160 or 185 mm dropper ? - new bike build- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    160 or 185 mm dropper ? - new bike build

    I'm ordering a new Ripmo and looking for advise on lengths of dropper posts. I have the option of either a 160 or 185 mm dropper. I demoed a Med with a 160 and it was perfectly fine and there looks to be plenty of room for the 185. The longer posts are new to me ( running a 150 fox on my Med Enduro ) and wondering if there any downsides to running the longer post? I did buzz my butt a few times on the rear tire when using the 160 and wondering if you get more of the same with the longer post?
    What are the Pros and Cons?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    I moved up to a 180, can't think of any downsides tbh.

    Ibis gives you the option of the Bikeyoke too, which is a double win.

  3. #3
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    A longer dropper would be less stiff (more deflection at the seat) but I don't know if it's something you would notice. People claim to notice the difference in stiffer wheels even though they're running low pressure in big tires.
    I have come here to chew bubblegum and kick ass... and I'm all out of bubblegum.

  4. #4
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    160 or 185 mm dropper ? - new bike build

    I am about 5'9" w/ a 30" inseam and just built up a Med Ripmo and put a Oneup 180mm dropper and it is great, but sometimes I question if I should have gone even longer to 200 or 210 because I still have plenty of room in the seat tube for an even longer dropper; i don't see any downside, only upside to going w/ as much drop as possible - however, you will get to the point where the saddle will rub the rear tire when using up all your rear travel and I think that is your limiting factor - buzzing your a$$ is more of a function of how you position your body and you will adjust to this as you get used to the bike and longer dropper

    I love this bike but one other thing I noticed coming from a Trek Slash is that I was pedal striking a lot so I just went to 165 cranks


  5. #5
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  6. #6
    Hella Olde
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    The longer the post, the less you have to expose to get full leg extension. You want to be able to fully slam it.

  7. #7
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    More is better. Always is.

  8. #8
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    I have a large Ripmo and went with the 160mm. I rode a demo bike with a 185 and almost buzzed my butt a couple times. Might just take some getting used to knowing that your butt is right next to the back tire. However, main reason for going 160 is that when itís all the way down I can still pedal without too much difficulty. Whereas with the 185, I felt like my legs were too bent to do much pedaling.

    Now, you could always let the seat come up a little and stop it, but I didnít want to mess around with that on the trail. Just wanted to go full slam or full up. YMMV.

  9. #9
    Hella Olde
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoNotShow View Post
    I have a large Ripmo and went with the 160mm. I rode a demo bike with a 185 and almost buzzed my butt a couple times. Might just take some getting used to knowing that your butt is right next to the back tire. However, main reason for going 160 is that when itís all the way down I can still pedal without too much difficulty. Whereas with the 185, I felt like my legs were too bent to do much pedaling.

    Now, you could always let the seat come up a little and stop it, but I didnít want to mess around with that on the trail. Just wanted to go full slam or full up. YMMV.
    You want full slam on both extremes, ideally. Pedaling at full-drop makes no sense.

  10. #10
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    Thanks for everyones input!
    I was on the fence but went with the 185.
    Pretty pumped on the Ripmo! Really didn't think I was going to like it as much as I do. The geo numbers are very close to my enduro's but the bike climbs very good, is light and super poppy and fun. Much more lively than my enduro. I demoed bikes in the 120 - 150 range and two days after riding the Ripmo I ordered one.
    Always fun to get a new bike!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by dp400 View Post
    Thanks for everyones input!
    I was on the fence but went with the 185.
    Pretty pumped on the Ripmo! Really didn't think I was going to like it as much as I do. The geo numbers are very close to my enduro's but the bike climbs very good, is light and super poppy and fun. Much more lively than my enduro. I demoed bikes in the 120 - 150 range and two days after riding the Ripmo I ordered one.
    Always fun to get a new bike!
    Congrats! My size L Ripley came with a 160 BY dropper and after a few rides I realized that I could easily fit a 185. I was fully prepared to work out some sort of upgrade deal but my awesome LBS switched it out for free. Itís awesome!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    Yes, I have about five rides on it and it's great. Overall quality and design seems better than the Wolf Tooth that I came from. Looks nice too.

  13. #13
    wretch
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    The Loam Lever is dialed! Easy setup as well with the cable clamp options. Plus your supporting a Bay Area kid and his awesome small company!

  14. #14
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    I have a 185 Bike Yoke on my Medium Ripmo. It really nice how far it drops. Plus I needed the long length to get the seat to my optimum pedaling position.
    Yes that is alot of seat post exposed, but the Ripmo has a short seat tube so you need alot of post. That does however leave room for lots of dropper too.

    I have 65mm dropper on my XC bike, but I don't see any downside to the long dropper as long as you can get it to fit.

    160 or 185 mm dropper ? - new bike build-rimpo-bag.jpg
    160 or 185 mm dropper ? - new bike build-73bdf7fe-19a8-4ed7-8492-637cf3667824.jpg
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", Vassago Verhauen SS 29", '19 Ibis Ripmo, XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by DH40 View Post
    You want full slam on both extremes, ideally. Pedaling at full-drop makes no sense.
    True. I meant more for soft pedaling a couple revs on a flat spot in the middle of a downhill section.

    My main riding area has downhill sections interrupted with short flat sections where it's not worth putting the seat up/down for just 10 seconds of pedaling and I'm too lazy to stand up an pedal. =)

  16. #16
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    I'm the opposite. I went from a 160mm dropper on my Stumpjumper to a 150mm (PNW Components). At 5'7", the 160 fully dropped, my butt was getting too close to the tire when the suspension compressed. I remember when my first dropper had 75mm of travel...

    Only have one ride in, but Loam lever and dropper felt great.
    Faster is not always better, but it's always more fun

  17. #17
    Uncle
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    Wow, you went Ripmo despite my constant proselytizing the Hardtail Gospel? I guess I need to ramp it up to 11...

  18. #18
    wretch
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    Quote Originally Posted by zorg View Post
    I'm the opposite. I went from a 160mm dropper on my Stumpjumper to a 150mm (PNW Components). At 5'7", the 160 fully dropped, my butt was getting too close to the tire when the suspension compressed. I remember when my first dropper had 75mm of travel...

    Only have one ride in, but Loam lever and dropper felt great.
    I have that issue - I have the PNW Bachelor at 200mm and the Bikeyoke at 185 ... drops and steeps make me question the extra travel for sure. . . The Loam Lever is so good!

  19. #19
    MK_
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    There's never too much drop as far as that goes.
    One thing I'm noticing on longer droppers, especially 200mm range, is reduced reliability. Probably due to extra flex of the system.

    _MK

    "The things you get fired for when youíre young are the same things you get Lifetime Achievements for when youíre old."

  20. #20
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    I believe ideally, the dropper should be slammed as much as possible on the downs.
    I have a 160mm and still need to keep the post sticking out of seattube about 20mm
    So it can reach full leg extension.
    My humble opinion,Bigger is better in this regard.

    Who actually sits on the seat on a downhill? Prone to bucking you off. Less control.





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  21. #21
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    I upgraded from my 160mm to 185mm Bikeyoke on my medium Sentinel. I could probably slam it down another 1.5" too. What I noticed is that the longer droppers move the saddle forward (makes sense, seatpost is angled, the lower it goes the further forward it moves), which means that my thighs never touch the saddle descending on my Sentinel, but do on my Smuggler (which is limited to a 150mm OneUp due to the bend in the seat tube). There's about 4" exposed post on that bike.

  22. #22
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    I'm only able to use a 125 on my Ripley so can't even imagine what more would be like. 150 would be nice.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Truckee Trash View Post
    I have that issue - I have the PNW Bachelor at 200mm and the Bikeyoke at 185 ... drops and steeps make me question the extra travel for sure. . . The Loam Lever is so good!
    How's the reliability on the Bachelor? Have you had it long enough to tell?

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by SikeMo View Post
    How's the reliability on the Bachelor? Have you had it long enough to tell?
    I have two bachelors on different bikes, only issue so far has been seat clamp coming loose but easy fix. Initially return was not coming all the way up but it was due to pressure low when I received it...pumped it up and no issues. Great value and loam lever is sweet!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  25. #25
    wretch
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    Quote Originally Posted by SikeMo View Post
    How's the reliability on the Bachelor? Have you had it long enough to tell?
    So far so good, I have two of the older posts with no problems. Early on I had an issue with one of the older posts - PNW replaced it no questions asked within two days. They are a small company and they'll take care of you immediately with any issue. In fact I've had the Bachelor as long as the Revive and had to send the Revive in for some internal issues which was surprising. Both w/ one year / season of use up here in Tahoe.

  26. #26
    fc
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    185 for sure!!!!!!!!

    It allows you to enter a whole new world of more dynamic and active riding. You'll be able to conquer more difficult terrain and perform wicked aerial maneuvers. It's proportional to your height of course, so the taller you are, the more appropriate 185mm is. But experience says that get a little more than you're used to.


    Of course there are downsides but they are minor.

    - it will work your quads!!! It will force you to not sit on descents (which is good) but you will get sore until you build up.

    - you will hit the 29er tire on long travel bikes. You'll get out of the way, eventually.

    - your other bikes will suckkkkkk. If they have 125mm droppers, the difference is no joke.

    - weight, flex, reliability (can be overcome by a good brand)
    IPA will save America

  27. #27
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    '- it will work your quads!!! It will force you to not sit on descents (which is good) but you will get sore until you build up'

    This is what I'm worried about

    Might get a PNW Bachelor 170mm for my Offering as that's all that will fit. I've been on 150's forever, but haven't tried anything longer. The Fox Transfer has been so reliable that it's hard to try anything else. However I used their online calculator and their 175mm definitely won't fit. The other option is the Oneup V2, which I am also curious about.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by dp400 View Post
    I'm ordering a new Ripmo and looking for advise on lengths of dropper posts. I have the option of either a 160 or 185 mm dropper. I demoed a Med with a 160 and it was perfectly fine and there looks to be plenty of room for the 185. The longer posts are new to me ( running a 150 fox on my Med Enduro ) and wondering if there any downsides to running the longer post? I did buzz my butt a few times on the rear tire when using the 160 and wondering if you get more of the same with the longer post?
    What are the Pros and Cons?

    Thanks!
    Hi! I have a Ripmo, although I am probably not as tall as you. But in any case, I forget what length my dropper post is (Probably 150mm). I have about 1.5 inch of exposed non-dropper post out of the seat tube. When it's in the fully down position, and I get way back & low (i.e. a steep descent or apex of a jump) the rear tire grazes my butt. YMMV, but I would not recommend too low of a dropper post - remember you have a gigantic knobby 29" tire back there and the geo is low slung. Edit: I'd agree with the general principle of getting the longest dropper that can fit, but the Ripmo is a different beast.

    Another edit: I often times think putting a 27.5" wheel on the back of the Ripmo would be sick, although haven't done it since worried about the bottom bracket height.
    Half the planet is deep into bloody tribal mayhem. Weíre just riding bikes (and drinking beer) here.
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