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  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElHombre View Post
    If you don't know Plymmer, it will be very easy to spot him; you can't miss his car...
    Lemme guess—something Chrysler/Dodge/Plymouth from the 1960s???

    I will be needing to buy one of those maps from him.
    goodbye cruel world. I am leaving you today.

  2. #102
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    I can't believe this is less than 24 hours away.. can't wait to ride out with everyone tomorrow!

  3. #103
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    Maybe I'll see some of ya tomorrow to cheer you on, not gonna make it by 7:00 am for the send off, but we will probably do a Middle / Middle ride with lunch at HQ, so maybe we we see some of you there.

    Good luck all!

  4. #104
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    Man, I just hope I can wake up at 4:30AM and have a couple proper bowel movements before the ride. On this turd-riddled notion, I forgot to ask the all-important question: ought I bring a trowel and some wipes for this ride?
    goodbye cruel world. I am leaving you today.

  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker View Post
    ought I bring a trowel and some wipes for this ride?
    Are you that constipated?
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  6. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker View Post
    Man, I just hope I can wake up at 4:30AM and have a couple proper bowel movements before the ride. On this turd-riddled notion, I forgot to ask the all-important question: ought I bring a trowel and some wipes for this ride?
    There are at least seven bathrooms along the route...

  7. #107
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    We want bush!
    Here's to sweat in your eye.

  8. #108
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    Guess we'll be there to join the party. *gasp*

    Need to get up at 4am. Busy day and still not packed yet. Feeling stressed out. The silver lining is I've gotten tomorrow all day to meditate (yeah, that's Coe for me). I get the metric century in mind, but will do whatever it takes to get back to car before dark.

    Though the thread got me curious. Before we start putting stuff on the bikes, I weighed them with a scale. My bike (26 FS) is 27lbs and Mr. Mud's bike (29 FS) is 30lbs. We must be doing something seriously wrong and will have to scrutinize (meaning upgrade) in the years to come. For now, I'll have to pack light to compensate.

    See you all tomorrow at the start.
    Inch by inch, I will get there...
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  9. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by pliebenberg View Post
    Are you that constipated?
    Uh no, I just eat a lot and sh¡t a lot.
    goodbye cruel world. I am leaving you today.

  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudncrud View Post
    We want bush!
    Sorry, I shave.
    goodbye cruel world. I am leaving you today.

  11. #111
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    Jeez! My mind is swimming around in circles. It’s like the sort of “butterflies in the stomach” feeling you get the night before a race. I know, it’s not a race, but the sort of mental tricks your grey matter plays on you—the false scenarios of failure that you conjure up of not actually being able to complete the whole ride. Crap. I hope I get some sleep tonight.
    goodbye cruel world. I am leaving you today.

  12. #112
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    Another reason for getting the map...

    Quote Originally Posted by Fast Eddy View Post
    There are at least seven bathrooms along the route...
    The outhouses are shown on the map; don't bother with the trowel, wipes are always good to have in case of a mechanical or a medical.

    There's also some porta-potties not shown on the map; most facilities shown on the Coe map are the bomb-proof standard issue concrete vault affairs. I counted 15 on the 100 miler, plus there's a few more a short way just off the route.

    The ones that'll probably be of interest in the AM will be the ones in the Hunting Hollow parking lot at the start,at Willson Camp at mile 4 and the bottom of Grizzly Gulch at mile 10.

    Perhaps another Pliny contest to determine the greatest trail distances between outhouses at Coe???
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  13. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudworm View Post
    Guess we'll be there to join the party. *gasp*

    Need to get up at 4am. Busy day and still not packed yet. Feeling stressed out. The silver lining is I've gotten tomorrow all day to meditate (yeah, that's Coe for me). I get the metric century in mind, but will do whatever it takes to get back to car before dark.

    Though the thread got me curious. Before we start putting stuff on the bikes, I weighed them with a scale. My bike (26 FS) is 27lbs and Mr. Mud's bike (29 FS) is 30lbs. We must be doing something seriously wrong and will have to scrutinize (meaning upgrade) in the years to come. For now, I'll have to pack light to compensate.

    See you all tomorrow at the start.
    Woohoo! Harrassment does work

    My bike is 28.75 lb and my Camelback (with water, lights, food) is 15.5 lb. ElHombre has a 2 lb advantage on me!

    I had an emergency tonight - went to check the bike and discovered the headset had frozen up. It had been getting rough for a while but the steering simply wouldn't move. I pulled it apart to see if cleaning the bearing would solve it (some WD-40 got it moving) but then it fell apart and the tiny ball bearings went scattering all over the floor.

    I don't think you can imagine the level of my angst.

    My wife spent 30 minutes on the garage floor (painted with speckles to make this sort of thing even harder) and found all but two of them. I was able to get it all back together and will, at least, start tomorrow.

    So much disappointment! Time to get that 29er HT I've been wanting - I never want to feel that sense of loss again!

    See you all tomorrow!

  14. #114
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    2012 Hard COEre 100-imageuploadedbytapatalk1349555359.824159.jpg
    Lunchtime progress report - at HQ, grabbing a plate at Tarantulafest. Sean is way off the front, Brian dropped us and decided to chase Sean down. The rest of us are going to eat and relax!

  15. #115
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    2012 Hard COEre 100-imageuploadedbytapatalk1349569847.187875.jpgTop of Bear Mountain. Porkstacker is in his happy place - 'the worst climb I've ever done'

  16. #116
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    At Bear Mountain with ElHombre, Porkstacker and Plymmer. 48 miles, 110000'. B Ahead of us is MudnCrud, Brian Lucido and Sean Allen and the 100K riders. Feeling good. Night ride coming.

  17. #117
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    Good news!

    Quote Originally Posted by ratpick View Post
    At Bear Mountain with ElHombre, Porkstacker and Plymmer. 48 miles, 110000'. B Ahead of us is MudnCrud, Brian Lucido and Sean Allen and the 100K riders. Feeling good. Night ride coming.
    Keep an eye on LP please ! He is kind of a Coevirgin with a fussy constitution!
    Suicide by single speed. Work in progress.

  18. #118
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    Good luck guys. I wish I could be there with you but I have no suitable bike @ the moment (only road bike).

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    Bob, Tommy and I stuck together through the first 23 miles to HQ, which took us close to 5 hours already. On the China Hole downhill we ran into Charlie, who had broken his rear derailleur cable, but a passerby had already given him a new cable and he had just finished putting it in, except for duct-taping the extra piece sticking out at the end. We had lunch at HQ, where they were holding the Tarantula festival. Those Tri-tip sandwiches with salad and corn were great! Sean, Brian, Mei and Charlie refilled their water bottles and moved on ahead. Tommy decided to take China Hole back to HH from there, while Bob and I took Flat Frog, Hobbs, Middle Ridge, Poverty Flat, and Schaefer to the Meadows. I decided against climbing that bear of a Bear mountain and talked Bob into bailing out. Lost Spring, Mahoney Meadows, Coit road, Cross-Canyon, Grapevine, Anza, Coit Road, and Gilroy Hot Springs Road back to the HH. Only 43 miles in 7+ hours riding, 9+ hours total, but that's with 8433 feet of climbing. I'm even more impressed now by anyone finishing the 100k and can't imagine ever doing the 100m. You guys and gal are HARD COEre!
    Last edited by JL de Jong; 10-06-2012 at 11:16 PM.
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  20. #120
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    I ended up having to bail on my ride today, missed being out there. My buddy said he gave Charlie his spare cable so hopefully he got rolling again.

    Good luck to you animals riding through the night!

  21. #121
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    I was volunteering at T-Fest and saw a good number of riders come through. Chris and I were selling the meal tickets, and sold meals to the riders. C-dog was with us too.

    After T-Fest we did the Middle Ridge Loop again and got back just as it was dark. A cool night ahead.

    At the top of Lost Spring we found the 2 Google riders. From HQ I think they bailed down Poverty Flat Rd and took Creekside and Narrows hike-a-bike to Los Cruzeros. Then they took Mahoney Rd (not the preferred route, Lost Spring). Holy!

    We also caught up with Diskus on Lost Spring. Diskus rode out to the bottom of Bear Mtn and saw a bunch of the riders go by out there.

    Tommy made it home. Got text and email from him.

  22. #122
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    quick update

    Happy to report that we had seven 100 mile finishers (Brian L, Sean A, LP, mudncrud, ratpick, plymmer and yours truly), and two 100k finishers (mudworm and Skyline35) - congrats to all, and special kudos to mudworm for making that awesome 'finishers' noodle soup and to Skyline35 for knocking out an enormous ride after all his mechanical troubles.

    Brian put down a blistering pace, finishing in 15 hours and change, demolishing the course record, about 45 min to an hour ahead of Sean (more later, when the GPS units have spit out their data).

    Reading through the other posts, it seems everyone is accounted for and made it safely back out of Coe. It was a great day out there.

  23. #123
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    Well done! Congratulations to all finishers.
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  24. #124
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    WOW!

    Congrats to all!, Thats a successful journey!. Glad I was able to meet a good number of you at my post at the base of Bear Mountain. All looked strong

    15 Hours! OMG he probably rode by me so fast I didnt see him!!!!

    Looking forward to the full reports

  25. #125
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    Amazing... congrats to all the finishers. That is a seriously crazy-long ride.

  26. #126
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    Pictures first. Text comes later.

    All photos are linked to the album, which includes a few more that are not posted.

    Some of the starters:



    2012 Finishers. Not great quality, but at least the moment was documented.

    Skyline35 after 100km.


    Brian


    Sean Allen


    The remaining five rolled in close together since they stuck together after Dowdy.

    ElHombre


    ratpick


    From left: mudncrud, plymmer, Leopold Porkstacker


    And yours truly on the other side of the camera (100km).
    Inch by inch, I will get there...
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  27. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElHombre View Post
    Brian put down a blistering pace, finishing in 15 hours and change, demolishing the course record, about 45 min to an hour ahead of Sean (more later, when the GPS units have spit out their data).
    Something’s just not right with that guy. He’s a mutant freak, plain and simple!
    goodbye cruel world. I am leaving you today.

  28. #128
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    That was the most grueling self-inflicted painfest I’ve ever experienced. Next time around I think I shall do it on the fatbike though, more relaxed cruising geometry, smoother ride, and greater cornering/downhill confidence on loose/steep terrain. My 29er had some pretty worn out/crappy tires, and coupled with the short stem and super-wide-ass handlebars it was quite a delicate balancing act trying keep the front end on the ground on the steeper climbs, and going down those loose singletrack sections felt like a drunk guy in a rally car. The finest hours of the ride I think were between 7:00PM – 2:00AM or so, as the temperatures were just about perfect. Garmin battery died at roughly the 18,000 footie mark, so I decided to use my iPhone for the remaining few footies. I had a great time riding with you all, it helped numb the pain and insanity.

    Strava does a good job painting a picture of the pain I experienced:


    goodbye cruel world. I am leaving you today.

  29. #129
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    Was good meeting everyone. El Hombre, impressive route you put together. After taking a nap and eating a bit do not feel to bad with the exception of my butt. Was so incredible to ride and meet such a crew. Everyone had such a great attitude, I guess that is what it takes to finish something like this.

    @Patrick if my headset fell apart before the ride like that I would have died.

    @LP quite the first ride at Coe.

    @Sean Allen Your first ride a Coe as well, dam!

    @Brian, Holy smokes.

    @Mudworm Special kudos for crushing the 100k then staying up and heating up Noodle Soup and hot water for everyone.
    Last edited by mudncrud; 10-07-2012 at 02:57 PM.
    Here's to sweat in your eye.

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  31. #131
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    Big day, fun day, long day…

    I don’t believe I finished the 100km route. Whew! I have been veg'ing all day today. Here are some photos and a time line of my day:

    6:43am - I started a bit early so I could get into my own groove for pace, navigation, and breaks plus a little more time in cool temps. I rode solo most of the day but you'll see I crossed paths with many others.

    7:13am - Lyman Willson Ridge Trail - sunrise:





    7:31am - What It Was Like Out There™ …the freshly bull-dozed, steep, loose Steer Ridge Road. Ugly going.





    7:52am - Alright, some good trail news, the fallen tree at Anza & Grapevine trails is gone:





    9:02am - Coit Road - Sean Allen has erased my 40 minute head start. He slowed up and rode with me for a couple minutes then he turned off at Coit Spring Road where the routes diverge.





    9:33am - Food break at Mahoney Meadows (Mahoney Meadows Road/China Hole Trail/Lost Spring Trail intersection). I'm nearly done and mudworm appears.This means she has chosen the 100km option. She gives me a quick briefing on what's going on back in the group and is off. A couple minutes later I'm going too but…

    9:55am - China Hole Trail - Sigh, the cable always breaks at the pinch clamp on these derailleurs:



    Certain my day is done, demoralized I turn back to the car.



    The next rider along is Paul B aka SecretSquirrel (not in the event, just out riding around Coe). "You want a cable?—'cause I got a spare cable. Here you go..." I took it and Paul rode off.

    "Hey, no photos"....Paul B:





    JL and Bob came by too:





    I wasn't in the mood to mess with this but, you know, I took the cable and I guess I have to try. It was a hassle getting the old frayed cable out, and it took about 100 tries to thread the new cable through the dual-control lever. There was no way to cut the extra cable length so I duct taped it to the chain stay:





    Amazingly, it worked better than before and I didn't even have to touch the adjuster barrel all day.

    Alright, back on track. It did take me a half hour to, as a football announcer would say, "get my head back into the game". I had lost an hour and figured completing the route was now out of the question. The long climb up to Park HQ is a good test of the repair and cleared out negative thoughts.

    12:10pm - Park HQ - I knew that with the Tarantula Festival at HQ, it would be chaotic. My plan is to get in, snap a few pics, get water, and get out as quickly as possible. What it was like there:





    JL:





    Sorcerer and his wife Chris working the ticket sales table:





    Sean Allen was out of water:





    I grab a couple liters of water and limit my time at HQ to 17 minutes. I didn't eat there, I prefer to eat at the top of a hill and went to the top of Middle Ridge Trail for a food break.

    1:11pm - Hobbs Road & Middle Ridge Trail - Ha it looks like Waiters on Wheels is bringing me something :-):





    No, it's Brian (2011 LKHC champion). Wondering if he should turn today's event into a race, he asked "How far ahead is Sean?". I told him I'd last seen Sean at the water fountain. Brian gave me some words of encouragement and rode off "Hmmm, I'll see if I can catch him." Afterwards, Brian said he did so at the top of Bear Mountain.

    Just as I leave this spot, Bob rides up and says JL and him will bail at the bottom of Middle Ridge.

    The Middle Ridge descent is, as always, fun though very dry right now. Even drier is Poverty Flat Road. I took this photo of it a couple weeks ago:



    I push my bike up about half of this. That conserves the pedaling muscles and is a warm up for what may come next…



    2:28pm - Coyote Creek streambed, Narrows Trail, What It Was Like Out There™:





    2:47pm - Bear Mountain Road, decision time…do I go up that? Or turn back???





    I consume some easily digestible food for the climb:





    2:53pm - An awesome surprise, diskus rides up and give moral support:





    3:21pm - I stop hesitating and begin walking uphill.

    3:27pm - I hear voices, turn, and see at the bottom, another rider with Mike:





    4:02pm - it's mudncrud:





    We exchange information on who is ahead and who is behind. I'm really curious about the ElHombre/plymmer/ratpick/LP group. I fully expected them to have caught me by then. He said they were still back there. mudncrud eased ahead of me and disappeared into the distance. He was the last person I saw until the finish.

    4:29pm - top of Bear Mountain. That took 1:06. I snap this photo of the Survey marker as proof, I guess, that I had got there:





    …and one of the surrounding landscape:





    Looking back, the peak isn't too impressive from this angle:





    4:46pm - My first view of Mississippi Lake:





    The route has us going CCW around the lake. There is a lot of bushwacking on the eastern shore. I'm happy that I do this and upper Heritage while the sun is still up. It looks like I will get to Pacheco Camp for my second water stop before sundown.

    6:18pm - Pacheco Camp, 23 minute stop, filter water, eat a little.

    6:41pm - Sunset.

    7:28pm - Wagon Road the handle bar light had been okay up to now but it's time to put the MagicShine on the helmet. This is a long fireroad section and is very easy to ride in the dark. Temperatures are dropping and I feel invigorated, the last big Wagon Road climb up Phegley Ridge isn't too bad.

    9:05pm - Phegley Ridge Trail, one last bit of single track. I take a little tumble when my front tire catches a pothole in a switchback and knifes under.

    9:19pm - Finish!

    So awesome, mudworm and Janet cheer me across the finish line. It's cold but I'm so wound-up from riding that I am comfortable wearing just a jersey. Once that wears off, it's cold! mudworm has heated up a can of soup for me and it's wonderful. She has a stove and light set up on the picnic table in the middle of the Hunting Hollow parking lot. I hang out and see Brian and Sean finish but as 1am approaches, we realize that likely it will be 4am before the other finish so I drive off. Long day!

    Lots of fun seeing everyone, thanks to Paul B and mudworm, ElHombre, great event! Big efforts by everyone who finished.

    ///Charlie



    Start from at Hunting Hollow » Hunting Hollow Road » Lyman Willson Ridge Trail » Bowl Trail » Willson Camp » Steer Ridge Road » Spike Jones Trail » Timm Trail » Coit Road » Anza Trail » Grapevine Road » Coit Road » Mahoney Meadows Road » China Hole Trail » Manzanita Point Road » Park HQ for water » Manzanita Point Road » Flat Frog Trail » Hobbs Road » Middle Ridge Trail » Poverty Flats Road » Shafer Corral Trail » Narrows Trail » Bear Mountain Road » County Line Road » Mississippi Lake Trail » Willow Ridge Road » Pacheco Ridge Road » Heritage Trail » Pacheco Creek Trail » Pacheco Camp (water stop) » Coit Road » Live Oak Spring Trail » Wagon Road » Wasno Road » Tule Pond Trail » Grizzly Gulch Road » Wagon Road » Phegley Ridge Road » Phegley Ridge Trail » Hunting Hollow Road » Hunting Hollow parking lot. 64.83 miles / 10:46 moving time / 14:36 total time

    Gilroy:





    Cordoza Ridge



    Last edited by Skyline35; 10-13-2012 at 09:14 AM. Reason: Still finding typos
    Long live long rides

  32. #132
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    The Most of Awesome Coe Rides Ever!

    Congratulations to you all!
    Chris say's "Awesome too!"

    Brian really set a high mark for the ages. I heard he had only over little more than an hour of non-rolling time. It's an incredible pace.

    Coe is big. The riders are too!

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    Nice pictures, Charlie.
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    Hard Beating At Coe Saturday

    The morning started at 4:45 AM. I wanted to be early enough because I was brining maps for those that might need them. I get to the Hunting Hollow parking lot at close to 7am and see several of the riders I have nearly died with on long and amazing rides, namely Patrick & Dirk. Mei and Erik were there and LP, who I hadn't yet met (he bought one of the maps) and Brian Lucido and Janet Wagner. Brian assured us that he would be riding with us and he did for a bit of time but there is something about him that has to dart ahead an become some superhuman phenomenon.

    I get my stuff together, food for a day, snacks, bars, hammer perpetuum, water, clothing for the possible coldness of the night and various tools and spare parts. My camel back is scary heavy. Considering that I will be living in the park for 20 odd hours it is understandable.

    Finally after the preparations, we are off. As usual, everyone is waiting for me and that is pointed out to me. I saddle up and soon we are on our way towards our 1st climb, Lyman Willson Ridge Trail. Steep climb and this warms everyone up quickly. A large group this year. I see some new people but don't really get a chance to talk with them. Up we climb and soon we are at the intersection of Steer Ridge Road and Spike Jones Trail, the single track downhill reward for the tough climb. I start off tentative but soon get into the glory of the 1st single track. Soon we are nearing the end and my front tire slips on the loose dirt and I am sliding. Somehow I end up going over the bars in slow motion. I feel something hit my ribs as I hit and shrug it off. In my subconscious I think of rib injury. That thought makes it's way out and soon I realize that I have indeed bruised my ribs. I continue on and decide to keep it too myself. Gut it out.

    Down again to Coit Road. From there we ride up Anza Trail. A bit of a climb but Jackson Trail is skipped out and the fun downhill of Anza is enjoyed by all. Coit Road again and then up Coit Spring Trail. I lag behind a bit and start a conversation with Brett Kelly aka: Leopold Porkstacker that lasted the rest of the day. Performance Volvos, his training of his kids on mountain bike (they are ridiculously young for MTB), more car conversations, and his exploits in bike racing among a galaxy of other subjects. Good to meet yet another like minded individual again on a bike ride. We were the ones that stayed behind at a slower pace throughout this ride.

    The climb leads us to Cross Canyon Trail and Coit Road. There we take a brief break and soon we are zooming down Cross Canyon Trail, another fun single track. At the bottom, I see Patrick and Dirk looking for something and Dirk mentions that he lost a light last year. It is black and therefore as lost as my watch on Mudd Spring Trail. It could be anywhere. We ride on trying to stay on the bike on the technical bottom of Cross Canyon Trail. A ride through and soon we are at the Cross Canyon Wall. I attempt it but it is so slippery and loose that a clean is not possible. Plus, have to save the energy. I do point out to all in earshot that I did clean this wall once. On the list along with me are Mike Plimier, Chris Kangas, and Paul Nam.

    Soon we are taking a break at Cross Canyon and Willow Ridge Road. Another brief break (the pace was fast and breaks were short at this point) and we are off again. Willow Ridge. I see two riders looking at a map at Coit Dam Trail and Willow Ridge Road and after asking where we are decide to ride with me and LP. We take a right at White Tank Spring Trail the veer left on the landing strip, Hoover Lake Trail. I point out that they used to land planes there and the giant tubular X's mark the area so that planes know where to aim. Planes have landed a few times since and rangers are ready to ticket them.

    Hoover Lake Trail soon turns to single track and winds around and down to the lake. Question came up of getting water there and I pointed out that the lake was full of scum. It is even worse now. We ride on and soon are on Willow Ridge Road again. We ride on and the hills are not hurting me yet. They are pretty mellow and soon we are darting down Willow Ridge Trail. More fun single track downhill.

    At the bottom, we regroup and we ride the Narrows Trail and soon are at Los Cruzeros. I manage to be the only one to clean the Mahoney Wall and then, when the others catch up, I lead them on the Lost Spring Trail and clean that. I arrive at the top and see Eric, Patrick and Dirk. Eric (one of the night riders and one of the 2 Eric(K)'s on this ride). The others catch up but I decide to ride ahead in Dirk's group. China Hole Trail is another fun single track. Soon we are in China Hole. Very dry there. Patrick has an idea of putting all the skipping rocks where they are accessible when the water fills. No time. We ride on and soon we are breaking at Manzanita Point bench. A quick bite and then move on. Our thoughts are on the Tarantula Festival and the food that can be had there. Closer and closer we get, Eric and I are riding together and we get to the parking lot at the park headquarters. Music, and a lot of people. A great and successful event. We get food, buying food tickets from Paul Nam and Chris Voci-Nam as they are volunteering there and talk to them for a while. Later they did a Middle Ridge ride. The food is good, I see people I know from the park and I buy ice cold water at the drink stand.

    Our longest break so far. Dirk and Patrick were ready to go so we rode off, me, Dirk, Patrick and Brett. Off to Middle Ridge Trail then Bear Mountain. Ahead of us were Sean and Brian. Brian took off after Sean wanting the win. I would never bet against Brian. Dirk and Patrick were ahead and LP and I bringing up the rear. We ambled up to the Middle Ridge Trail head to see Dirk and Patrick waiting for us. Patrick had what looked like everything out of his camel back and was in repair mode. Tubeless. Soon we were off again. Middle Ridge is a fun trail and now that Paul Nam has cleared all the trees it is regaining its awesome flow. LP had problems the whole way as he had to adjust for poor tire grip. Something like riding on ice he said.

    Then it was Poverty Flat Road. Pretty grippy at this point and cleaning was done by all. We catch up to Dirk and Patrick taking a break at Jack Ass Trail. At this point it would've been a true pain going up that way. I was glad the route was reasonable. I suppose 100 miles and the worst climbs of Coe might be in the cards in the future but that would be even more insane. The ride to Shafer Corral Trail was fun but uneventful. We rode the Narrows Trail and then Bear Mountain. Nearing Bear Mountain we see Mike (Diskus) and talk with him a while. He had rode to the base of Bear Mountain and greeted several of the riders. We arrived last so he soon went back. Very good to see a familiar face!

    Bear Mountain was grueling as usual. I usually can clean most of it but that wasn't happening today. Legs not fresh anymore after 10K of vertical. It had to be done but I did put in an effort to clean some hills. Like most of the ride it was Dirk and Patrick and farther back, LP and I as we had a constant conversation going. It was good to take the mind off of the pain.

    At the top of Bear Mountain, we see Dirk and Patrick. Time for a sandwich. Good to eat often and I probably could have eaten more but somehow didn't. It seems every time I started (an effort to get anything out of the camel back with so much in there) it was time to go. I had to wolf down food rather than casually eat it. I totally understood. It isn't good to break too long and that break at headquarters should have been shorter as it was difficult to start up again.

    Down Bear Mountain to Mississippi Lake Trail. My derrailuer was stuck in the small gear in front having a rock in it. I get to Mississippi Lake with the dying light and Dirk helps me to extricate the small rock as I cannot seem to find it. I decide I can make it to Pacheco Camp and don't filter water. We take off again and get to Pacheco Ridge Road then a right on Heritage Trail. This trail is in good shape thanks to a tree cutting effort earlier and another more recent tree clearing by Charlie. We almost ride all of it and only have problems at the end where it connects with Pacheco Creek Trail. It is a fun downhill with the usual brush scraping your arms and legs while you carefully navigate trying to stay on your bike.

    Pacheco Creek Trail goes pretty quick as it seems downhill. It is very bumpy and my ribs on my right side cry out in pain. I am very glad to get to Pacheco Camp and give my side a rest. The temptation to tell the others of my pain is great to acquire a bit of sympathy but I really don't want to whine. We get to Pacheco Camp with still enough light to filter water and eat and discuss the ride and joke around. It is a great group with the edition of the surprisingly strong LP. It is his first ride in Coe. I suppose you might as well see all of it at once. Sort of a tour of Coe. We were happy to be his tour guides.

    We take off and soon we are flying down Phoneline Trail. I am riding tentative as I don't want another crash and it is dark. Less bumpy so I feel better. We get lost a bit at the end but Patrick leads us out to Coit Road again. From there we ride down and then up Coit Road to County Line Road. Temperatures are fairly warm and I decide to take off my jacket at County Line Road since I am sweating. Not near as depressing as last year when we rode out of Pacheco Camp. I suppose we know what to expect now.

    Turkey Pond Trail is fun but sketchy in the dark. Very steep in sections so I take it easy. LP and I are both taking it easy on the steep stuff so I don't feel as weak. Kind of hanging together, checking each other. Good. LP is in front and soon takes a wrong turn. I lead us out as I have a pretty good idea of this trail even in the dark. From there we hit County Line Road again, crossing Kaiser Aetna Road (we know we will be feeling that pain soon enough).

    We ride up County Line Road, not too bad, it goes quickly. We get to the trail head of Dutch's Trail, have a brief break and then start up it. I am in back and have problems getting started. The wire on my light is hanging out and wrapping around things on my bike and getting frustrating. Fatigue creates anger as this is the toughest section to Wagon Road. I manage to get going. I am not cleaning hills at this point. I am beat. I hurt. I do manage to continue on and even though at the rear and slow, I persevere. I am afraid of the steep hills in the dark but do well and find it not as bad as Turkey Pond Trail. We get to the creek crossing and soon are going up. I try and ride as much as I can but the legs are a bit noodle. Luckily I know this trail well. No chance of getting lost. It can be a bit mysterious for those without the experience but I've been here so often that I recognize and anticipate every section.

    Soon I arrive at Yellowjacket Pond. The others are waiting. I start hiking my bike up knowing I can normally clean this but know my state and don't push it. LP does the same. Patrick and Dirk try to ride but are soon hiking their bikes. That makes me feel a little better about myself. We ride to the North Fork Trail without incident and the technical trail is too much. I ride as much as I can but ease up and roll with my feet balancing me. Must stay on bike. No crashes.

    Ah, now we get Kaiser Aetna Road. Up, up an more up. Demoralizing. I am in pain and want to stop and rest forever. Near the allusive end I cry out! Really, really tough. And I know that Burra Burra Trail and Center Flats Road will be the 2-3 punch quickly afterwards. I manage to get to the top and park the bike. It has gotten cold so an extended break is out of the question. We fill with water, empty our human bladders in real toilets, and and eat. We see that Erik is there. He has had a difficult time with getting lost and going in circles for a while. All alone in the dark. He is having what seems like a private conversation with Patrick. He seems delirious and a bit deranged but maybe that was just my twisted mind. Such a strong rider he falls in line with us and stays in with the lead group. I am the one behind. Still, I am carrying on. Not sure how much my ribs are affecting me but I suppose I can use that as an excuse.

    We leave Dowdy and head up Kaiser Aetna Road to Burra Burra Trail. I sweep and struggle up the hills. Very tough going. I catch up to the group at Center Flats Road. Last year I had problems with falling asleep at this point. I took 4 espresso balls at Kaiser Aetna road and am feeling ok. Later I take more and soon have taken 16. This and the Hammer Perpetuem have served me well. Soon we are at Wagon Road. I am slowly feeling better.

    We take that right on Coit Road (so close to getting to the car, but the route says no) and then down Live Oak Spring Trail. Tough going as it has been graded like so many other fire roads to different degrees of success. No success here. Loose dirt, rocks and scary at night. But all things come to and end and we get back to Coit Road and climb to Coit Dam Trail, the top of the climb. I race down to Coit and Wagon Roads. I had forgotten that Kelly Lake Trail was in the route. We got to Crest Trail soon enough and it was a long and slow climb to Kelly Lake Trail. From there a wild downhill night ride to Kelly Lake. We ride Crest Road. Very heinous for me. All things come to and end though and soon we were all zooming down Kelly Lake Trail. I was scared but took it easy and it was fun. At Kelly Lake it was quite cold. Patrick and Erik had to filter water, I opted out. I felt I had enough water and didn't bother to check. These later hours I wasn't that thirsty anyway. I would have filled at Dowdy Ranch but the water is horrible. Seemed we waited a long time and it was cold. Dirk and I decided to ride on. Soon Patrick caught up (Dirk was already way beyond me) and we all three took a break near Wasno Road. I shut the eyes for the first time and lied down. It felt so good. Later Eric and Brett (LP) show up. There was mechanical issues. We were a bit frightened that they might have gone the wrong way and someone would have to go back. Luckily (unimaginable situation) they showed up.

    Wasno Road to Dexter Trail. Fun downhill and even more fun was Grizzly Gulch Trail. I was feeling pretty good and was not sweeping. I was keeping up and staying ahead of Erik and riding well. Near the end with the grading I fell back. We took a break at Wagon Road then moved on to our next challenge Vasquez Road.

    I felt it would be a crapshoot on the condition of Vasquez Road. I could see that they graded it and riding down it we found it quite good. I've ridden Vasquez at this beginning section and found it scary and with deep ruts and crevices. Not the case now. We knew what was coming though. More hills. A combination of walking and riding got us to Long Dam Road. Long Dam was pretty followable and we came out to Wagon Road again fairly quickly.

    Wagon Road. Downhill for a bit. At the downhill bit Brett goes over the bars. I am right beside him and see it all. I ask the inevitable question, "Are you alright" and he says he is. Fitting that I should see his crash in great detail as he was there for mine mentioning that it was quite graceful. It was at that point I let him know about jamming the handlebar into my ribs on the way down and bruising my ribs. And then the longest climb. It seemed not to end. Brett and I hung together alternating hiking and riding. The conversations helped as before and soon we saw the others at the top and it was a good feeling.

    Down Wagon Road with only a brief climb then all downhill. Finally that phrase that Dirk kept repeating was true! A fast ride to the bottom. With Dirk and Erik at the bottom we see Brett floating down the hill. Such a floaty feeling to see a light drifting down the hill. Patrick had taken off past the gate at Hunting Hollow to get more feet. He was a bit shy and wanting all showing on his gps unit.

    The ride took awhile but it was flat. We rode and rode. We passed Redfern Pond Trail. We past a fence that never ended on the left telling me not close to Lyman Willson Trail head yet. We rode and rode. Anticipation was huge. We had done it. This was the last bit. It seemed to get colder and colder. Finally the Lyman Willson sign comes into view. Finally the end is near. Finally we see the Jim Donnelly Trail sign is in view. Finally we see the gate to the parking lot. Finally we are finished. In the lot we see Mei who takes a picture of us. I stop and turn my head. Fatigue. But complete. I didn't think I could do it while I was wailing away in anguish 3/4 of the way up Kaiser Aetna Road. That section killed me. But here I was. Tired. Brian and Janet are there to welcome us too. Brian has done something well beyond super human. It is hard to believe such a person exists. Me, I'm just stubborn. And, maybe a bit stupid. But I'm here.

    Mei treats us to chicken soup, good for what ails us. Something warm was soooo goooood! Thanks Mei. Very good talking and joking around at the picnic bench. Thank you so much for waiting for us Mei, Brian and Janet. Very cool of you.

    I pull myself away wanting to warm up and go home and sleep. All the way home I am slapping myself to stay awake. All the way home. Soon I am home. I pull into the driveway and go in the house not even bothering to take any of the many items out of the truck. I change and sleep, dirty and in pain. The rib pain is strong but it will not keep me awake.

    I still cannot believe I did this again. Wow. Three for three.

    Roy.
    Last edited by plymmer; 10-07-2012 at 08:52 PM. Reason: A large plate of tuna in my eye...

  35. #135
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    *Off-Topic*ProWrenchTip for ya here, 2cm section of heat shrink tubing put over the cable and shrunk down so only 1-2mm sticks past the inside edge of the pinch-bolt plate will help spread the stress from the cable delfection. Literally, as a reference using your picture here, where you see just the one strand left and where the 2nd strand remains you go just a smidge past the end of the second strand.Try to not use any cable housing sheath like some have tried, it makes the issue worse.

    ~LMK (Shoot me a PM) if you want me to show you what I mean in person, I'll be in SanJose most evenings this week until 5pm. I want a Lambic Beer as payment for sharing this.



    Quote Originally Posted by Skyline35 View Post
    9:55am - China Hole Trail. Sigh, the cable always breaks at the pinch clamp on these derailleurs:



    Certain my day is done, demoralized I turn back the car...

  36. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker View Post
    it was quite a delicate balancing act trying keep the front end on the ground on the steeper climbs, and going down those loose singletrack sections felt like a drunk guy in a rally car.
    Great ride! And the quote above is exactly how I feel on my hardtail.

  37. #137
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    Thanks for the ride report, Roy. I can't believe you've done this 3 years in a row. Maybe it's like child birth (according to my wife): you forget the pain and only remember the joy at the end. I hope your ribs are feeling better now.
    Last edited by JL de Jong; 10-08-2012 at 12:18 PM.
    Also known as Menso's dad.

  38. #138
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    El Tri

    Quote Originally Posted by JL de Jong View Post
    Thanks for the ride report, Roy. I can't believe you've done this 3 years in a row. Maybe it's like child birth (according to wife): you forget the pain and only remember the joy at the end. I hope your ribs are feeling better now.
    Thanks JL. I can't really explain it either. Maybe I think it is an obligation or maybe it keeps me young. Perhaps it is stubbornness. I don't really think I like the pain. Maybe just the accomplishment.

    Ribs. You know ribs. You just have to wait it out while sleep is disrupted and you happen to cough or move in the wrong way. Ribs. What do you do with them? Thanks for the kind thoughts.

    Roy.

  39. #139
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    Recap

    What a fantastic event - I always remember that this is the hardest ride I do every year but I forget just how hard it is. Finishing for the 3rd time feels just as big an accomplishment as the first time!

    As documented above, I had a problem with my bike while checking it over the night before - the headset had frozen up. I pulled the steerer tube out and WD-40 got the upper bearing moving but then it came unstuck and the bearings spread all over the garage floor. I thought I was done. My dear wife went over the floor and found all but 2 of the bearings while I tried alternatives. Somehow I got the bike back together in working condition (steering much improved although it would occasionally creak ominously during the day).

    The downside was I lost sleep, getting to bed after midnight leaving me with only 4 hours of sleep, and that restless with nervous excitement for the ride. I paid for it late in the ride but at least I was there!

    Huge kudos and thanks to ElHombre for his tireless work in organizing this ride, providing all the detailed routes, and single-handedly keeping the event on the calendar and growing. After this year's big turnout I can't wait to see how many turn up next year to test themselves!

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    Skyline35 and mudworm broke the starting rules and took off before the main group. But we had a large group start together, most attempting the full 100 miles.

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    It was very, very cold in Hunting Hollow (my Garmin showed 35°) so it was very welcome when the temperatures quickly climbed as we ascended Lyman-Willson Trail. Brian was already showing his strength, starting at the back and passing everyone on the way up; I wondered how he was going to contain himself to ride with us at our much slower endurance pace (and, of course, he wasn't able to, going on to set an unreachable course record).

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    Most of the pack started up Steer Ridge Rd together but quickly splintered into several groups. The day was looking to be quite spectacular for a big ride!

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    We regrouped near the summit of Steer Ridge Trail - this was the last I saw of MudnCrud until very late in the ride,. aside from a very quick meeting at the bottom of Spike Jones Trail, who took off at a fast solo pace.

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    I nearly missed the turn up Anza, forgetting about that fun little detour in the route. Here ElHombre leads Brian up Anza.
    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    A few of us managed to clean the Cross Canyon climb out of Coit Springs - that made me feel good and set a nice tone for climbing for the rest of the day.

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    This was my final view of Brian as he disappeared over the ridge ahead on Cross Canyon - his incredible time was even more amazing considering he spent the first few hours hanging back with us!

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    The Cross Canyon Wall looks so enticing with the work plymmer and others have done to create a clean line on the lower half, but it's just too much for heavily laden riders and we all push.

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    After the top of Cross Canyon Trail, ElHombre and I rode for a while with Eric, hoping that plymmer was hanging with the Google guys to make sure they didn't get lost

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    We've had every type of weather at Los Cruzeros for this event - today was a perfect 71°, making perfect conditions for the Mahoney Wall and Lost Spring Trail climbs. I was able to clean the Wall with very little pain which was very pleasing this late into the ride.

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    I had an enjoyable descent down to China Hole, cleaning the final rocky descent thankfully because I had my drop seatpost. China Hole still had a bit of water.

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    I chased down ElHombre on the climb out of China Hole so I could do the climb with him. There was a very nice breeze making it much more comfortable than usual. I really like the Manzanita grove on this trail

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    On the climb up towards HQ, I tried to recreate the "cover photo" I took for last year's Coe 100. I really like that photo. This is, perhaps, more representative of this year's Coe 100, with more color and less heat.

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    The whole way up to HQ I was really enjoying the colors all around - the normally brown and dull grass was a vibrant gold and the clouds in the sky just made everything picture perfect.

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    Last year we had spent 50 mins at HQ for lunch and had originally planned to cut this down in the 2012 running. We failed miserably, staying even longer this year. But with a larger group, we were enjoying ourselves so didn't feel the need to rush at this point.

    Porkstacker had been riding very strong all day and while the rest of us tried to minimize our intake of solid food to just enough to keep the hunger away, he got a double order! I was impressed! I can ride pretty well with solid food but this was a whole new level!

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    We took a while to get our stuff together and get moving again. I had set my Garmin on a USB charger to hopefully ensure it made it thought the night but unfortunately, it caused it to stop properly recording (without giving any indication of a problem) until quite late in the ride. Garmin sucks. I pasted ElHombre's track into the missing segment of mine since we rode pretty close together for most of that section.

    The two Google riders decided at this point to forgo the joys of a long night ride and made plans for a Middle Ridge descent then straight back to Hunting Hollow.

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    While descending from HQ, my front brake made the unmistakable metal-on-metal sound. These things always happen right after I've had the opportunity to fix it without holding folks up! So I determined to ride Flat Frog and Hobbs without using the front brake, try to get a gap on the group so I could replace the pads without creating too much delay.

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    I was pleased to see Middle Ridge is growing again, although still plenty of evidence of the fire. I cleaned the first wall with no difficulty, feeling great that I had this much strength this late in the ride.

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    Porkstacker had told us, amongst many, many other interesting things , that he really liked steep fire roads so we were pleased to present him with Poverty Flat Rd! Of course, it's not only steep but quite sandy and his tires were definitely not optimal - I have no doubt that he would be a spot in the distance if he had his fat bike.

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    Nevertheless, he seemed to enjoy it (where enjoy it means a lot of swearing

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    After a brief rest at the JackAss Trailhead, we got moving down to Shaffer Corral then along The Narrows.

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    We had wondered earlier if we would spot a tarantula on this ride and sure enough, on The Narrows, we had our only encounter.

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    On my first ride to Bear Mountain, I was given the full description of how terrible the climb was, how jaw-dropping it was to see it for the first time, so I did my best to pass that tradition onto Porkstacker since this was his first counter with The Bear. He seemed suitably impressed with it!

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    Near the start of the Bear Mountain climb, we ran into discus who had stationed himself out there to offer encouragement to all the passing climbers. Very cool! I assume he was responsible for this awesome creation as well!

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    There is only one known clean of Bear Mountain (our very own Brian Lucido) but I thought given the right conditions, I might have a shot at it except one of the first walls. It didn't take long on that wall to realize that today wasn't the day!

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    I made a pretty solid effort with the rest of the climbs and definitely got a new PR of around 43 mins (have no Garmin data for this section to know for sure). mudworm, proving that she should have been riding the 100 miles, blew this away by at least a minute in a very impressive performance! Porkstacker was seemingly having a great time

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    One of the most sobering events on this ride is getting to the summit of Bear Mountain and realizing that you aren't even half way done yet!

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    Everyone was low on water so we sprinted down to Mississippi Lake and filtered. Plymmer took the time there to fix a problem with his derailleur jamming up.

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    We had hoped to get to Pacheco Camp before sunset but it was clear it would be dark before then, so we fixed our lights at the lake. Sunset came not long after we climbed up Willow Ridge Rd from the lake, although I resisted using my light until we got down to Pacheco Creek Trail, enjoying riding in the low light.

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    We spent a little longer at Pacheco Camp than I expected, given we had filtered at the lake. At this point, we weren't really pushing for any particular time so longer breaks were ok.

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    Phoneline was uneventful this time, although in memory of it, my rear tubeless tire lost a lot of air while we were stopped at Pacheco Camp. I topped it up and sloshed the sealant around and it was solid for the rest of the ride. Turkey Pond was a lot of fun with all the trees removed (thanks to Plymmer and others who undertook this!)

    The climb up to County Line Rd to Dutch's seemed to take longer than usual but once there we ate a little and hit it. Dutch's is a fun trail but somehow it seems even more fun at night; we don't get to see the great views from the trail but when we did stop and turn off our lights, we had a great 180° view of the starry night which more than made up for it!

    As we descended Dutch's, I was reminded of last year when we found Aaron and Sean lost in this section we have named Coe's Burmuda Triangle. When we got to the creek crossing, I realized why - the trail appears to go into the creek when in fact it crosses it - that's obvious in daylight but not at all at night.

    We made our way up the steep climbs, walking a lot of them but giving some good efforts on others. Lots of regroups here so folks didn't get lost. I also appreciated the new signposts which make it a little easier to navigate here.

    We learned later than MudnCrud had taken a wrong turn here and done a bonus climb. He found his way to Kaiser-Aetna Rd and decided to wait for company for the remainder of the ride - we met him there later and he became a fast addition to our groupetto!

    The climb up Kaiser Aetna was draining as always, but not nearly as much as it can be in the heat. Porkstacker showed off his climbing strength here, powering ahead of us until ElHombre could take no more and chased him down! We rolled into Dowdy Ranch at just past midnight to find MudnCrud there!

    It's hard not to stay a while at Dowdy but it was very cold. Even though I was drinking a lot, I was feeling dehydrated which is never a good thing. We all decided to take our caffeine supplements at this point, hoping to avoid the sleepiness of last year's final 30 miles.

    We spent 30 mins at Dowdy but I got chilled to the bone while we were there. Mudncrud mentioned that the bathrooms were actually open, so I stayed in there for 5 minutes to warm up a little. The moon was finally up as we left Dowdy - I hoped it would help illuminate the way (I love riding by moonlight alone).

    ElHombre lead the way on Burra Burra which somehow seemed much shorter in the dark this year. Nearly every time I cross Burra Burra in this direction, I almost turn down the Dormida Trail but this time I didn't even see that intersection!

    From 2012 Hard CoeRE 100 - Oct 2012


    Once on Center Flats, we steeled ourselves for the short but difficult climbing to come. Although much better in this direction, Center Flats is very hard with 73 miles and about 16,000' already in our legs. I made good attempts at all the climbs - except the big one which I chose to walk. The final climb to Wagon Rd was soft from grading - I had been hoping to make a good attempt at cleaning that.

    At Wagon Rd, there was no talk at all about anyone bailing out. Solid group we had assembled here with firm resolve to see this through. I was getting quite sleepy and had started to lay down and close my eyes at regroups to try and clear the sleepiness away. A couple of times I actually fell asleep (blissful!).

    My foggy mind couldn't remember the rest of the route very well so I mostly followed ElHombre's lead. In typical fashion, he had started very strong, tired for a small period in the middle but was coming on very strong now; some don't need to train for epics; it's just built in!

    We regrouped at nearly every major intersection to make sure nobody got lost but otherwise went at our own paces. I had been drinking steadily since Dowdy but was feeling increasingly dehydrated. I had long lost the ability to eat anything - even Perpetuem tablets wouldn't go down. Sipping water was producing stomach pain. But I figured I would be able to hang on from here - riding out any other way wouldn't have been that much faster than just competing the course.

    I enjoyed the Dexter descent, even though I accidentally left my fork locked. ElHombre set a fast pace along Grizzly Gulch. At Willson Camp, every fiber of my being was saying to not go down into Vasquez but nevertheless, I followed everyone down and made reasonable attempts at the climbs to the Long Dam Trail intersection.

    The last 2 years we had got lost at the bottom of Long Dam but this year, ElHombre found the way through quite directly. We reached the final climb on Wagon Rd at about 5:50am. I remembered this climb was quite steep but I worked at it with a steady, slow pace, trying to clean it. Unfortunately, my tiredness was making my steering erratic and I steered into some gravel and had to dab. ElHombre had shot ahead up the climb and we both cheered as I reached the summit. It's quite a good feeling to know the climbing is done.

    It was really, really cold up here and found laying the grass was warmer than standing in the cold breeze. My Garmin was showing only 19,849' ascended which I knew I'd have to make up. We bombed down Wagon Rd, ElHombre and MudnCrud taking the lead, into a freezer at the bottom. While we waited there for others to arrive, I climbed up the end of Hunting Hollow Rd to the gate, adding some footies so that the deficit to 20,000' was small.

    ElHombre powered along Hunting Hollow Rd and I played catch up for most of the distance. At the Jim Donnely Trail, I took off up it in an attempt to accumulate some miles and footies. My Garmin clicked over to 20,000' quickly.

    Back at Hunting Hollow, I was greeted by mudworm and Brian wrapped in blankets; I didn't even have time to manufacture a 100-mile stare! Once I was done, I turned on my car's engine and after changing out of riding gear, sat and let the shivers subside. Then some very good chicken noodle soup courtesy of mudworm. I was able to eat the cup of noodles no problem but was getting pretty severe indigestion and nausea. It took a while for that to subside.

    Rather than hang around in cold Hunting Hollow and getting a little sleep, I drank a Red Bull and attempted to drive home. It was a bad idea as it was obvious I was unable to keep focus. I pulled off on New Rd and slept for 20 mins or so. After that it was still a battle to stay awake on the road but I was able to get home safely.

    It's hard to explain to others, especially cyclists, how just riding 100 miles is such an epic ride. A part of the fun of having more finishers is that there are now more of us who truly understand just how difficult this ride is. Hopefully, next year will expand that even further!!

    Last edited by ratpick; 10-08-2012 at 10:21 AM.

  40. #140
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    Maaaaan. I am exhausted after reading that

  41. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by francois View Post
    Maaaaan. I am exhausted after reading that
    Agreed, not to mention all that whining by plymmer

    Bravo to all of you

    So I take it no one was so inclined to go for Everest, that would be one hell of a feat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TahoeBC View Post
    Agreed, not to mention all that whining by plymmer

    Bravo to all of you

    So I take it no one was so inclined to go for Everest, that would be one hell of a feat.
    We briefly chatted with Sean at HH near sunrise, who said he was suffering cramps at the end. Brian had enough as well I think, though he probably would have gone if sufficiently challenged . Patrick was the last one to bring up the topic but he was shut down quickly ... it was just too freaking cold after that frigid descent onto the Hunting Hollow road to do anything but warm up and get comfortable/lazy...

  43. #143
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    Quote Originally Posted by TahoeBC View Post
    Agreed, not to mention all that whining by plymmer

    Bravo to all of you

    So I take it no one was so inclined to go for Everest, that would be one hell of a feat.
    Yeah.. I really wanted to do it just to prove you wrong

    But it was so bitterly cold and I just didn't have the gear. I did start up JDT at the end of the ride to get the final 50 feet to make 20K, and it did occur to me to just keep going, but since I hadn't let anyone know, I turned back which was essentially writing off any possibility of 29K once I was warm again.

  44. #144
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    Really incredible job, everyone!

    Question... Is Porkstacker more or less entertaining after riding 100 miles of dirt?

  45. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by tburger View Post
    Really incredible job, everyone!

    Question... Is Porkstacker more or less entertaining after riding 100 miles of dirt?
    The entertainment is non-stop. There was some incredibly funny stuff coming out - and the impressions!! - and I felt really bad that all I could muster most of the time was a small chuckle. Any other day I think I would have been RFLMAO!

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    Quote Originally Posted by ratpick View Post
    The entertainment is non-stop. There was some incredibly funny stuff coming out - and the impressions!! - and I felt really bad that all I could muster most of the time was a small chuckle. Any other day I think I would have been RFLMAO!
    LP is a force of nature - even on the hardest hills, while we were hardly uttering a word in order to save as much energy as possible, he was producing a non-stop stream of stand-up comedy quality material...

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    Quote Originally Posted by ratpick View Post
    It's hard to explain to others, especially cyclists, how just riding 100 miles is such an epic ride. A part of the fun of having more finishers is that there are now more of us who truly understand just how difficult this ride is. Hopefully, next year will expand that even further!!
    No worries - understood! Roadies might not understand. Coe-virgin mtb'ers may not understand either. But we get it! You guys/gals are all heroes in my book.
    Half the planet is deep into bloody tribal mayhem. We’re just riding bikes (and drinking beer) here.
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    HC100 video

    Hey all - here's a video of Garret and I's failed attempt a few weeks ago. Looks like most of you had a great day this weekend. 15 hours is incredible. Cheers!

    from Aaron Johnson on Vimeo.


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    Oh, and I borrowed the tarantula cover photo from pliebenberg - sweet photo. Sorry, should have asked to use it first, hopefully he or she doesn't mind! Thanks!

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    Quote Originally Posted by ElHombre View Post
    LP is a force of nature - even on the hardest hills, while we were hardly uttering a word in order to save as much energy as possible, he was producing a non-stop stream of stand-up comedy quality material...
    +1 on the force of nature deal. Despite his ... "R" to "NC-17" Parental guidance ratings we all compete to get him to go on our rides. Dion and myself / STCP and Kennedy. Now you and your "Coehorts" will want him @ Coe. We need three of him?
    Suicide by single speed. Work in progress.

  51. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by ayayron View Post
    Hey all - here's a video of Garret and I's failed attempt a few weeks ago. Looks like most of you had a great day this weekend. 15 hours is incredible. Cheers!
    That is one seriously awesome production! I will adopt this as the official 2012 video if you don't mind.

    I can't believe you took the time to compose entire scenes and shots while trying to finish the course in 90+ degrees. So much to like in here, the sunset run down the Burra Burra singletrack through the tall golden grass for instance. And of course the bike portage up Bear Mountain
    Last edited by ElHombre; 10-08-2012 at 04:16 PM.

  52. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by ayayron View Post
    Hey all - here's a video of Garret and I's failed attempt a few weeks ago. Looks like most of you had a great day this weekend. 15 hours is incredible. Cheers!
    Wow! I knew I should have taken my GoPro.. this is fantastic!

  53. #153
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    No; he doesn't mind...

    Quote Originally Posted by ayayron View Post
    Oh, and I borrowed the tarantula cover photo from pliebenberg - sweet photo. Sorry, should have asked to use it first, hopefully he or she doesn't mind! Thanks!
    ...if fact, he takes it as a compliment. Glad you could use it!

    Congrats to all the participants in this event (regardless of the distances covered); Great job!

    Aaron; if you and Garret hadn't spent so much time shooting video you might have been able to claim the 100 miler! (but I'm glad you took the time to do it!)
    Content here does not officially represent the CA DPR.

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  54. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by ratpick View Post
    The entertainment is non-stop. There was some incredibly funny stuff coming out - and the impressions!! - and I felt really bad that all I could muster most of the time was a small chuckle. Any other day I think I would have been RFLMAO!
    He wasn't very entertaining while wolfing down the two plates of food. He didn't even introduce himself.

    Awesome thread. I have some ridiculous aspirations of making the 100k sometime...

  55. #155
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    Wow, that was hard....

    First off, thanks to Dirk and the rest of the crew that helped to put on such a epic event. I was amazed at the amount of work it must have taken to connect the network of roads, trails, game trails, rodent trails, insect trails....(I think you get my point) It was obviously a labor of love to put this on and it showed!

    Anyone who completed this is a complete badass, I don't care how long it took you.

    Congrats to Brian as well, super nice guy and I can think of no one more deserving of the title. There is time to shave from that, and I am sure he is the man to do it.

    Some thoughts on the way to HQ:

    Great trails and roads, steep, but very fun.

    Spike Jones and Anza trails were great as was the pretty stretch up the streambed where my GPS failed.

    The view of in the distance to Coit Lake(?) from Willow Ridge(?) was beautiful as well.

    China Hole Trail, up and down was really nice.



    I certainly suffered in not knowing the course and upon further self reflection, not respecting the terrain. When I first started looking at the cue sheets I figured it would be no problem to make it to HQ in 4 hours. I haven't averaged less than 8-9 miles an hour in a ride or race in years so that seemed completely appropriate. Had I known that the 34 miles to HQ would involve nearly 8,500' of climbing I would have adjusted my lofty expectations.

    I also had a bit of a GPS issue that conspired against me when my gps died and upon restarting it added an undetermined amount of miles to my total. Great, now my cue sheets and map are useless Completely my fault for using the wrong batteries, nonetheless it made life difficult for a newbie.

    I ran out of water at 11:06 and finally made it to HQ at 12:36. That one hour and twenty minutes without water made the next 10 hours completely miserable at times. Had I known where I was and how to get back to the car, I likely would have bailed. I'm glad I didn't, but it certainly crossed my mind.

    Some thoughts out past HQ:

    Middle Ridge Trail is a screamer, but who the hell built that thing, wow...

    Poverty Flats Rd is a *****.

    I walked all of Bear Mountain hoping to save some matches for later lighting. My matches were sweat soaked by the time I got to the top and would never relight again

    Beautiful country out around Mississippi Lake and Pacheco Camp.



    Brian appeared out of nowhere at the top of Bear Mountain and besides my two visits with Charlie, I saw no one else out on the trails away from HQ. It was nice to ride with Brian. As we chatted I finally made the connection as to who he was since our introduction at HH was pretty basic. Although he is quite a bit younger than me and I don't think we ever raced each other personally, we had raced tandems against each other at Sea Otter and Downieville. We both made some wrong turns and had a couple of mechanicals, but generally waited for each other on the way out to Dowdy.

    We rode together till Dowdy Ranch where he disappeared into the evening sunset on Burra Burra Trail. I would see his lights every so often, but other than that it was pretty solitary out there. It was a spectacular evening though. I stopped more than a few times and turned my lights off to enjoy the stars and what I assume were the lights of Gilroy.

    I had been suffering from cramps on and off since Pacheco Camp, but out past Dowdy they became more of an issue and forced me off the bike. No matter how much I screamed and cursed at them, my legs just wouldn't go and the debilitating type of cramps were getting more common. Walking was the order of the night and I became resigned to it.

    Some thoughts out past Dowdy Ranch:

    There are no flats on Center Flats Rd.

    I got a hoot and a wave from a camper at Kelly Lake(?)

    I got turned around at the intersection of Vasquez Rd and the outgoing GPS track and almost bailed out, glad I didn't.

    Got completely lost in the Long Dam Trail area and walked around for what seemed like eternity until I just plunged off the side of the mountain following my GPS track and found the trail.

    Not knowing where I was made every climb seem like the "last climb" on the cue sheets.

    Wagon Rd sucked and I walked every inch of it.

    Froze my ass off on the descent back into Hunting Hollow, next year I bring a nice jacket for that sucker.

    Cheering from Mei, Brian, Janet and Charlie as I returned to HH was awesome.

    Mei, after killing the 100k, being so very cheery and offering me soup, classic!

    Full body shivers and the occasional full leg cramp as I sat in the truck trying to get warm. Ouch...

    I took a bunch of pictures, but since I don't know where any of them are I'll just be content that Patrick and Charlie knew where the hell they were and look at their wonderful shots.



    All in all an excellent adventure. I am certainly glad I did it. I am also grateful that there are people of like minds who search out these adventures and allow others to experience it with them. There are certainly a number of people who could do this as a supported race, but very few who have the ability to route find, carry your own gear and posses the adventurous spirit required to not only attempt this kind of feat, but to revel in it's accomplishment.

    I am glad to have shared that with you all.

    Edit. My GPS track is completely screwed up. I believe we left at 7:17 or 18 and Mei said 11:18 when I rolled in I think. I took a picture of my GPS but the glare is too much to see the numbers. 16 hours flat?

  56. #156
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    Great ride reports, pictures and videos. Inspiring stuff.

  57. #157
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    Quote Originally Posted by ratpick View Post
    Yeah.. I really wanted to do it just to prove you wrong

    But it was so bitterly cold and I just didn't have the gear. I did start up JDT at the end of the ride to get the final 50 feet to make 20K, and it did occur to me to just keep going, but since I hadn't let anyone know, I turned back which was essentially writing off any possibility of 29K once I was warm again.
    Dude… the fact you did this crazy-ass ride on only 4 hours of sleep the day before is pretty freakin’ superman-like. Impressive!
    goodbye cruel world. I am leaving you today.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fast Eddy View Post
    He wasn't very entertaining while wolfing down the two plates of food. He didn't even introduce himself.
    Sorry, but the food required my full and undivided attention. I meant well, but I don’t like to talk with my mouth full of food.
    goodbye cruel world. I am leaving you today.

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    Mega-super thanks to everyone involved with this apparently-semi-supported-yet-slated-as-unsupported ride, especially to Dirk “El Hombre” for organising it. Thanks to all who supported and cheered on my tired slow newbie slacker ass on such an epic (I rarely use that term, it’s generally reserved for those skinny-legged DH boys who use shuttles) ride, it helped fuel my momentum into the wee hours of darkness.

    Going in to the ride, I had my doubts of completing the whole thing; much further into the ride—around the 15,000 footie mark or thereabouts—it became apparent that there weren’t really any bailout options since I was unfamiliar with the trail layout and general lack of visible trail markers at Coe. Super special thanks to Roy “Plymmer” for the entertainment, as it surely numbed the pain and made the journey easier on the mind—this ride was afterall, a mental endurance exercise more than physical—and also for hanging back with me for an endurance pace. Also a great thanks to MudnCrud for staying with me near Kelly Lake (I think this was the place—???) when I had to put a tube in my otherwise-tubeless front tire while the other guys got antsy and headed back up the steep stuff.

    When I finally crossed the virtual finish line (through the trail connector gate at the Hunting Hollow parking lot), I just wanted to go to sleep… but I was shivering something fierce. Dashboard temperature indicator in my car read a chilly 41°F, so before even putting my bike on the rack I started up the puny 1.6 liter engine and kicked the heater on. About 20 minutes later I started to feel a little bit better. The morning of the start of the ride I purposely left about 1/2 of my Thermos full of strong coffee in the hopes it would still be warm 22 hours later… it was!!! The coffee hit the spot. I didn’t stay for the chicken noodle soup, as my brain was clouded with misjudgment due to lack of sleep.

    Driving home after the ride, through my mind whirled thoughts of, “No way in hell I am doing this ride again. What was I thinking? This was a mistake.”, however, looking back now, although there were some major technical issues on my part (wrong tires and cockpit setup, lack of preparedness, not being familiar at all with Coe, never before taking part in blasting down steep-ass loose singletrack in pitch black 2:00AM darkness!!!), yes—I will do it again! In fact, I fancy the idea of doing the Spring ride as well. Plenty of time to prepare.

    Thanks again to everyone involved with this ride!!!
    goodbye cruel world. I am leaving you today.

  60. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker View Post
    Dude… the fact you did this crazy-ass ride on only 4 hours of sleep the day before is pretty freakin’ superman-like. Impressive!
    Thanks.. but you must have missed the bits where I lay down in the grass catching up on that missing sleep during the ride. ElHombre has become quite used to kicking me to wake up now!

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    ???

    Quote Originally Posted by ratpick
    We regrouped near the summit of Steer Ridge Trail - this was the last I saw of MudnCrud until very late in the ride,. aside from a very quick meeting at the bottom of Spike Jones Trail, who took off at a fast solo pace.
    Then who was I talking to at HQ?


    Here's to sweat in your eye.

  62. #162
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudncrud View Post
    Then who was I talking to at HQ?
    No, this must be photoshopped, or you stole it from someone's camera.

    I would remember seeing you at HQ because my brain was working perfectly all day and my mental capacity not at all impaired

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    Sean it was real good to meet you even though it was brief. It is quite amazing that you did as well as you did considering you had not previously ridden Coe. As you state below most people just do not realize the nature of the place. I really like the quote about Bear Mountain, it sums that climb up well.

    Everyone wonders where the Center Flats name comes from.... got a good laugh.

    The Long Dam area does that to even the experienced Coe riders.

    Really glad you joined the ride and hope to see you on the trails.

    Here's to sweat in your eye
    Mudncrud

    Quote Originally Posted by Sean Allan View Post
    Wow, that was hard....

    I certainly suffered in not knowing the course and upon further self reflection, not respecting the terrain.

    I walked all of Bear Mountain hoping to save some matches for later lighting. My matches were sweat soaked by the time I got to the top and would never relight again

    There are no flats on Center Flats Rd.

    Got completely lost in the Long Dam Trail area and walked around for what seemed like eternity until I just plunged off the side of the mountain following my GPS track and found the trail.

    I am glad to have shared that with you all.
    ?
    Here's to sweat in your eye.

  64. #164
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean Allan View Post
    Wow, that was hard....

    All in all an excellent adventure. I am certainly glad I did it. I am also grateful that there are people of like minds who search out these adventures and allow others to experience it with them. There are certainly a number of people who could do this as a supported race, but very few who have the ability to route find, carry your own gear and posses the adventurous spirit required to not only attempt this kind of feat, but to revel in it's accomplishment.

    I am glad to have shared that with you all.

    Edit. My GPS track is completely screwed up. I believe we left at 7:17 or 18 and Mei said 11:18 when I rolled in I think. I took a picture of my GPS but the glare is too much to see the numbers. 16 hours flat?
    Thanks Sean for doing the long drive and join us in our 'playground'... what you mention above is exactly why I wanted to get this going. I have been inspired myself by many; for instance by reading here on mtbr about some crazy guy riding all of the TRT in a day .
    Or when I first met Roy/plymmer; I thought the sorts of things he was doing was insane (I still do, I should admit ). And Paul/Sorcerer's legendary 10k rides - it doesn't get more adventurous than it did on those rides.

    We'll call it 16 hours flat btw.

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    my photos

    First, thanks and congratulations to everyone who attempted this (100m or 100k) and showed up. Coe is a vast and amazing place with very varied terrain, it's not all just steep climbs, though it may sometimes sound like that (I guess it just makes for more entertaining discussion). We're really fortunate to have a place like that so nearby, with hundreds of miles of trails and roads that can be legally ridden day or night.

    Below some of my photos (the rest is over here), I may do my own writeup later; the day has been captured pretty well already and I will try to collect all relevant links on the site soon.


    The pain train up Lyman-Willson




    Ratpick cleaning that first SOB-section of Cross Canyon trail




    Leopold Porkstacker checking whether the family jewels are still ok




    Riding along with nightrider Eric S and Ratpick on the Hoover airstrip




    Onto HQ - the great colors and clouds made the scene look like a slightly less disturbed version of Van Gogh had painted it




    We received a great welcome at HQ...




    ...and also at the base of Bear Mountain




    Fantastic diskus artwork! (though he claims ignorance)




    Mandatory iconic Bear Mountain suffer-scene




    Diskus says this should be the cover shot for a Coe mtb book. (Note Porkstacker doin' it CX style...)




    Ratpick on a 'hill-cleaning' spree; incredible to see how he rode that sucker clean (ten times steeper than it looks)...



    After this, it got dark quickly so I don't have much more photos to show... why no photos of singletrack descents? Because these are way too fun to stop and fumble around with a camera, obviously...

  66. #166
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    “Hats off“ to ElHombre, ratpick, and plymmer. I said this to Patrick before the ride but I’ll repeat here; it’s one kind of courage to go into the unknown, and it’s another to go back after you’ve been through something like this.

    Great photos and write-ups! Aaron, I enjoyed your video.

    ///Charlie
    Long live long rides

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    Here is my recap

    This is the third year of this event and I had wanted to do this since I first heard of it but the prior years I just did not have the base fitness to be anything other than a liability.  This year some how everything came together.  Even at the last minute the bike.  I replaced the drive train Thursday night since the middle chain ring was so worn that it skipped when under load.  I did a test ride around the yard and there was not skipping even when ridding up the steep side sections.  Problems would come later as the bike never shifted right during the entire ride.

     
    Finished packing around 11 PM on Friday.  I tried to be a bit conservative since I did not want to carry to much weight but there was just kind of a large mound of food.  I tried to only take easy to eat stuff but I could not help but think "I have to carry that?".  After a good nights sleep the previous day just seemed to blur into the early morning drive to Coe the site of the third annual Hard COEre 100.  A 100 mile race that has 20,000 feet of climbing.  Some of those hills are incredibly steep.
     
    We arrived at Hunting Hollow a bit early and just about everyone was there.  I really love this stuff, the excitement in the air can be felt.  There were quick greetings and I briefly got to meet Sean Allen, and said hi to some Coe Veterans.  Dirk gave a quick briefing and we were off.  One mile in is the first climb, Lyman Wilson, a two thousand foot shot straight up.  I had not managed to clean this in a long time so I was very happy to get to the top without a dab.  It was close though as at one point a person came off their bike right in front of me and I had to do a brief track stand before turning and pulling around him.  We then rode a rolling fire road for a ways and at various points people stopped took pictures and peeled off layers.

     
    The next long downhill seemed to spread people out a bit.  At the bottom I took a good look at the course on my gps and kept riding.  I did not really see much of the group after that.  Brian caught up and we rode together until just after the airstrip.  It was amazing that out by the airstrip we ran into an old timer that looked to be doing a long ride and he asked us if we were doing the Coe Century.  The airstrip is a fair distance from anywhere.  I almost stopped my bike to ask how the sam hill he knew about this little event but the long day ahead pushed me on.  Brian and I rode briefly with Eric but he kept stopping to do trail work (talk about devotion).

     
    The ride down Willow Ridge Trail was really fun and quite a surprise.  I had only ridden up it , which is a suffer fest and a major challenge, and right near impossible if you want to ride up it without a dab.  I had not even thought of riding down it.  I managed to see the last of Brian as he disappeared over the top of the Mahoney Wall.  I did manage to clean Lost Springs trail for the first time in a long time and felt real good about that.  Soon I was at Headquarters and ate, met Fast Eddy, talked with Paul and Chris and just as I was heading out had time to say hi to Dirk, Patrick and Roy.

     
    The Flat Frog through Middle Ridge section is always fun.  I was not real fast but it was good to just settle down and roll through the hills to the base of Bear Mountain where a solitary person had setup post, marked by two crossed bones.  Quite the welcome to Bear Mountain.  It turned out to be Diskus.  A person I had had heard quite a bit about but had never met.  Up ahead up on Bear Mountain I could see a small person and a bike.  After a talking with Diskus for a bit I headed out and after quite some time and quite a bit of hike a bike managed to exchange pleasantries with Charlie.  He was making really good time up Bear Mountain.  After a bit we departed and I rolled up past Mississippi Lake.  A beautiful oasis in the middle of no where.  I had not ridden the trail around the lake and found it quite nice and peaceful.  I thought about stopping and eating the cob of corn that Fast Eddy had given me and filtering water but could not get myself stopped so on I went.

     
    I really like the Heritage Trail to Pacheco Creek section and felt a good rhythm going although I started to get real hungry toward the end and was really happy when I got to Pacheco Camp.  I ate half of what was left of my burrito and downed some goo, filtered water and futzed with my derailleur since it was still acting up.  My rear tire was low so I pumped that up.  This was the start of where my ride started to come apart.  I remember looking at the time and it was 6:15 as headed up the road in the right direction direction toward Phoneline.  No problems there but it seems then end of Phonline had changed so I had to do a double take to make sure I was at the bottom.
     
    A bit later my tire went flat again so put some air in, just a bit later my gps beeped and the screen went blank.  I rode up to the intersection of Coit Road and County Line and used a sign post as a bicycle stand.  I put in a tube, dug out the lights and enjoyed the sunset.  Ate some food and contemplated my predicament.   I spread the map out and figured I could wait where I was, as it quickly turning to dark, or ride on knowing that I would be slower having to regularly consult the map ( Mudworm had given this to me at the last minute).  Sooner or later the group behind me would catch up and I could finish the course with them.  I had no idea how far ahead I was.  I figured if I got to Dowdy I could always wait in the bathroom since those are usually fairly warm.  I was confident (or was that just hubris) that I could make it to Dowdy just using the map and my memory.

     
    I found the start of Dutches no problem but did have to stop and consult the map at every intersection to get there and few times on the way down Dutches.  When I hit the Tie Down and Yellow Jacket junction I went up Tie Down instead of taking Yellow Jacket so I did an extra hike a bike.  But no worries as I once  again took a wrong turn and ended up at Yellow Jacket Pond, which was more scum than pond.  How quickly we forget how to read a map.  From there I made my way into the the heart of the Coe Triangle where I marched up and down the creek.  At one point I thought I had to be going in the correct direction because I found some blue ribbons but that petered out.  Eventually I gave up and took the wrong trail to Kaiser Aetna Road.

     
    Once on Kaiser Aetna it is just a long grind upward to Dowdy Ranch with flush toilets and picnic tables.  I was walking around in the dark trying to get cell phone reception when I heard voices.  Not the usual voices but actual voices from real people.  Soon the voices were followed by lights and up came Dirk, Patrick, Roy and Brett.  Now I had companions and riding partners.  We ate, drank, used the facilities and traded stories.  All to soon we headed off.  This next section from mile 75 to mile 80 was and I think for many is the hardest.  Out of Dowdy Ranch the course goes up Bura Bura Trail which is not to bad on a normal day but after 75 miles and fifteen thousand feet of climbing it is tiresome and it ends at Center Flats Road.
     
    Who named Center Flats Road is what I want to know cuz it aint flat.  It is a series of short to medium length steep climbs that just do not stop and can suck the life out of the Tasmanian Devil.  Five friggin miles that seem to never end.  At the end of the road a quick left takes one back to Hunting Hollow rather quickly.  But, the course does not go that way.  Center Flats Road makes the distance one way seem quite short and the distance the other way seems very long.
     
    We all gather up and head the long way back.  Center Flats is followed by a somewhat long continuous climb.  It hurts because it follows Center Flats, it feels good because it is not Center Flats.  Very much like stopping to hit yourself in the head with a hammer.  Glad your not doing it anymore but it still hurts.  Finally Live Oaks Springs comes along and there is some much enjoyed easy miles.  Live Oaks Springs Trail was a conundrum for me.  This used to be a very beautiful road that had overgrown and become mostly single track but in places was double track.  Everyone that I ever talked to about this trail would comment on how beautiful it was in some way.  Then the fire went went through and it was scorched black.  Then they took the graders to the road.  Now it is a charred blacked carcass of a long dead dream.  At least we did not have to pedal up.
     
    The ride from there was quite pleasant rolling hills, a sky jammed with stars the occasional eyes reflecting from behind a tree.  The miles seemed to float by.  It was pretty cool how strong everyone seemed to be riding after 20 plus hours on a bike.  Soon we are a stones throw from Wilson Camp and a 5 minute ride to the parking lot but one last detour was at hand.  Down Vasquez Road, down into the pit we flew we knew we had one last destination.  The last of the big climbs which Patrick and Dirk power up.  Dirk was definitely feeling beer gravity.  We hung out and chatted for just a bit at the top before dropping down to Hunting Hollow Road, at the very bottom of the descent I came to a complete stop and watched a couple of lights float down the hill. Patrick rode off in another direction to get some extra footies.  That stop was the last stop for my front brakes, as I started to ride the final four flat miles back to the parking lot my brakes started squealing, it was metal on metal.  My pads had given up and were gone.  I worked the calipers apart just a bit and heading onward.
     
    Rolling into the parking lot Mudworm, Brian and Janet came out to cheer us into the parking lot.  It was a bit after 5 AM.  Brian had finished at 10:15, Mudworm rode the 100K and finished in a little over 10 hours so had gotten back well before dark.  It felt great.  Well everything felt great with the exception of my butt.  Mudworm heated up chicken noodle soup and hot water for everyone.  I started to get my usual shakes, I had ridden all night with just a light vest and arm warmers only putting a wind breaker on for the final descent into Hunting Hollow.  It is always cold here, it reminds me of the Pinnacles Camp ground.  Just friggen cold even for a hot place.


    We all traded stories and generally enjoyed the moment.  After a bit Sean Allen, a Tahoe local, who drove down for the event showed up, he had gone off to camp and get some sleep.  Really enjoyed just hanging out and watching the sunrise and talking bikes, riding and Henry Coe.  Slowly people packed up and disappeared being replaced by the next day of visitors.  I pulled over and let Mudworm take over the wheel as I just could not hold it together.  After a bit we saw Patricks car along side the road, he was getting a necessary nap.  Mudwom and I talked about the ride and other riders, talked strategy for the ride next year.  Then we hit Hwy 101 and I lost consciousness.
    Last edited by mudncrud; 10-10-2012 at 07:58 AM.
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  68. #168
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    A 100mile report on a 100km ride

    I'm proud to announce that we did it — Erik is now an official Hard COEre 100 (mile) finisher, and yours truly is a Hard COEre 100 (km) finisher as well as the course record holder. Yeah, as our dear friend Stephen once said, screw modesty!

    I wrote that very short paragraph (except the last sentence) on my iPad while sitting at the picnic table alone in Henry Coe Hunting HollowParking Lot. I had returned from my 100km (63mi) solo MTB ride, got cleaned up and re-fueled. It would still be hours before I'd see Erik to return from his 100 miler assault, but I was confident. I figured I'd give myself a head start writing my ride report. Before I typed any further, I saw a rider come in with his helmet light already turned on despite it still being light out. That was when I put my iPad down, for good, and didn't pick up writing again until now.

    Let me give a quick background introduction to the people who are not familiar with Hard COEre 100 (I wrote this part for my blog post). It was Dirk's idea. Not sure how long it had been brewing in his high capacity head (of a normal size though), but it came out in the open in 2010. One would ride a 100 mile loop on Henry Coe trails in one day. Other than the stop at the headquarter, where drinks and food can be obtained, the ride would otherwise be unsupported. The mileage is only one part of the challenge. The bigger challenge is the steep hills throughout the course, which will total to 20,000 feet of elevation gain. Sounds crazy? His friends Roy and Patrick jumped on it. It took them two attempts, but they succeeded and finished the ride in 21 hours 13 minutes. Pain oozed out of their reports everywhere, which apparently sounded so good that it drew them back in 2011 as well as attracted some new blood. However, for one reason or another, the finisher list was still the same three names, and for one reason or another, it took them 23 hours 40 minutes this time. Then came 2012…

    They had harassed (as Patrick puts it) us to join them. But 2010 was an extremely busy year for Erik. So, it was out of the question for him. I was riding strong, but I was not interested. To this day, I have still not done any night riding. Darkness scares me. I hear sounds and I imagine things, bad things. In 2011, we did not ride, and were not even following MTBR. So even though I think I still got an occasional reminder about the ride, it was easy for me to ignore it, guilt free. But the guys were persistent! Was that our first week back on our mountain bike around the New Year of 2012? Dirk already put 2012/10/6 on my calendar! At the time, I was feeling like such a rookie that I could barely ride in a straight line! In the next few months, I think I repeated a dozen times that I refuse to ride at night! Then… he came up with a metric century (100km/13,500'). But still, I didn't think I could finish it in daylight. Mid September, I asked Erik to stop by Dirk's work to make a drop off for me and put it in bold in the email, "Do not commit to Coe 100!" So, he committed — he'd do the 100 miler. Oh, men are so predictable! But now, what about me??? By Oct 5th, the day before the event, it was clear that I had no better things to do this weekend, so I guess I'd give the 100km ride a try? *Gulp*

    On Friday evening, we had a guest — our contractor friend was over to discuss next weekend's work and get the material list. We needed that, but that also delayed our packing. When we finally went to bed, it was almost 11:30pm. And still I didn't have time to do any bike maintenance other than Erik's quick chain lube job for me. (I paid for that on the ride because the entire drivetrain was creaking really bad in the second half of the ride, which made me wonder if the bike would hold). At least, I didn't forget to put the 10 cans of chicken noodle soup in the car. The alarm went off too soon at 4am. Ugh!

    Dirk said 7am start, so I made sure not to break that rule (unlike somebody else who left around 6:40am… not to name names). But when Dirk was giving a briefing to the group, I took off — never the meeting type of person. It was 7:08am. Plus, I felt that I needed a head start — for sure, the strong 100km riders, J.L. being one, would catch me soon, not to mention the super strong riders in the 100m group since we go the same way until the split to Coit Spring Road after 14 miles of riding. I guess this is a good time to show an overlay of the routes to give people a visual how the two routes differ.



    I stuffed myself with breakfast on the drive to the start hoping to store as many calories as possible in my body. Oh, it was not comfortable climbing Lyman Wilson, which has a couple of very steep sections. I was just riding along (JRA) pacing myself for a long day, but still, I felt close to puking. Nonetheless, I enjoyed the climb and cleaned it without any problem. As it turned out, with the exception of that super tight switchback right out of China Hole and Bear Mountain, I cleaned all the climbs on my course, including the steeps on Middle Ridge Tr and at the end, Wagon Rd.

    After I topped out from Wilson Camp, I took a wrong turn that resulted back tracking to that point. Just then, Sean Allen topped out. At the parking lot, I saw he was all ready to roll long before everyone else, but stayed for the briefing. I was not surprised to see him catching and passing me. That was the last time I saw him until his finish before midnight. After him, I expected to be passed by more riders any minute, but all the way until the 100 milers' Coit Spring Rd turn off, still nobody came up. Weird. I started to wonder if Dirk's brief was actually anything but brief. Later, I was told that it was indeed brief. The group left 10 minutes after I did.

    Next person I saw was Charlie (Skyline35), eating at China Hole and Mahoney Meadows Rd intersection. At the time, I was still feeling the breakfast in my throat, so I didn't stop long and kept rolling after a brief chat. Charlie is used to riding at Coe alone late into the night, so it will not be a good idea for me to team up with him considering I made a point not to pack any light. It was a gorgeous day, but I didn't see hikers out on the trails.When I rolled into the HQ area at 10:54 am, it was a different scene. Ah… the Tarantula Festival. By then, I was feeling hungry again. Thanks to Ed (Fast Eddy), my lunch was waiting for me. Saw Paul Nam (Sorcerer) and wife Chris and their friend Camille, whom I'd met before. Everyone gave me a warm welcome. Apparently they had a lot of questions. Where I was headed; where were the rest of the group; who were at the start; where everybody was going… I wish I could chat with them longer, but remembering that I still had two thirds of the long way to go, I answered the questions in a press conference style. Actually, I held multiple press conferences because they were not all conveniently located at one spot. Half an hour later, I was ready to pull out of the parking lot. Not too bad, but where the heck was everybody?

    By the time I turned off on Flat Frog Tr. after leaving HQ, I still had not seen a second Hard COEre riders. The 100 milers had to do 10 extra miles (more than 100km course) before getting to HQ. Okay, I'll give them some time, but where were the other 100km riders??? I didn't mind riding solo, but the fact that nobody was catching me puzzled me.

    While riding up Hobbs Rd, I saw Paul B stopped at Frog Lake. We recognized each other, so I stopped to chat. He asked me if Charlie's bike was fixed. Not having the context, I said, "I'd think so since he's riding." I remember asking myself how come I don't remember seeing him mention his bike being broken on Strava. In hindsight, the conversation felt funny because I passed Charlie before Paul ran into him right after Charlie broke his derailleur cable and Paul played trail fairy by giving him one. I had no idea about that. When he saw that my bike was pointing up the fire road, he asked very innocently pointing at the gentle singletrack climb, Frog Lake Tr., which by passes the steep Hobbs Rod climb. I told him the the course sent us up the fire road, so I had to obey the rules (never mind that the trail is closed to bicyclists). We parted ways. Little did I know at the time, he would be the last human being I saw on my entire ride! If I had known that, I'd have given him a hug, a kiss, or something.

    Middle Ridge is always fun, especially so today because all the previously down trees had been cleared (thanks to Paul N). After cresting the top, I washed out at a gentle bend when I forgot about my funky brakes (very weak front brake and a very sensitive and grabby, yet, rubbing, rear brake) and then reacted incorrectly when my rear tire started to slide. Bam! My left side (hip and knee) was bruised and scratched up. I really should had studied that cornering technique thread! I picked myself up and took the rest of the descent easy. But in the end I felt quite happy that the crash was the only time my feet touched the ground on Middle Ridge. I cleaned all the steep uphills as well as steep downhills.

    Continuing on, I arrived at the base of Bear Mountain around 1:15pm. That was before Mike (diskus), god bless his tender heart, showed up to greet the Hard COEre riders. Later I learned that he missed me, Sean Allen, and Brian Lucido, both of whom were gunning for a fast finish of the 100 mile course. At the sight of the steep Bear Mountain Road, I smiled. A big grin emerged on my face. No, I'm not twisted (okay, maybe a little). I had good reasons to smile: 1) The road was so steep that it looked comically ridiculous; 2) the previous time I climbed that road was already after I started suffering leg cramps, and it was 100+ degrees, but not today… I felt fresh and it was not too hot; 3) I was ready to take a break from my saddle, so I look forward to the mandatory hike-a-bikes. Unfortunately, the road turned out to be easier than it looked — I thought for sure I would be pushing the steep hill right at the bottom, but it surprised me that I rode up it without feeling too much exertion. Thankfully, my awesome performance did not last too long, and I got off my bike and started pushing. Whew! I took my time going up the mountain alternating between pushing and riding. In the mean time, I constantly looked back taking in the view behind/below me and trying to spot any rider. But none! Who would have thought I made the 2nd overall place on this Bear Mountain Strava segment!

    Once topped out on Bear Mountain, I knew the rest of the ride would be pure fun. I really enjoyed the primitive trail around Mississippi Lake and then Heritage Trail. Still expecting to be caught by the next rider, I took comfort in knowing that I was breaking trails for the people behind me. But of course, all I was doing was having fun on my bike, unlike what Charlie, Roy, Paul N, and many others do on a regular basis by removing branches and clearing bushes out there.

    At 3:21pm, I rolled into Pacheco Camp. My first time ever being there all by myself. It was peaceful, but I had an eery feeling. The question mark that had been hanging above my head grew bigger — where the hell was everybody? Where was J.L., a strong rider doing 100km? Where were Sean and Brian who only had 10 extra miles more than my ride up to that point and I already covered near 50 miles by then. I ought to have been caught, but I wasn't. What had I done wrong??? I was not going to hang around to find out though. Ate my food and refilled water. While sitting around, I contemplated a plan to welcome the riders behind me. It would be fun to set up water balloons in the trees and when the riders come in and sit down, the balloons would burst and water would rain down on them. Just a thought. I'm actually not that twisted, plus, I didn't have the balloons. It was a 20 minute break, then I pushed on. Later studying the tracks, I realize that Brian (together with Sean?) came in to the camp about 23 minutes after I left. That was the closest I got with my fellow COEre riders after passing Charlie at the top of China Hole.

    I remember feeling a bit puzzled after I left Pacheco Camp. I thought I remembered my previous visits to the Camp, and it was always a long climb to get there, and how come, now I was also doing what seemed like endless climbing to get out? Does Coe phenomenon — everywhere you go, it's a climb — exist? The last part after dropping down Tule Pond Trail was new to me. I remember distinctly on the cue sheet (which I didn't print) that there would be 600 ft of climbing near the end. I did not expect the miles of climbing on Wagon Rd and later Phegley Ridge Rd. I cleaned it all, but it certainly caught me by surprise. The steep single track Phegley Ridge Trail descent at the end was fun. When Dirk later asked me if the sunset on Phegley was pretty, I gave him a blank look — I wouldn't know because I rolled into Hunting Hollow parking lot at 5:29. I was too fast for the pretty sunset!

    Back at the car, I had a dilemma. Remember how people say their legs feel like wet noodles after a long ride? I have experienced that before, but today, I had none of that! I was feeling very strong at the end that I wanted to ride up Jim Donnelly just to show that I could. Should I go back out? Just then, I saw the sun shower sitting on the top of my car. The dilemma resolved instantly. The hot shower felt so good! After everything was cleaned and put away, I set up my station on a picnic table at the center of the parking lot. Camp stove, light, food, water, iPad, and Kindle. I'd be there for a long time! (I brought a tent, but forgot a mat. Sleeping would be uncomfortable anyway.) That's when I wrote down the first sentence in this report.

    The rider who rode in was Mike. He had returned from his mission. I was happy to chat with him, especially, he had some information where and when he saw the riders. It sounded that Erik was riding strong and was an hour ahead of others (Dirk, Patrick, Roy, Brett) at Bear Mountain. Two young Google riders also returned after they aborted the 100 mile effort after HQ and returned via some less-than-optimal way. One guy said that his office mate, an ultra runner, would be giving him tons of crap for not finishing the ride, and he said it with a look of terror on his face. After a few seconds, he said, I think more to himself than to us, "I'm gonna lie about it."

    After they all left before I barely sat back down, a truck pulled in. That was Janet returning from her dinner with friends. She came to wait for her husband Brian. By then, it already got dark. The time in darkness goes by faster when you have company, and I was thankful that she was there.

    The worry about Charlie crept up a little. I believed that he was doing the 100km course, but as it got late, I wondered if everything was okay with him. Everything was (after he replaced his derailleur cable) as he rolled in at 9:21pm, and joined the conversation after he cleaned up. Brian rolled in at 10:34pm, and Sean at 11:18pm, both of whom had completed the 100 mile course in a record time. Brian still looked energetic when he returned, but he didn't want to go back out and do the Everest Challenge (which should add 8000 feet of climbing)… unless someone else wants to do it. As he put it himself, "then I have to do it!" So, he lubed his chain and had everything laid out ready to go and joined us for conversation and food.

    Eventually, everybody got tired and Brian did some math and predicted that a 21 hour finish (the group's previous course record) would have them return at 4am, so, they hit the sack. Charlie left for home at 1am. I was alone again. I set up my tent near the gate with one door wide open facing the direction of return. Thinking that Erik was riding strong and he was hoping for an 18 hour finish, I wondered if I would see him at 1:30am. Laying down in the tent with no mat beneath me, I closed my eyes. But I didn't fall asleep because I was straining my ears to listen to sound of return. A lot of sounds are made in the dark out in the wilderness, so, I pretty much opened my eyes every few seconds. 2am, 3am, 4am… No sign of Erik. I grew more and more anxious by the minute and sleeping became out of the question. I fetched my iPad and sat up, but staring at the notepad what I had written down, my brain drew blank — I wasn't sure what I would end up writing, so I gave up.

    5:46am, finally, sound! Light! That was Dirk first sprinted back. I jumped up with my camera and headlight. I had been taking photos of each finisher and would not want to miss theirs. Erik was with them. So, what happened? Why did he not make it back earlier? I invite you to read his own account.

    Oh, BTW, the harassment for next year's 100 miler has already started! (See it for yourself!)

    Overheard and Extras:

    -- Erik told me after returning home that he finally could understand why American Indians wore war paint. "I was riding with Brian. Took a look at him and saw his white, but blotched, face. It freaked me out! I closed my eyes, and he was still there!" … I decided to post this because I found it funny. Come on, Brian might be god, but still, someone has to make fun of him, right? BTW, Charlie called it a Geisha face.

    -- When Erik rode talked with Charlie at the top of Bear Mountain, Charlie expressed his doubt about finishing the route. Erik says, you have to do it! / Charlie: But where is everybody??? / Erik: Don't matter, man, they are all behind you! You are the first place of men so far! … A little encouragement goes long ways! And really long ways in this case. Charlie may be the mellowest guy on earth, but you can't say he doesn't have competitiveness in him.

    -- Brett wasn't very entertaining after the ride either. He went straight to and disappeared in his car while everyone else gathered at the picnic table trading stories. Then he drove off after uttering a few brief parting words through the open window. But after reading about his non-stop chattering, my guess is he must have finally run out of stuff to say.

    -- I was amazed when Erik told me that he was never scared while being lost in the Bermuda Triangle in the dark. He did say that at one point, he saw two eyes staring at him behind a tree. "So, what did you do?" "I barked at it." I asked him how he barked at the two eyes and he replayed for me. Our three cats scattered and went hiding. Nice job!

    -- I didn't capture on film Patrick's 100 mile stare after the ride, although it was definitely there, but I did capture his monk look.

    -- At the headquarter, when I was walking away from Ed's BBQ, I heard him say to the lady next to him, "she is riding 100 miles today..." I turned around to correct him, "100 kilometers!" He waved me off saying, "oh... let me tell my story."

    -- Oh, I forgot that after Mike left and Janet showed up, Eric, the night rider came back from his own 100km ride. It was a great feat as he had a freak accident a few months ago that involved Henry Coe, road, and a ranger. And according to everyone who rode briefly with him, he apparently did a ton of trail work as well (I believe he couldn't help it).
    Last edited by mudworm; 10-10-2012 at 10:40 AM. Reason: adding extras
    Inch by inch, I will get there...
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  69. #169
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    Thanks for the writeup.. it's so fun to see how everyone else experienced this ride!

    Oh I wish I had a driver to take me home ....

  70. #170
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    Amazing write up guys. Maybe next year I can work up to doing the 100k
    We will never know our full potential unless we push ourselves to find it.

  71. #171
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    Longer Than

    Yep! Very entertaining reading everyones's experience on this Saturday of pain. Thank you all for the play by plays of where and how you all were. The stuffs of legend.

    Roy.

  72. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by plymmer View Post
    Yep! Very entertaining reading everyones's experience on this Saturday of pain. Thank you all for the play by plays of where and how you all were. The stuffs of legend.

    Roy.
    Roy, you get this year's "hard man of Hard COEre 100" award for riding the whole thing injured. ElHombre will hand over the trophy from his win last year

    I guess next year it's my turn for a rib injury - be prepared - I'll be whining like a baby the whole way....

  73. #173
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudworm View Post
    I'm proud to announce that we did it — Erik is now an official Hard COEre 100 (mile) finisher, and yours truly is a Hard COEre 100 (km) finisher as well as the course record holder. Yeah, as our dear friend Stephen once said, screw modesty!

    [....]

    -- I didn't capture on film Patrick's 100 mile stare after the ride, although it was definitely there, but I did capture his monk look.
    Truth be told, I only wanted to you two to participate so I could read your writeup Not disappointed!

    As for the stare, you guys surprised me with the camera when entering Hunting Hollow and I didn't have time to get my face on!

  74. #174
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    I’d be interested in a shorter ride at Coe SOON sometime—perhaps a 12-hour ride? What would be a good route? I must ride there more. That was a great experience.
    goodbye cruel world. I am leaving you today.

  75. #175
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker View Post
    I’d be interested in a shorter ride at Coe SOON sometime—perhaps a 12-hour ride? What would be a good route? I must ride there more. That was a great experience.
    Roy, someone needs to visit Long Ridge...

  76. #176
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    recap

    It took a few weeks, but here it is... (see my objective #3 below - produce recap longer than ratpick's). I'm sinning against using mtbr aliases but oh well (if someone insists, I'll edit and run some find/replace's...).

    From the annals of this year's Hard COEre 100:

    Tackling this endeavour again, I had three major objectives: first, do my best to ensure nobody got in real trouble (even though as un-organizer I should be un-responsible); second, finish the 100 miler; and last but not least, produce a recap even more painstakingly detailed than Patrick's! I think that all worked out pretty well, as I hope you can attest (though that last part took almost two weeks).

    I'd like to take the opportunity to thank all the folks that have done some form of trailwork or another, cleaning up trails, removing down trees etc; it was great being able to ride Lost Spring trail without the constant need to weave and dodge shrubs of poison oak; Middle Ridge has regained its previous glory; Turkey Pond trail - last year a complete mess - was impeccable; Lower Heritage trail + Pacheco Creek trail in so much better shape than last time. Too many people to list and thank, as I will forget some, but Sorcerer Paul deserves special kudos for his tireless efforts throughout the years.

    This monster of a ride has been inspired by a mix of things, Paul's legendary 10k solstice rides being not the least. Though some may accuse me of dishing out cruel and unusal punishment with this ride, I really just like a good challenge, and enjoy taking one on with likeminded folks. Most people are capable of more than they give themselves credit for - this event shows that again and again. But enough with the psychology 101...

    ...it's a bit before 7am and I hold a quick briefing at the parking lot - mostly to make sure that everyone knows what they're in for, and that those who need them get maps or cue sheets (thanks Paul and Roy for providing them).

    Img 4300 Even though I've done this ride now twice before, for a variety of reasons I haven't been able to do much dedicated training - a perfect excuse to start sandbagging, as Patrick can attest - I honestly have no idea how I'd fare though. Luckily there are a few early 'indicators' along the way - how I'd feel on the Lyman-Willson and Cross Canyon walls, for instance. We start out with a fairly easy pace up the Lyman-Willson trail - and I don't have much trouble cleaning the Wall, so that's a good first omen. Mei and Charlie (doing the 100k course) have taken a headstart, and unfortunately I wouldn't see them again on the trails during the day (I have received some suggestions to modify the 100k route so most 100k and 100m riders would 'meet' at HQ and think this is a good idea).

    Reports have been floating around of many of the fireroads having been freshly graded, which is always unwelcome news, in particular since we haven't seen the first rains yet, and we could expect a loose, dusty mess in many places. Steer Ridge road is the first case in point. It feels harder to clean than it should. The string or riders stretches out - I chat with Brian, it's always fun to hear what he's up to and he talks about some incredible trail runs he's done with a team of friends - right now a friend of his was trying to break some ultrarunning record in Tahoe. His white mask of sunscreen looks like war paint indeed, though I'd suggest next time he'd add some different color features, to get rid of the geisha-look. He has a pretty lightweight gear setup, with a big handlebar bag (which would create at times a bit of trouble on steep descents) and small hydration pack. So far I'm very pleased with my own backpack-less setup, featuring a Revelate seat bag and fuel tank. It would survive the rigors of Coe perfectly - consider this a shameless plug for their stuff (they're a tiny operation in Alaska specializing in bikepacking gear and deserve the kudos). Soon we find ourselves descend Spike Jones and Timm trails, as always a blast.

    Img 4308

    Sean Allan had dropped the field earlier on Lyman-Willson, and I'm secretly hoping Brian would take off to chase him down and give us some racing action. That is exactly what seems to unfold, as soon he takes off with only Erik (with 'k', aka Mr. Mud) in his wake. I find myself riding in a little group with Patrick, Roy, Eric (with 'c', the Nightrider), Brett (aka Leopold Porkstacker) and the two 'Google riders'. I chat a bit with Liehann, one of them, from South Africa, who just moved here a year ago - he talked about some adventure racing he had done back home and I think about that famous video shot in South Africa where a mountain biker almost gets taken out by an antelope in full sprint. I figure he has seen quite a variety of wildlife riding out there. He talks about an ultrarunner colleague of his, Beat, who for a while considered to trail run the 100 miler with us - sounds like Google may have cloned Brian!

    We seem to have dropped the other 100k riders as there is no trace of JL and company. After a fun intermezzo on Anza trail we climb Coit road and subsequently first climb, then descend Cross Canyon trail. I pass the spot where I went down hard last year - conduct a brief search for the LED bar light that I lost there, to no avail. I clean the entire canyon trail, another good sign, but that of course only lasts until we hit the Wall - it is just too loose right now. The slow grind out seems to take forever, but at last we make it out and hit Willow Ridge road.

    Hoover Lake currently looks more like Hoover's Pond of Scum but that will hopefully change soon. The rollers on Willow Ridge road are tedious and take a lot longer than I care to remember. Eric, Patrick and I ride ahead of the rest of the pack. Eric talks about the Furnace Creek 508 race starting on this same day, and jokes how our ride isn't too bad compared to the grueling 100 degree heat and distance the Furnace Creek riders have to endure - he mentions one of the Nightriders is out there crewing right now. We drop down Willow Ridge trail, always a fun undertaking and I try to dodge as much poison oak as I can, making it reasonably fine through the Urushiol Tunnel from Hell near the bottom... onto the Mahoney Meadows Wall now! I make it past the hardest section only to lose traction a bit further and dab. I curse loudly, as God doesn't just kill a kitten when you don't climb 10k in Coe, but he also pulls out whiskers from the poor things every time you dab somewhere. Patrick stoically cleans the entire Wall - I remember how he almost did the same on his CX bike and -gearing months ago. Amazing how he's capable of cleaning pretty much any line, as steep as they come - he should try rockclimbing.

    Img 4328

    Eric mentions he and others had brushed and cleaned up Lost Spring trail, and it shows - a job well done and in its current state the trail is very friendly to even the most PO-phobic. At the top we are joined by Roy, and a bit later the rest of the group. The China Hole descent is a welcome opportunity to recover and I continue the recovery process by setting a pedestrian pace up the long climb towards HQ. With Patrick in tow we finally make it to the bench on Manzanita road. A dusty fireroad is all that separates us now from the Tarantulafest taking place at Headquarters, and the heaps of grilled food that go with it. A very welcome prospect at this point. Patrick and I are joined by Eric and Roy and we complete the slow grind up to HQ. We are greeted by Paul and his wife Chris (Coe uber-volunteers and trail builders) who are manning the ticket/cash counter where we can buy our goodies. A bit later Erik "Mr. Mud" appears out of the crowd - he is on his way out and we briefly talk about the events of the day: Erik is currently riding solo, as Brian had left him behind, in pursuit of Sean.

    Img 4336 I had told myself before not to lose too much time at HQ this time around but somehow that never really pans out. The company is fine and the food tastes great; I chat with head ranger Verhoeven, and a bit later Brett (who starts devouring two huge sandwiches) and the Google guys show up. I check how they're doing; the Google riders will probably turn around at some point (they are not planning to night ride, which looks unavoidable now also in order to complete the 100k route) - Eric is going to do his own ride from here on, and Brett only needs a little bit of coercion to commit to the full 100 miler. With the long break at HQ I put my intentions for a 'fast finish' aside - with Brett never having been at Coe before I don't think I'd like to see him roam around at night alone in Coe's Bermuda Triangle - and we form a small, four piece grupetto, with the stubborn intent on finishing this thing. Roy is a tad more quiet than usual - only at the very end he would mention his rib injury due to an early crash; Patrick is eating through his brake pads and after we finish the always entertaining Flat Frog trail he rides ahead on Hobbs road to take some time to swap them out. Brett is a non-stop source of entertainment, doing impressions, accents, and almost entire stand-up comedy acts.

    Img 4341 Middle Ridge is awesome and almost fully restored now; the fatigue makes me pick some questionable lines but I make it down without too many blemishes. Then, knowing what's in store the next few miles, my mood sombers. All of us clean Poverty Flat (the appetizer), which is fairly rideable now a couple of seasons after it had gotten the moon dust grading treatment. Schafer-Corral is a short but pleasant intermezzo, and we float through the tall golden grass down into the dried out Coyote Creek bed. After the few bumpy miles through the creek bed, a welcome surprise awaits us: Mike B is greeting us at the base of Bear Mountain, the giant roadblock ahead. He briefs us on the status of the other riders: the 100k'ers - Mei and Charlie - are far ahead and out of reach; equally out of reach are Brian and Sean; Erik is about an hour ahead of us. The big climb then; that first glance never disappoints - with another 'Bear Mountain virgin' amongst us I admit finding an almost diabolical enjoyment witnessing Brett's jaw drop when he takes in the scene.

    It appears Mike has created again some real nice 'Coe 100' trail art with the materials at hand... after we ride past his handiwork, we make our way through the creek and tackle the climb... I ride, stall, hike-a-bike, ride, stall, push, curse and repeat this ad nauseam. I witness in awe how Patrick cleans some very challenging pitches but my mind is going blank - I start to feel real lousy, and even though it has been a rather cool day, the afternoon heat is now getting to me, I'm a tad low on water and start dreaming of the shores of Mississippi Lake... but I need to get over this steep pitch first... and then the next, and the next. Finally, there's the summit, and Patrick; Roy and Brett have fallen behind, but it seems Brett hasn't been suffering in silence, as soon we hear them turn the last corner. I don't feel too bad cutting the break short, as I need to go filter some water and we charge onto County Line road to Mississippi Lake. We loop back on the lakeside trail, overgrown in spots, but I always find this primitive trail a pleasant break from the fireroads at this point. At the picnic spot on the other side of the lake we have a lengthy break where we filter water and dislodge a very stubborn little rock that had been sabotaging Roy's front derailer. At this spot I reach the same sobering conclusion as in previous years: we hardly made it past the halfway-point...

    Img 4356

    Under a cloudless sunset we install our lights and head up Willow Ridge road, towards the always entertaining Heritage trail. Both Heritage and upper Pacheco Creek trails have recently been brushed and cleaned up by friendly trail fairies - Patrick charges ahead and I follow in his wake, storming towards Pacheco Camp. It was a time to recover from my typical 'mid-ride crisis', during which I entertained thoughts of bailing, knowing the camp is so tantalizingly close to home. But of course, once at Pacheco Camp there is no doubt that I will take a left on Coit road instead, onto the third leg of our course. We don't bother trying to filter the water (where did the tub go?) and pour it in directly from the hose; I think back of those pictures of the innards of the water tanks near Live Oak Spring trail... I figure it's somewhat cleaned up now, and how bad can a bit of an 'escargot flavor' be? It is very dark now, the night moonless so far, and riding under lights gives things a new dynamic; it rejuvenates and injects some needed adrenaline, waking me up and making me more aware. Self-delusional perhaps, but I'll take self-delusion if it works! Improved awareness is a good thing, as with Phoneline and Turkey Pond trail we have some tricky descents ahead. Unlike last year, no mechanical or other incidents occur and we find Turkey Pond trail fully cleared of down trees - quite the contrast with the previous editions.

    We grind our way up County Line road, to the top of my cherished Dutch's trail; in the dark almost even more fun than in broad daylight. The cloud- and moonless night allows for a great viewing of the stars, the milky way and various flying objects - I try to look for (bike)lights in the general direction of Dowdy Ranch but am not able to discern much. Soon the fun is over and we enter Coe's Bermuda Triangle, starting with the grueling climb out to Yellowjacket pond and Tie Down trail. We're now able to find our way pretty easily in the Triangle, even in the dark, and soon we hit the fun descent on Tie Down trail to the North Fork trail bit that will then dump us on Kaiser Aetna road. A steep-ass fireroad looks to be exactly what the doctor had prescribed for Brett, as he seems suddenly fully revived, and takes off setting the pace towards Dowdy Ranch. In truth, the grade is not that steep, and its consistency allows for fairly easy granny spinning. But it seems to drag on forever. At last, we hit the ranch.

    Img 4353

    Rolling in, I discern a figure in the darkness, quietly seated on the porch bench; luckily it is not the dark Sith Lord of Coe preying on us but instead Erik, who welcomes us to Dowdy Ranch. He recounts how he got lost in the Triangle, finally ended up here after some amount of frustration and quite a few bonus vertical feet climbed, and decided to then wait for us. It is time now to recover a bit, eat, refill on water and check out the facilities: yes, the full service restrooms are open for business. It is getting cold now though, and the spectacular crescent moon rising from behind the hills is the sign for me to get moving again. It takes some mild coercion to get everyone on board and leave the relative comfort of our temporary shelter, but off we go again, into the dark of the night.

    I feel surprisingly frisky as I motor up Burra Burra trail - it's a bit too early though for my traditional end-of-ride kick. Center Flats road then: a seemingly endless sequence of rollers and steep walls. Some time a massive search party should be organized to try locate the namesake flats; as far as I can tell they have never been observed. Roy, having learnt his lesson from last year, had started ingesting espresso beans, and they seem quite effective; no more 'sleepbiking' for him. As usual, Patrick delivers the best efforts on the steeps, though Erik seems to have a good deal of energy reserves left as well. At long last, we hit the intersection with Wagon Road. Making the mental switch ('all easy miles from now on'), I take up my role of ride tyrant again and try to keep the break short; those last miles may be 'easier' but they will seem to last forever.

    After the slog up Wagon road, an unpleasant surprise awaits us at Live Oak Spring trail. The 'trail' - in this direction normally a fun rollicking descent - has mutated into a hideous and dusty mess of a dirt road; the mark of the grader, so it appears. Oh well... more miles of fireroad are ahead of us now, until we finally reach the top of Kelly Lake trail. A fun and thriling singletrack descent breaks up the routine, and dumps us in the chilly basin of Kelly Lake. Brett and Erik need to filter water; they seem to be taking a while, and Roy and I decide to start the slow climb out, as we're both freezing and starting to shiver; it's warmer on the ridges and hilltops. I switch into 'grind' mode and plod up the hill. There's the summit, at last, and Patrick arrives soon after me; we both lie down and rest. There's Roy... but no Erik or Brett, or any lights we can discern in the distance. For a while I worry they took the wrong turn up Coit, which would be a very bad thing, but luckily that fear proves to be ungrounded, and soon our five piece grupetto is complete again.

    We're closing in on the finish now, and complete the fun singletrack intermezzo Dexter / Grizzly Gulch trail at a very healthy pace, riding almost in formation. A break at Camp Willson is kept brief when Erik says 'let's get this done', and we take off... to tackle the last few obstacles. First, Vasquez trail - surprisingly it has received the grading treatment as well, but in this case made it a tad more pleasant (which is all very relative, if you know Vasquez); next up is Long Dam trail, with its confusing and post holed labyrinth section - I do find my way relatively easy this time, practice makes mastery I guess; and finally, that last beeyatch of a climb up Wagon road to Phegley Ridge... I can almost hear Brett and Erik curse me in their thoughts for including this in the route; but I'm delighted, as I know all of us have got this in the pocket now.

    I'm sleepy and cold but clean this last hill without too much trouble. I keep moving to try stay warm while the others summit. Erik, Patrick and I lead the fast descent into Hunting Hollow road, which is as I expected a very frigid affair. Patrick picks up some extra footies towards Kickham Ranch in order to make his GPS display the proper value (20k) and when Roy and Brett arrive, we head for home. The frosty conditions inspire me to get these last four miles done with quickly; I'd say beer gravity was at work but I'm far too cold to enjoy that treat at this point. When I roll into the lot I'm delighted to be greeted by a one person welcome committee, Mei! Brian and Janet are camping out as well and soon check up on me. After the rest of the group rolls in, the party is on - at least if you can call a hypothermic congregation of a handful of delirious sleepwalkers a party - Mei's hot noodle soup is exactly what the doctor prescribed though (thanks again!). While the sun makes some shy attempts to rise, Sean Allan drives up the lot in his truck to say hi - we have seven finishers of 100 miler, and two of the 100k, and I'm delirious... but very tired and cold. Too tired and cold for the Everest Challenge, which once again remains elusive; there were no takers, though Brian and Patrick probably came closest to giving it a go. I head to the car now, which will provide warmth, but I need to apply the Roy Method (repeatedly slapping oneself in the face) during the drive home to stay awake and get home safely...

    Dirk

  77. #177
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    This was a fun day, looking forward to it again next year

  78. #178
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    Awwww... the recap brought back fond memories and put a big smile on my face. Thanks Dirk for an excellent read! "Mid-ride crisis," hahaha... I love it!

    P.S. I haven't seemed to be able to comment (or reply to the comments) on the result page. Disqus appears a bit finiky. Ever considered Wordpress style?
    Inch by inch, I will get there...
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  79. #179
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    That was an awesome read.. I'll have to do better in the length department next year

    I feel like doing it again...

  80. #180
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElHombre View Post
    Brett and Erik need to filter water; they seem to be taking a while, and Roy and I decide to start the slow climb out, as we're both freezing and starting to shiver; it's warmer on the ridges and hilltops. I switch into 'grind' mode and plod up the hill. There's the summit, at last, and Patrick arrives soon after me; we both lie down and rest. There's Roy... but no Erik or Brett, or any lights we can discern in the distance. For a while I worry they took the wrong turn up Coit, which would be a very bad thing, but luckily that fear proves to be ungrounded, and soon our five piece grupetto is complete again.
    Erik was keeping me company while I finally tamed my tubeless flat tire with an innertube; up to that point I’d been periodically stopping to add air, but eventually the Stan’s goop threw in the towel. We hadn’t realised you guys were just motoring on without us until it was too late to catch up with you guys.

    The other day I noticed why my light wasn’t performing as spectacularly usual on the HardCOEre 100 ride—the lens on the die of my MC-E LED physically had separated from the die, it was just sort of bobbling around inside the external lens. Gee, no wonder the light spread was so crappy! I can only guess that the constant beating the front of the bike took going down some of that singletrack dislodged the lens.

    And I, too, am looking forward to doing this ride again next year. I am confident I will be better prepared than this time around.
    goodbye cruel world. I am leaving you today.

  81. #181
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudworm View Post
    Awwww... the recap brought back fond memories and put a big smile on my face. Thanks Dirk for an excellent read! "Mid-ride crisis," hahaha... I love it!

    P.S. I haven't seemed to be able to comment (or reply to the comments) on the result page. Disqus appears a bit finiky. Ever considered Wordpress style?
    Funny, I went with Disqus as it seemed less finiky than Wordpress, with its leaky php code base that one has to update/patch every three days otherwise it gets hacked .

    I just tried it out and it seems to work for me (also when you don't log in but post as guest), what was the issue?

  82. #182
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker View Post
    Erik was keeping me company while I finally tamed my tubeless flat tire with an innertube; up to that point I’d been periodically stopping to add air, but eventually the Stan’s goop threw in the towel. We hadn’t realised you guys were just motoring on without us until it was too late to catch up with you guys.
    Sorry, you should have picked a warmer spot to fix the tire .

    Btw, I'm a bit of a tubeless luddite, but it seems that on almost every ride I do with folks on tubeless, there is some sort of issue (Stan's not working or becoming stale, sidewalls torn, burping etc)... isn't conducive for making me change my mind! Pinch flats and/or having to run high tire pressure also suck, I do admit.

    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker View Post
    The other day I noticed why my light wasn’t performing as spectacularly usual on the HardCOEre 100 ride—the lens on the die of my MC-E LED physically had separated from the die, it was just sort of bobbling around inside the external lens. Gee, no wonder the light spread was so crappy! I can only guess that the constant beating the front of the bike took going down some of that singletrack dislodged the lens.

    And I, too, am looking forward to doing this ride again next year. I am confident I will be better prepared than this time around.
    Awesome! You were pretty well prepared this time around, and now that you know your way I'm convinced you'll do great. Would be cool to see the fatbike roam around in Coe!

  83. #183
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElHombre View Post
    Sorry, you should have picked a warmer spot to fix the tire .

    Btw, I'm a bit of a tubeless luddite, but it seems that on almost every ride I do with folks on tubeless, there is some sort of issue (Stan's not working or becoming stale, sidewalls torn, burping etc)... isn't conducive for making me change my mind! Pinch flats and/or having to run high tire pressure also suck, I do admit.
    I, too, am not fond of the “this is the latest trend—everyone’s doing it and you’re a crusty old retro geezer if you don’t conform” fads, but there are a few tiny merits to tubeless—no failures during any races I’ve done… oh, and the occasional bombing run down rock gardens with the tires at 25psi and amazingly you didn’t pinchflat. That’s about it though. Tired of people’s “tubeless is the end-all for your woes” claims. Utter bullshit if you ask me… it has afforded me about 6 fewer tube changes, but has not eliminated flats as the tubeless cheerleaders tried to brainwash me into thinking.

    Quote Originally Posted by ElHombre View Post
    Awesome! You were pretty well prepared this time around, and now that you know your way I'm convinced you'll do great. Would be cool to see the fatbike roam around in Coe!
    Dude, I am determined. Much slacker geometry on the fatbike than my racebike, much more comfortable ride on longer distances… although my Vaude backpack/hydration pack did offer SUPERB lower back support, now I see why some men wear girdles. Sure, 10 pounds heavier, but I’ve gotten used to lugging that extra boatload of rotating mass up hills. It is my destiny (density? Marty McFly?) to do the next HardCOEre 100 on my fatbike. You can count on it.
    goodbye cruel world. I am leaving you today.

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