about 4 years ago. I'm fine with that. When I was down in weight I was having no issues at all, but since putting on 15 pounds after a bad crash that kept me off the bike for a couple months I've had some minor episodes. I can pretty much tell when I'm at risk for it and can often ride through it or get over it after a brief break.

    It's important to talk to a good cardiologist. I did treadmill tests, halter tests, carried around various devices trying to catch an episode. In the end none of those tests revealed anything, but they've pretty much ruled out v-fib which is good.

    I've never been a racer, but I still rack up a lot of PRs. A couple weeks ago I took over two minutes off my best time on a local loop (46:50 -> 44:41) from 5 years ago. But I do have to think about it all the time which kind of sucks.

    Anyway, that's my story...

  34. #134
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    There was a commercial on the radio recently about how Stanford has made some advances on doing surgeries for a-fib. Being a shorty I did not pay attention to it.

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    Greg Minnaar's results haven't been his norm this year, wonder if that has to do with his heart thingy he had.

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    A thumbs up for Stanford...

    Quote Originally Posted by zorg View Post
    There was a commercial on the radio recently about how Stanford has made some advances on doing surgeries for a-fib. Being a shorty I did not pay attention to it.

    Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
    My good riding buddy went to Stanford a year ago last spring and had them do the ablation with tremendous success. No more issues w/ the arrhythmia. His episodes are gone.

    Recently rode w/ another friend who experienced an a-fib (atrial flutter?) event while guiding with me. It took forever for his heart rate to come back to normal from his high rate he was experiencing of 240 bpm. Scared the hell of me as well as him.
    Last edited by RooHarris; 09-14-2016 at 02:38 PM.

  37. #137
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    Hot issue once agin. The Vibiker, John Easton death this week is a suspected cardiac issue.
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    previous cardiac issues?

    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    Hot issue once agin. The Vibiker, John Easton death this week is a suspected cardiac issue.
    Did John have any previous cardiac issues or events of any nature?

  39. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by RooHarris View Post
    Did John have any previous cardiac issues or events of any nature?
    Felt weaker lung/chest capacity after BC Bike Race. And then had a fainting incident on a ride at Lake Tahoe the week before.
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    I'm not sure how this works.

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    Quote Originally Posted by squashyo View Post
    Ill buy if you read it and post up cliffnotes
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    Recently went through all the tests myself after two fainting spells, one doing some heavy yard work and once on a solo ride. My doctor yelled it me for not going straight to ER but I explained when it happened I was still almost 4 miles from pavement and I had no cell service. I sat for about 30 mins before I finished my ride and took it really easy. By the time I got to pavement I felt ok so I just called and got into see him the next day.
    I'm 50 yrs old and about 15lbs overweight -Doctor did all the tests but in the end nothing was found. EKG, stress test, 48 hr heart monitor, blood work, all is totally fine, cholesterol is fine, blood pressure is great, resting rate is 50. I've taken it easy the last two weeks cuting rides to 3-4 and not pushing at all.
    So I really don't know what to think. I raced several years but that was a long time ago and never had any problems. I'm not going to give up riding since it's been my life since I was in elementary school.
    What do you do if all tests show nothing...I guess if it's gonna happen not much you can do.
    Sorta funny after way too much procrastination we set up our trust a month ago...coincidence?

  43. #143
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    I'm 60, I ride at least 25 miles on my road bike 4 nights a week at a brisk not hammer pace. I did have a full on Physical and Cardio Stress test a couple of years ago and got the all clear. I will be getting another cardio stress test this next year. It's not cheap but it only takes 30 minutes to complete and it gives a reasonabe peace of mind. I can't wait for Saturday to go out and ride dirt for 3-4 hours.
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    Okay, I posted here about Ride or Rot in August last year. Idiotically, I never visited a Cardiologist prior to April this year. Well the end of April actually as I had a heart attack while out riding with a group of friends. I didn't know it was a heart attack, just that I had the energy reserve when cresting a hill of roadkill.
    A few hours later I was ensconced in the womb of a CICU where my HR dropped to 28 and BP rose to almost flame-out. An angiogram two days later turned into an agioplasty and another crash on the table.
    Resuscitated by the Cardiologist and subjected the a carsh test 7 days later I was allowed to rehab on my bike. Another test by the Cardiologist 4 months later showed the efficacy of cycling as a rehab medium.
    The upshot of this diatribe is 1. Regulkarly visit a Cardiologist and be tested. 2. Ride with a HR monitor for a first indication of a cardio-vascular issue.

  45. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buzz Cut View Post
    I'm 60, I ride at least 25 miles on my road bike 4 nights a week at a brisk not hammer pace. I did have a full on Physical and Cardio Stress test a couple of years ago and got the all clear. I will be getting another cardio stress test this next year. It's not cheap but it only takes 30 minutes to complete and it gives a reasonabe peace of mind. I can't wait for Saturday to go out and ride dirt for 3-4 hours.
    Road bike????? Is that what happened to you?
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  46. #146
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stormf View Post
    Okay, I posted here about Ride or Rot in August last year. Idiotically, I never visited a Cardiologist prior to April this year. Well the end of April actually as I had a heart attack while out riding with a group of friends. I didn't know it was a heart attack, just that I had the energy reserve when cresting a hill of roadkill.
    A few hours later I was ensconced in the womb of a CICU where my HR dropped to 28 and BP rose to almost flame-out. An angiogram two days later turned into an agioplasty and another crash on the table.
    Resuscitated by the Cardiologist and subjected the a carsh test 7 days later I was allowed to rehab on my bike. Another test by the Cardiologist 4 months later showed the efficacy of cycling as a rehab medium.
    The upshot of this diatribe is 1. Regulkarly visit a Cardiologist and be tested. 2. Ride with a HR monitor for a first indication of a cardio-vascular issue.
    Wow!!!!! Real life-death experience.

    What did the heart attack feel like?

    How old are you? How much do you ride?
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  47. #147
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    FWIW FC, I see everyone noting a-fib. What most people are not aware of is an equally as dangerous a risk (IMHO), Tachycardia.

    Look it up, it's a more subtle thing. The reason I mention this is yeah, there's the bit about "..Heart-related conditions such as high blood pressure (hypertension) Poor blood supply to the heart muscle due to coronary artery disease (atherosclerosis), heart valve disease, heart failure, heart muscle disease (cardiomyopathy), tumors, or infections..." but I know of it affecting people who are/were in top shape with nothing as a cause other than their body being stressed from riding hard and not being optimal about rehydrating. Like a-fib, it can come on suddenly, isn't necessarily inherited, and can strike merely due to lowered electrolytes, exhaustion, or lowered body fluids, all of which we face as cyclists.

  48. #148
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    Heart attack felt like indigestion and jaw cramp combined. No pain just zero energy. Lost around 8kgs of muscle as well. I ride at least 4 times per week and the dirt as often as possible and will be 72 next month.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    Road bike????? Is that what happened to you?
    Yeah but it got this old guy thin and back in shape


    Last edited by Buzz Cut; 09-15-2016 at 11:50 AM.
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  50. #150
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    Cardiac concerns later in life...

    Quote Originally Posted by Buzz Cut View Post
    Yeah but it got this old guy thin and back in shape

    That's VERY good. Killed your hair though and shortened your left arm . Now get back on the trail. Never go pure roadie.
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    Never went pure roadie. Dirt on the weekends


    Last edited by Buzz Cut; 09-15-2016 at 11:48 AM.

  52. #152
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    right on!

    (some reason, I can see your photo from the phone but not from this mac)
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  53. #153
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stormf View Post
    Heart attack felt like indigestion and jaw cramp combined. No pain just zero energy. Lost around 8kgs of muscle as well. I ride at least 4 times per week and the dirt as often as possible and will be 72 next month.
    Thanks for sharing bud. Very valuable info.
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  54. #154
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    The other thing we need to start sharing is more info on these tests, hospitals and doctors.

    This 'athlete heart attacks' are a fairly new phenomenon and not all doctors/tests are equal.

    It is my opinion that most doctors have no clue what's going. Doctors will test and release an athlete that may drop dead that week.

    It's just an evolving science and a family practitioner in not in same position as a renowned cardiologist who sees these cases every week.

    So if you have experiences with tests, doctors and operations, share them and guide us where to go and what questions to ask.

    Also on the wishlist is autopsies. When an athlete in the best shape of his/her life stops breathing and dies, it would be good to learn from it.

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  55. #155
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    Here is something else to be aware of with cardiac issues.

    "Alcohol may increase the risk of atrial fibrillation. Every additional drink/day was linked to a 5% increased risk."

    https://www.ucsf.edu/news/2016/09/40...tion-new-study
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    Is Pliny exempt from this study?

    Quote Originally Posted by slocaus View Post
    Here is something else to be aware of with cardiac issues.

    "Alcohol may increase the risk of atrial fibrillation. Every additional drink/day was linked to a 5% increased risk."

    https://www.ucsf.edu/news/2016/09/40...tion-new-study
    Is Pliny the Elder exempt from this study?

  57. #157
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    The other thing we need to start sharing is more info on these tests, hospitals and doctors.

    This 'athlete heart attacks' are a fairly new phenomenon and not all doctors/tests are equal.

    It is my opinion that most doctors have no clue what's going. Doctors will test and release an athlete that may drop dead that week.

    It's just an evolving science and a family practitioner in not in same position as a renowned cardiologist who sees these cases every week.

    So if you have experiences with tests, doctors and operations, share them and guide us where to go and what questions to ask.

    Also on the wishlist is autopsies. When an athlete in the best shape of his/her life stops breathing and dies, it would be good to learn from it.

    fc
    FC,

    Were you at Hurricane this weekend, thought I saw you?

    Below is a recent article on the high level endurance athlete that came out this last January. New research has been done on this level of competitors and a relationship to Right Ventricular Over flow Tract (RVOT). Sounds like solid research:

    https://www.tctmd.com/news/unique-sc...rance-athletes

  58. #158
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    Quote Originally Posted by slocaus View Post
    Here is something else to be aware of with cardiac issues.

    "Alcohol may increase the risk of atrial fibrillation. Every additional drink/day was linked to a 5% increased risk."

    https://www.ucsf.edu/news/2016/09/40...tion-new-study
    Bad news...I'm 10,000% past my heart attack due date

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    deleted....

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    my mom's best friend is the city's best heart doc. he did a full workup on me just to get my mom off of both of our asses.

    i got a clean bill of health..my ticker is ticking fine.
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  61. #161
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    A month ago, I sat down with my doc (not a cardiologist) and started asking those questions during my physical. I wondered then (and still do now I guess) why they don't get you a stress test at a certain age. Especially when you express your concerns related to your activities. I asked about it and the answer I got back was that basically, they look at your health history, your weight, cholesterol and the rest of your vitals and assign you a risk score from 3-7. I was at a 3.5, so he said a stress test simply wasn't warranted. He did however, approve me for an EKG to establish a base line. That was probably to appease me more than anything else.

    But hey, if I have an "event" they have a baseline as a comparison.
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    Thanks for keeping this thread alive...

    Quote Originally Posted by Boomchakabowwow View Post
    my mom's best friend is the city's best heart doc. he did a full workup on me just to get my mom off of both of our asses.

    i got a clean bill of health..my ticker is ticking fine.
    Great news! Mom's tend to worry too much...

    Several bike riding friends of mine who are closer to my age (I'm 70) are having cardiac issues. One was an endurance rider for years and now his arrhythmia is being controlled with medication, which is preventing him from higher cardiac performance levels. He is slated for an ablation at UCSF in January.

    Keep on cycling for heart health!

  63. #163
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    I'm vegetarian now and I did all my tests. A+ now. No headaches too and upset stomache which have been bothering me the last 10 years.

    I'm going to do the EKG treadmill test, just because. I wanna learn more about it. I also have awesome healthcare right now (United Healthcare) but not for long.

    So there. Still good with beer and coffee. Sweets, not so much. 52 years creaky.
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    Dear older and creaky...

    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    I'm vegetarian now and I did all my tests. A+ now. No headaches too and upset stomache which have been bothering me the last 10 years.

    I'm going to do the EKG treadmill test, just because. I wanna learn more about it. I also have awesome healthcare right now (United Healthcare) but not for long.

    So there. Still good with beer and coffee. Sweets, not so much. 52 years creaky.
    52? No way! I thought you were early 40's, tops! As far as United Health care goes, I have not had good luck with them over the last 5 years as a Medicare supplemental policy. It took me the last 12 months to get a new PCP. My records show 35+ calls to them over that period of time with them dropping the ball, lying or just plain incompetent in honoring my request for change. A doctor friend of mine said they were the worst when it came to billing. But, if you are comfortable with this giant, I'm happy for you.

    I plan on dropping them on December 7th (last date for disenrollment).

  65. #165
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    Quote Originally Posted by RooHarris View Post
    52? No way! I thought you were early 40's, tops! As far as United Health care goes, I have not had good luck with them over the last 5 years as a Medicare supplemental policy. It took me the last 12 months to get a new PCP. My records show 35+ calls to them over that period of time with them dropping the ball, lying or just plain incompetent in honoring my request for change. A doctor friend of mine said they were the worst when it came to billing. But, if you are comfortable with this giant, I'm happy for you.

    I plan on dropping them on December 7th (last date for disenrollment).
    Good to know. I liked them since Palo Alto Medical and Stanford and El Camino H love em. Accupuncture and massage too.

    But I'm dropping them this month since they are pricey and my wife has free coverage now for the fam. Blue Cross is the new empire.
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  66. #166
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    Quote Originally Posted by RooHarris View Post
    Great news! Mom's tend to worry too much...

    Several bike riding friends of mine who are closer to my age (I'm 70) are having cardiac issues. One was an endurance rider for years and now his arrhythmia is being controlled with medication, which is preventing him from higher cardiac performance levels. He is slated for an ablation at UCSF in January.

    Keep on cycling for heart health!
    Damn, Roo you pedal faster than most people in their 40s and 50s. Keep it up.

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  67. #167
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    So did anyone clear up the symptoms of Afib and Atrial arrhythmias for guys here?
    ------------------------------------------------------
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  68. #168
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    Cardio event recovery is a long path,patience is the key for me.
    Been through 2 OH Surgeries for Aortic valve replacement in last 30 yrs,still sport a pacemaker which averages 2-4% function(basically only paces 2-4% of the time)
    I currently ride 5-7 days a week,1-2 hrs average loop w dawgies.
    After 1st OHS in 87, my recovery included a few successes,once my sternum stopped achin.
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    This is why you need to be mindful of afib. This is going to be long, but will try to share. 50 year old endurance athlete. Mostly road but CC MTB a couple times a month. No Red meat for the last seven years, monitor calories in/out obsessively. Blood work all very good. Very low blood pressure and a resting heart rate in the high 40's low 50's. Tremendously concerned with losing weight and getting as fit as possible cycling wise. Ride about 130-150 miles a week. Endurance rides, and fast paced training rides with a group. Last April I started noticing an irregular rhythm every once in a while at bedtime while waiting to fall asleep. The HR was very low but irregular so I didn't worry about it. Couple times later in the year I passed out when getting up to go the bathroom in the middle of the night. Dr. concluded it was just orthostatic hypotension and advised me to sit on bed for a few seconds before getting up. Started feeling dizzy after hard road rides, and ignored it. In October I had 2 instances of skyrocketing HR while riding and ignored it. I didn't want anything messing with my training schedule so did nothing about it. On November 1st 2016, I developed a really sore muscle in my back. It got progressively worse. On November 12th I had a group ride planned but awoke with really bad pain in my side/back and a tiny bit of swelling. The pain was far worse than any pulled muscle I ever had and decided that I would go the ER AFTER my ride. Again......didn't want to derail my cycling........stubborn..........too tough, what have you. Rode a fast paced 64 miles in Livermore, drove home, showered, shaved, texted my wife and told her I was going in to get my back looked at. See the triage nurse and they immediately put me in a room. Before I know what is happening, they are wheeling me to a CT Scan. Doctor comes into the CT scan room and advises me that I have a resting heart rate of 190bpm, and my "pulled muscle" is actually a blood clot in my kidney. From November 12th to November 17th, I was in Cardiac ICU. They tried a variety of drugs to stop my afib and lower my heart rate but nothing worked. November 14th I had a cardioversion to stop the afib. Cardioversion is just shocking your heart to knock it back to a normal rhythm. Was put on strong afib meds, blood thinners, and a heart strengthening drug, and was sent home. Over the next four months I had every test there is to determine if I could get an ablation. Pulmonary function testing, Echocardiograms, sleep studies, stress tests, every thing else. They determined I was a strong candidate for an ablation. Spencer Liu at Kaiser Santa Clara did my ablation on April 13th. I miraculously went into afib while they were in there, so he was able to identify exactly where the electrical signal was coming from, and he froze a circle of scar tissue around the source, creating a "fence" that the abnormal signal could not penetrate. Had to stay on blood thinners until yesterday. Just got off them, due to no recurrences of afib since the surgery. Totally cured. Total success. Cannot say enough about cardiac ablation.

    The reason that afib is dangerous and not to be taken lightly is the clotting. When the heart is tachycardic and in an irregular rhythm, it's stroke volume decreases and it can't keep up with the blood flow. Blood begins pooling in the bottom of the atrium. The pooled blood can begin to clot, and a clot can be "knocked or thrown" into your system. I was lucky and mine lodged in my kidney. Could have been my brain or anywhere else. If you know you have afib, at least get on blood thinners. With blood thinners on board you can choose to "live with" afib, and it can't really hurt you, but you know......get it taken care of. All you guys that think you may have something weird going on with HR pulmonary function, fainting, etc.........go get it looked at.

  70. #170
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocop View Post
    This is why you need to be mindful of afib. This is going to be long, but will try to share. 50 year old endurance athlete. Mostly road but CC MTB a couple times a month. No Red meat for the last seven years, monitor calories in/out obsessively. Blood work all very good. Very low blood pressure and a resting heart rate in the high 40's low 50's. Tremendously concerned with losing weight and getting as fit as possible cycling wise. Ride about 130-150 miles a week. Endurance rides, and fast paced training rides with a group. Last April I started noticing an irregular rhythm every once in a while at bedtime while waiting to fall asleep. The HR was very low but irregular so I didn't worry about it. Couple times later in the year I passed out when getting up to go the bathroom in the middle of the night. Dr. concluded it was just orthostatic hypotension and advised me to sit on bed for a few seconds before getting up. Started feeling dizzy after hard road rides, and ignored it. In October I had 2 instances of skyrocketing HR while riding and ignored it. I didn't want anything messing with my training schedule so did nothing about it. On November 1st 2016, I developed a really sore muscle in my back. It got progressively worse. On November 12th I had a group ride planned but awoke with really bad pain in my side/back and a tiny bit of swelling. The pain was far worse than any pulled muscle I ever had and decided that I would go the ER AFTER my ride. Again......didn't want to derail my cycling........stubborn..........too tough, what have you. Rode a fast paced 64 miles in Livermore, drove home, showered, shaved, texted my wife and told her I was going in to get my back looked at. See the triage nurse and they immediately put me in a room. Before I know what is happening, they are wheeling me to a CT Scan. Doctor comes into the CT scan room and advises me that I have a resting heart rate of 190bpm, and my "pulled muscle" is actually a blood clot in my kidney. From November 12th to November 17th, I was in Cardiac ICU. They tried a variety of drugs to stop my afib and lower my heart rate but nothing worked. November 14th I had a cardioversion to stop the afib. Cardioversion is just shocking your heart to knock it back to a normal rhythm. Was put on strong afib meds, blood thinners, and a heart strengthening drug, and was sent home. Over the next four months I had every test there is to determine if I could get an ablation. Pulmonary function testing, Echocardiograms, sleep studies, stress tests, every thing else. They determined I was a strong candidate for an ablation. Spencer Liu at Kaiser Santa Clara did my ablation on April 13th. I miraculously went into afib while they were in there, so he was able to identify exactly where the electrical signal was coming from, and he froze a circle of scar tissue around the source, creating a "fence" that the abnormal signal could not penetrate. Had to stay on blood thinners until yesterday. Just got off them, due to no recurrences of afib since the surgery. Totally cured. Total success. Cannot say enough about cardiac ablation.

    The reason that afib is dangerous and not to be taken lightly is the clotting. When the heart is tachycardic and in an irregular rhythm, it's stroke volume decreases and it can't keep up with the blood flow. Blood begins pooling in the bottom of the atrium. The pooled blood can begin to clot, and a clot can be "knocked or thrown" into your system. I was lucky and mine lodged in my kidney. Could have been my brain or anywhere else. If you know you have afib, at least get on blood thinners. With blood thinners on board you can choose to "live with" afib, and it can't really hurt you, but you know......get it taken care of. All you guys that think you may have something weird going on with HR pulmonary function, fainting, etc.........go get it looked at.
    Not long, but scary. Glad you got it caught before something really bad happened and even better they were able to get it treated. I hear horror stories about Kaiser, but my sister, who is an ER Doctor tells me they are actually really good at most things and better at dealing with preventative medicine and treatment than most.


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  71. #171
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    Great, relevant information Ghettocop!
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    Great, relevant information Ghettocop!
    Thanks FC........I would like to verify what you touched on earlier, in that most Cardiologists in a general HMO/PPO setting are pretty ill-equipped to deal with athletes with cardiac symptoms. I live in Pacifica and Kaiser SSF is my headquarters. The patient they see is a sedentary, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, pre-diabetic, who is generally greatly overweight with a very poor diet. This whole "Athlete Heart" thing is just now gaining some traction, with more and more endurance athletes developing afib later in life. You can find tons of useful information on line, and get lots of support, but at home on a local level, the cardiologists out here are not quite up to speed yet. Granted, there are really good specialists in the area, but for the average Joe who has to use a health care system to get treated, the options are not that great.

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    Cardiac concerns later in life...

    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocop View Post
    Thanks FC........I would like to verify what you touched on earlier, in that most Cardiologists in a general HMO/PPO setting are pretty ill-equipped to deal with athletes with cardiac symptoms. I live in Pacifica and Kaiser SSF is my headquarters. The patient they see is a sedentary, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, pre-diabetic, who is generally greatly overweight with a very poor diet. This whole "Athlete Heart" thing is just now gaining some traction, with more and more endurance athletes developing afib later in life. You can find tons of useful information on line, and get lots of support, but at home on a local level, the cardiologists out here are not quite up to speed yet. Granted, there are really good specialists in the area, but for the average Joe who has to use a health care system to get treated, the options are not that great.
    Yeah man, I know of about 10 athletes now who just dropped dead biking. And in two cases, these folks had a 'heart attack or fainting episode' got fully checked out at a doctor and then died on the bike within a month after getting 'cleared'.

    Like concussions, we're at the infancy of knowledge in this arena.
    Last edited by fc; 11-02-2017 at 12:28 PM.
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    A certain company is Cupertino is looking at using their smart watch to address cardiac arrhythmia. There's a Cardiogram app out that tracks your heart rate and lets you

    "share your health data with medical researchers, to contribute to studies on abnormal heart rhythms like atrial fibrillation, heart failure, and more"

    https://www.cnbc.com/2017/09/11/appl...ican-well.html

    I'm sure Android watches support or will support it as well. Maybe this will be something we all end up using?

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    Quote Originally Posted by normonster View Post
    A certain company is Cupertino is looking at using their smart watch to address cardiac arrhythmia. There's a Cardiogram app out that tracks your heart rate and lets you

    "share your health data with medical researchers, to contribute to studies on abnormal heart rhythms like atrial fibrillation, heart failure, and more"

    https://www.cnbc.com/2017/09/11/appl...ican-well.html

    I'm sure Android watches support or will support it as well. Maybe this will be something we all end up using?
    Atari?? It's good they're doing that. Something really key though (morbid) is an autopsy of folks/athletes who die of a heart condition unexpectedly. Same thing with concussions victims. Try and find out what exactly happened.
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    It is definitely something to be concerned about. In that particular article case, it may of been him pushing his heart over the years that created the poor heart condition and that it just failed on him. However, I think that case was an extreme with a combination of a lot of factors together is what triggered the atrial fibrillation.

    It says, he didn't eat much, he had two big coffees, and an hour before the race downed a few caffeinated energy gels. That is a lot of caffeine on an empty stomach and racing at high altitude with little oxygen didn't help either. Caffeine can raise your heart rate quite a bit as well.

    However, over time I can see how pushing it to the extremes regularly can be damaging. It is probably good to monitor heart rates on workouts so you are keeping heart rates at a good pace. I also think a healthy diet with low saturated fats and lots of vegetables can aid in keeping the plumbing clear and being heart healthy.
    Last edited by aliikane; 11-03-2017 at 12:10 PM.

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    ghettocop;
    The reason that afib is dangerous and not to be taken lightly is the clotting. When the heart is tachycardic and in an irregular rhythm, it's stroke volume decreases and it can't keep up with the blood flow. Blood begins pooling in the bottom of the atrium. The pooled blood can begin to clot, and a clot can be "knocked or thrown" into your system. I was lucky and mine lodged in my kidney. Could have been my brain or anywhere else. If you know you have afib, at least get on blood thinners. With blood thinners on board you can choose to "live with" afib, and it can't really hurt you, but you know......get it taken care of. All you guys that think you may have something weird going on with HR pulmonary function, fainting, etc.........go get it looked at.


    Thank you for this great and helpful information. I started this thread two years ago to get a dialogue going for all of us who are dedicated to riding for our health sake. I have never been an endurance athlete, but I have dedicated my life to staying fit and healthy.

    By having this thread, I believe it is MTBR's way to provide a continuous flow of specific information thus, keeping the majority of the dedicated riders safe and healthy. This is supportive medical information in the world of cardiovascular health for the dedicated athlete. Most information is limited based on couch potato health (or lack of). So little information seems to exist especially for those endurance athletes who thought they were doing it right only to find themselves facing new cardiac challenges.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocop View Post
    Thanks FC........I would like to verify what you touched on earlier, in that most Cardiologists in a general HMO/PPO setting are pretty ill-equipped to deal with athletes with cardiac symptoms. I live in Pacifica and Kaiser SSF is my headquarters. The patient they see is a sedentary, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, pre-diabetic, who is generally greatly overweight with a very poor diet. This whole "Athlete Heart" thing is just now gaining some traction, with more and more endurance athletes developing afib later in life. You can find tons of useful information on line, and get lots of support, but at home on a local level, the cardiologists out here are not quite up to speed yet. Granted, there are really good specialists in the area, but for the average Joe who has to use a health care system to get treated, the options are not that great.
    I posted here a year ago but maybe I should chime in with some words of encouragement. I agree most doctors look at younger athletes and feel a sense of relief compared to their average patient. However there are unique circumstances that pertain to athletes that need to be addressed. Iíve been the head of the cardiac anesthesia group at Sequoia for several years, and trained at Stanford so Iíve seen a lot of this stuff. If you are experiencing an arrhythmia go get it checked out. Lifestyle changes can help and might be the way to go depending on the circumstance, but certain arrhythmias long term can lead to changes in the heart structure that are harder to recover from. FC asked for recommendations on doctors and hospitals and Iím hesitant to look like a shill, but Iíll say people come from all over the country to have their ablations done by our electrophysiologists at Sequoia. Dr. Don St. Claire and Dr. Nellis Smith are both cardiologists that Iíd highly recommend that are athletes themselves, and are the first step in a cardiac workup. They can determine if you need to be treated by the Electrophysiologist cardiologists here. *

    *I want to disclose that I have no direct financial relationship with these doctors other than we are affiliated with the same parent organization (Pamf) like most of the private practice physicians in the Bay Area. I was hesitant to make a direct physician recommendation but decided maybe it will save someone on the fence a step and get them in. No matter who you see, remember if you defer maintenence on a house you can always move, you only have one body. Hope this helps.
    -Dave

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dpca10 View Post
    I posted here a year ago but maybe I should chime in with some words of encouragement. I agree most doctors look at younger athletes and feel a sense of relief compared to their average patient. However there are unique circumstances that pertain to athletes that need to be addressed. Iíve been the head of the cardiac anesthesia group at Sequoia for several years, and trained at Stanford so Iíve seen a lot of this stuff. If you are experiencing an arrhythmia go get it checked out. Lifestyle changes can help and might be the way to go depending on the circumstance, but certain arrhythmias long term can lead to changes in the heart structure that are harder to recover from. FC asked for recommendations on doctors and hospitals and Iím hesitant to look like a shill, but people come from all over the country to have their ablations done by our electrophysiologists at Sequoia. Almost all the major groups in the Bay Area use the technology Stanford so heavily markets, in case that was a concern. Dr. Don St. Claire and Dr. Nellis Smith are both cardiologists that Iíd highly recommend that are athletes themselves, and are the first step in a cardiac workup.* They can determine if you need to be treated by the Electrophysiologist cardiologists here.

    *I want to disclose that I have no direct financial relationship with these doctors other than we are affiliated with the same parent organization (Pamf) like most of the private practice physicians in the Bay Area. I was hesitant to make a direct physician recommendation but decided maybe it will save someone on the fence a step and get them in. No matter who you see remember if you defer maintenence on a house you can always move, you only have one body. Hope this helps.
    -Dave
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dpca10 View Post
    I posted here a year ago but maybe I should chime in with some words of encouragement. I agree most doctors look at younger athletes and feel a sense of relief compared to their average patient. However there are unique circumstances that pertain to athletes that need to be addressed. Iíve been the head of the cardiac anesthesia group at Sequoia for several years, and trained at Stanford so Iíve seen a lot of this stuff. If you are experiencing an arrhythmia go get it checked out. Lifestyle changes can help and might be the way to go depending on the circumstance, but certain arrhythmias long term can lead to changes in the heart structure that are harder to recover from. FC asked for recommendations on doctors and hospitals and Iím hesitant to look like a shill, but Iíll say people come from all over the country to have their ablations done by our electrophysiologists at Sequoia. Dr. Don St. Claire and Dr. Nellis Smith are both cardiologists that Iíd highly recommend that are athletes themselves, and are the first step in a cardiac workup. They can determine if you need to be treated by the Electrophysiologist cardiologists here. *

    *I want to disclose that I have no direct financial relationship with these doctors other than we are affiliated with the same parent organization (Pamf) like most of the private practice physicians in the Bay Area. I was hesitant to make a direct physician recommendation but decided maybe it will save someone on the fence a step and get them in. No matter who you see, remember if you defer maintenence on a house you can always move, you only have one body. Hope this helps.
    -Dave
    That is really great info, and not shill-like at all. This stuff is important. In my case, I agree they may feel a sense of relief, but my two cardiologists in particular, were not versed at all with fit patients and afib. I was lucky that the guy who actually did my ablation was pretty squared away, and had some experience with athletes. He kind of took the reigns after my first consult with him. My cardiologists seemed to be following a flow chart or template that was geared towards sedentary folks with a variety of health problems. I had a really hard time getting them to understand the amount of riding I do. They just didn't get it. They thought I was doing 3-5 mile rides three times a week or something. They assigned a personal Cardiac Nurse to me who weighed about 400 lbs, and would call me incessantly advising me to "try to walk around the neighborhood for fifteen minutes today!" "Have less bacon for breakfast". Just ridiculous insulting shit. I don't think to this day the three of them have any clue what kind of activity level a serious roadie achieves. Glad I'm done with all of that.

    IF IT FEELS WEIRD............GET IT CHECKED

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    I had felt some heart palpitations over a week or so last August and eventually spent some time in the ER on an EKG. Bloodwork clean, not a heart attack. Chest x-ray clear. Stress test on a treadmill went fine but I was able to see the palpitations hit on the screen as I felt them in my chest. Pretty unnerving to say the least. They felt like someone was hitting me in the chest, but on a random type schedule. I wore a Holter heart monitor for 24 hours. Everything came back within normal levels. It was eventually attributed to some energy type drinks that I had bought unknowingly. Vitamin water multi packs from Costco contained one drink called energy. Apparently my body had a bad reaction to whatever was in it and it was causing my condition. Once it was removed from my diet, along with any other type of stimulant, the palpitations went away. I have since started drinking coffee again with no ill effects.

    Now I try my best to monitor my heart rate while riding, when I see the heart rate hit 175 I usually start to back off and allow myself to rest a bit. When it hits to 180 range I have a hard time catching my breath so I try not to get too close to that rate. My weight loss of over 50 lbs this year has kept me focused on getting more miles on both my road and mtb bikes. My heart feels stronger than ever right now.

    But I have to agree that if something doesn't feel right get it checked. I spent a week stressing over the palpitations and feeling them get stronger each day. Which I assume made things worse. Even though I felt a little foolish once I figured it all out I was happy to have been checked and given a clean bill of heath.

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    Just read this on Jeremy poweers' Facebook page recounting some heart issues he's having. 4 minute HR average of over 200 with max at 216bpm....

    Another top level athlete trying to figure it out.


    """""Today was the Pan American Championships, I've had my eye on this day since the start of the season, itís always been a challenge for me to keep my eye on the 'prize' and as I've gotten a little older and taken more on my plate, I've had to select the races I go for more then ever. I targeted today and had a plan.

    Full disclosure: I didn't go 100% in Saturday's C2 / US Cup race and stopped early with this goal in mind to do everything I could to put in a ride I could be happy with at Pan Am's on Sunday. I knew from riding it at race pace Saturday that I could have a good day if I rode within myself and turned consistent laps. After an extended warm up / more recon of the course, when the gun went off, I was riding the race I wanted, in the front group and feeling good about executing the plan.

    Since the beginning of the season I've periodically been having some strange things happen with my heart, It happened at the season kick off in Rochester and at the Friday night race in Iowa City, I hadn't been racing with my HR monitor in the races because...I didn't want to know the data! (if you know what I'm saying here) But after those races I started racing with my Wahoo Ticker X, which records the HR file and you can download it after your work out is done, no watch needed. (it's awesome)

    So at Charm City, in Baltimore, the heart thing happened again, I downloaded the file and my heart rate was 213 for 2 minutes, I knew it, because...when your heart rate is at 213, you feel it. I shot the file to my heart doctor who after looking at my file said it was "non-threatening, I.e. low risk supraventricular tachycardia" no need to do anything about it, but to reach back out if anything changes.

    Today, same thing happened, but it happened for 6 minutes, my 4 minute average during this episode was 200 for four minutes and 195 for 6 minutes. My average heart rate for the past 4 years during racing has been 176-182.

    So, what does this all mean? For me, today was wild, I've had plenty of palpitations and strange things with my heart over the years, if you followed along you've seen me post some of the visits to the heart doc on my instagram and here on facebook. I always push competitive athletes to get their hearts looked at periodically as I think it should be mandatory to have a racing license (but thats for another day) - I've also been working on a couple other health things, mainly finding out I'm very sensitive to gluten and getting rid of some crap in my stomach that wasn't supposed to be there, but thats more qaulity of life, feeling great, and making sure I'm firing on all cylinders as a pro athlete, but despite feeling way stronger / healthier, etc. I didn't expect this, today's episode felt like I was going to pass out and my HR wouldn't go down despite stopping, so I stopped my race, riding in the chase group for 2nd place.

    I'm good and OF COURSE I'm going to dig into this more with my crew / doctors / friends and get some opinions, because I don't know anything about this other than what I wrote here. Maybe it is nothing - I'm not overly nervous about it all because it's never happened unless I'm absolutely throttling myself, which in ALL instances, has been the case. But for anyone that knows me, I don't play games with my health and I'll make sure before I race again, I'm good.

    Thank you to everyone who reached out and checked in, I'll do my best to keep everyone in the loop as I work to figure it out.

    Jeremy"""""
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  83. #183
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    Quote Originally Posted by Internal14 View Post
    Just read this on Jeremy poweers' Facebook page recounting some heart issues he's having. 4 minute HR average of over 200 with max at 216bpm....

    Another top level athlete trying to figure it out.


    """""Today was the Pan American Championships, I've had my eye on this day since the start of the season, itís always been a challenge for me to keep my eye on the 'prize' and as I've gotten a little older and taken more on my plate, I've had to select the races I go for more then ever. I targeted today and had a plan.

    Full disclosure: I didn't go 100% in Saturday's C2 / US Cup race and stopped early with this goal in mind to do everything I could to put in a ride I could be happy with at Pan Am's on Sunday. I knew from riding it at race pace Saturday that I could have a good day if I rode within myself and turned consistent laps. After an extended warm up / more recon of the course, when the gun went off, I was riding the race I wanted, in the front group and feeling good about executing the plan.

    Since the beginning of the season I've periodically been having some strange things happen with my heart, It happened at the season kick off in Rochester and at the Friday night race in Iowa City, I hadn't been racing with my HR monitor in the races because...I didn't want to know the data! (if you know what I'm saying here) But after those races I started racing with my Wahoo Ticker X, which records the HR file and you can download it after your work out is done, no watch needed. (it's awesome)

    So at Charm City, in Baltimore, the heart thing happened again, I downloaded the file and my heart rate was 213 for 2 minutes, I knew it, because...when your heart rate is at 213, you feel it. I shot the file to my heart doctor who after looking at my file said it was "non-threatening, I.e. low risk supraventricular tachycardia" no need to do anything about it, but to reach back out if anything changes.

    Today, same thing happened, but it happened for 6 minutes, my 4 minute average during this episode was 200 for four minutes and 195 for 6 minutes. My average heart rate for the past 4 years during racing has been 176-182.

    So, what does this all mean? For me, today was wild, I've had plenty of palpitations and strange things with my heart over the years, if you followed along you've seen me post some of the visits to the heart doc on my instagram and here on facebook. I always push competitive athletes to get their hearts looked at periodically as I think it should be mandatory to have a racing license (but thats for another day) - I've also been working on a couple other health things, mainly finding out I'm very sensitive to gluten and getting rid of some crap in my stomach that wasn't supposed to be there, but thats more qaulity of life, feeling great, and making sure I'm firing on all cylinders as a pro athlete, but despite feeling way stronger / healthier, etc. I didn't expect this, today's episode felt like I was going to pass out and my HR wouldn't go down despite stopping, so I stopped my race, riding in the chase group for 2nd place.

    I'm good and OF COURSE I'm going to dig into this more with my crew / doctors / friends and get some opinions, because I don't know anything about this other than what I wrote here. Maybe it is nothing - I'm not overly nervous about it all because it's never happened unless I'm absolutely throttling myself, which in ALL instances, has been the case. But for anyone that knows me, I don't play games with my health and I'll make sure before I race again, I'm good.

    Thank you to everyone who reached out and checked in, I'll do my best to keep everyone in the loop as I work to figure it out.

    Jeremy"""""
    Wow!!!!!

    Same thing happened to Lenard Zinn, author at Velonews. He has amazing write-ups on the whole journey. Bottom line after some failed fixes is no more riding hard.
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    Thanks for the articles!

    fasterskier.com/fsarticle/lifelong-skiers-show-increased-risk-of-developing-heart-arrhythmias/]Lifelong Skiers Show Increased Risk of Developing Heart Arrhythmias - FasterSkier.com

    Thank you FC for listing this one of several great sport's research articles. For me, this illustrates the fine line between what we are capable of doing versus what is necessary to achieve good conditioning without the upper end stress to the cardiovascular system. This is a very reveling article regarding endurance events and training. Apparently, cardiac research in XC skiers has been a long time study in Sweden.

    Today, skiers are still being used to investigate how endurance training can change the heart. A recent study by Swedish researchers found that elite nordic skiers frequently developed heart arrhythmias. While most people assume that endurance training has only positive effects on cardiovascular health, a growing body of work suggests that a lifetime of exercise can contribute to cardiac abnormalities.
    ďBasically, this study shows, that even though physical activity is generally healthy, athletes committed to endurance sports at elite level have higher risk of suffering from a heart rhythm disorder,Ē lead researcher Kasper Andersen of Uppsala University said in a press release. ďThere seems to be a relation with the duration of the sport commitment and at which level the athletes competed.Ē
    The study surveyed skiers who completed Swedenís Vasaloppet, one of the longest and most popular races in the world. In all, over 47,000 skiers who competed between 1989 and 1998 were included, and those who had competed five or more of the races had a 29 percent higher frequency of heart arrhythmias.

    But Dr. Andresen said that the increase in arrthymias did not lead to an increase in fatalities. So what does this mean for athletes?


    Lifelong Skiers Show Increased Risk of Developing Heart Arrhythmias - FasterSkier.com

    So, am I safe to assume that the non-competitive levels we ride at have significantly lower chances of contributing to arrhythmia occurrences or increased chance of developing it? This is assuming that we start with a heathy heart.

    From my own athletic work experience, I feel I'm in constant touch with my level of cardiac output. My breathing, when at higher levels of work, dictates my performance without feeling I'm over doing it. This was something I learned years ago in the late 1980's and early 1990's when I trained and ran 10K races (generally 4 to 5 a year). In training, I ran 5 miles every other day for five or 6 years at a moderate 6:20/mile. I continued to worked at falling into a rhythmic pattern which I maintained for the vast majority of an event. My competitive skier's knees began to bark constantly so, I took up MTB bike riding to replace running. Today, I still feel very fit (sans recent shoulder injury) and am capable of a sustained active workout. I guess each has his or her level of output that is borderline comfortable. I no longer push passed my discomfort levels and enjoy settling into a high output rhythm. I love climbing!

    My thoughts anyway...

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    Thanks Mike

    Quote Originally Posted by Internal14 View Post
    Just read this on Jeremy poweers' Facebook page recounting some heart issues he's having. 4 minute HR average of over 200 with max at 216bpm....

    Another top level athlete trying to figure it out.


    """""Today was the Pan American Championships, I've had my eye on this day since the start of the season, itís always been a challenge for me to keep my eye on the 'prize' and as I've gotten a little older and taken more on my plate, I've had to select the races I go for more then ever. I targeted today and had a plan.

    Full disclosure: I didn't go 100% in Saturday's C2 / US Cup race and stopped early with this goal in mind to do everything I could to put in a ride I could be happy with at Pan Am's on Sunday. I knew from riding it at race pace Saturday that I could have a good day if I rode within myself and turned consistent laps. After an extended warm up / more recon of the course, when the gun went off, I was riding the race I wanted, in the front group and feeling good about executing the plan.

    Since the beginning of the season I've periodically been having some strange things happen with my heart, It happened at the season kick off in Rochester and at the Friday night race in Iowa City, I hadn't been racing with my HR monitor in the races because...I didn't want to know the data! (if you know what I'm saying here) But after those races I started racing with my Wahoo Ticker X, which records the HR file and you can download it after your work out is done, no watch needed. (it's awesome)

    So at Charm City, in Baltimore, the heart thing happened again, I downloaded the file and my heart rate was 213 for 2 minutes, I knew it, because...when your heart rate is at 213, you feel it. I shot the file to my heart doctor who after looking at my file said it was "non-threatening, I.e. low risk supraventricular tachycardia" no need to do anything about it, but to reach back out if anything changes.

    Today, same thing happened, but it happened for 6 minutes, my 4 minute average during this episode was 200 for four minutes and 195 for 6 minutes. My average heart rate for the past 4 years during racing has been 176-182.

    So, what does this all mean? For me, today was wild, I've had plenty of palpitations and strange things with my heart over the years, if you followed along you've seen me post some of the visits to the heart doc on my instagram and here on facebook. I always push competitive athletes to get their hearts looked at periodically as I think it should be mandatory to have a racing license (but thats for another day) - I've also been working on a couple other health things, mainly finding out I'm very sensitive to gluten and getting rid of some crap in my stomach that wasn't supposed to be there, but thats more qaulity of life, feeling great, and making sure I'm firing on all cylinders as a pro athlete, but despite feeling way stronger / healthier, etc. I didn't expect this, today's episode felt like I was going to pass out and my HR wouldn't go down despite stopping, so I stopped my race, riding in the chase group for 2nd place.

    I'm good and OF COURSE I'm going to dig into this more with my crew / doctors / friends and get some opinions, because I don't know anything about this other than what I wrote here. Maybe it is nothing - I'm not overly nervous about it all because it's never happened unless I'm absolutely throttling myself, which in ALL instances, has been the case. But for anyone that knows me, I don't play games with my health and I'll make sure before I race again, I'm good.

    Thank you to everyone who reached out and checked in, I'll do my best to keep everyone in the loop as I work to figure it out.

    Jeremy"""""
    Thank you Mike for this information. I think this discussion is pertinent to all of us who are in the middle regarding our physical activity levels. It would be great if the cardio-geniuses out there come up with ideas how to train differently.

  87. #187
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    Quote Originally Posted by RooHarris View Post
    Thank you Mike for this information. I think this discussion is pertinent to all of us who are in the middle regarding our physical activity levels. It would be great if the cardio-geniuses out there come up with ideas how to train differently.
    Sadly, it will probably take decades to develop enough data to even get an idea of where the line is. The reality is we are talking about a very small percentage of the population that this will ever be an issue. The good take from the ski article is there doesnít seem to be an increase in mortality from it, but again, this is one study with limited data (we would need to track everyone for the rest of their lives to get an idea if mortality is affected).

    I believe we can make one safe conclusion. Overall, even the guys on the extreme end of the endurance curve that are having these issues are living happier and better lives than someone sitting on the sofa drinking soda and eating chips all day.


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    Afib situation with a friend

    [QUOTE=Cary;13408495]Sadly, it will probably take decades to develop enough data to even get an idea of where the line is. The reality is we are talking about a very small percentage of the population that this will ever be an issue. The good take from the ski article is there doesnít seem to be an increase in mortality from it, but again, this is one study with limited data (we would need to track everyone for the rest of their lives to get an idea if mortality is affected).

    I believe we can make one safe conclusion. Overall, even the guys on the extreme end of the endurance curve that are having these issues are living happier and better lives than someone sitting on the sofa drinking soda and eating chips all day.


    Cary,

    I thought that I would add another perspective from a friend who periodically guided with me at the M5. He has had some issues in the past and now must seek treatment. Once someone develops a heart rhythm disorder or arrthymia it needs to be addressed as it does not go away, but will most likely become more of a medical issue becoming a potential risk later in life. This is Craig's email to me on this subject:

    [I]Roo,
    Thanks for sharing this interesting article, which is accompanied by some equally interesting comments. From everything Iíve been able to read, I donít believe that there is a clear answer to your question regarding whether the level of riding you/we are doing is increasing the likelihood of developing or exacerbating arrhythmias.*

    From all the studies Iíve reviewed, it appears that a high total cardiac load does increase the risk of developing arrhythmias. It seems reasonable that this cardiac load is both a combination of intensity and duration of cardiac workload. But I imagine that other factors have a huge effect on the physiological impact on the heart. Factors such as rest after demanding efforts, maintenance of hydration status during and following endurance exercise, the ability for complete physical recovery following prolonged exercise at various ages, etc.*

    There are also genetic factors that place some of us at greater risk of developing arrhythmias, which may be potentiated by endurance exercise. Considering genetic differences, compared to others, some individuals may tolerate greater cardiac loads without significant adverse consequences.*

    As one of the commentators noted, some studies have suggested a significant increased risk for arrhythmias with a lifetime endurance exercise load >1500 hours. Exercising a mere 6 hours (3 2-hour rides) a week adds up to to >1500 hours in only 5 years. So by that standard, we all are at increased risk. But again, intensity of the exercise, as well as rest and recovery following each exercise session, surely plays a big role in outcome.*

    From a personal standpoint, for over 40 of my 65 years, I have had a yearly endurance exercise total of at least 1000-1500 hours. A large portion of these exercise hours were performed at relatively high intensity and frequently with poor rest and recovery. It took up until about 7 years ago for it to catch up to me and maybe I was always destined to develop arrhythmias, since they are present in my family at an increased rate.

    I believe that your riding practices of not riding too intensely or doing long death marches, combined with good rest and recovery between rides, should lessen the potential of your endurance exercise harming your heart. Of course, all of this concern for heart health needs to be weighed against the joy we all experience from riding, as well as the obvious physical and mental benefits derived.

    Ride on,
    Craig

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    Leonard Zinn's latest article on afib...

    I wanted to dig this thread up again from the cellar. It is as a subject that should not be avoided especially if your have any cardiac concerns later in your riding career. Unfortunately, most of us want to be in denial that we can possibly fall into the issues that have been discussed above.
    Leonard Zinn's most recent article on afib and the use of an e-bike in such a circumstance. I personally feel that this is a situation that warrants the use of an e-bike. Otherwise, I do not favor them. I am 71 and still riding my Ripley 4 days/week throughout the year. I have never been an ultra-racing type. Just someone who has always incorporated exercise on a daily basis. The ultra folks seem driven to the point where cardiac concerns should be seriously considered earlier in life.

    Zinn: An e-bike can be life-changing for a lifelong cyclist | VeloNews.com

  90. #190
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    Quote Originally Posted by RooHarris View Post
    I wanted to dig this thread up again from the cellar. It is as a subject that should not be avoided especially if your have any cardiac concerns later in your riding career. Unfortunately, most of us want to be in denial that we can possibly fall into the issues that have been discussed above.
    Leonard Zinn's most recent article on afib and the use of an e-bike in such a circumstance. I personally feel that this is a situation that warrants the use of an e-bike. Otherwise, I do not favor them. I am 71 and still riding my Ripley 4 days/week throughout the year. I have never been an ultra-racing type. Just someone who has always incorporated exercise on a daily basis. The ultra folks seem driven to the point where cardiac concerns should be seriously considered earlier in life.

    Zinn: An e-bike can be life-changing for a lifelong cyclist | VeloNews.com


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  91. #191
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    Quote Originally Posted by RooHarris View Post
    I wanted to dig this thread up again from the cellar. It is as a subject that should not be avoided especially if your have any cardiac concerns later in your riding career. Unfortunately, most of us want to be in denial that we can possibly fall into the issues that have been discussed above.
    Leonard Zinn's most recent article on afib and the use of an e-bike in such a circumstance. I personally feel that this is a situation that warrants the use of an e-bike. Otherwise, I do not favor them. I am 71 and still riding my Ripley 4 days/week throughout the year. I have never been an ultra-racing type. Just someone who has always incorporated exercise on a daily basis. The ultra folks seem driven to the point where cardiac concerns should be seriously considered earlier in life.

    Zinn: An e-bike can be life-changing for a lifelong cyclist | VeloNews.com
    Right on, good find. Zinn is a good, good man.
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    Mark Weir almost died in late October with a 99% blockage.

    It's taken him this long to open up about it but he feels it's a story worth telling since there are many, many out there with this hidden danger inside them.

    https://reviews.mtbr.com/mark-weir-s...s-heart-attackCardiac concerns later in life...-screen-shot-2018-12-03-11.20.56-am.jpg
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    Thank you!

    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    Mark Weir almost died in late October with a 99% blockage.

    It's taken him this long to open up about it but he feels it's a story worth telling since there are many, many out there with this hidden danger inside them.

    https://reviews.mtbr.com/mark-weir-s...s-heart-attackClick image for larger version. 

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    Thank you for posting this FC. None of us are immune.

    And, to Mark: All of us from the mendo-coast wish you a speedy recovery. Damn, you are tough, dude!

  94. #194
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    My friend Wayne who owns Atomik wheels just posted this:

    Wayne - So I may be able to add another perspective to this...i died about 2 years ago of a heart attack and was fortunate enough to be discovered soon after it happened and brought back to life. The chest pains happen gradually and you dont really feel it...think of it this way....you have accumulated a lot.of plaque over 30/40/50 years....why would you NOT go and have a stress test? Stupid if you ask me. Yet, most people that I know will not do it....like if they dont know about it, its not there....the wife of a friend of mine ( h3 is also a sells stents ) forced her husband to.get checked and was admitted immediately after the test, had a bypass. You owe it to you family. Not like the movies....I passed out and that was it, lights out. I am.one very lucky person...

    Cardiac concerns later in life...-43687653_10156710294114376_8356897663748145152_o.jpg
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  95. #195
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    So how do you make sure insurance covers it or you get your doc to refer you out?

    I got blown off by my GP for even asking (yes heís fired, and Iím looking for another).
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  96. #196
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    Quote Originally Posted by stripes View Post
    So how do you make sure insurance covers it or you get your doc to refer you out?

    I got blown off by my GP for even asking (yes heís fired, and Iím looking for another).
    Weird. Wasn't a problem when I asked.

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  97. #197
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    [QUOTE=fc;13905317]My friend Wayne who owns Atomik wheels just posted this:

    ....why would you NOT go and have a stress test? Stupid if you ask me. Yet, most people that I know will not do it....like if they dont know about it, its not there....the wife of a friend of mine ( h3 is also a sells stents ) forced her husband to.get checked and was admitted immediately after the test, had a bypass. You owe it to you family. Not like the movies....I passed out and that was it, lights out. I am.one very lucky person...



    Wayne what exactly should I be requesting from my GP? Is there a specific name for the test? You have certainly pique my interest. Thank you for your insights.

  98. #198
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    Quote Originally Posted by RooHarris View Post


    Wayne what exactly should I be requesting from my GP? Is there a specific name for the test? You have certainly pique my interest. Thank you for your insights.
    It's called a "Coronary Artery Calcium scan". See more info here: GET A SCAN ‚Äď No More Broken Hearts
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  99. #199
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    Quote Originally Posted by RooHarris View Post
    Wayne what exactly should I be requesting from my GP? Is there a specific name for the test? You have certainly pique my interest. Thank you for your insights.
    Iím amused at the concept of asking random strangers on the internet for advice about how to advise your doctor as to how he/she should be providing your medical care.

    If your lack of confidence in your doctor is so great that you think youíll get better advice on a bicycle hobbyist forum then clearly you need to find a better doctor. Google can be a useful tool but itís not a substitute for 4 years of college, 4 years of medical school, and 4+ years of formal specialty training, and actually doing that work day in and day out.

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