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  1. #1
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    Carbon rims wheel builder recommendation?

    Anyone have any recent recommendation for LBS wheel builders?

    Specifically in any of the following areas:
    -Fremont/Newark/Union City/San Leandro/Hayward
    -Milpitas/San Jose/ Palo Alto/ San Mateo/ Redwood City
    -San Bruno /Millbrae/ Burlingame / Belmont / Menlo Park


    Have a 27.5 35mm(OD)30mm(ID) carbon rims with CK hubs that I need built.

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Trailhead cyclery

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  3. #3
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    Buy this book and do it yourself. It's not complicated.

    Wheelbuilding book for cycle wheels

  4. #4
    fc
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    Buy this book and do it yourself. It's not complicated.

    Wheelbuilding book for cycle wheels
    Don't do it!!!

    It'll take hours or days and your first wheelset is going to be mediocre. By your 10th wheelset, you'll be pretty good at it.
    IPA will save America

  5. #5
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    Ford at Tread in Campbell.

  6. #6
    MarkyMark
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    I've had a 3 carbon wheelsets (re)built by Ford @ Tread in Campbell. All are running true after years of use so I recommend him highly.

    Quote Originally Posted by bluesaint View Post
    Anyone have any recent recommendation for LBS wheel builders?
    ..snip
    -Milpitas/San Jose/ Palo Alto/ San Mateo/ Redwood City
    ..snip
    Have a 27.5 35mm(OD)30mm(ID) carbon rims with CK hubs that I need built.

  7. #7
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    Sun bikes in Milpitas! Theyve built all my wheels and does a solid job! Usual turn around time is just a day


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    Don't do it!!!

    It'll take hours or days and your first wheelset is going to be mediocre. By your 10th wheelset, you'll be pretty good at it.
    It doesn't take days, it takes a beginner about 2 hours to build a wheel. If it's mediocre then do it 10 times. I can build a wheel in about 1/2 hour. Learn to do it yourself and you'll never have to rely on anyone again and you'll have the joy of self reliance. This is far more important than a 'perfect' set of wheels.

    The first set of MTB wheels I built in 1990 I did with no instruction, no tension gauge, using my fork as a truing stand and looking at another wheel for reference. I rode those wheels for 5 years, no problems.

    With all the money you'll save you can also buy yourself a fancy truing stand with lateral and radial gauges. Here's mine.

    Carbon rims wheel builder recommendation?-img_4741.jpg

  9. #9
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    And, if you want to understand the math behind bicycle wheels buy Jobst's book. I'm a chemical engineer by training, so the math appeals to me.

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  10. #10
    fc
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    It doesn't take days, it takes a beginner about 2 hours to build a wheel. If it's mediocre then do it 10 times. I can build a wheel in about 1/2 hour. Learn to do it yourself and you'll never have to rely on anyone again and you'll have the joy of self reliance. This is far more important than a 'perfect' set of wheels.

    The first set of MTB wheels I built in 1990 I did with no instruction, no tension gauge, using my fork as a truing stand and looking at another wheel for reference. I rode those wheels for 5 years, no problems.

    With all the money you'll save you can also buy yourself a fancy truing stand with lateral and radial gauges. Here's mine.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_4741.jpg 
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    I'll beg to differ. Bluesaint has carbon rims and hubs and looking for a good wheel builder. He doesn't even have spokes or the wheel building tools.

    Just buying the right spokes for this setup and his weight and style is a critical decision. Achieving even tension on the spokes is not easy. And how does one even know how much tension to put. Ideally, you want to tension it close to what the rim and hub can take.

    The wheel is one of the most critical parts of the bike. Build it right and it will enhance the ride and with stiffness and weight good for the rider. A great build means it will be trouble free for years to come. A bad one means it'll come out of true every few months.

    I love building and truing wheels but it took a while. And many of my friends have tried and did not have a good experience. It's like welding your own frame. some are bad at it and some are great at it... eventually.
    IPA will save America

  11. #11
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    ^Yup^

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    Buy this book and do it yourself. It's not complicated.

    Wheelbuilding book for cycle wheels
    Buy some junk wheels and learn on something that doesn't cost carbon fiber dollars. This is like advising someone to learn to ride motorcycles on a full dress Harley.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    I'll beg to differ. Bluesaint has carbon rims and hubs and looking for a good wheel builder. He doesn't even have spokes or the wheel building tools.

    Just buying the right spokes for this setup and his weight and style is a critical decision. Achieving even tension on the spokes is not easy. And how does one even know how much tension to put. Ideally, you want to tension it close to what the rim and hub can take.

    The wheel is one of the most critical parts of the bike. Build it right and it will enhance the ride and with stiffness and weight good for the rider. A great build means it will be trouble free for years to come. A bad one means it'll come out of true every few months.

    I love building and truing wheels but it took a while. And many of my friends have tried and did not have a good experience. It's like welding your own frame. some are bad at it and some are great at it... eventually.
    Good points! I take a different approach to things than most people, I enjoy screwing things up and then figuring out why. That path is not for everyone!

    But, the most critical part of the bike is the rider.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forster View Post
    Buy some junk wheels and learn on something that doesn't cost carbon fiber dollars. This is like advising someone to learn to ride motorcycles on a full dress Harley.
    Then you can learn how to build junk wheels. Start with what you have. If a mistake is made, they can be taken apart and started over, or even sent out for someone else to finish. Nothing will be hurt by doing it wrong.

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    I'll take a look at the LBS recommended thanks! For me, time is not something I have with 2 small kids and busy tech job. I rather spend whatever time I have riding and not in my garage

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluesaint View Post
    I'll take a look at the LBS recommended thanks! For me, time is not something I have with 2 small kids and busy tech job. I rather spend whatever time I have riding and not in my garage
    There you go, priorities!

  17. #17
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    I highly recommend Ford @ Tread In Campbell.

  18. #18
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    Unless you find a good local shop, one of the best is famed endurance racer Mike Curiak, Lace Mine 29 - Big Bicycle Wheels

  19. #19
    fc
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluesaint View Post
    I'll take a look at the LBS recommended thanks! For me, time is not something I have with 2 small kids and busy tech job. I rather spend whatever time I have riding and not in my garage
    Nice!!

    What kind of bike is it going on and how much do you weigh? Sapim cx ray spokes are awesome. DT double butted too. Bass nipples is more reliable than alloy.
    IPA will save America

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    Nice!!

    What kind of bike is it going on and how much do you weigh? Sapim cx ray spokes are awesome. DT double butted too. Bass nipples is more reliable than alloy.

    Just dropped off the rims @ Tread for Ford to build them.

    They will sport nobby nic 2.6, Sapim CX-Ray, Sapim alloy nipples.

    I weigh 158lb and it's going onto a Custom AM Titanium HT w/ 150mm fork

    Components of any relevance
    -RF Next G4 SL w/ AB 34t Oval
    -XX1 Eagle: RD/Cassette/Shifter
    -Hope Tech 3 E4 (front) / X3 (Rear)
    -BikeYoke Revive 125mm dropper

  21. #21
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    Wheels for Midpen? Norcal? Tamo Flow? Important distinctions!



    (good luck and let us know how it goes)
    The broken are the more evolved. Rejoice.

  22. #22
    fc
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluesaint View Post
    Just dropped off the rims @ Tread for Ford to build them.

    They will sport nobby nic 2.6, Sapim CX-Ray, Sapim alloy nipples.

    I weigh 158lb and it's going onto a Custom AM Titanium HT w/ 150mm fork

    Components of any relevance
    -RF Next G4 SL w/ AB 34t Oval
    -XX1 Eagle: RD/Cassette/Shifter
    -Hope Tech 3 E4 (front) / X3 (Rear)
    -BikeYoke Revive 125mm dropper
    You can get a "hell yeah!"
    IPA will save America

  23. #23
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    This thread without (full bike) pictures is useless !

  24. #24
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    No bladed spokes?!?
    I wouldn't even get my hair cut except it's near the liquor store and it seems like my eyebrows need trimming now and then.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finch Platte View Post
    No bladed spokes?!?
    Sapim CX-Ray are bladed. And $4 a pop at LBS

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluesaint View Post
    Sapim CX-Ray are bladed. And $4 a pop at LBS
    Err, ok.
    I wouldn't even get my hair cut except it's near the liquor store and it seems like my eyebrows need trimming now and then.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    I'll beg to differ. Bluesaint has carbon rims and hubs and looking for a good wheel builder. He doesn't even have spokes or the wheel building tools.

    Just buying the right spokes for this setup and his weight and style is a critical decision. Achieving even tension on the spokes is not easy. And how does one even know how much tension to put. Ideally, you want to tension it close to what the rim and hub can take.

    The wheel is one of the most critical parts of the bike. Build it right and it will enhance the ride and with stiffness and weight good for the rider. A great build means it will be trouble free for years to come. A bad one means it'll come out of true every few months.

    I love building and truing wheels but it took a while. And many of my friends have tried and did not have a good experience. It's like welding your own frame. some are bad at it and some are great at it... eventually.
    I am going to disagree with your disagreement. Most bike shop mechanics are no better at building wheels than a decent home mechanic and want to charge a large premium to hack together a wheel set. There is no real magic, past spending some time to get it right. You mention spokes. It is simple, double butted, pick your manufacture. Nipples, brass for simplicity, aluminium to save weight, and make sure you have a four sided wrench to not round them (Spokey for $10).

    I can't tell you the number of shops I have had screw up wheel builds and repairs. Wrong spoke lengths, poor tension, improper stress relieving so they have to be retensioned. I never wanted to build wheels, but after enough poor experiences with different shops, I decided if I wanted it right to do it myself. All the necessary tools can be had for less than $100. Add another $70 if you want a tensionmeter (which I bought) and stands can range from using the bike with zip ties to several hundred dollars.

    This is not to take away from the real wheelbuilders. There are some great ones out there (Gravy, Southern Wheelworks, Lace Mine, and others), who have a great knowledge base and provide a top notch build. Unfortunately from my experience, they are the exception, rather than the rule.
    Riding slowly since 1977.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by yeti575inCA View Post
    Trailhead cyclery

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    +1 to Trailhead

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  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    It doesn't take days, it takes a beginner about 2 hours to build a wheel. If it's mediocre then do it 10 times. I can build a wheel in about 1/2 hour. Learn to do it yourself and you'll never have to rely on anyone again and you'll have the joy of self reliance. This is far more important than a 'perfect' set of wheels.

    The first set of MTB wheels I built in 1990 I did with no instruction, no tension gauge, using my fork as a truing stand and looking at another wheel for reference. I rode those wheels for 5 years, no problems.

    With all the money you'll save you can also buy yourself a fancy truing stand with lateral and radial gauges. Here's mine.
    Probably your first set of wheels that you built in 1990 were not as fiddly as modern carbon rims hubs and spokes, and you are more handy than most. I was getting frustrated just researching what length spokes to buy and needed professional intervention!

    Benny at Scott's Valley Cycle Sport did a great job on my custom carbon wheelset (but it's a little outside of the bluesaint's area).
    Half the planet is deep into bloody tribal mayhem. We’re just riding bikes (and drinking beer) here.
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  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by shredchic View Post
    Probably your first set of wheels that you built in 1990 were not as fiddly as modern carbon rims hubs and spokes, and you are more handy than most. I was getting frustrated just researching what length spokes to buy and needed professional intervention!

    Benny at Scott's Valley Cycle Sport did a great job on my custom carbon wheelset (but it's a little outside of the bluesaint's area).
    Actually back in the 90s the rim ERD and hub diameter had to be hand measured. Today you can look this stuff up an plug into an online calculator and it spits out the spoke length! I still hand measure though.

    Wheel building like anything, is dive in, take it step by step, and you begin to realize it's really not very complicated. This forum has some great wheel builders on it, that will answer any questions you have. Back in the 90s no one would help you!

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by shredchic View Post
    Probably your first set of wheels that you built in 1990 were not as fiddly as modern carbon rims hubs and spokes, and you are more handy than most. I was getting frustrated just researching what length spokes to buy and needed professional intervention!

    Benny at Scott's Valley Cycle Sport did a great job on my custom carbon wheelset (but it's a little outside of the bluesaint's area).
    If anything, carbon rims are easier as they are stiffer and more likely to be true under equal tension. Bring them up to tension and then just a little true.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD so please forgive the typos that occur when typing with two fingers.
    Riding slowly since 1977.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finch Platte View Post
    No bladed spokes?!?
    That brings up a good point. Building a wheel with blades spokes and carbon rims is far more complicated and time intensive that round spokes on a standard aluminum rim. it requires more tools, different tools, more time and a different process.

    Unless you're super mechanically inclined - learning to build wheels on carbon rims is a bad idea.
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  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    That brings up a good point. Building a wheel with blades spokes and carbon rims is far more complicated and time intensive that round spokes on a standard aluminum rim. it requires more tools, different tools, more time and a different process.

    Unless you're super mechanically inclined - learning to build wheels on carbon rims is a bad idea.
    The better point is, why would anyone build a mountain bike wheel with bladed spokes?

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    The better point is, why would anyone build a mountain bike wheel with bladed spokes?
    if you're that old fashioned, maybe carbon isn't for you, either?

    realistically forged spokes are stronger than non-forged. They allow for lighter weight - but also require higher tension. Even more reasons you may not want to cut your wheel building teeth on carbon.
    Stupid, but sometimes witty. Occasionally brilliant. Slow and fat though.

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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles View Post
    if you're that old fashioned, maybe carbon isn't for you, either?

    realistically forged spokes are stronger than non-forged. They allow for lighter weight - but also require higher tension. Even more reasons you may not want to cut your wheel building teeth on carbon.
    I would guess that if the average mountain biker did a blind comparison of a pair of carbon wheels with bladed spokes vs standard rims with DB spokes, they wouldn't be able to tell the difference.

    Is it harder to build aluminum or carbon wheels? This is like the old question, is it harder to weld steel or aluminum? I would say different, not harder.

  37. #37
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    BUMP - any recs for a wheel builder in the (north) Tahoe area? Probably looking non-carbon rims

  38. #38
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    Robinson Wheel Works in San Leandro. Chris has been doing it longer then just about anyone else around here.

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